Skip to main content

Full text of "San Francisco municipal reports Fiscal Year 1879-80, Ending June 30, 1880"

See other formats


SAN  FRANCISCO  PUBLIC  LIBRARY 


3  1223  90202  4794 


ROOMMAIN      LIBRARY 


-50 


SA52:5       C  778493 

NOT  TO  BE  TAKEN  FROM  THE  LIBRARY 


Form  3427 


DOCUMENTS   DEPARTMENT 


SAN    FRANCISCO 


MUNICIPAL  REPORTS 


FISCAL  YEAR  1819-80  ENDING  JUNE  30,. 


PUBLISHED  BY  ORDER  OF  THE 

BOARD  OF  SUPERVISORS 


SAN  FRANCISCO. 
W.  M.   HINTON    &    CO.,    PRINTERS,    536    CLAY    STREET. 

1880. 


—  is 

— 


776493 

.-.<• 


TABLE    OF    CONTENTS. 


PAGES. 
ASSESSOR'S  REPORT 547-561 

Introductory  Remarks 547-548 

Assessed  Value  of  Property,  etc 547 

Report  to  Surveyor-General 549-561 

Statistics — Mechanical  and  Manufacturing  Industries 549-561 

AUDITOR'S  REPORT 1-81 

Demands  Audited — General  Fund 1-22 

"  "  "  "    Salaries    City    and    County 

Officers 1-3 

Extra  Deputies....  3 

Police   Force 4 

"         Fire  Department. ..  4 
"         "         Fire  Alarm  and  Po- 
lice Telegraph. . .  6 
"         "        Hospital  Employees          7-8 
"            "         "         Alms    House     Em- 
ployees    8 

"         "        Industrial      School 

Employees 9 

"         "        House  ot  Correction 

Employees   10 

Small-pox  Employ- 
ees    11 

"         '.'         Hospital  Physicians 

and  Surgeons.  . .  7-8 

"-.      "        Health  Department.  13 

"    Fir e  D  epartment  —  Material 

and  Running  Expenses, etc.          5-6 

"     Hydrants 5 

"    Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Tele- 
graph    6-7 


iv  CONTENTS. 

AUDITOR'S  REPORT— CONTINUED. 

Demands  Audited— General  Fund-  Fuel   for,    Repairs   to    and 

Lighting  Public  Buildings 
«  "  «  "    Hospital   and   Alms    House 

Expenses 7-9 

«               «<                 •*             "    Industrial  School  Expenses.         9-10 
"               «                 «             "    House    of     Correction    Ex- 
penses     t   10-11 

«                 "             "    Small-pox      Hospital      Ex- 
penses    11 

<«  "  <<  "    Burial  of  Indigent  Dead 11 

•  <  «<  "  "    Coroner's  Expenses,  etc. ...  12 

"  «  «<  "    Examination  of  Insane,  etc.  12 

"  «'  "  ««    Court  Expenses,  Rents 12-13 

«  ««  «  "    Law  Library  Expenses ....  12 

«  ««  «•    Health  Department 13-14 

««  ««  ««  •«    Special  Counsel,  Reporters' 

Expenses 14-15 

"    Relief  of  Disabled  Firemen .  12 

««  ««  «•  "    Advertising,   Subsistence  of 

Prisoners,  Witness  Fees . .       18-19 
"  "  "  "    Municipal  Reports,  Printing 

etc 19 

<«  «  «<  "    Assessment     and     Military 

Roll,  etc 19-20 

<«               "                 "             "    Public     Squares     Improve- 
ment   22 

««  ««  "  "    Registration     and     Election 

Expenses 20-21 

<«  ««  ««  "     Army  Street  Expenses 22 

<'               "                 «'             "    Finance     Committee  —  Ex- 
pert's Services,  etc 21 

"  "  "  "    Repairs  to  County  Road,  etc.  21 

"  •«  "    Judgments ' 21-22 

"  ««  "  "    Mission  Creek  and  Channel 

Street,  Filling  in 22 

"  "  "  '«    Abatement  of  Nuisances.. ..  22 

"  "  "  "    Miscellaneous  Expenses ....       20-22 

11  "  "  "    Fourth  of  July  Expenses.  ..  20 

•«  '«  '•  "    Jury  Expenses  in   Criminal 

Cases 21 

"              "                "            "    Golden  Gate  Park  Improve- 
ment    24 

"  "  "  "    Gas  Inspector's  Expenses..  3-22 


CONTENTS. 


AUDITOR'S  REPORT— CONTINUED. 

Demands  Audited — General  Fund — Mayor's  Contingent  Expen- 
ses, etc 20 

"  ••  "    Water    Litigation,     Special 

Counsel  Fees 15 

'    "                "            «    Damages  by  Eioters .......  22 

"             "    Amount  of  Taxes  Refunded.  22 

"             •  "         Urgent  Necessity  Fund 15-18 

Library  Fund 23 

"         Park  Improvement  Fund 24 

' '               "         Street  Department  Fund 29-30 

School  Department  Fund 27 

"         Salaries  of  Teachers  and  Employees 27 

"  "         Special  Fee  Fund — Salaries  City  and  County 

Officers 27-28 

"  "  "  "  Stationery  for  City  and 

County  Officers,   Pub- 
lishing        Delinquent 

List 28-29 

Pound  Fee  Fund 23 

.                         "         Police  Contingent  Fund 23 

Street  Light  Fund 23 

"               "        Lighting  Streets  and  Re- 
pairs to  Lamps 23 

"               "         Police  Life,  Health  and  Insurance  Fund.  ..  23 

"               "         Bonds — Interest  Account 24-25 

Sinking  Funds 25-27 

"               "             "          Loans  on  Security  of 25-27 

Total  City  Hall  Demands  Audited 30 

Total  Amount  of  Demands  Audited,  1879-80.  30 

Recapitulation  of  Demands  Audited 30-33 

New  City  Hall  Account  and  Fund 33 

Demands  Audited  Outstanding  July  1,  1880,  etc 34 

Treasurer's  Account  with  City  and  County 35-45 

Receipts,  General,  Special  Fee  Funds,  etc.  . 35-41 

Total  Cash  Receipts,  1879-80,  and  Cash  on  Hand  July  1,  1879  .  41 

Receipts,  Rents  of  Lincoln  School  Lots,  etc -.  37 

Disbursements 42-43 

Cash  in  Treasury  at  Credit  of  Funds  and  Accounts,  June  30, 

1880 43-45 

Cash  Received  for  and  Paid  to  the  State,  etc 45 

Transfer  Entries,  1879-80 46 

Loan  Account,  1879-80 47 


VI  CONTENTS. 

AUDITOR'S  REPORT — CONCLUDED. 

Recapitulation  of  City  and  County  Finances   48 

License  Exhibit— State,  City  and  County 49-50 

Poll  Tax  Statement 50 

Treasurer's  Account  with  State 45 

Tax  Collector's  Account  with  City  and  County,  1879-80. 50-53 

Tax  Collector's  Account  with  City  and  County  for  Montgomery 

Avenue  and  Dupout  Street  Taxes 52-53 

Summary  of  Taxes  Collected,  1879-80 53 

Taxes  Held  under  Protest  by  the  late  Alex.  Austin,  ex-Tax  Col- 
lector    53 

Apportionment  of  Taxes  Collected .  ' 54 

Bonded  Debt  and  Amount  of  Sinking  Fund,  June  30,  1880 55 

Bonds  Redeemed  during  Fiscal  Year  1879-80 55 

Bond  and  Coupon  Accounts 56-57 

Estimated  Expenditure  and  Revenue  for  the' year  1880-81 57-70 

Recapitulation  of  Estimates,  1880-81 72-73 

Assessed  Value  of  Property  and  Rates  of  Taxation  from  1861-2 

to  1880-81,  inclusive 71-73 

Index  to  Statutes  referring  to  Revenue  and  Expenditures 74-81 

BOARD  OF  HEALTH  REPORT .413 

Members  and  Officers  of  Board  of  Health 417 

HEALTH  OFFICER'S  REPORT 413 

Introductory  Remarks — Ratio  of  Deaths,  etc 413-414 

Condition  of  Sewers — Ventilation  by  Perforating  Manhole  Cov- 
ers Recommended 414-415 

Tabular  Statistics — Monthly  Distribution   and   Percentage   of 

Mortality  from  1866-7,   etc 418 

"  "          Mortality  according  to  Classes  from  1866-7, 

etc.... 419 

"  Number  and  Monthly  Per  Cent,  of   Still 

Births  from  1866-7,  etc 420 

"  "          Estimated  Population,    Deaths  and  Death 

Rate  from  1866-7 .'.  .  421 

"  "          Mortality  Report  for  Calendar  Year  1879. .   422-425 

Mortality  Report  for  Fiscal  Year  1879-80 . .  426-448 

Causes  of  Death,    etc 426-429 

"  "          Causes  of  Death  Classified,  etc 430-448 

"  "          Monthly  Distribution  of  Mortality  among 

Mongolians  from  1866-7— Causes,  etc. . .  449-456 
"          Nativities,  Ages,  Sex  and  Race  of  Decedents  457-460 
"  "          Localities  of  Mortality  for  each  Month. ...  461 

"  "          Monthly  Distribution  of   Mortality  among 

Minors,  1879-80 461 


CONTENTS.  Vll 


BOAKD  OF  HEALTH   EEPOKT— CONTINUED. 

Tabular  Statistics — Monthly  Distribution  of  Mortality 462 

"  "  Interment,  Disinterment  and  Removal  Per- 

mits issued  during  Fiscal  Year  1879-80. . .  463 

"  "  Occupations,  Ages  and  Nativities  of  Deced- 
ents  . 464-467 

"  "  Comparative  Vital  Statistics  of  various  Cities 

during  1879 468 

"  "  Marriages,  Births  and  Deaths  during  the 

Fiscal  Years  1878-9  and  1879-80 469 

"  "  Monthly  Distribution  of  Mortality  from  Zy- 
motic Diseases 470 

"  "  Keport  of  Quarantine  Officer — Quarantine 

Fees  and  Expenses 472-473 

"  "  Report  of  Resident  Physician  Twenty-sixth 

Street  Hospital 474 

"  "          Market  Inspector's  Report 475 

"  "  Health  Inspectors'  Reports  —  Nuisances 

Abated,  etc 476-482 

"  "          Health  Office  Expenses 471 

CITY  PHYSICIAN'S  REPOBT 483-494 

Introductory  Remarks — Condition  of  County  Jail,  House  of 

Correction  and  City  Receiving  Hospital 483-485 

Number  of  Cases  Attended  in  Jails  and  House  of  Correction.  . .  485-488 

Character  of  Diseases  Treated  at  County  Jail. 485-486 

Character  of  Diseases  Treated  at  House  of  Correction 486-488 

Reports  of  Assistant  City  Physicians 489-494 

Cases  Treated  at  City  Receiving  Hospital — Number,  Nativity 

and  Disposition,  etc 489 

Character  of  Diseases  Treated,  etc 490-491 

Autopsies  made  by  Police  Surgeons,  etc 491-494 

Classification  of  Causes  of  Death 491-494 

HOSPITAL  REPOET 495-531 

Introductory  Remarks - 495-496 

Patients  Admitted  and  Discharged,  etc 497 

Nativity  of  Patients,  etc 498 

Tabular  Statement,  Causes  of  Death 499-500 

"  "  Sex,  Race  and  Nationality  of  Decedents. ...  501 

"  Diseases  of  Patients  Admitted 502-509 

Coroner's  Cases  and  Births  in  Hospital. . ..  510 

Occupation,  Ages,  Civil  Condition  of  Patients  Admitted 511-513 

Relative  Ages  of  Decedents 513 


Vlll  CONTENTS. 


BOAKD  OF  HEALTH  REPORT— CONCLUDED. 

HOSPITAL  REPORT — CONCLUDED. 

Steward's  Report 514-523 

Subsistence  and  Supplies  Purchased  and  Expense 514-523 

Salaries,  Relative  Cost  of  Subsistence 523 

Apothecary's  Report 524-527 

Tabular  Statement  of  Cost  of  Drugs,  Surgical  Instruments  and 

Liquors  Used,  etc 524-526 

Summary  of  Total  Expenditures 527 

Rules  House  Physicians  and  House  Surgeons 528-530 

Members  of  Board  of  Health  and  Officers  of  City  and  County 

Hospital 531 

ALMS  HOUSE  REPORT 534-543 

Inmates  Admitted  and  Discharged,  etc . . 534 

Nativity,  Occupation  and  Ages  of  Inmates 535-536 

Amount  of  Money  in  Possession  of  Inmates  when  Admitted. . ..  536 

Inmates,  by  whose  Order  Admitted,  etc 536-537 

Expenditures,  1879-80 537 

Statement  as  to  Expenses  and  Cost  of  Keeping  Inmates 538 

Clothing  Made  and  Shoes  Manufactured 538 

Farm,  Estimated  Crops,  Live  Stock,  etc 540-541 

Remarks— Improvements  made,  Recommendations 541-543 

CITT  CEMETERY— Keeper's  Report 532-533 

Recommendations,  Interments,  etc 532-533 

CHIEF  OF  POLICE'S  REPORT... 279-296 

Introductory  Remarks — Explanatory  of  Statistical  Tables,  Po- 
lice Stations,  etc 279 

Arrests  and  Classification,  etc 281-283 

Comparative  Statement  of  Arrests  and  Strength  of  Police  Force 

from  1862-3 284 

Cash  Received  for  Keeping  of  Prisoners  in  City  Prison 285-286 

Value  of  Property  Stolen,  Lost  and  Recovered 287 

Witnesses  Subpoenaed  for  Criminal  Courts 287 

Schedule  of  Unclaimed  Money  and  Property 288-294 

Police  Stations — Location,  etc 295 

Comparative  Statement  of  Population,  Police  Force,  Number  of 

Arrests,  etc.,  in  Principal  Cities 295 

Summary  of  Action  taken  by  the  Board  of  Police  Commission- 

ers  on  Applications  for  Retail  Liquor  Licenses,  etc 296 


CONTENTS.  IX 


CITY  HALL  COMMISSIONER'S  REPORT 609-613* 

Receipts  and  Expenditures 610 

Tabular  Statement  of  Contracts  Completed   and  in   Course   of 

Completion  on  City  Hall  Building,  etc 611-613 

Progress  made'in  Construction 613 

Materials  and  Value  of,  on  City  Hall  Grounds,  June  30,  1880.  .  613 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT . ; 113--183 

City  Litigation — Condition  and  Disposition  of  Cases . 113-183- 

Character  of  Actions 182 

Street  Assessment  Suits 183 

CITY  AND  COUNTY  SURVEYOR'S  REPORT '  408 

Surveys  Made  and.  Certificates  Issued 408 

COMMON  SCHOOL  REPORT 630-807 

Report  of  Superintendent 630-807 

Members,  Officers  and  Standing  Committees  of  the   Board   of 

Education 631 

Historical  Sketch  of  the  Public  Schools  by  Ex-Supt.  Jas.  Den- 
man,    with    Corrections    and     Additions     Necessitated     by 

Changes,  etc 632-655 

List  of  Books  used  in  the  Common  Schools 656-659> 

Report  of  Secretary 660-687 

Summary  of  School  Statistics 660-662 

Total  Income  for  the  Year  1879-80 660 

Value  of  School  Property , 661 

Summary  of  Annual  Reports  of  Principals  of  Schools 663-664 

Number  of  Pupils  Enrolled  and  the  Average  Daily  Attendance 

at  School  During  the  Year 663-664 

Tabular  Statement  of  Number  of  Pupils  in  the  Public  Schools, 

May,  1880   665- 

Comparative  Statement  of  Number  of  Pupils  Enrolled  and  the 

Average  Daily  Attendance  at  School  from  1851,  etc 666- 

Result  of  the  Annual  Examination  of  the  Grammar  and  Primary 

Schools 667-669- 

Result  of  the  Annual  Examination  of  the  High  Schools 670 

School  Census  Report,  June,   1880 672-673 

Comparative   Statement   of   Number   of   Children   in   the  City 

since  1859 , 671 

Tabular  Statement  of  Number  of  Pupils  Studying  Languages.  . .  674-675 


X  CONTENTS. 

COMMON  SCHOOL  REPORT— CONTINUED. 

Statistics  from  Reports  of  Principals  of  Schools 675 

Number  and  Apportionment  of  Teachers  Employed  in  School 

Department 675 

Schools  and  Number  of  Teachers  employed  by  Grades 676-677 

Schedule  of  Teachers'  Salaries,  etc 677-681 

School  Libraries  and  Number  of  Volumes 682 

Expenditures 683 

Receipts  and  Disbursements  for  Fiscal  Year 684 

Comparative   Tabular   Statement   of   Expense   of     the   Public 

Schools  from  1852,  with  Total  Expenses  of  the  City 685 

Estimated  Revenue  and  Amount   Levied  for   the   Fiscal   Year 

1880-81 686-687 

Number  of  Buildings  Used  for  School  Houses 686-687 

School  Building,  Grant  Primary ,  687 

School  Buildings  Erected  during  Fiscal  Year  1879-80 687 

School  Buildings,  Contracts  Awarded  to  Construct 687 

Hemarks  and  Recommendations  on  Conduct  and  Management 

of  the  P  ublic  Schools,  etc  688 
"                 School      Buildings,      Con- 
struction,  Ventilation   of, 
Bonds    Issued    to     Con- 
struct, etc 689-693 

Record  of  Supplies  Fur-  ] 

nished  and  Disposition.  I 

Extract   from    Report    of  !    QQ^_QQQ 

Committee  in  Favor  of  i 

Instituting  a  System  to  | 

•  Keep J 

"  Itemized   Account   of    Ex- 

penditures     for       Fiscal 
Year  and  Recapitulation .   696-731 
"  Free  Text  Books,  Amount 

Expended  for 731 

"  Kindergartens — Report    of 

Sarah  B.  Cooper  on 731-742 

Report  of  the  Deputy  Superintendent 743-755 

Report  of  the  Principal  of  Girls'  High  School 756-767 

Report  of  the  Principal  of  Boys'  High  School 768-776 

Report  on  Cosmopolitan  Schools 777-782 

Remarks  and  Recommendations  on  Secondary  Education,  etc. .   783-793 
Remarks  on  Teachers' Work  and  Salaries.  .  .   793-807 


CONTENTS.  XI 

COEONEK'S   REPORT '  333-387 

Introductory  Remarks— Explanatory  of  Statistical  Tables 333-342 

Analyses  of  Causes  of  Suicide 337-343 

Fees  Collected  and  Paid  into  Treasury 343 

Mortuary  Tables — Autopsies  Made  and  Inquests  Held,  etc 34.4 

"  "         Causes   of   Death,    and     Nature     of     Crime 

Charged,  if  any 345 

Sudden  Deaths  from  Natural  Causes 346-349 

"             "         Homicides — Number,  Age,  Nativity,  Occupa- 
tion, etc 355-357 

Accidental  Deaths— Age,  Nativity,  etc 350-354 

"  "         Suicides — Age,  Nativity,  Religious  Belief ,  etc .   358-366 

Suicides— Number  each  Month  from  1862-3  .  367 

"  "         Bodies   found  in   the  Bay,  Cause  of  Death 

Unknown 368 

Report  and  Description  of  Unknown  Dead,  etc 369-  371 

Tabular  Statement  of  Property  of  Decedents  and  its  Disposi- 
tion    372-386 

Expenditures  for  Chemical  Analyses,  and  Rewards  for  Bodies 

Recovered  from  the  Bay 387 


COUNTY  CLERK'S   REPORT   575-606 

Organization  of  Superior  Courts 574-575 

Court  Proceedings — Number  and  Character  of  Suits  in  the  late 

District  Courts  and  in  Superior  Court 576-582 

Number  of  Judgments  Entered  in  District  Courts  and  in  Superior 

Court 579-581 

Criminal  Actions  in  District  Courts  up  to  Dec.  31,  1879 582 

Naturalization    of    Foreigners,    Certificates   of    Naturalization 

Issued,  etc 582-583 

Probate  Proceedings — Probate  and  Superior  Courts 584-585 

Value  of  Estates  Filed  in  Probate  and  Superior  Courts,  etc. . . .   584-585 

County  Court  Proceedings — Civil  and  Criminal 586 

Number  and  Character  of  Incorporations 587 

Ages,  Nationalities  and  Number  of  Persons  Examined  by  Com- 
missioners of  Insanity 588 

Number  of  Partnerships — Coroner's  Inquests ; 588 

Proceedings  in  Insolvency,  etc.,  in  Superior  Court,  Dept.  No.  10  589 

Municipal   Criminal  Court  Proceedings — Disposition  of  Cases, 

etc.,  to  Dec.  31,  1879 590-595 

Criminal  Proceedings — Action  of  Superior  Court  from  Jan.  1  to 

June  30,  1880  —Disposition  of  Cases 591-597 


Xll  CONTENTS. 

COUNTY     CLERK'S    REPORT— CONCLUDED. 

Number  and  Nature  of  Informations  Filed  by  District  Attorney 
in  Criminal  Actions  in  Superior  Court  from  Jan.  1  to  June  30, 

1880 592 

Disposition  of  Cases  on  Appeal  from  Police  Judge's  Court 598 

City  Criminal  Court  Proceedings — Disposition  of  Cases,  etc., 

from  June  30  to  Dec.  31,  1879 599-600 

Amounts  Deposited  in  and  Paid  out  by  Order  of  Court 601 

Amount  of  Fines  Imposed  by  Courts  and  Paid  into  Treasury. . .  601 

Law  Library  Fund — Amoiint   Collected 601 

Marriage  Licenses  Issued 601 

Tabular  Statement  of  Fees  Received 602 

Receipts  and  Expenditures,  etc 603-604 

Remarks  and  Recommendations   604-606 

COUNTY  RECORDER'S  REPORT 409-412 

Receipts  and  Expenditures 409 

Instruments  Recorded 410-411 

List  of  Principal  Books  of  Record ...    412 

FIRE   ALARM   AND   POLICE   TELEGRAPH 245-254 

Apparatus  in  Use,  etc 245-247 

Signal  Boxes,  Gongs,  Bells  and  Amount  of  Wire  in  Use 246-247 

Remarks — Names   and   Salaries  of  Employees,  Improvements 

Made,  Expenditures,  etc 248-250 

Tabular  Statement  of  Number  of  Fire  Alarms 251-252 

Remarks — Condition  and  Requirements  of  Telegraph 253-254 

FIRE  DEPARTMENT  REPORT 184-244 

Report  of  the  Board  of  Fire  Commissioners   184-194 

Introductory  Remarks 184-185 

Total  Expenditure  for  Fiscal  Year 184 

Total  Value  of  Fire  Department  Property 185 

Corporation  Yard— Expenditures 186 

Pay  Roll  of  Officers,  and  Employees 186 

Material  Purchased  During  Fiscal  Year 187 

Recapitulation  of  Expenditures 187 

Amounts  Allowed  by  Law  for  Maintenance 187 

Classification   of   Expenditures   of   Engine,    Hose   and    Truck 

Companies 188-189 

Annual  Salaries  Paid  Officers  and  Employees 190 

Value  of  Real  Estate  and  Improvements 190 

Value  of  Horses,  Hose,  Furniture,  Supplies 391 

Value  of  Apparatus 191-192 


CONTENTS.  XI 11 

FIRE  DEPARTMENT  REPORT— CONCLUDED. 

Recapitulation  of  Values 192 

Fire  Commissioners,'  Standing  Committees  and  Officers  of  the 

Board x 193-194 

Report  of  Chief  Engineer 195-244 

Remarks  and  Recommendations 195-198 

Condition  of  Fire  Department  Buildings 196 

Purchase  of  Additional  Apparatus,'  etc.,  Recommended 196-197 

Colored  Glass  Recommended  to   be   Placed   in    Street   Lamps 

Contiguous  to  Hydrants  and  Fire  Alarm  Boxes 196 

Officers  and  Employees,  Number  and  Position 199 

Apparatus  and  Horses  Belonging  to  Department 199 

Corporation  Yard  Employees,  Names  and  Position 199 

Hose,  Quantity  and  Location  of 200 

Fire  Apparatus  at  Stationary  Points 200-201 

Engine,  Hose  and  Truck  Companies,  Location  of 201-202 

Corporation  Yard,  Inventory  of  Property  in 202-203 

Statistics— Steam  Fire  Engines  (12) 204-215 

"  Hose  Carts  (8) 216-223 

"  Fire  Boat  "  Governor  Ir win" 224 

"  Hook  and  Ladder  Trucks  (4)    225-228 

Tabular  Statement  of  the  Duty  Performed  by  Each  Company 

During  the  Year 229 

Statistics,  Losses  by  Fire,  Insurance  Paid,  etc 229 

Cisterns,  Number,  Location  and  Capacity 230 

Hydrants,  Location 231-244 

FREE  PUBLIC  LIBRARY  REPORT -....'. 625-629 

Remarks  and  Recommendations,  Condition  and  Requirements 

of  the  Library,  etc 625-629 

Number  of  Volumes  Purchased  and  Donated — Donor's  Names, 

etc 626 

Number  of  Visitors  to  Library,  etc (527 

Receipts  and  Expenditures 629 

GAS  INSPECTOR'S  REPORT 562-569 

Expenses  of  Office 562 

Daily,  Weekly  and  Monthly  Averages  of  Illuminating  Power  of 

Gas  Supplied 563-569 

HOME  FOR  CARE  OF  THE   INEBRIATE 544-546 

Report  of  Trustees 544-546 

Inmates  Admitted  and  Discharged 54.4. 

Financial  Exhibit 545 

Summary — Average  Number  of  Patients  Admitted— Disposition 

of  Insane  Persons 54.6 


XIV  CONTENTS. 

HOUSE  OF  CORRECTION  REPORT 297-313 

Introductory.     Explanatory  of  Statistical  Tables 297 

Prisoners  Committed,  Discharged,  etc 298 

Offenses  for  which  Prisoners  were  Committed , 299 

Courts  in  which  Prisoners  were  Committed  and  Terms  of   Sen- 
tence      300-301 

Age,  Nationality,  Occupation  aud  Religious  Belief  of  Prisoners 

Committed 302-306 

Number  of  Prisoners  who  have  been  Committed  more  than  once          306 

Character  and  Amount  of  Work  Performed  by  Prisoners 307 

Number  of,  and  Offenses  for  which  Prisoners  were  Punished. .  308 

Expenditures  for  Fiscal  Year 309 

Diet  Table  of  Prisoners 310 

General  Remarks  and  Recommendations 311-313 

INDUSTRIAL  SCHOOL  REPORT 314-332 

Introductory  Remarks — Conduct  and  Morals  of  Inmates.     Im- 
provements made  in  Building  and  Grounds,  etc 314-319 

Work  Performed  in  Shoe  and  Tailor  Shops,  Laundry  and  Sew- 
ing Room,  and  Material  on  Hand 315-316 

Farm,  Estimated  Crops,  Stock  and  Implements 316-317 

Comparative  Statement  of  Cost  of  Inmates  in  Industrial  School 

and  Magdalen  Asylum  . . 339 

School  Department,  Condition,  Studies  and  Progress  made  by 
Pupils,  Religious  Exercises,  etc 320-323 

Tabular  Statements — Causes  and  Terms  of  Commitments,  Ages, 

Nationalities,  etc.,  of  Inmates 324-326 

Tabular  Statement — Inmates  Received  and  Discharged,  etc. .  ..  327-328 

"  "  Classification  of  Expenditures 329-331 

"  "  Recapitulation  of  Expenditures 332 

JUSTICES'  COURT,  CLERK'S  REPORT 607-608 

Suits  Instituted  and  Fees  Received 607-608 

LAW  LIBRARY 808-813 

Librarian's  Report 808-813 

Organization  of  Library — Location,  etc 808-809 

Number  of  Members,  Public  Officers  Entitled  to  the  Privileges 

of  Library 809-810 

Average  Daily  Number  Visiting  Library 810 

Condition  of  Furniture,  Accommodations,  etc 810-811 

Number  and  Classification  of  Registered  Volumes,  etc 811-812 

Receipts  and  Expenditures 813 


CONTENTS.  XV 

LICENSE  COLLECTOR'S  REPORT 110-112 

Receipts  from  Tax  on  Stock  Certificates Ill 

Quarterly  Licenses  Issued,  County  and  Municipal 110-111 

Yearly  Licenses  Issued,  Street  Department Ill 

Exemption  Merchandise  Licenses,  Issued  when  Sales  were  Less 

than  $600  per  Quarter   lift 

Recapitulation 112 


PARK  COMMISSIONER'S   REPORT 614-624 

Introductory  Remarks-  -Condition  of,  and  Improvements  made 

to  Park 614-615- 

Receipts  and  Disbursements  for  Fiscal  Year  1879-80 616-618 

Exhibits,  Number  of  Visitors  to  Golden  Gate  Park  during   the 

Year 619 

"           Accidents    and    Arrests    at    the    Park — Animals  Im- 
pounded, etc 620-622 

Donors'  Names  and  Gifts  Received 623-624 

POUND  KEEPER'S   REPORT 573-574 

Receipts,  Dogs  Impounded  and  Redeemed,  etc „  .  573-574 

PUBLIC  ADMINISTRATOR'S  REPORT 388-407 

Letters  of  Administration  Issued  and  Value  of  Estates  during 

the  Six  Months  Ending  Dec.  31,  1879,  etc 388-393- 

Estates  Settled  and  Closed 394 

Letters  of  Administration  Issued  and  Value  of  Estates  during 

the  Six  Months  Ending  June  30,  1880,  etc 395-407 

Letters  of,  and  Administration  Granted  on  Estates  where  no 

Property  has  been  Received  .....  407 

REGISTRAR  OF  VOTERS'  REPORT 570-572 

Expenditures  in  the  Registration  Office  from  July   1,    1879,    to 

June  30,  1880 571 

Expenses  of  Elections  held  Sept.  3,  1879,  and  March  30,  1880..  571-572 

SHERIFF'S  REPORT     ..    .....,..> 273-278 

Fees  Received  and  Paid  into  the  Treasury 274 

Statistics — Classifications,  Charges  Against,  Number  and  Dis- 
position of  Prisoners  Confined  in  County  Jail 275-278 


XVI  CONTENTS. 

SUPERINTENDENT  OF  PUBLIC  STREETS'  REPORT  ........  255-272 

Remarks  and  Recommendations  ..............  ...............  255-256 

Comparative  Statement  of  Sewers  Constructed  ................  272 

Summary,  Cost  of  Street  Work  during  Year  1879-80  ...........  256 

Expenditures  from  Street  Fund  for  Repairs  to  Streets,  etc  .....  257 

Grading  Performed  and  Cost  ____  ..........................   268-269 

Sewers,  Redwood  Constructed  and  Cost  .....................  265 

Sewers,  Brick,  Cement  and  Iron-stone  Pipe  Constructed  and  Cost  263-265 
Paving,  Composite  and  Basalt  Blocks  Laid  and  Cost  .....  .  ----  262 

)     258—259 
Planking  and  Sidewalking  Performed  and  Cost 


Macadamizing  Performed,  and  Cost 

Gutterways  Constructed  and  Cost  ............  '  .............  .  .  260-261 

Crosswalks  and  Curbs  Constructed  and  Cost  ..................  270-271 

Recapitulation  of  Street  Work  Performed  and  Cost  ............  272 

TAX  COLLECTOR'S  REPORT—  ..........................  ....  105-109 

Real  Estate  Roll,  Tax  and  Amount  Paid  into  Treasury  ........  105 

Personal  Property  Roll,  Tax  and  Amount  Paid  into  Treasury  .  .  106 
Montgomery  Avenue  and  Dupont  Street  Rolls,  Tax  and  Amount 

paid  into  Treasury  .....................................  106-107 

Fees  and  Penalties  Collected  and  Paid  into  Treasury,  etc  ......  107 

Summary  of  Taxes  Collected  ................................  108 

Poll  Tax  Account  and  Other  Taxes  Collected  ..................  107 

Office  Expanses  ............................................  108 

Comparative  Statement  of  Collections  made,  with  Remarks  ----  109 

TREASURER'S  REPORT  .....................................  82-104 

Receipts  and  Disbursements  ......  '.  ..........................  82-84 

Street  Assessment  Fund,  Receipts  and  Disbursements  .........  84 

Account  with  Public  Administrator  .........................  .  90-92 

Special  Redemption  Fund,  State  and  County  Taxes  ...........  85-88 

Special  Deposits  from  the  County  Clerk  ....................  89-90 

Fifteenth   Avenue  Extension   Fuud  —  Receipts   and  Disburse- 

ments ........................................  ..........  93 

Montgomery  Avenue  Fund  .......  .....  ......................  85 

Dupont  Street  Widening  Fund  —  Receipts  and  Disbursements.  .  93 
Montgomery   Avenue    Change   of   Grade  Fund  —  Receipts   and 

Disbursements  .............  .  .  *.  .  .........................  94 

Second  Street  Grading  Fund  ........................  ........  93 

Leidesdorff  Street  Opening  Fund  ...........................  93 

Bridge  Silver  Medal  Fund  ...............  '.  .............  .  ____  93 

Police  Money  —  Receipts  and  Disbursements  ..................  95 


CONTENTS.  XVII 

TREASURER'S   REPORT— CONCLUDED. 

Money  Belonging  to  Insane  Persons 95-96 

Special  Deposits 94-95 

Bonds  Redeemed  and  Paid  During  Fiscal  Year  ..... 96-97 

Amount  at  Credit  of  Funds  and  Accounts 98 

List  of  Property  Received  from  Coroners  during  the  Last  Five 

Years,  and  not  yet  Disposed  of 99-104 


APPENDIX    TO    MUNICIPAL    REPORTS. 

COMPILED  BY  JNO.  A.  RUSSELL. 

Appendix 815-1091 

Board   of   Supervisors,    Members,    Standing   Committees    and- 

Officers,  1879-80 816 

Financial  Condition  of  the  City  and  County,  Oct,  1,  1880 817 

Address  of  His  Honor  Mayor  Bryant 818-834 

Inaugural  Address  of  His  Honor  Mayor  Kalloch 835-841 

Revenue  Orders— Fiscal  Year  1880-81 842-845 

GAS  SUPPLIES 846-878 

Introductory — Contracts  entered  into  to  light  the  Streets  with 

Gas,  etc  846-847 

Tabular  Statement  of  number  of  Lamps  erected  and  Price  paid, 

from  1854 847 

Copy  of  Gas  Contract  executed  May  19,  1869 847-854 

Proceedings  had  on  Continuation  of  Gas  Contract  for  Second 

Term  of  Five  Years 854-863 

Proceedings  had  on  Continuation  of  Gas  Contract  for  Third 

Term  of  Five  Years 863-873 

Action  had  in  regulating  Quality  and  fixing  Price  of  Gas 873-878 

RAILROAD    FRANCHISES 879-918 

Extract  from  Civil  Code , 879-880 

Copy  of  Act  of  the  Legislature  fixing  Rates  of  Fare 881 

Franchises  granted  by  Board  of  Supervisors 879-904 

California  Street  Railroad  Company 897-898 

Central  Railroad  Company 883-885 

City  Railroad  Company 888-889 

Clay  Street  Hill  Railroad  Company • 890-891 

Geary  Street,  Park  and  Ocean  Railroad  Company •   899-900 


xviii  CONTENTS. 

RAILROAD     FEANCHISES— CONCLUDED. 

Market  Street  Railway  Company 893-894 

North  Beach  and  Mission  Railroad  Company 881-883 

Ocean  Beach  Railroad  Company 898-899 

Omnibus  Railroad  Company 885-888 

Southern  and  Central  Pacific  Railroad  Companies 892-893 

Sutter  Street  Railroad  Company 895-896 

Order  regulating  the  construction  of  Railroad  Tracks 905 

Franchises  granted  by  the  Legislature 906-918 

WATER  RATES 919-953 

Introductory  Remarks — Action  had  in  fixing  Rates,  with  Opin- 
ion of  Supreme  Court  as  to  Legal  Obligation  of  Water  Com- 
pany   919-923 

Communications  from  Officers  of  Spring  Valley  Water  Works. .   923-933 

Reports  of  Water  Committee 934-944 

Water  Rates  established  to  June  30,  1881 944-946 

Message  of  Mayor  Kalloch  reciting  Reasons  for  approving  Order 

fixing  Water  Rates 946-949 

Action  on  Demands  of  the  Spring  Valley  Water  Works 949-953 

PERSONAL    PROPERTY    ASSESSMENTS 954-1010 

Persons,  Firms  and  Corporations  assessed  $5,000  and  over 954-994 

Chinese  assessed  $5,000  and  over 994-995 

Shipping  assessed  $5,000  and  over 996-998 

Recapitulation  of  Assessments 998 

Subsequent  Personal  Property  Assessment  and  Recapitulation .  999-1010 

ARMY  STREET  SEWER 1011-1027 

Act  of  the  Legislature  Providing  for  Construction 1011-1012 

Proceedings  had  in  Acquiring  Land  and  Constructing  Sewer.  .1012-1016 

Contracts  Awarded 1017 

Land  Donated  for  Street  and  Conveyed  to  City  and  County. .  .1017-1019 

Land  Purchased,  Amount  of  Consideration,  etc 1019-1021 

Land  Acquired  by  Condemnation,  but  Not  Conveyed 1021-1022 

.  "  "  "  and  Conveyed  by  Deed 1022-1024 

Description  of  Land  Acquired  and  Declared  to  be  an  Open 

Public  Street 1024-1025 

Expenditures  to  November  30,  1880 1025 

Proceedings  in  Acquiring  Land,  Constructing  Extension  of 

Sewer  and  Cost  to  December  1,  1880 1025-1027 

LOTTA   FOUNTAIN ' 1028 

Location,  Description,  Cost,  Donor's  Name,  etc 1028 


CONTENTS.  XIX 

FIFTEENTH  AVENUE   EXTENSION i.  < . .  1029-1030 

Names  of  Commissioners,  Expense,   etc 1029-1030 

POINT  LOBOS  TOLL    EOAD 1031-1034 

Amount  Paid  and  Proceedings  in  Acquiring 1031-1032 

Description  of  Property  Conveyed  to  City  and  County 1032-1034 

MISSION  AND  OCEAN  BEACH  EOAD 1035-1038 

Action  had  in  Purchase  of  Franchise . 1035-1038 

Amount  Paid,  Description  of  Koad  in  Conveyance .1037-1038 

OLD    CEMETEEY  AVENUE 1039-1042 

Proceedings  had  in  Closing 1039-1042 

Sale  of  Property  Embraced  in  Triangular  Plaza  and  in 1039-1042 

VALENCIA  STEEET  EXTENSION 1043-1045 

Action  had  and  Description  of  Land  Acquired,  etc 1043-1045 

CITY  CHAETEE 1046-1050 

Election  of  and  Proceedings  of  Board  of  Fifteen  Freehold- 
ers, etc 1046-1050 

Election,  Names  and  Committees  of  Board 1047 

Number  of  Votes  Polled  For  and  Against  Eatification  of  Pro- 
posed Charter 1048 

Expenses  Incurred 1049-1050 

ACCEPTED    STEEETS 1051-1076 

Provisions  of  Statutes  and  Orders  Applicable  to 1051-1054 

Conditions  of  Acceptance 1054 

Streets  Accepted,  Conditions,  etc 1055-1076 

STEAM  ENGINES  AND  BOILEES _. 1077-1089 

Introductory  Eeniarks 1077 

Inspector  of  Boilers,  Appointment  Eecoinrnended  by  Board  of 

Fire  Commissioners 1077-1078 

Eeports  of  Judiciary  Committee  on  the  Application  for  Ap- 
pointment of  an  Inspector 1078-1081 

Permits  Granted  to  Erect  Steam  Engines  and  Boilers 1082-1089 

POPULATION  OF  STATE,  ETC, 1090 

Total  Vote  of  State  at  Presidential  Elections 1090 

RESOLUTION  CALLING  FOE  MUNICIPAL  EEPOETS.  1091 


AUDITOR'S  REPORT 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  AUDITOR'S  OFFICE,  ) 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  31,  A.  D.  1880.  ) 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

Of  the  City  and  County  of  8 'an  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — In  accordance  with  Resolution  No.  14,765  (New 
Series),  adopted  at  a  meeting  of  your  honorable  body  held  July 
6, 1880,  I  herewith  submit  to  you  my  annual  report  for  the  fiscal 
year  ending  June  30, 1880. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

JOHN  P.  DUNN, 

Auditor. 


DEMANDS     AUDITED     DURING    THE    FISCAL     YEAR 
1879-80,  ENDING  JUNE   30,  1880. 

ON  THE  GENERAL  FUND. 
CITY   AND   COUNTY   OFFICERS'    SALARIES — 
Salary  of — 

Mayor $3,000  00 

Mayor's  Clerk 3,000  00 

Judge  of  the  Municipal  Criminal 

Court 2,499  96 

Judge  of  Probate  Court 2,499  96 

Judge  of  County  Court 25491)  96 

Judge    of    Municipal    Court    of 

Appeals 2,499  96 

Judges  of  the  Superior  Court  (12) 

(six  months) 11,955  51 


Carried  forward $27,955  35 


AUDITOR  S    REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $27,955  35 

District  Attorney 5,000  00 

District  Attorney's  1st  Assistant.  3,600  00 

District  Attorney's  2d  Assistant. .  3,000  00 

District  Attorney's  Clerks  (2) 3,300  00 

City  and  County  Attorney 5,000  00 

City  and  County  Attorney's  Clerks 

(2) 2,700  00 

Police  Judge 4,000  00 

Judge  of  the  City  Criminal  Court .  1,999  98 
Prosecuting  Attorney  City  Crim- 
inal Court  (six  months) 1,200  00 

Prosecuting       Attorney      Police 

Court 3,000  00 

Clerk    to    Prosecuting    Attorney 

Police  Court 1,500  00 

Chief  of  Police 4,000  00 

President    of    Board    of     Police 

Commissioners 3,000  -00 

Police  Commissioners  (2) 2,400  00 

Superintendent  Common  Schools     4,000  00 
Superintendent        of       Common 

Schools'  Deputy 3,000  00 

Assessor 4,000  00 

Assessor's  Deputies 133,625  65 

Superintendent    of     Streets    and 

Highways 4,000  00 

Superintendent  of  Streets'  Dep- 
uties   28,500  00 

Tax    Collector's     Deputies     and 

Clerks 46,595  00 

Treasurer's  Deputies. 5,100  00 

Auditor's  Deputy 3,000  00 

Auditor's  Clerks 4,030  00 

Coroner 4,000  00 

Surveyor. .  500  00 


Carried  forward .$312,005  98 


DEMANDS    AUDITED  O 

Amount  brought  forward $312,005  98 

Sheriffs  Bookkeeper 3,000  00 

Under  Sheriff 2,400  00 

Sheriff 's  Counsel  Fees 1 ,800  00 

Sheriff's  Deputies  andJail  -keepers  53,441  72 

County     Clerk's     Deputies     and 

Copyists 85,041  00 

Deputy  Clerk  of  Board  of  Super- 
visors   1,800  00 

Sergeant-at-Arms  Board  of  Su- 
pervisors   1,200  00 

Supervisors  (12) 14,436  63 

Court  Room  Interpreters  (4) 6,000  00 

Gardeners  of  Public  Squares  (5).     4,500  00 

Janitors,  City  Halls,  Superior  and 

District  Courts 6,125  00 

Watchman  Old  City  Hall 1,020  00 

License  Collector's  Deputy 1,800  00 

Lice  use  Collector's  Assistants.  .  .  .   18,000  00 

Recorder's  Chief  Deputy 3,000  00 

Recorder's   Deputy 1,800  00 

Recorder's  Porter  and  Messenger        900  00 

Recorder's  Folio  Clerks 19,875  72 

Assistant  Attorney  and  Clerk  to 
City  and  County  Attorney 
Prosecuting  suits  in  Street 
Assessment  cases 1,800  00 

Law  Librarian 2,400  00 

Gas  Inspector 1,200  00 

Matron  County  Jail 600  00 

Engineer,  Fireman  and  Elevator 

Conductor  New  City  Hill.  .  .         720  00 

544,866  05 

EXTRA  DEPUTIES'  SALARIES — 

Salaries  of  Extra  Clerks  and  Copy- 
ists in  County  Clerk's  Offi-e  2,550  00 

Carried forwwd $  547,416  05 


4  AUDITOR  S    REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $547,416  05 

POLICE  FORCE  SALARIES — 

Salaries  of  5  Captains  at  $150  per 
month,  1  Clerk  of  Chief  of  Po- 
lice at  $150  per  month,  1  Prop- 
erty Clerk  at  $150  per  month, 
12  Detective  Officers  at  $125 
per  month,  25  Sergeants  at 
$125  per  month,  12  Corporals 
at  $117  per  month  and  346 
Officers  at  $102  per  month. .  .  435,469  20 

FIRE  DEPARTMENT  SALARIES — 

Chief  Engineer $3,000  00 

Assistant  Chief  Engineer 2,400  00 

Assistant  Engineers  (4) 7,200  00 

Superintendent   of    Steam   Fire 

Engines 1,800  00 

Assistant  Superintendent  of  En- 
gines   1,680  00 

Substitute  and  Belief  Engineer.  1,680  00 
Clerk  to  Board  of  Fire  Commis- 
sioners    1,800  00 

Messenger  Board  of  Fire  Com- 
missioners    900  00 

Clerk  Corporation  Yard 1,500  00 

Carpenter 1,200  00 

Hydrantmen  (2) 2,160  00 

Corporation  Yard  Drayman 1,080  00 

Corporation  Yard  Watchman ...  900  00 

Veterinary  Surgeon. .  . . , 720  00 

Steam  Engine  Companies  (12).  .  92,300  00 

Hook  and  Ladder  Companies  (4) .  31,200  00 

Hose  Companies  (9) 42,140  00 

193,660  00 


Carried  forward $1,176,545  25* 


DEMANDS    AUDITED.  5 

Amount  brought  forward 11,176,545  25 

FIRE  DEPARTMENT  MATERIAL — 

Hose  and  Couplings $16,556  00 

One  3d  class  Amoskeag  Engine, 

and  Freight  on  Same 4,672  25 

One  Hayes  Patent  Truck 3,250  00 

One  Four-Wheel  Hose  Carriage.  .  1,000  00 
Scaling  Ladders  and  Life  Saving 

Tube 524  60 

14  Horses 4,025  CO 

Copper  Tanks  and  Pump  Valves.  292  50 
Rubber  Valves,  Bumpers  and 

Flange  Pipe 119  60 

30,469  95 

FIRE  DEPARTMENT  RUNNING  EXPENSES — 

Horse  Feed,  Shoeing,  etc $10,808  19 

Harness  and  Repairs  to  Harness.  2,878  74 

Fuel  and  Oil 2,607  84 

Repairs  on  Engines,  Trucks,  etc.  .  15,313  32 
Repairs  and  Material  for  Build- 
ings (including  Hardware)  .  .  8,496  38 
Soap,  Packing,  Waste,    Broom?, 

Sacks,  Emery  Cloth,  etc.  ...  740  82 

Stoves  and  Stove-pipes 104  78 

Medicines 965  62 

Keeping  Horses  for  Chief  and  As- 
sistant Engineers 645  GO 

Lamps  and  Lanterns,  and  Repairs 

of  same 114  30 

Charges  for  Fire  Extinguishers.  .  121  50 

Furniture 139  97 

Printing  and  Stationery 453  73 

Setting  and  Resetting  Hydrant?..  3,220  CO 

Hydrants  and  Hydrant  Bends.  .  .  3,538  75 


Carried  forward $50,149  54     $1,207,015  20 


6  AUDITORS    REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward. $50,149,54     $1,207,015  20 

Final  Payment  on  Engine  House 
Corner  of  Drumm  and  Com- 
mercial Streets 4,338  75 

Hire  of  Wagon   19  00 

Cartage 143  25 

Fairbanks  Scales...... 2800 

Telephone  Expenses 250  G5 

One  Spring  Wagon 475  00 

Damages  Done  by  Supply  AVagon  35  00 

Storage  on  Engines,  Carts,  etc .  .  136  65 

55,575  84 

KENT     OF    OFFICE    FOE   FIRE    COMMIS- 
SIONERS (5  months) 450  00 

FIRE    ALARM    AND    POLICE    TELEGRAPH 
SALARIES — 

Superintendent $2,400  00 

Operators  (3) 4,500  00 

Eepairer 1,200  00 

8,100  00 

EXTENSION     AND     REPAIRS     OF     FIRE 
ALARM  AND  POLICE  TELEGRAPH — 

Telegraph  Poles  and  Cartage.  .  .  8273  85 

Salaries  of  Repairers . .  . .  2,367  25 

Furnishing  Time 60  00 

Horse  Hire  and  Keeping 475  25 

Labor  on  Extensions 200  00 

Repairs  to  Vehicles 314  25 

Stationery  and  Printing 293  50 

One  Wagon 300  00 

Wire 648  39 

Insulators,  Fire  Alarm  Boxes, 
Gongs,  Materials  for  Batter- 
ies, etc 4,452  88 


Carried  forward $9,385  37     $1,271,141  04 


DEMANDS    AUDITED. 


7 


Amount  brought  forward  ......   $9,385  37     $1,271,141  04 

Lumber,  Hardware,  etc  .........         573  48 

Painting  Signs,  Feather  Duster.  .  20  25 

9,979  10 

FUEL  FOR  PUBLIC  BUILDINGS  — 

Fuel  Furnished  New   City   Hall 

and  Public  Offices  .....  ....  5,691  83 

LIGHTING  PUBLIC  BUILDINGS  — 

City  Halls  and  other  Buildings.   $22,730  40 
Fire  Department  Buildings  ____       3,303  30 

Kental   of    53   Standard    Auto- 
matic   Gas    Regulators,    at 
$2  50  per  month  ..........          250  00 

26,283  70 

REPAIRS    AND    FURNITURE    FOR    PUBLIC 
BUILDINGS  — 
Repairs  to  City  Halls  ..........     $8,546  02 

Repairs      and      Furniture      for 

County    Jails  .............  601  58 

Furniture  for  Public  Officers  .  .  .       4,486  60 
Furniture  and   Repairs   Harbor 

Police  Station.    ..........  296  37 

Repairs  to  Police  Stations  .....       1,038  96 

14,969  53 

CITY  AND  COUNTY  HOSPITAL  EXPENSES  — 

Salary  of  Superintending  Physi- 

cian (eleven  months)  ...."...  $2,180  00 

Salary  of  Resident  Physician 

(eleven  mouths)  ..........  1,375  00 

Salary  of  Visiting  Physicians 

(2)  (eleven  months)  ........  2,200  00 


Carried  forward $5,755  00     $1,328,065  20 


8  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $5,755  00     $1,328,065  20 

Salary  of  Visiting  Surgeons  and 

Gynecologist 3,100  00 

Salaries  of  Employees 20.374  34 

Groceries  and  Supplies 29,220  37 

Liquors,  Medicines  and  Surgical 

Instruments 7,106  70 

Clothing,  Dry  Goods  and  Shoes  2,373  33 

Fuel  and  Light 5,049  11 

Dining  Room  and  Kitchen  Arti- 
cles   456  95 

Furniture  and  Bedding 337  89 

Cartage  of  Supplies 587  50 

Repairs  to  Buildings,  etc 3,473  16 

Stationery,  Printing  and  News- 
papers    279  76 

Brushes,  Brooms,  etc 180  00 

Washing 520  00 

Soap 691  86 

Horse  Feed,  Shoeing,  etc 256  12 

Repairs  to  Vehicles  and  Harness  251  95 

Rental  of  Telephones 94  60 

2  Horses 260  65 

80,369  29 

ALMS  HOUSE  EXPENSES — 

Salary    of     Superintendent   ^11 

months) $2,200  00 

Salary  of  Resident  Physician  (11 

months) 1,375  00 

Salary  of  Matron  (11  months) .  .  660  00 

Salaries  of  Employees  (11  mos.)  8,801  58 

Provisions  and  Supplies 26,658  70 

Liquors,  Medicines  and  Surgical 

Instruments 2,073  44 


Carried  forward $41,768  72     $1,408,434  49 


DEMANDS    AUDITED. 

Amount  brought  forward $41,768  72     $1,408,434  4$ 

Clothing,    Dry    Goods,    Shoes, 

Hats  and  Caps 7,448  51 

Fuel  and  Light 3,396  44 

Dining  Room  and  Kitchen  Arti- 
cles.'   464  83 

Horse  Feed,  Shoeing,  etc 3,713  50 

Harness  arid  Eepairs  of  Harness.  165  75 

Repairs  and  Material  for  Build- 
ings and  Grounds ,..,..  4,639  91 

Furniture 369  07 

Repairs    on   Vehicles   and    Ma- 
chines   738  20 

Stationery,  Books  and  Newspa- 
pers   196  72 

Brooms,  Brushes,  etc 168  00 

Telephone 35  10 

Sewing  Machine 45  00 

1  Wagon 225  00 

63,374  75 

INDUSTRIAL  SCHOOL  EXPENSES — 

Salary  of  Superintendent $1,750  00 

Salary   of  Clerk 1,152  90 

Salary  of  Physician 900  00 

Salaries  of  Employees 13,285  57 

Provisions  and  Supplies   8,536  10 

Clothing,  Dry  Goods,  Shoes  and 

Shoe  Material 2,903  40 

Horse  Feed,  Shoeing,  etc 368  43 

Medicines 165  99 

Fuel  and  Light   2,066  99 

Repairs  to  Vehicles  and  Black- 
smith Work 503  60 

Books  and  Stationery  . .  217  21 


Carried  forward $31,850  19    $1,471,809  24 


10  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $31,850  19     $1,471,809  24 

Dining  Eoom  and  Kitchen  Arti- 
cles    523  57 

Material  and    Repairs  of  Build- 
ings and  Grounds 4,273  90 

Maintenance  of  Girls  at  Magda- 
len Asylum ,   12,910  96 

Horse  Hire 31  00 

Seeds  and  Plants 65  42 

Framing  Fruit  Pieces 22  50 

Harness  and  Repairs  to  Harness.  228  50 

Rope   42  05 

Telephone  Expenses ....    45  40 

49,993  49 


HOUSE  OF  CORRECTION  EXPENSES — 

Salary  of  Superintendent $1,799  98 

Salaries  of  Employees  (Assistant 
Superintendent,  Guards,  Ma- 
tron, etc.) 21,243  97 

Provisions  and  Supplies 25,523  36 

Clothing,  Shoes,  and  Shoe  Mate- 
rial   1,721  66 

Dining  Room  and  Kitchen  Arti- 
cles  ;..  287  41 

Horse  Feed,  Shoeing,  etc 817  91 

Drags,  Medicines  and  Liquors. .  .  1,419  82 

Fuel  and  Lights 1,423  35 

Repairs  to  Buildings  and  Grounds  978  81 

Hardware  and  Powder 585  05 

Harness  and  Repairing  same  ...  80  75 
Horse    and    Buggy,    Hack   and 

Wagon  Hire 140  25 

Stationery  and  Printing 191  76 

Seeds  and  Plants .  .  70  20 


Carried  forward $56,284  31     $1,521,802  73 


DEMANDS    AUDITED.  1  1 

Amount  brought  forward $56,284  31     $1,521,802  73 

Telephone  Expenses 54  15 

2Eanges 475  00 

Hose  and  Couplings 93  13 

Eent  of  Quarry 20  60 

Expenses  taking  Dennis  Kearney 

to  Sacramento 42  00 

Sharpening  Tools  and  Repairing 

Pistols 102  95 

Use  of  Water  Casks 25  00 

Repairing  "Wagons. . .  82  00 

1  Horse,  1  Cow,  1  Sow 275  00 

Sundries 17  95 

57,472  09 

SMALLPOX  HOSPITAL  EXPENSES — 

Salary  of  Resident  Physician  .  .  .  $1,800  00 

Salaries  of  Employees 720  00 

Repairs  to  Building  and  Tools.  .  106  09 

Provisions  and  Supplies 1,601  93 

Medicines  and  Liquors 323  69 

Repairing  Vehicles  and  Harness.  80  05 

1  Set  Harness 40  00 

Fuel  and  Light 322  85 

Clothing  and  Blankets 109  95 

Horse  Feed  and  Shoeing 148  89 

Dining  Room  and  Kitchen  Arti- 
cles   41  34 

Telephone  Repairs 1  50 

5,296  29 

BURYING  INDIGENT  DEAD — 

From  City  and  County  Hospital.  $379  66 

From  Alms  House 66  76 

From  order  of  Mayor 282  87 

From  order  of  Coroner 148  72 

From  Smallpox  Hospital 1  37 

879  38 


Carried  forward   $1,585,450  49 


12  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $1,585,450  49 

CORONER'S  EXPENSES — 

Chemical  Analyses  (2) 100  00 

KEEPING  AND  SHOEING  PRISON  VEHICLE 

HORSES : 600  00 

NEW  CITY  CEMETERY — 

250  Head  and  Foot  Boards $162  50 

Curbing  Well 150  00 

Repairing  Dwelling  of  Keeper.  .          112  13 


424  63 


EXAMINING  INSANE  PERSONS 4,350  00 

APPROPRIATION  FOR  SAN  FRANCISCO  BE- 
NEVOLENT ASSOCIATION 5,000  00 

FIRE  DEPARTMENT  RELIEF  FUND — 

Relief  of  Disabled  Firemen.  ...  562  50 

TWENTY-THIRD    DISTRICT    COURT     EX- 
PENSES— 
Rent  of  Rooms 750  00 

FIFTEENTH  DISTRICT  COURT  EXPENSES — 

Rent  of  Rooms  (6  months) 750  00 

LAW   LIBRARY    EXPENSES — 

Rent  of  Rooms $2,100  00 

Salary  of  Janitor 870  00 

Stationery 331  95 

Exchange  on  Stoves 33  00 

Lamp  Shades,  etc 17  25 

Repairs 775 

(Salary  of  Law  Librarian,  $2,400, 
see  City  and  County  Officers' 
Salaries.) 

3,359  95 


Carried  forward $1,601,347  57 


DEMANDS    AUDITED.  13 

Amount  brought  forward $1,601,347  57 

RENT  OF  SUPERIOR  COURT    ROOM,    DE- 
PARTMENT No.  11 875  00 

RENT   OF    SUPERIOR   COURT  ROOM,  DE- 
PARTMENT No.  12 600  00 

RENT     OF     CHAMBERS     FOR     SUPERIOR 

JUDGES 1,200  00 

RENT  OF  POLICE  STATIONS 310  00 

HEALTH   DEPARTMENT  EXPENSES — 

Salary  of  Health   Officer $3,000  00 

Salary    of    Secretary   Board    of 

Health 2,100  00 

Salary  of  Assistant  Secretary.  . . .       1,200  00 

Salary  of  Messenger,  $900;  Por- 
ter, $60 960  00 

Salary  of  Market  Inspector 1,200  00 

Salaries    of    Health    Inspectors 

($100  per  mo.) 7,750  00 

Salary    of    Superintendent     of 

Disinterments 875  00 

Salary  of  Quarantine  Officer 1,800  00 

Salaries  of  Quarantine  Boat- 
men (4) 3,600  00 

Salary  of  City  Physician.  .  ,• 1,800  00 

Salary  of  Assistant  Physician  and 

Surgeon 1,200  00 

Salary  of   Superintendent,    City 

Cemetery 900  00 

Clerical    Services   to    Board    of 

Health 40  83 

Liquors,  Medicines  and  Surgical 
Instruments  for  County  Jail, 
City  Prison  and  Indigent 
Persons 2,014  00 

Keeping  and  Shoeing  Horses.  ..       2,612  50 


Carried  forward .$31,052  33     $1,604,332  57 


14  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $31,052  33      $1,604,332  57 

Rent  of  Health  Office 1,500  00 

Rent  of  Quarantine  Office 360  00 

Rent  of  Office  for  City  Physician 

(4  mos.)   140  00 

Books,    Printing,     Newspapers, 

and  Postage  Stamps 1,460  28 

Chinese  Interpreter 42  00 

Reporting  Arrivals  of  Vessels ...  216  00 

Cleaning  Public  Vaults,  Build- 
ings and  Removing  Dead 
Animals  from  Streets 1,189  75 

Washing     for     City     Receiving 

Hospital 42  50 

Reporting  Testimony  in  Regard 

to  Smallpox  on  Ships 61  00 

Expenses     in     the     Matter      of 
Cleansing     "  Chinatown"- 
Legal   Expenses,    Advertis- 
ing, etc 302  00 

Engrossing  Resolutions  in  Mem- 
ory of  Dr.  Toland 100  00 

Incidental  Expenses,  Quarantine 

Office 30  15 

Telephone  Expenses . 73  22 

Furniture  and  Repairs.  ...'......  37  31 

Sundries  (Inspecting  Sewers, 
Wagon  Repairs  and  Repairs 

to  Quarantine  Boat) 25  03 

36,631  57 

SPECIAL  COUNSEL — 

Legal  Sarvices  in  the  Case  of 
Wm.  M.  Lent  et  als.  vs. 
Wm.  Mitchell,  Tax  Collec- 
tor, to  Restrain  Sale  of  Du- 
pont  St.  Property  for  Taxes  $2,500  00 


Carried  for  ward $2,500  00     $1,640,964  14 


DEMANDS   AUDITED.  15 

Amount  brought  forward $2,500  00     $1,640,964  14 

Legal  Services  in  the  Case  of  the 
People  vs.  Water  Commis- 
sioners   .  1,000  00 

Legal    Services    Rendered     the 

Board  of  Supervisors 1,000  00 

4,500  00 

REPORTERS'  EXPENSES — 

Reporting  Cases  and  Transcrib- 
ing Testimony  in  Criminal 
Cases 8,727  30 

URGENT   NECESSITY — 

Miscellaneous    Expenses   not  other- 
wise Provided  for  by  Law: 

Services  of  Extra  Clerks  in  Li- 
cense Collector's  Office $4,062  49 

Services  of  Extra  Clerk  for  Jus- 
tices' Court 1,396  00 

Services     of    Extra   Clerks   and 

Copyists  for  County  Clerk.  .        6,834  50 

Services   of   Porters   City  Halls 

and  City  and  County  Offices       6,156  38 

Services  of  Extra  Clerk  for  Su- 
perintendent of  Streets ....  45  00 

Services  of  Elevator  Conductor, 

New  City  Hall  (5  months) .  .  190  00 

Services  of  Engineer  and  Fire- 
man, New  City  Hall,  4  mos.  800  00 

Services  of  Auctioneer,  Tax 
Sales,  Montgomery  avenue 
and  Dupont  street 100  00 

Services   of   Expert,  Examining 

Treasurer's  Accounts.  .  20  00 


Carried  forward $19,604  37     $1,654,191  44 


16  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $19,604  37     $1,654,191  44 

Expenses  in  Matter  of  Forgeries 
of  H.  S.  Tibbey— Pamphlets, 
Short  Hand  Reporter  and 
Searching  Records 563  60 

Court  Fees  and  Sundry  Court 

Expenses 226  90 

Expenses  in  Suit  of  Pacific  Sub- 
marine and  Earthquake  Co. 
vs.  New  City  Hall  Commis- 
sioners   449  00 

Serving  Subpoenas 49  00 

Reward  for  Arrest  of  F.  W.  May          250  00 

Judgment  of  J.  Norton 83  20 

Taking  Testimony,  Case  of  C. 
E.  Blake  vs.  City  and 
County 45  80 

Forfeited  Bail  Returned,  as  per 

Order  of  Police  Court  Judge  30  00 

Incidental  Expenses,  District 

Attorney's  Office 14  50 

Incidental  Expenses,  City  and 

County  Attorney's  Office...  45  45 

Incidental  Expenses,  County 

Clerk's  Office. 254  20 

Incidental  Expenses  License  Col- 
lector's Office 100  00 

Incidental  Expenses,  Clerks' 

Office  Board  of  Supervisors.  143  95 

Incidental  Expenses  Clerk  of 

Police  Court 60  00 

Rent  of  Chambers  for  Judges.  .  .       1,835  00 

Impounding  and  Keeping  Dogs, 

etc.,andRentofPublicPound  2,989  80 

Care  of  "Lotta  Fountain". .  190  00 


Carried  forward $26,934  77     $1,654,191  44 


DEMANDS    AUDITED  17 

Amount  brought  forward $26,934  77     $1,654,191  44 

Washing     Towels     for     Public 

Offices 311  05 

Bent  of  and  Fitting  up   Police 

Stations 1,091  64 

Ice  for  Public  Offices 449  40 

Horse   and  Buggy   Hire  for  As- 
sessor           424  00 

Horse  and  Buggy  Hire  for  Oth- 
er Officers 50  00 

[Removing  Books,  etc.,  from  Old 

to  New  City  Hall 476  90 

Recovering  Bodies  from  Bay  (54)          540  00 

Furniture  for  Public  Offices 402  00 

Computing    Time     that     Street 
Lights   are   Required  to  be 

Lighted 50  00 

Stationery  for  City  Physician ....  55  00 

Telephone   Expenses  — Rentals, 

Switching,  etc 530  55 

Engrossing  Resolutions,  "Wm. 
Mitchell,  Tax  Collector,  Dr. 
Toland  and  Monroe  Ash- 
bury 146  00 

Repairs  to  Sheriff's  Prison  Ve- 
hicle, Harness  and  Use  of 

Horse 191  50 

Services  of  Bridge  Tender  and 
Sundry  Expenses,  6th  St. 

Bridge.. '.          553  16 

Expenses  in  the  Matter  of  Open- 
ing Valencia  Street 380  75 

Expenses  Entertaining   General 

Grant 1,362  65 


Carried  forward $33,949  37    $1,654,191  44 


18  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $33,949  37     $1,654,191  44 

CollectiDg  Money  from    Banks 

for  Tax  Collector 40  00 

Hire  of  Carriages  for  Funeral  of 

Wm.  Mitchell,  Tax  Collector  25  00 
Surveying  Grounds  Around  Pub- 
lic Buildings 30  00 

Telegraphing     and     Messenger 

Service .'...'  290  80 

Moving  Batteries 336  DO 

Wagon  for  Police  Department  .  .  225  00 

Gas  Service  Pipe 25  80 

Ascertaining  Number  of  Vierra 

Street  Guides 200  00 

Sawdust  for  New  City  Hall 22  75 

500  Police  Clubs  and  Sockets. .  .  428  00 

50  Pairs  of  Blankets 350  00 

Urgent  Eepairs,  Old  City  Hall.  .  51  60 

Urgent  Eepairs,  County  Jail 57  25 

Sundries 25  13 

36,056  70 
ADVERTISING — 

Advertising  for  Assessor $179  70 

Advertising  for  Auditor 847  50 

Advertising  for  Board  of  Super- 
visors   9,320  20 

Advertising  for  Collector  of  Li- 
censes    151  00 

Advertising  for  Mayor 233  75 

Advertising  for  Surveyor 22  25 

Advertising  for  Tax  Collector..  1,230  75 

Advertising  for  Treasurer 3,011  28 

14,996  43 
SUBSISTENCE  or  PRISONERS — 

In  County  Jails $14,562  92 

In  City  Prison 6,321  71 

20,884  63 


Carried  forward $1,726,129  20 


DEMANDS   AUDITED.  19 

Amount  brought  forward $1,726,129  20 

WITNESS  EXPELS zs — 

Fees  for  Attendance  and  Deten- 
tion in  Criminal  Cases 1,958  75 

ASSESSMENT  AND  MILITARY  ROLL — 

Copying,  etc.,  Assessment  Boll.    $10,520  00 

Making  up  and  Compiling  Mili- 
tary Boll 1,325  00 

Montgomery  Avenue  Assessment          510  00 

Services  of   Clerks  of   Board   of 

Equalization 2,014  00 

14,369  00 

MUNICIPAL  REPORTS — 

Printing  3,000  Municipal  Reports  $3,464  37 

Binding  Reports 887  50 

Compiling  Reports 300  00 

Experts  Examining  the  Printing 

of  Reports 20  00 

Photographs  for  Reports 150  00 

Distributing  Reports 150  00 

Printing  and  Binding  Auditor's 

Report 70  00 

Printing  Coroner's  Report 65  00 

Printing   Chief  of   Police's   Re- 
port    65  00 

Printing  Health  Officer's  Report  142  00 

Printing  City  Physician's  Report  24  00 

Printing  City  and  County  Hos- 
pital Report 49  50 

Printing  Report  of  Fire  Commis- 
sioners   . . 145  00 

Printing   Industrial   School  Re- 
port    24  00 

5,556  37 


Carried  forward $1,748,013  32 


20  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $1,748,013  32 

AUCTIONEER'S  SERVICES,  TAX  SALES  ...  200  00 

RECORDER'S  NEWSPAPERS 71  70 

MAYOR'S  CONTINGENT  EXPENSES 1,800  00 

BENT  OF  HARBOR  POLICE  STATION  ....  405  00 

FOURTH  OF  JULY  APPROPRIATION 3,000  00 

REGISTRATION  AND  ELECTION  EXPENSES — 

Salary  of  Registrar  of  Voters  .  .  .     |3,600  00 

Salary  of  Registrar's  Clerks  and 

Watchmen 28,431  70 

Advertising 5,834  22 

Printing  and  Binding  Precinct 

Registers 9,568  60 

Stationery  and  Printing  Blanks.       7,35696 

Incidental  Expenses  of  Registrar          876  30 

Furniture  and  Carpenter's  Work 
for  Registrar  and  Polling- 
Places  .•--.•.,  646  85 

Telegraphing  and  Telephoning ..  803  55 

Horse  and  Buggy  Hire 627  75 

Use  of  Wagons  Taking  Ballot- 
boxes,  etc,,  to  Polling  Places  270  00 

Surveying  and  Indicating  100- 

f oot  radius 179  00 

Compensation  of  Officers  of  Elec- 
tion  40,985  00 

Rent  of  Polling  Places 2,465  00 

Compiling,  etc.,  Supplemental 

Ward  Register  in  1877 387  94 

Making  Maps  and  Subdividing 

into  Precincts  .  400  00 


Carried  forward $102,432  87     §1,753,490  02 


DEMANDS   AUDITED.  21 

Amount  brought  forward. . $102,432  87     $1,753,490  02 

Engrossing  and  Framing  Reso- 
lutions            131  00 

Legal  Services — State  vs.  Elec- 
tion Commissioners 2,000  00 

104,563  87 

JURY  EXPENSES  IN  CRIMINAL  -CASES  ....  278  65 

RENT    or    ENGINE   HOUSE    ON   BRYANT 

STREET 600  00 

FINANCE   COMMITTEE  EXPENSES — BOARD 
OF  SUPERVISORS — 

Experts'  Services  in  Examining 
Accounts  of  City  and  County 
Officers ." $3,150  00 

Clerk   and   Additional   Clerk    to 

Board  of  Supervisors 1,800  00 

Reporting  and  Transcribing  Tes- 
timony    847  00 

Carriage  Hire 5  00 

5,802  00 

WATER  SUPPLY  EXPENSES 495  00 

COUNTY  ROAD  REPAIRS — 

Labor   and  Material   on   County 

Roads 10,049  75 

CHINESE  BASKET  NUMBERS,  DOG   TAGS, 

ETC.,  FOR  LICENSE  COLLECTOR 550  60 

JUDGMENT  IN  FAVOR  OF  GUERIN  vs.  CITY 

AND  COUNTY . .  925  6 


Carried  forward $1,876,755  57 


22  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $1,876,755  57 

JUDGMENT   IN   FAVOR   VIERRA    STREET- 
GUIDES 3,008  10 

* 

CONSTRUCTING  SEWER  IN  ARMY  STREET.  .  94,161  99 

IMPROVING  PLAZAS  AND  SQUARES — 

Hamilton  Square f  5,060  20 

Jefferson  Square 3,988  26 

Portsmouth  Square 683  26 

Columbia  Square 555  71 

"Washington  Square 455  83 

Union  Square ,          89  08 

Alamo  Square 6  00 

Extra  Services  of  Head  Gardener 

(5  months) 125  00 

10,963  34 

FILLING  IN  MISSION  [  CREEK   AND  CHAN- 
NEL STREET 4,950  00 

SURVEYS,    ESTIMATES    AND    PLANS    FOR 

CHANNEL  STREET 625  00 

INCIDENTAL  EXPENSES  OF  GAS  INSPECTOR  117  50 

DAMAGES  BY  EIOTERS 66,461  26 

ABATING    NUISANCES — ORDER  OF  BOARD 

OF  HEALTH 3,500  00 

TAXES  EEFDNDED 199  62 

IMPROVING  PIONEER  PARK 4,159  23 


Carried  forward $2,064,901  61 


DEMANDS    AUDITED. 
Amount  brought  forward 

ON    THE    STREET   LIGHT   FUND. 


23 
$2,064,931  61 


MONTH. 

Lighting 

Streets. 

Repairs 
on  Lamps  anc 
Lamp-posts  . 

TOTAL. 

April 

1879 

$93  697  45 

$883  16 

$24  580  61 

May  

..1879 

23  201  37 

887  50 

24  088  87 

June 

1879 

20  791  25 

887  83 

21  679  08 

July  

..1879 

20  793  73 

889  16 

21  682  89 

August 

1879 

20  829  85 

889  83 

21  719  68 

September  

..1879 

20  853  04 

889  83 

21  742  87 

November 

1879 

90  867  09 

891  50 

21  758  59 

December  

.  1879 

21  689  40 

894  00 

29  583  40 

January 

1880 

21  714  33 

894  17 

29  gog  50 

Februarj"  

.   1880 

20  173  42 

894  33 

91  067  75 

March 

1880 

21  735  78 

893  83 

22  629  61 

April  

1880 

20  975  19 

894  67 

21  869  79 

$257,321  83 

$10,689  81 

$268,011  64 

Labor,  etc.,  removing  Lamp-posts  on  account  of  Re-gra- 
ding Public  Streets .- 2,213  80 


ON   THE    POUND   FEE   FUND. 

Salary  of  Keeper  of  Public  Pound 

ON  THE  POLICE  CONTINGENT  FUND. 

Conveying     Prisoners,     Photo- 
graphing Criminals,  etc .... 

ON   THE   LIBRARY  FUND. 

Establishing     and     Maintaining 
Free   Public  Library ...... 

ON   THE   POLICE   LIFE,  HEALTH  AND   INSURANCE  FUND. 

Insurance  paid $    3,000  00 

Dues  refunded ...  32  00 


270,225  44 


900  00 


6,650  25 


48,636  56 


3,032  00 


Carried  forward 


$2,394,345  86 


24  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward. ......  $2,394,345  86 

ON    THE    PARK   IMPROVEMENT    FUND. 

Labor  and  Material,  Improving 

Golden  Gate  Park 53,103  39 

ON    INTEREST    ACCOUNT CITY    HALL    CONSTRUCTION    BONDS. 

Coupons  of  New  City  Hall  Con- 
struction Bonds $  41,715  00 

Fractional  Interest  paid  on  Sur- 
render of  Bonds-. 7  00 

41,722  00 

ON   INTEREST   ACCOUNT SCHOOL    BONDS    OF    1866-67. 

Coupons    of    School    Bonds    of 

1863-67 .' 13,475  00 

ON   INTEREST    ACCOUNT SCHOOL  BONDS    OF    1870. 

Coupons  of  School  Bonds  of  1870  19,005  00 

ON   INTEREST   ACCOUNT SCHOOL    BONDS    OF    1872. 

Coupons  of  School  Bonds  of  1872  6,300  00 

ON   INTEREST   ACCOUNT SCHOOL    BONDS    OF    1874. 

Coupons  of  School  Bonds  of  1874  12,000  00 

ON   INTEREST   ACCOUNT BONDS    OF    1858. 

Coupons  of  Bonds  of  1858 $32,280  00 

Fractional  Interest  paid  on  Sur- 
render of  Bonds 1,200  00 

33,480  00 

ON    INTEREST   ACCOUNT — BONDS    OF    1863-64. 

Coupons  of  Bonds  of  1863-64  ...  30,852  50 


Carried  forward $2,604,283  75 


DEMANDS    AUDITED.  25 

Amount  brought  forward $2,604,283  75 

ON    INTEREST    ACCOUNT —BONDS    OF    1867. 

Coupons  of  Bonds  of  1867 17,710  00 

ON    INTEREST    ACCOUNT DUPONT    STREET    BONDS. 

Coupons  of  Dupont  Street  Bonds  14,595  00 

ON    INTEREST    TAX    ACCOUNT PACIFIC    R.   R.    BONDS. 

Coupon  C.  P.  K.  K.  Bonds $22,505  00 

Fractional  Interest  paid  on  Sur- 
render of  Bonds 906  40 

Coupon  W.  P.  E.  E.  Bonds 12,530  00 

Fractional  Interest  paid  on  Sur- 
render of  Bonds 225  96 

36,167  36 

ON    INTEREST    ACCOUNT PARK    IMPROVEMENT    BONDS. 

Coupons  of  Park  Improvement 

BONDS 32,280  00 

ON  INTEREST  ACCOUNT MONTGOMERY  AVENUE  BONDS. 

Coupons  of  Montgomery  Avenue 

Bonds 91,740  00 

ON    INTEREST    ACCOUNT HOSPITAL     BONDS. 

Coupons  of  Hospital  Bonds 12,570  00 

ON    INTEREST    ACCOUNT HOUSE    OF    CORRECTION    BONDS. 

Coupons  of  House  of  Correction 

Bonds 10,465  00 

SINKING    FUNDS— 

ON  SINKING  FUND SCHOOL  BONDS  OF  1866-67. 

Loans  on  security  of  City   and 

County  and  U.  S.  Bonds. .  .  232,000  00 

Carried  forward $3,05 1,811  11 


26  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $3,051,811  11 

ON    SINKING   FOND — SCHOOL    BONDS    OF  1870 

Loans  on  security  of  City  and 

County  and  U.  S.  Bonds. .  .  252,000  00 

ON    SINKING   FUND SCHOOL  BONDS  OF    1872. 

Loans   on  security  of  City  and 

County'andU.  S.  Bonds..  154,400  00 

ON    SINKING   FUND BONDS    OF  1863-64. 

Loans  on  security  of  City  and 

County  and  II.  S.  Bonds..  .  331,000  00 

ON    SINKING   FUND BONDS    OF    1867 

Loans   on   security   of  City  and 

County  and  U.  S.  Bonds.. .  200,000  00 

ON    SINKING   FUND HOSPITAL    BONDS. 

Loans  on  security  of  City  and 

County  and  U.  S.  Bonds. .  .  109,500  00 

ON  SINKING   FUND — -PARK  IMPROVEMENT  BONDS. 

Loans   on  security  of  City  and 

County  and  U.  S.  Bonds. .  .  33,000  00 

ON    SINKING   FUND BONDS    OF   1858. 

Bonds  Bedeemed $127,500  00 

Accrued  Interest  on  Bonds  Sur- 
rendered    32  55 

127,532  55 

ON    SINKING   FUND CITY    HALL    BONDS. 

Bonds  Bedeemed $97,000  00 

Acciu?d  Interest  on  Bonds  Sur- 
rendered    414  35 

97,414  35 


Carried fonuard $4,356,658  01 


DEMANDS    AUDITED.  27 

Amount  brought  forward $4,356,658  01 

ON    SINKING    FUND PACIFIC    R.   R.    BONDS. 

Bonds  Kedeemed  (C.  P.  K.  R.).   $47,000  00 
Bonds  Redeemed  (W.  P.  E.  R.) .     27,000  00 
Accrued  Interest  on  Bonds  Sur- 
rendered   190  92 

74,190  92 

ON    SINKING   FUND DUPONT    STREET    BONDS. 

Bonds  Redeemed *   9,583  20 

ON     THE     SCHOOL     DEPARTMENT    FUND. 

Teachers'  Salaries $580,977  10 

Janitors'    Salaries 44,460  25 

School  Text  Books 2,411  57 

Stationery  and  School  Inciden- 
tals/.   13,169  95 

Fuel  and  Light 7,053  80 

Repairs  and  Carpenters' work.  .  39,808  42 

Rents 8,675  20 

Incidentals  Board  of  Education.  12,647  36 

Erection  of  Buildings 35,831  83 

Furniture 11,435  99 

Census  Marshals 3,977  50 

Water 80  00 

760,528  97 

(Salary  of  Superintendent  of  Pub- 
lic Schools,  $4,000  per  year; 
and  Salary  of  Deputy  Super- 
intendent, $3,000  per  year; 
paid  out  of  General  Fund). 

ON  THE  SPECIAL  FEE  FUND. 
SALARY  OF 

Treasurer $4,000  00 

Recorder 4,000  00 

County  Clerk 4,000  00 

Auditor 4,000  00 


Carried  forward $16,000  00     $5,200,961  10 


28  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $16,000  00     $5,200,961  10 

Tax  Collector 4,177  77 

Sheriff 8,000  00 

Sheriff's  Deputies  (4) 6,300  00 

Sheriff's  Assistant  Book-keeper.  1,200  00 

Sheriff's  Porters  (2) 1,800  00 

Presiding  Justice  Justices' Court  3,000  00 
Associate  Justices  Justices'  Court 

(Four) 9,600  00 

Clerk  Justices'  Court 2,400  00 

Deputy   Clerks  Justices'    Court 

(2  at  $1,200  each) 1,400  00 

Porter  Justices'  Court '.  900  00 

[Recorder's  Deputy 1,800  00 

Coroner's  Deputies  (2) 3,300  00 

Coroner's  Messenger 900  00 

Clerk  of  Police  Court 2,400  00 

License  Collector 3,000  00 

Clerk  of  Board  of  Supervisors.  3,600  00 
Extra  Clerk  to  Board  of  Super- 
visors   1,800  00 

Extra  Clerk  to  Treasurer 1,200  00 

Notice  Server  to  City  and  County 

Attorney 900  00 

Folio   Clerks    and    Copyists    in 

County  Clerk's  Office 12,082  50 

$85,760  27 

STATIONERY,     BLANKS,     PRINTING    AND 
BINDING  BOOKS,  BRIEFS,  LICENSES, 

ETC.,  FOR  ClTY  AND  COUNTY  OFF- 
ICERS, SUPERIOR  AND  DISTRICT 
COURTS  AND  JUDGES — 

FOR 

Assessor 7,858  10 

Auditor..                  1,007  00 


Carried  forward ,  $  94,625  37     $5,200,961  10 


DEMANDS  AUDITED.  29 

Amount  brought  forward $94,625  37     $5,200,961  10 

FOR 

Board  of  Supervisors 1,673  11 

Chief  of  Police 1,777  10      . 

Coroner 331  85 

County  Clerk,  Superior  and  Dis- 
trict Courts 22,063  17 

City  and  County  Attorney 1,058  90 

District  Attorney 854  40 

'  Justices'  Court 1,229  50 

License  Collector 1,098  50 

Mayor 490  23 

Police  Court 1,241  68 

Eecorder 1,880  40 

Sheriff 4,337  79 

Superintendent  of  Streets 1,314  53 

Surveyor 326  03 

Tax  Collector 5,222  87 

Treasurer 974  00 

Printing  License  Blanks 899  25 

Publishing  Delinquent  Tax  List  2,732  28 

144,130  96 


ON    THE     STREET     DEPARTMENT    FUND. 

Eepairs  and  Material  for  Accep- 
ted Streets $164,630  46 

Eepairs  of   and  Cleaning  Sewers 

and  Streets 96,631  75 

Eepairs   of    Streets  in   front   of 

City  and  County  Property.     23,311  49 

Eepairs  of  Streets  in  front  of  U. 

S.  Property 12,340  54 

Eepairs  of  Streets,  Urgent 8,414  29 

Eepairs  of   County  Eoads 6,80490 


Carried  forward $312,133  43     $5,345,092  06 


30  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $312,133  43     $5,345,092  06 

Repairs  and  Material  on  Plazas 

and  Squares 1,077  00 

Grading   West  Mission    Street, 
from      Potter      to     Ridley 

Streets 9,843  88 

323,054  31 


5,668,146  37 

Demands  Audited  on  New  City  Hall 

Fund  During  Fiscal  Year  1879-80  176,099  61 


Total  Demands  Audited  Fiscal  Year 

1879-80 $5,844,245  98 


RECAPITULATION    OF    DEMANDS   AUDITED    DURING 
THE  FISCAL  YEAR  1879-80. 

City   and    County   Officers'    Salaries 

(General  Fund) $544,866  05 

City   and    County   Officers'   Salaries 

(Special  Fee  Fund) 85,760  27 

$630,626  32 

Extra  Deputies'  Salaries 2,550  00 

Police  Force  Salaries 435,469  20 

Fire  Department  Salaries 193,660  00 

Fire  Department  Material 30,469  95 

Fire  Department  Running  Expenses 55,575  84 

Office  Rent  for  Fire  Commissioners 450  00 

Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph  Salaries 8,100  00 

Extension   and  Repairs  Fire  Alarm  and   Police 

Telegraph 9,979  10 

Fuel  for  Public  Buildings 5,691  83 

Lighting   Public  Buildings 26,283  70 

Repairs  and  Furniture  for  Public  Buildings.  . .  .  14,969  53 


Carried  forward $1,413,825  47 


DEMANDS  AUDITED.  31 

Amount  brought  forward $1,413,825  47 

Hospital  Supplies  and  Expenses 80,369  29 

Alms  House  Supplies  and  Expenses 63,374  75 

Industrial  School  Supplies  and  Expenses 49,993  49 

House  of  Correction  Supplies  and  Expenses.  .  .  .  57,472  09 

Small  Pox  Hospital  Supplies  and  Expenses.      .  5,296  29 

Burying  Indigent  Dead 879  38 

Coroner's  Expenses 100  00 

Keeping  and  Shoeing  Horses  for  Prison  Van ....  600  00 

Improving  New  City  Cemetery 424  63 

Examining  Insane  Persons 4,350  00 

Appropriation  to  San  Francisco  Benevolent  As- 
sociation   5,000  00 

Fire  Department  Belief  Fund 562  50 

Bent  of  Twenty-third  District  Court  Booms 750  00 

Bent  of  Fifteenth  District  Court  Booms 750  00 

Bents,  etc.,  Law  Library  Booms 3,359  95 

Bent  of  Court  Booms  Department  11,  Superior 

Court 875  00 

Bent  of  Court  Booms  Department  12,  Superior 

Court 600  00 

Bent  of  Chambers  for  Superior  Judges 1,200  00 

Bent  of  Police  Stations 310  00 

Health  Department  Expenses   36,631  57 

Services  of  Special  Counsel 4,500  00 

Beporting  and  Transcribing  Testimony 8,727  30 

Urgent  Necessity 36,056  70 

Advertising  for  City  and  County  Officers 14,996  43 

Subsistence  of  Prisoners 20,884  63 

Witness  Expenses 1,958  75 

Assessment  and  Military  Boll 14,369  00 

Printing  and  Binding  Municipal  Beports 5,556  37 

Auctioneer's  Services  Tax  Sales 200  00 

Newspapers  for  Becorder's  Office 71  70 

Contingent  Expenses  of  Mayor's  Office 1,800  00 

Bent  of  Harbor  Police  Station .  .  405  00 


Carried  forward $1,836,250  29 


32  AUDITORS    REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $1,836,250  29 

Appropriation  Celebrating  the  4th  of  July,  1879  3,000  00 

Registration  and  Election  Expenses 104,563  87 

Jury  Expenses  in  Criminal  Cases 278  65 

Rent  of  Engine  House  on  Bryant  Street 600  00 

Finance  Committee  Expenses 5,802  00 

Water  Supply  Expenses . . . .  . 495  00 

Repairs  on  County  Roads 10,049  75 

Dog  Tags,  Produce  and  Basket  Numbers 550  60 

Judgment  in  favor  of  M.   Guerin  vs.  City  and 

County  of  San  Francisco 925  68 

Judgment  in  favor  of  Vierra  Street-Guides 3,008  10 

Army  Street  Sewer 94,161  99 

Improving  Plazas  and  Squares 10,963  34 

Improving  Pioneer  Park 4,159  23 

Taxes  Refunded 199  62 

Filling  in  Mission  Creek  and  Channel  Street   .  .  .  4,950  00 

Surveys,  Estimates  and  Plans  for  Channel  Street  625  00 

Gas  Inspector's  Expenses 117  50 

Damages  by  Rioters .  . 66,461  26 

Abating  Nuisances  by  Board  of  Health 3,500  00 

Stationery,  Books,  Printing  Blanks,  etc.,  for 
City  and  County  Officers,  Superior  and  Dis- 
trict Courts  and  Judges 54,739  16 

Publishing  Delinquent  Tax  List 2,732  28 

Printing  License  Blanks 899  25 

Lighting  Streets  and  Repairs  of  Lamps  and  Lamp 

Posts *  268,011  64 

Removing  Lamp  Posts,  etc.,  on  Account  of  Re- 
grading  Public  Streets 2,213  80 

Salary  of  Keeper  of  Public  Pound 900  00 

Contingent  Expenses  of  Police  Department ....  6,650  25 

Expenses  of  Free  Public  Library 48,636  56 

Police  Life,  Health  and  Insurance  Fund 3,032  00 

Improving  Golden  Gate  Park 53,103  39 

Interest  on  Funded  Debt 266,026  86 


Carried  forward $2,857,607  07 


DEMANDS   AUDITED.  33 

Amount  brought  forward $2,857,607  07 

Street  Department  Expenses,  Other  Than 

Salaries  of  Superintendent  and  Deputies. . .  .  323,054  31 

School  Department  Expenses,  Other  Than 
Salary  of  Superintendent  and  Deputy,  and 
Interest  Account  and  Sinking  Funds 760,528  97 

Labor  and  Material  on  New  City  Hall 176,099  61 


Grand  Total  Expenditure  for  the  Fis- 
cal Year  1879-80 $4,117,289  96 

Loans  from  Sinking  Funds.  .  .  $1,311,900  00 

City       and        County       Bonds 

Redeemed 299,137  82 

Dupont  Street  Bonds  Eedeemed       9,583  20 

Interest    Paid   on   Montgomery 

Avenue  Bonds '.  .     91,740  00 

Interest  Paid  on  Dupont  Street 

Bonds 14,595  00 

1,726,956  02 


Total   Demands  Audited  Fiscal 

Year  1879-80 $5,844,245  98 


NEW  CITY  HALL  FUND  ACCOUNT — 

Total   Demands    Audited    from 

June   7,    1876,   to   July    1, 

1880     (Including     $15,000, 

New    City   Hall    Furniture 

Fund) $1,343,934  71 

Total  Demands  Paid  (Including 
$15,000,  New  City  Hall 
Furniture  Fund)  to  July  1, 
1880 1,340,330  91 


Demands  Unpaid  July  1,  1880. .      $3,603  80 


34 


AUDITORS    REPORT. 


L^r-COfNL^OO 


OTM^OOOOCOOOOOOlr^OO     I    ^ 


efi}$^i-4<io<}?efi#  i^  i-i"cj'c5"-*~t^'< 
iHcij-HOSr-rHeoiaio&aea      o  i^  cs  • 


J 

i 


CO  • 


rH"~  oTocTcootco'c-  Tjr^o^^ro2ot 

•*  i-H  r-l         i-l  M  CO  rH  0-5  rH  CO  I—  C5  i-l  rH  JO  O  u~,  'M  CO         O  L—  CS 


00  -H  O  O  CR  CO 
00  00  >0  O  O  CO 


3     '  o  1--  l^- 

.  ^   ;  oo  oo  oo 


S  §    .2 


ill 


!  §  §  "c  la  -a  r*     9  ^"^r^-^^^r^^^r*."^" 

a  S  3  I,?  cfe  -JsSSSSCfisSSS 


o8ra_,,a'_-p?p    .»*jB2»™S«B»SStno953c'OOI'2FaoonQDOnal)2Pa8  =' 

f'g|^ffl4»t3Oga>g®ggg«g«w«®Sg««cce3CCflce!(5aa 
g4j.SsSkg3®®§9«««®«3®«««a3q}33333SIS233333 
£^llisllSlllllIIIIIIIIIIIllllll--§^-s3l 


DEMANDS    AUDITED.  35 

WM.  E.  SHABEE,  TEEASUEEE,  IN  CASH  ACCOUNT  WITH  THE 
AUDITOE  FOE  MONEYS  BELONGING  TO  THE  CITY  AND 
COUNTY  EECEIVED  DUEING  THE  FISCAL  YEAE  1879-1880, 
ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 

GENERAL  FUND. 
FROM — 

Taxes $1,311,120  31 

State,  City  and  County  Licenses  311,763  00 

Municipal  Licenses 50,572  50 

Stock  Certificate  Tax 26,625  80 

Quarantine  Fees 4,278  50 

Fines  Imposed  in  the  Police  Court    31,093  50 

Fines  Imposed  in  the  Municipal 

Criminal  and  District  Courts          800  00 

Fines  Imposed  in  the  Superior 

Court 2,653  00 

Auditor's  and  Assessor's  Propor- 
tion of  Expenses  from  State     30,059  43 

Rents  of  City  and  County  Prop- 
erty    52  00 

Accrued  Interest  on  Montgomery 

Avenue  Bonds 720  00 

Sale  of  Fire  Department  Prop- 
erty           571  67 

Sale    of     Public     Property    by 

Mayor 81  00 

Sale  of  Old  Furniture 127  . 00 

Coroner,    Effects    of    Deceased 

Persons 29  95 

Alms  House  Produce 452  50 

Sale   of   Surplus   Eations   from 

House   of  Correction 369   70 

Fines  Imposed  in  the  City  Crim- 
inal Court 1,591  00 

Sheriff,  for  Subsistence  of  U.  S. 

Prisoners 2,372  15 


C arried forward , . . ,  $1,775,333  01 


36  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $1,775,333  01 

Treasurer,  for  Sale  of  Effects  of 

Deceased  Persons 29  35 

Treasurer,  for  Sale  of  Effects  of 

Prisoners 544  23 

Sale    of    Swill,    etc.,    City   and 

County  Hospital 398  30 

Sheriff,  for  Conveying  Insane  to 
Asylums  and  Prisoners  to 

State  Prison 772  30 

Forfeited  Eecognizances  Collect- 
ed by  J.  P.  Bell,  Special 

Counsel 2,455  44 

W.  C.  Burnett,  Balance  Return- 
ed of  Sums  Advanced  for 
Costs  in  Street  Assessment 

Suits 334  00 

W.  C.  Burnett,  Amount  Paid 
Treasurer  in  the  Case  of 

Rousset  vs.  Austin 5  00 

Redemption  of  Real  Estate  Sold 

to  State 36  25 

W.  C.  Burnett,  Judgment  in  the 
Case  of  Adams  vs.  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco. .  .  34  00 

$1,779,941  88 
SPECIAL  FEE  FUND. 
FROM— 

Recorder $34,783  75 

County  Clerk 58,796  75 

Sheriff 42,268  81 

Treasurer 7,701  49 

Tax  Collector 17,467  65 

Clerk  of  Board  of  Supervisors.  196  90 

Clerk  of  Justices'  Court 16,598  00 

License  Collector 24,146  00 

Coroner 208  60 

202,167  95 


Carried  forward  $1,982,109 


DEMANDS    AUDITED.  37 

Amount  brought  forward $1,982,109  83 

SCHOOL  DEPAKTMENT  FUND. 
FROM — 

Taxes $419,690  87 

State  Apportionment 432,183  10 

Poll   Taxes 69,418  40 

Bents 505  50 

921,797  87 

POUND  FEE   FUND. 
FROM — 

Pound  Fees 1,456  20 

STREET  DEPARTMENT  FUND. 
FROM — 

Taxes $253,386  14 

Licenses  on  Vehicles 16,030  00 

Sale  of   Old  Material 181  90 

269,598  04 

PARK  IMPROVEMENT  FUND. 
FROM — 

Taxes $51,235  96 

Park  Fines 80  00 

Park  Pound  Fees 59  00 

51,374  96 

INTEREST   ACCOUNT   SCHOOL^  BONDS    OF  1874. 
FROM — 

Bent  of  Lincoln  School  Lots. . .  13,255  00 

POLICE,  LIFE,  HEALTH  AND  INSURANCE  FUND. 
FROM — 

Contributions   of  Captains    and 

Officers 8,092  00 

DISINTERMENT  FUND. 
FROM — 

Permits..  1,75000 


Carried  forward $3,252,433  90 


38  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $3,252,433  90 

LIBRARY  FUND. 
PROM — 

Taxes... 45,462  9a 

NEW   CITY   HALL   FUND. 
FROM— 

Taxes 114,072  19 

STREET   LIGHT  FUND. 
FROM— 

Taxes 244,839  40 

CORPORATION   DEBT   FUND. 
FROM— 

Taxes 25,614  02 

SINKING   FUND   SCHOOL   BONDS,  1866-67. 
FROM— 

Taxes $14,649  66 

Loans  Returned 166,000  00 

Interest  Received 2,616  02 

183,265  68 

SINKING   FUND    SCHOOL   BONDS,   1870. 
FROM— 

Taxes $13,417  01 

Loans  Returned 127,500  00 

Interest  Received 2,011  80 

142,928  81 

SINKING   FUND   SCHOOL   BONDS,  1872. 
FROM — 

Taxes $8,336  09 

Loans  Returned 74,400  00 

Interest  Receiyed 1,202  87 

83,938  96 


Carried  forward $4,092,555  89 


DEMANDS    AUDITED.  39 


Amount  brought  forward $4,092,555  89 

SINKING    FUND   BONDS,  1863-64. 
FROM — 

Taxes $43,503  77 

Loans  Ke turned 83,000  00 

Interest  Received 4,905  50 

131,409  27 

SINKING     FUND     BONDS,   1867. 

FROM— 

Taxes $16,045  19 

Loans  Returned 90,000  00 

Interest  Received 1,467  18 

107,512  37 

SINKING  FUND  HOSPITAL  BONDS. 
FROM — 

Taxes $10,773  80 

Loans  Returned 41,000  00 

Interest  Received 532  95 

52,306  75 

SINKING   FUND   PARK   IMPROVEMENT  BONDS. 
FROM — 

Taxes $11,180  38 

Loans  Returned 12,500  CO 

Interest  Received 206  97 

23,887  35 

SINKING   FUND   BONDS,  1858. 
FROM— 

Taxes... 38,828  10 

SINKING  FUND  DUPONT  STREET  BONDS. 
FROM— 

Taxes 6,776  39 


Carried  forward $4,453,276  12 


40  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $4,453,276  12 

LOAN    FUND    ACCOUNT    PACIFIC    R.    R     BONDS. 

FROM— 

Taxes 30,899  32 

INTEREST    TAX    ACCOUNT    PACIFIC     R.    R.    BONDS. 

FROM— 

Taxes 32,336  44 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT  BONDS,  1863-84. 
FROM — 

Taxes 28,864  25 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT  BONDS,  1867. 
FROM — 

Taxes 16,252  48 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT  SCHOOL  BONDS,  1366-67. 
FROM— 

Taxes 13,009  76 

IN 

FROM— 

Taxes 18,905  03 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT  SCHOOL  BONDS,  1872 
FROM— 

Taxes 6,707  13 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT  HOSPITAL  BONDS. 
FROM— 

Taxes 11,993  57 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT  HOUSE  OF  CORRECTION  BONDS. 

FROM— 

Taxes 9,960  57 


Carried  forward $4,622,204  67 


DEMANDS    AUDITED.  41 

Amount  brought  forward $4,622,204  67 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT  PARK  IMPROVEMENT  BONDS. 

FROM — 

Taxes 26,832  30 

'  INTEREST  ACCOUNT  MONTGOMERY  AVENUE  BONDS. 
FROM — 

Taxes 60,322  83 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT  DUPONT  STREET  BONDS. 
FROM — 

Taxes 7,979  43 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT  CITY  HALL  BONDS. 

FROM — 

Taxes 36,392  05 

SINKING  FUND  CITY  HALL  CONSTRUCTION  BONDS. 
FROM  — 

Taxes..  31,915  44 


Total  Receipts  into  the  Treasury 
for  the  fiscal  year  ending- 
June  30,  1880,  (City  and 
County  Cash  only) $4,785,646  72 

Cash  on  hand  at  credit  of   City 

and  County  July  1, 1879 ....  1,731,383  59 


$6,517,030  31 


42  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Cr. 

By  Payments  at  Debit  of  the  Following  Funds  and  Accounts  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  1879-80,  Ending  June  30,  1880. 

FOR  DEMANDS  REDEEMED. 

General  Fund $1,915,008  73 

School  Fund 743,479  72 

Street  Department  Fund 307,307  80 

Street  Light  Fund 270,087  99 

New  City  Hall  Fund 176,771  48 

Special  Fee  Fund 144,600  00 

Park  Improvement  Fund 52,921  36 

Library  Fund 47,974  75 

Police  Contingent  Fund 6,275  35 

Police,  Life,  Health  and  Insurance 

Fund 3,032  00 

Pound  Fee  Fund 900  00 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  of  1858 ......  127,532  55 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  of  1863-64 . . .  331,000  00 

Sinking  Fund— Pacific  R.  R,  Bonds  74,190  92 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  of  1867 200,000  00 

Sinking  Fund  Park  Improvement 

Bonds 33,000  00 

Sinking  Fund— Hospital  Bonds.  .  109,500  00 

Sinking  Fund— City  Hall  Bonds.  97,414  35 
Sinking  Fund  —  Dupont  Street 

Bonds ; 9,583  20 

Sinking  Fund —  School  Bonds 

1866-67 232,000  00 

Sinking  Fund— School  Bonds  1870  252,000  00 

Sinking  Fund— School  Bonds  1872  154,400  00 
Interest  Tax  Account — Pacific  R. 

R,  Bonds 36,167  36 

Interest  Account— Bonds  of  1858..  33,480  00 

Interest  Account-Bonds  1863-64  30,852  50 


Carried  forward  . . $5,389,480  06 


DEMANDS    AUDITED. 

Amount  brought  forward  .    .  .$5,389,480  06 

Interest  Account— Bonds  1867 ....         17,710  00 

Interest  Account— Hospital  Bonds         12,570  00 

Interest  Account— City  Hall  Bonds         41,722  00 

Interest  Account — Dupont  Street 

Bonds 14,595  00 

Interest  Account  —  Montgomery 

Avenue  Bonds 91,740  00 

Interest  Account — Park  Improve- 
ment Bonds, 32,280  00 

Interest  Account — House  of  Cor- 
rection Bonds 10,465  00 

Interest  Account — School  Bonds 

1866-67 ....  13,475  00 

Interest  Account— School  Bonds 

1870 19,005  00 

Interest  Account — School  Bonds 

1872 6,300  00 

Interest  Account — School  Bonds 

1874 12,000  00 

Total  Demands  Redeemed  During 

the  Fiscal  Year  1879-80 $5,661,342  06 

City  Hall  Construction  Bond  Fund 

(Old  Issue.     Not  Audited) ...  274  56 

$5,661,616  62 

Br  CASH  ON  HAND  JUNE  30,  1880, 

AT  CREDIT  OF    THE   FOLLOWING 

FUNDS  AND  ACCOUNTS — 

General  Fund  $41,456  97 

Special  Fee  Fund 7,000  66 

School  Fund 229,618  61 

Street  Light  Fund 18,718  73 

Street  Department  Fund 21,209  86 

Pound  Fee  Fund 75  00 

Police  Contingent  Fund 924  65 


Carried  for  ward $319,004  48     $5,661,616  62 


44  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward ...  $319,004  48     $5,661,616  62 

Park  Improvement  Fund 7,809  28 

Corporation  Debt  Fund 49  62 

New  City  Hall  Fund 22,828  03 

Library  Fund 21,465  68 

Police  Life,  Health  and  Insurance 

Fund 10,704  00 

Disinterment  Fund 2,440  00 

Sinking  Fund — Dupont  Street 

Bonds 2,114  74 

Sinking  Fund— Hospital  Bonds. .  .  15,058  37 
Sinking  Fund  —  School  Bonds 

1866-67 117,476  63 

Sinking  Fund— School  Bonds  1870  19,283  00 

Sinking  Fund— School  Bonds  1872  3,117  67 

Sinking  Fund— School  Bonds  1874  8,253  34 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  1858 75,631  08 

Sinking  Fund — Park  Improvement 

Bonds 2,689  80 

Sinking  Fund— Bonds  1863-64.  ...  6,201  10 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  1867 1,242  22 

Sinking  Fund — Pacific  Eailroad 

Bonds 48,704  90 

Sinking  Fund— City  Hall  Bonds .  .  38,910  91 
Pacific  E.  E.  Interest  Tax  Account  11,972  43 
Interest  Account — Bonds  of  1858.  9,230  91 
Interest  Account — Bondsof  1863-4  23,811  64 
Interest  Account — Bondsof  1867.  12,680  81 
Interest  Account — Park  Improve- 
ment Bonds. 3,896  97 

Interest  Account — Hospital  Bonds  3,385  48 
Interest  Account — School  Bonds 

1866-67 6,581  59 

Interest  Account — School  Bonds 

1870 6,137  12 

Interest  Account — School  Bonds 

1872 1,842  72 


Carried  forward $802,524  52     $5,661,616  62 


DEMANDS    AUDITED. 

Amount  brought  forward.  .  .     $802,524  52     $5,661,616  62 

Interest   Account  -School    Bonds 

1874 17,375  14 

Interest  Account — House  of  Cor- 
rection Bonds 6,170  02 

Interest      Account   —  City     Hall 

Bonds 21,662  45 

Interest     Account  —  Montgomery 

Avenue  Bonds 5,850  15 

Interest  Account — Dupont  Street 

Bonds 1,831  41 

855,413  69 


$6,517,030  31 


WM.  E.  SHABEE,  TEEASUEEE,  IN  CASH  ACCOUNT  WITH  THE 
AUDITOE  FOE  MONEYS  EECEIVED  FOE  THE  STATE  DUEING 
THE  FISCAL  YEAE  1879-80,  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 

DR. 

To  receipts  for  the  State  of  California — 
FROM— 

Taxes $1,300,080  49 

Escheated  Estates 18,114  01 

Kedemption   of    Keal   Estate 

sold  for  Taxes ,  7  08 

Cash   in  Hands   of   City  and 
County  Treasurer,  July  1, 

1879 643  32 

$1,318,844  90 

CR. 
By- 
Amount      Paid      to       State 

Treasurer $1,265,694  24 

Commissions  for  Collecting.  .          16,377  20 
State's  proportion  of  Assess- 
ment Expenses 30,059  43 

Treasurer's  Mileage 168  00 

Balance  Cash  in  hands  of  City 
and     County     Treasurer, 

July  1,  1880 6,546  03 

$1,318,844  90 


46  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

TRANSFER    ENTRIES. 

FROM  GENERAL  FUND — 

To  Police  Contingent  Fund.  .  $7,010  25 

FROM  GENERAL  FUND — 

To  Library  Fund $23,977  50 

FROM  GENERAL  FUND — 

To  Park  Improvement  Fund.  $4,000  00 

FROM  CORPORATION  DEBT  FUND — 

'To   Interest  Account    Bonds 

1858 $29,300  00 

FROM  POUND  FEE  FUND — 

To  General  Fund $556  20 

FROM  SPECIAL  FEE  FUND- 
TO  General  Fund. .  $57,492  29 


DEMANDS    AUDITED. 


47 


Sinking  Fund, 

o 
o 

§0 
0 

§      5 

L.O 

oo" 

Hospital  Bonds. 

TH 

rH 

£ 

§ 

§o 
§ 

i 

Sinking  Fund,  Park 

co" 

co"          CM" 

o" 

CO 

CO                 rH 

CM 

Improvement  Bonds. 

Sinking   Fund  School 

1 

§o 
O 

O 

o 
o 

^ 

T^                       Tfl 

o" 

Bonds,  1872. 

1.O 

IO               t- 

«ft 

& 

o          o 

o 

*__, 

o          o 

c^ 

Sinking  Fund   Scho 

o 
ef 
us 

CD              >-0> 

CM"          t^-' 

IO                CM 

!J 

Bonds,  1870. 

CM 

CM                rH 

T—  1 

g 

§                § 

§ 

Sinking  Fund  School 

CM" 

O              O 

CM"          o 

o" 

Bonds,  1866-67. 

CO 
CM 

€£= 

1          " 

i 

Sinking  Fund 

O 
§ 

T-l 

§•      8 

o 
oo" 

00 

Bonds,  1863-64. 

S 

£ 

CM 

o 

o          o 
o          o 

g 

Sinking  Fund 

•  o" 

g"             g" 

o" 

Bonds,  1867. 

I 

I 

s 

o 

J 

1 

QO 

O5 

1 

b- 

t^ 

00 

• 

Ot> 

r~l 

oo 

I-          ^ 

ft 

QO 

oo           ?-< 

cB 

<u 

K^ 

o" 

r-T               K"1 

"3 

CO 

^               'cS 

0 
02 

o> 

re     s 

-cT 

** 

oT 
PH           r3 

O 

B 

'1 

§              fl 

"co 

a 

R 

c 

r-1 

02                   03 

02 

QO 

G          a 

d 

c3 

S 

o           o 
H!          ^ 

O 

3 

48 


AUDITORS    REPORT. 


CITY   AND   COUNTY  FINANCE  RECAPITULATION  FOR 
FISCAL  YEAR   1879-80. 


Demands  unpaid  July  1,  1879 — 
(Including  $4,275  67  New  City 
Hall  Demands) 

Demands  Audited,  during  the 
fiscal  year  1879-1880— (Includ- 
ing $176,099  61  New  City  Hall 
Fund) 

Demands  paid  during  the  Fiscal 
Year  1879-80— (Including  $176,- 
771  48  New  City  Hall  Fund).  .  . 

Demands   unpaid   July  1,  1880 — 

(Including  $3,603  80,  New  City 

Hall  Demands) 


Cash  on  hand  July  1,  1879— (In- 
cluding $85,527"  32,  New  City 
Hall  Fund) 

Receipts  during  fiscal  year  1879-80 
(Including  $114,072  19,  New 
City  Hall  Fund) 


Demands  paid  during  the  fiscal 
year  1879-80— (Including  $176,- 
771  48,  New  City  Hall  Demands) 

Warrants  paid,  City  Hall  Construc- 
tion Bond  Fund  (old  issue) 

Cash  on  hand  July  1,  1880— (In- 
cluding $22,828  03,  New  City 
Hall  Fund) 


$144,783  99 


5,844,245  98 


$5,989,029  97 


$5,661,342  06 


327,687  91 

!  $5,989,029  97 


$1,731,383  59 


4,785,646  72 


$5,661,342  06 

274  56 

855,413  69 


$6,517,030  31 


$6,517,030  31 


DEMANDS    AUDITED. 


49 


STATEMENT  OF  LICENSES  ISSUED  DUEING  THE 
FISCAL  YEAH  1879-30— STATE,  CITY  AND  COUNTY 
LICENSES. 


NO. 

CLASS   ISSUED. 

TIME. 

AMOUNT. 

7,217 
1,477 

14,018 
194 
461 
150 
221 
98 
158 
35 
19 
98 

Eetail  Liquor  Dealers 
Grocery     and    Eetail 
Liquor  Dealers  .... 
Merchandise  
Bankers 

Quarterly  

$144,340  00 

29,540  00 
79,533  00 
34,650  00 
11,430  00 
4,500  00 
2,050  00 
1,695  00 
474  00 
525  00 
170  00 
2,856  00 

Quarterly. 

Quarterly 

Quarterly 

Brokers 

Quarterly. 

Pawnbrokers 

Quarterly 

Billiard  Tables 

Quarterly. 

Auctioneers  .  .  .  
Livery  Stables 

Quarterly  
Quarterly 

Intelligence  Offices  .  . 
Bowling  Alleys  
Theaters 

Quarterly. 

Quarterly. 

1  dy.  1  mo.  3  mos.  1  yr. 

24,146 

$311,763  00 

Fee  of  $1  00  on  each  License  issued,  paid  to  credit 

of  Special  Fee  Fund 24,146  00 

$335,909  00 


MUNICIPAL  GENERAL  FUND. 


NUMBER. 

LICENSES  ISSUED. 

AMOUNT. 

8,972 

Municipal  Licenses,  Dog  Ta^s,  etc  

$50  57°  50 

266,258 

Stock*  Certificate  Tax  Transfers  . 

26  695  80 

275,230 

•$77,198  30 

50 


AUDITORS   REPORT. 


MUNICIPAL  STREET  DEPARTMENT  FUND. 


4,807 


LICENSES   ISSUED. 


Street  and  Vehicle  Licenses. 


$16,030  00 


RECAPITULATION. 


24,146 


State,  City  and  County  Licenses  (General  Fund) 

Fee  of  $1  on  each  License  issued  (Special  Fee  Fund) 

Municipal  Licenses  issued  (General  Fund) 

Stock  Certificate  Tax  Transfers  (General  Fund) 

Street  Department  (Municipal)  Licenses  (Street  Dept.  Fund) 

Total  Amount  paid  City  and  County  Treasurer 


8311,763  00 
24,146  00 
50,572  50 
26,625  80 
16,030  00 


$429,137  30 


STATEMENT    OF    POLL    TAXES   FOR   THE  FISCAL  YEAR  1879-80. 
CREDIT  OF  THE  SCHOOL  FUND. 


Sold  by  Alexander  Badlam,  Assessor— 
3  960  Receipts,  at  $3  00  each 

$11  880  00 

Less  15  per  cent,  commission  .... 

1  782  00 

$10,098  00 

32,107  Receipts  at  $9  00  each. 

Less  15  per  cent  commission. 

54,581  90 

£64,679  90 

Sold  by  William  Mitchell,  William  Ford  and 
Charles  Tillson,  Tax  Collectors— 

23  Receipts,  at  $4  00  each  

*92  00 

Less  25  per  cent,  commission 

93  00 

$<39  00 

STATEMENT    OF    TAXES. 


51 


STATEMENT  OF  TAXES  FOE  THE  FISCAL  YEAR  1879-80: 

WILLIAM  FORD  AND  CHARLES  TILLSON,  TAX  COLLECTORS,  IN  ACCOUNT  WITH 
THE  AUDITOR  FOR  TAXES  FOR 'THE  FISCAL  YEAR  1879-80. 


ASSESSED  VALUE 

OF 

PROPERTY. 

TOTAL   TAX,   $1  99^ 
ox 
EACH  §100  VALUATION 

Dr. 

To  Real  Estate  Roll  1879-80  (State,  City  and  County). 

$166,429,845  00 

§3,320,275  41 

48  06 

Cr. 

By  Amount  collected  and  paid  into  the  Treasury  
By  Property  sold  to  State  

$3,318,483  54 
1  378  49 

§3,320,323  47 

By  Erroneous  Assessments.  ...                 

126  68 

By  Delinquent  Taxes 

334  76 

§3,320,323  47 


ASSES&ED  VALUE 

OF 

PROPERTY. 


TOTAL  TAX,  §1  37 

ON 

EACH  $100  VALUATION 


Dr. 

To  City  and  County  Personal  Property  Roll 

Cr. 

By  Amount  collecte    and  paid  into  the  Treasury. .. 

By  Erroneous  Assessments 

By  Delinquent  Taxes 


§51,057,229  CO 


§467,983  33 

12,434  46 

219,066  26 


$699,434  05 


$699,484  05 


52 


AUDITOR  S   REPORT. 


ASSESSED  VALUE 

OF 

PROPERTY. 

TOTAL  TAX,  $0  62% 
ox 
EACH  $100  VALUATION 

Dr. 

851,057,229  00 

8319,107  68 

Cr, 
By  Amount  collected  and  paid  into  the  Treasury  .  .  . 

$210,187  41 
5,672  66 

By  Delinquent  Taxes  ,  .'  

103,247  61 

8319,107  68 

ASSESSED  VALUE 

OF 
PROPERTY. 


TOTAL  TAX,  $1  39 

ON 
EACH  $100  VALUATION 


Dr. 

To  Montgomery  Avenue  Real  Estate  Roll 

To  Duplicate  and  Overpayments 


Cr 

By  Amount  collected  and  paid  into  the  Treasury 
By  Delinquent  Taxes 


86,816,322  34 


§60,158  74 
34,594  93 


$94,746  88 
6  79 


894,753  67 


$94,753  67 


SUMMARY    OF    TAXES. 


53 


ASSESSED  VALUE 

OP 

PROPERTY. 

TOTAL  TAX,  $13  53 

ON 

EACH  $100  VALUATION 

Dr. 

To  Dupont  Street  Real  Estate  Roll  

8796,947  00 

§107,826  93 

Cr. 

By  Amount  collected  and  paid  into  the  Treasury.  .  . 

$14,75    82 
93,071  11 

8107,826  93 

SUMMARY  OF  TAXES  COLLECTED  AND  PAID  INTO  THE  TREASURY  DURING 
THE  FISCAL  YEAR  1879-SO. 


Roal  Estate  and  Personal  Taxes  of  1879-80 

$3  996  654  28 

Penalties  on  Same                             

19,219  45 

Real  Estate  and  Personal  Taxes  of  former  years  
Penalties  on  Same 

142,334  48 
28  096  31 

$4,186,304  52 

Montgomery  Avenue  Taxes  of  this  and  former  years. 
Dupont  Street  Taxes  O«M  1879-80  

60,322  96 
14,755  82 

Total  Taxes  collected  and  paid  into  the  Treasury  .... 

§4,261,383  30 

TAXES  HELD  UNDER  PROTEST  JUNE  30,  1880,  BY  ALEXANDER  AUSTIN,  EX- 
TAX  COLLECTOR. 


Taxes  for  Fiscal  Year  1868-69 

$3,362  63 

Taxes  for  Fiscal  Year  1869-70 

3  572  80 

Taxes  for  Fiscal  Year  1870-71  

44,365  30 

Taxes  for  Fiscal  Year  1  871-72  

14,503  94 

Taxes  for  Fiscal  Year  1872-7S  

39,440  56 

Taxes  for  Fiscal  Year  1873-74 

109  670  96 

Taxes  for  Fiscal  Year  1874-75  

71,320  34 

8286,236  53 

54  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 


APPORTIONMENT  OF  TAXES    COLLECTED  DURING  THE  FISCAL 

YEAR  1879-80. 

To- 
State  of  California $1,300,080  49 

General    Fund 1,311,120  31 

Street  Department  Fund 253,386  14 

Street  Light  Fund 244,839  40 

School  Department  Fund 419,690  87 

New  City  Hall  Fund 114,072  19 

Park  Improvement  Fund 51,235  96 

Library  Fund 45,462  93 

Corporation  Debt  Fund 25,614  02 

Sinking  Fund  School  Bonds  1866-67 14,649  66 

Sinking  Fund  School  Bonds  1870, 13,417  01 

Sinking  Fund  School  Bonds  1872 8,336  09 

Sinking  Fund  City  Hall  Construction  Bonds.  31,915  44 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  1858 38,828  10 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  1863-64 43,503  77 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  1867 16,045  19 

Sinking  Fund  Dupont  Street  Bonds 6,776  39 

Sinking  Fund  Hospital  Bonds 10,773  80 

Sinking  Fund  Pacific  K.  E.  Bonds 30,899  32 

Sinking  Fund  Park  Improvement  Bonds.  .  .  11,180  38 

Interest  Tax  Account  Pacific  E.  E.  Bonds.  .  .  32,336  44 

Interest  Account  Bonds  1863-64 28,864  25 

Interest  Account  Bonds  of  1867 16,252  48 

Interest  Account  School  Bonds  1866-67 13,009  76 

Interest  Account  School  Bonds  1870 18,905  03 

Interest  Account  School  Bonds  1872 6,707  13 

Interest  Account  Hospital  Bonds 11,993  57 

Interest  Account  House  of  Correction  Bonds.  9,960  57 

Interest  Account  Park  Improvement  Bonds.  26,832  30 

Interest  Account  Montgomery  Avenue  Bonds.  60,322  83 

Interest  Account  Dupont  Street  Bonds 7,979  43 

Interest    Account    City    Hall   Construction 

Bonds 36,39205 


Total   Taxes   Collected   During  the    Fiscal 

Year  1879-80 $4,261,383  30 


Eeceived  by  Treasurer  from  Eents  of  Lincoln 
School  Lots,  to  Credit  of  Interest  Ac- 
count. School  Bonds  of  1874 $16,255  00 


BONDED    DEBT. 


55 


§  S    8 

rH      rH         •*      CO  (^  CO  1^ 
COO         Ol>-^OOrH 


§  8    8  BBSS  88 


m    m      o 
i-T  in"     o-f 


o 

,0 


888888888888888888 

S  T*I  ^  CO  i-l  rH  W  <N  rH  r4         rH         I-(  N  l-l  1-H  S 


i  ;  ill 


1  :l1 


2    «3S' 

"g   :   :  ja.fi,  •   •  a.  •««  &,. 
5  ;   ;  s  s'^'3  S   :^  ~' 


•  coo  o  coco  cor-coo 


•»  ti      -rH  ""•      ^  fc<  *"!    -^  ^  X!  J3 


88888  |8 

| 

lllll 

1 

o 

|oi$£S 

o" 

i 

Q 
1 

8 

S5 

lllll 

0 

g 

OS 
p 

•J 

i 

PH 

OS 

o 

W. 

w 

M 

I 

H 

1 

p 

o' 

ft 

ft 

1 

ft 

I 

[ 

ft 

^03  73   G 

O 

0  0  S  a 

' 

M 

1P1 

Iiil 

Sill 

oo  ^-S'sS  ft 

ssalS 

? 

H 

A 

gg|g» 

AUDITORS   REPORT. 


BOND    ACCOUNT. 


Pate. 

Bonds. 

Bonds 
Outstanding 
June  30,  1879. 

Bonds 
Issued  Fiscal 
Year  1879-80. 

Bonds 
Redeemed 
Fiscal  Year 
1879-80. 

Bonds 
Outstanding 
June  30,  1880. 

1858 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1865 
1866-7 
1867 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1872 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1875 
1875-6 

1858 

§534,000  00 
424,500  00 
11,000  00 
368,000  00 
215,000  00 
197,000  00 
246,000  00 
285,000  00 
170,000  00 
150,000  00 
100,000  00 
75,000  00 
40,000  00 
125,000  00 
200,000  00 
150,000  00 
125,000  00 
746,000  00 
• 

$127,500  00 

$406,500  00 
424,500  00 
11,000  00 
321,000  00 
188,000  00 
197,000  00 
246,000  00 
285,000  00 
170,000  00 
150,000  00 
100,000  00 
75,000  00 
40,000  00 
125,000  00 
200,000  00 
150,000  00 
125,000  00 
649,000  00 

Central  Pacific  R.  R.. 
Western  Pacific  R.  R. 
School  

47,000  00 
27,000-00 

Hospital  .  . 

Park  Improvement  .  . 
School  
Park  Improvement  .  . 
Hospital  
Park  Improvement  .  . 

House  of  Correction. 
Park  Improvement  .  . 
City  Hall  Construction 

97,000  00 

$4,161,500  00 

$298,500  00 

$3,863,000  00 

MONTGOMERY   AVENUE   BONDS. 


Bonds 
Outstanding 
June  30,  1880. 

1875-76 

Montgomery  Avenue  Bonds,  paid  out  of  Special  Tax  on  District 
benefited 

$1  579  000  00 

DUPONT    STREET    BONDS. 


DATE. 

Bonds 
Outstanding 
June  30,79. 

Bonds 
Redeemed 
Fiscal    Year 
1879-80. 

Bonds 
Outstanding 
June  30,  '80. 

1877 

Dupont  Street  Bonds,  paid  out  of 
Special  Tax  on  District  bene- 

fited   

$940,000  00 

$12,000  00 

$928,000  00 

EXPENDITURE    AND    REVENUE. 


57 


COUPON    ACCOUNT. 

RECAPITULATION  OF  COUPON  ACCOUNTS  FOR  THE  FISCAL  YEAR  ENDING 
JUNE  30,  1880. 


Year. 

Bonds. 

Coupons  du(- 
and  unpaid 
June  30, 
1879. 

Coupons  due 
Fiscal  Year 
1879-80. 

TOTAL. 

Coupons 
paid   and 
Cancelled 
Fiscal  Year 
1879-80. 

Coupons  due 
and  unpaid 
June  30,  '80. 

1858 
1862-3 
1863-4 
1864-5 
1866-7 
1867 
1870 
1872 
1871-2 
1872-3 
1874 
1874 
1875-6 

1873-4 

1876-7 

1858  

$2,520  00 
17  50 
1,662  50 
840  00 
35  00 
595  00 
5,670  00 
875  00 
390  00 
3,990  00 

$32,520  00 

$35,040  00 
17  50 
32,147  50 
41,650  00 
13,825  00 
17,815  00 
25,620  00 
7,875  00 
12,990  00 
32,490  00 
12,000  00 
10,500  00 
44,775  00 

$286,745  00 
96,930  00 
72,030  00 

$32,280  00 

"'30,852  '56 
40,565  00 
13,475  00 
17,710  00 
19,005  00 
6,300  00 
12,570  00 
32,280  00 
12,000  00 
10,465  00 
44,625  00 

$2,760  00 
17  50 
1,295  00 
1,085  00 
350  00 
105  00 
6,615  00 
1,575  00 
420  00 
210  00 

'"35"  66 

150  00 

S.  F.  &S.  J.  R.  R... 

Judgment 

30,485  00 
40,810  00 
13,790  00 
17,220  00 
19,950  00 
7,000  00 
12,600  00 
28,500  00 
12,000  00 
10,500  00 
44,760  00 

Pacific  Railroad  
School 

Judgment  
School 

School  
Hospital  
Park  Improvement  .  . 
School  
House  of  Correction  . 
CityHall  Construct'n 

Montgomery  Avenue 
Special  Tax 

15  00 

$16,610  00 
2,190  00 
6,230  00 

$270,135  00 
94,740  00 
65,800  00 

$272,127  50 
91,740  00 
14,595  00 

$14,617  50 
5,190  00 
57,435  OO 

Dupont  Street,  Spe- 
cial Tax  

$25,030  00 

$430,675  00 

1455,705  00 

$378,462  50 

$77,242  50 

ESTIMATED  EXPENDITUKE  AND  REVENUE  FOB  THE 
FISCAL  TEAR  188*0-1881. 

[Filed  with  Board  of  Supervisors  June  14,  1880.] 
GENERAL    FUND. 

SALARY  OF— 

Mayor $3,000  00 

Mayor's  Clerk 3,000  00 

Judges  of  Superior  Court  (12) 24,000  00 

Judge  of  Police  Court ! 4,000  00 

Prosecuting  Attorney  of  Police  Court 3,000  00 

Clerk  to    Prosecuting    Attorney  of    Police 

Court 1,500  00 

Clerk  of  Police  Court.  .  2,400  00 


Carried  forward $40,900  00 


58  AUDITOR'S  REPORT 

Amount  brought  forward $40,900  00 

Chief  of  Police 4,000  00 

President  Board  of  Police  Commissioners. .  .  3,000  00 

Police  Commissioners  (2) 2,400  00 

District  Attorney 5,000  00 

District  Attorney— First  Assistant 3,600  00 

District  Attorney — Second  Assistant 3,000  00 

District  Attorney  Clerks  (2) 3,300  00 

City  and  County  Attorney 5,000  00 

City  and  County  Attorney's  Clerks  (2) 2,700  00 

City  and  County  Attorney  Prosecuting  Suits 

in  Street  Matters 1,800  00 

City  and  County  Attorney  Notice  Server  in 

Suits  in  Street.  Matters 1,200  00 

Superintendent  of  Public  Schools 4,000  00 

Superintendent  of  Public  Schools  Deputy . .  3,000  00 

Assessor 4,000  00 

Assessor's  Deputies 78,000  00 

Superintendent  of  Streets 4,000  00 

Superintendent  of  Streets'  Deputies 28,500  00 

Treasurer 4,000  00 

Treasurer's  Deputies  (2)  and  Clerk 6,300  00 

Sheriff 8,000  00 

Sheriff's  Counsel  Fees   1,800  00 

Sheriff's  Deputies,'  Bookkeepers   and   Jail- 
keepers  71,100  00 

Tax  Collector - 4,000  00 

Tax  Collector's  Deputies  and  Clerks 37,200  00 

County  Clerk 4,000  00 

County  Clerk's  Deputies  and  Copying  Clerks  127,300  00 

Auditor 4,000  00 

Auditor's  Deputy 3,000  00 

Auditor's  Clerks 3,300  00 

Recorder 4,000  00 

Recorder's  Deputies  and  Folio  Clerks 30,000  00 

License  Collector.  .  3,000  00 


Carried  forward $508,400  00 


EXPENDITURE    AND    REVENUE.  59 

Amount  brought  forward $508,400  00 

License  Collector's  Deputy 1,800  00 

License  Collector's  Assistants  (12) 18,000  00 

Supervisors  (12) 14,400  00 

Clerks  of  Board  of  Supervisors 7,200  00 

Sergeant-at-Arms,  Board  of  Supervisors.  .  .  .  1,200  00 

Coroner 4,000  00 

Coroner's  Deputies  (2) 3,300  00 

Coroner's  Messenger 900  00 

Surveyor 500  00 

Health  Officer 3,000  00 

Quarantine  Officer .  .  1,800  00 

Secretary  Board  of  Health 2,100  00 

Assistant  Secretary  Board  of  Health 1,200  00 

Messenger  to  Board  of  Health 900  00 

Market  Inspector 1,200  00 

Health  Inspectors  (6) 7,200  00 

Court  Koom  Interpreters  (4) 6,000  00 

Law  Librarian 2,400  00 

Presiding  Justice,  Justices'  Court 3,000  00 

Associate  Justices,  Justices'  Court  (4) 9,600  00 

Olerks  Justices'  Court  (3) 4,800  00 

Messenger  and  Janitor,  Justices  Court 900  00 

Matron,  County  Jail 900  00 

Porters,  City  Halls,  Court  Booms,  etc.  (16). .  14,580  00 

Gardeners,  Public  Squares  (5) 4,500  00 

Watchman,  Old  City  flail 1,080  00 

Superintendent  City  Cemetery 1,200  00 

Pound  Keeper 900  00 

JExtra  Deputies 3,000  00 

Police  Force  Salaries 513,100  00 

•  Fire  Department  Salaries  (Officers,  13  Steam- 
ers, 5  Hook  and  Ladder  and  9  Hose  Com- 
panies)    213,960  00 

Fire  Department  Bunning  Expenses,  Cisterns, 

Hydrants,  etc 60,000  00 


Carried  forward $1,417,020  00 


60  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

Amount  brought  forward $1,417,020  00 

Fire  Department  Material 27,000  00 

Office  Bent,  Stationery,  etc.,  for  Fire  Commis- 
sioners    ]  ,500  00 

Messenger  to  Board  of  Fire  Commissioners .  .  900  00 

Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph  Salaries.  .  .  8,100  00 
Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph  Extension 

and  Eepairs 10,000  00 

Fuel  for  Public  Buildings 5,000  00 

Eepairs  of  and  Furniture  for  Public  Buildings  15,000  00 
Hospital  and  Alms  House  Expenses,  and  "Vis- 
iting Physicians  and  Surgeons 144,000  00 

Industrial  School  Expenses 50,000  00 

Smallpox  Hospital  Expenses 5,000  00 

House  of  Correction  Expenses 55,000  00 

Burials  of  Indigent  Dead 6,000  00 

Salary  of  City  Physician 1,800  00 

Salary  of  Assistant  City  Physician 1,200  00 

Keeping  Horses  for  Prison  Purposes 600  00 

Examining  Insane  Persons 4,500  00 

Registration  and  Election  Expenses 60,000  00 

Enclosing   and    Improving   Public   Grounds 

(annual) 1,000  00 

Eent  of  Eooms  for  Department  No.  11,  Supe- 
rior Court 2,100  00 

Eent  of  Eooms  for  Department  No.  12,  Supe- 
rior Court 1,800  00 

Eent  of   Chambers   for  Judges   of   Superior 

Court 3,600  00 

Salary  of  Engineer,  Fireman   and  Elevator 

Conductor 3,300  00 

Improving  Golden  Gate  Park  (limited) 4,000  00 

Eent  of  Eooms  for  Law  Library  and  Porter's 

Services 3,000  00 

Health  Department  Expenses 7,500  00 

Special  Counsel  Fees 5,000  00 

Carried  forward $1,843,920  00 


EXPENDITURE    AND    REVENUE.  61 

Amount  brought  forward $1,843,920  00 

Lighting  Public  Buildings 17,500  00 

Court  Reporters'  Expenses 7,500  00 

Advertising  for  City  and  County  Officers 15,000  00 

Subsistence  of  Prisoners 18,000  00 

Printing,  Binding,  etc.,  Municipal  Reports.  .  7,000  00 

Witness  Expenses 1,200  00 

Assessment  and  Military  Eoll 10,000  00 

Auctioneers'  Services,  Tax  Sales 200  00 

Recorder's  Newspapers    75  00 

Contingent  Expenses  Mayor's  Office .  .  1,800  00 

Rents,  Harbor  Police  and  Police  Stations.  .  .  3,000  00 

Fourth  of  July  Expenses 3,000  00 ' 

Repairs  on  County  Roads 6,000  00 

Publishing  Delinquent  Tax  List 4,000  00 

Contingent  Expenses  Police  Department.  .  . .  7,200  00 

Urgent  Necessity 36,000  00 

Stationery,    Printing,  Blanks,  etc.,  for  City 

and  County  Officers 30,000  00 

Jury  Expenses  in  Criminal  Cases 1,000  00 

Improving  New  City  Cemetery 1,000  00 

Enclosing  City  and  County  Property  (limited)  1,500  00 

Salary  of  Gas  Inspector 1,200  00 

Incidental  Expenses  of  Gas  Inspector 500  00 

Grading  Plazas  and  Squares 5,000  00 

Constructing  Army  Street  Sewer 50,000  00 

Henry  F.  Williams,    one-fourth   of   $36,875, 

$9,219;   Interest,  $2,213 11,432  00 

Hospital  and  Alms  House  Improvements.  .  . .  5,000  00 

Constructing  Intercepting  Sewers 70,500  00 

Enlarging  County  Jail  and  City  Prison 7,500  00 

Finance  Committee  Expenses 5,000  00 

"Water  for  Municipal  Purposes 324,000  00 


Total . . .   $2,495,027  00 


62  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

ESTIMATED  GENERAL  FUND  REVENUE. 
FROM — 

Taxes $1,875,307  00 

City  and  County  Licenses 290,000  00 

Municipal  Licenses 50,000  00 

Fees   from   City    and    County 

Officers.... 205,000  00 

Fines  imposed 30,000  00 

State's  Proportion  of  Assess- 
ment Expenses 35,000  00 

Quarantine  Fees 4,500  00 

Unclaimed  Police  Property.  .  .  500  00 

Alms  House,  House  of  Correc- 
tion and  Industrial  School 
Produce 1,000  00 

Accrued  Interest  on  12  Mont- 
gomery Avenue  Bonds.  . .  720  00 

Maintenance  of  United  States 

Prisoners 2,000  00 

Transportation  of  Insane  and 

Prisoners 1,000  00 

$2,495,027  00 


STREET   LIGHT   FUND. 

Lighting  Streets  and  Repairs 

of  Lamps  and  Posts.  .....  $260,000  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $260,000,00 


STREET   DEPARTMENT   FUND. 

Repairing  and  cleaning  Streets 

and  Sewers $240,000  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $224,000  00 

Licenses  on  Vehicles 16,000  00 

$240,000  00 


EXPENDITURE  AND  REVENUE.  63 

SCHOOL    DEPARTMENT    FUND. 

Estimated  Expenditure  made 

by  Board  of  Education.  . .  $750,000  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $400,000  00 

State  Apportionment 350,000  00 

$750,000  00 


LIBRARY    FUND. 

Maintaining       Free      Public 

Library $24,000  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $24,000  00 


NEW    CITY    HALL    FUND. 

Labor  and  Material  Construct- 
ing New  City  Hall $352,500  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $352,500  00 


PARK    IMPROVEMENT    FUND. 

Improving  Golden  Gate  Park.  $58,750  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $58,750  00 


INTEREST  ACCOUNT CORPORATION  DEBT 

FUND. 

Coupons   of  Bonds   of   1858, 
•   Required   for  the   Fiscal 
Year  1880-81,  on  $334,000 
@  6  per  cent $20,040  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $20,040  00 


64  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

INTEREST   ACCOUNT BONDS    OF    1S65M34. 

Coupons  of  Bonds  of  1863-64, 

Required   for   the  Fiscal 

Year  1880-81  on  $435,500 

@  7  per  cent $30,485  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $30,485  00 


INTEREST       ACCOUNT PACIFIC      R.      R. 

BONDS. 

Coupons  of  Pacific  R.R.  Bonds 

Required   for   the    Fiscal 

Year  1880-81  on  $509,000 

@  1  per  cent $35,630  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $35,630  00 


INTEREST   ACCOUNT — JUDGMENT     BONDS 

1867. 

Coupons  of  Judgment  Bonds 
of  1867,  Required  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  1880-81  on 
$246,000  @  7  per  cent.  .  .  $17,220  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $17,220  00 


INTEREST   ACCOUNT CITY     HALL      CON- 
STRUCTION   BONDS, 

Coupons  of  City  Hall  Bonds 

Required  for   the   Fiscal 

Year  1880-81  on  $644,000 

@  6  per  cent $38,640  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $38,640  00 


EXPENDITURE  AND  REVENUE.  65 

INTEREST       ACCOUNT PARK       IMPROVE- 
MENT BONDS. 

Coupons  of  Park  Improvement 
Bonds  Required  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  1880-81  on 
$475,000  @  6  per  cent.  .  .  $28,500  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $28,500  00 

INTEREST    ACCOUNT — HOSPITAL    BONDS. 

Coupons  of  Hospital  Bonds, 
Required  for  the  Fiscal 
Year  1880-81,  on  $210,000 
@  6  per  cent $12,600  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes. .  $12,600  00 


INTEREST   ACCOUNT SCHOOL   BONDS    OF   1866-67. 

Coupons  of  School  Bonds  of 
1866-67,  Required  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  1880-81  on 
$197,000  @  1  per  cent.  . .  $13,790  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes.  . , $13,790  00 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT SCHOOL  BONDS  1870. 

Coupons  of  School  Bonds  of 
1870,  Required  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  1880-81  on 
$285,000  at  7  per  cent $19,950  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $19,950  00 


66  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT SCHOOL  BONDS  1872. 

Coupons  of  School  Bonds  of 
1872,  Required  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  1880-81  on 
$100,000  at  7  per  cent $7,000  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $7,000  00 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT SCHOOL  BONDS  1874. 

Coupons  of  School  Bonds  of 
1874,  Required  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  1880-81  on 
$200,000  at  6  per  cent $12,000  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Rent  of  Lincoln  School 

Lots $12,000  00 

INTEREST  ACCOUNT HOUSE  OF  CORREC- 
TION BONDS. 

Coupons  of  House  of  Correc- 
tion Bonds,  required  for 
the  Fiscal  Year  1880-81  on 
$150,000  @  7  per  cent.  .  .  $10,500  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes.  .  $10,500  00 


EXPENDITURE    AND    REVENUE.  67 

SINKING  FUNDS. 

SINKING  FUND  BONDS  OF  1858. 

Bonds   due   January  1,    1888 

(8  Sinking  Funds  required) 
Bonds   outstanding,  $410,000 

(less  $76,000  called  iu  but 

not  surrendered) $334,000  00 

Less  Cash  on  hand  $79,000  00 

(less  $76,000  called  in  but 

not  surrendered). .  .  .  3,000  00 


One-eighth  at  par $331,000  00         $41,375  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $41,375  00 


SINKING  FUND BONDS  OF  1853-64. 

Bonds  due  1883-84(4  Sinking 

Funds  required). 

Bonds  outstanding $435,500  00 

Less  Loans  out  and  Cash  on 

hand 252,400  00 


One-quarter  at  par $183,100  00          $45,775  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $45,775  00 


SINKING  FUND CITY  HALL  BONDS. 

Bonds  due  1899  (18  Sinking 
Funds  required). 

Bonds  outstanding  $650,000 
(less  $6,000  called  in  but  not 
surrendered) $644,000  00 

Less  Cash  on  hand,  $40,000 
(less  $6,000  Bonds  not  sur- 
rendered)   34,000  00 

One-eighteenth  at  par.  .  .      $610,000  00          $34,000  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes $34,000  00 


68  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

SINKING   FUND BONDS    OF   1867. 

Bonds  due  October  I,  1887 
(8  Sinking  Funds  required) 
Bonds  Outstanding $246,000  00 

Less  Loans  out  and  Cash  on 

hand 110,100  00 

One-eighth  at  par $135,900  00         $17,000  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes  .  $17,000  00 


SINKING   FUND SCHOOL    BONDS    OF    1866-67. 

Bonds   due   April   1,    1881  (1 

Sinking  Fund   required), 

Bonds  Outstanding $197,000  00 

Less  Loans  out,  and  Cash  on 

hand..  182,50000 


SINKING  FUND — SCHOOL   BONDS  OF  1870. 

Bonds  due  June   1,  1890   (10 

Sinking  Funds  required) 

Bonds  Outstanding $285,000  00 

Less  Loans  out,  and  Cash  on 

hand..  142,800  00 


At  par $14,500  00         $14,500  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes. .  $14,500  00 


One-tenth  at  par $142,200  00         $14,200  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes..  $14,200  00 


EXPENDITURE  AND  REVENUE.  69 


SINKING  FUND SCHOOL  BONDS  OF  1872. 

Bonds   due   June  1,  1882    (2 

Sinking   Funds  required) 

Bonds  Outstanding $100,000  00 

Less  Loans  out  and  Cash  on 

hand..,  82,400  00 


One-half  at  par $17,600  00  $8,800  00 

ESTIMATED  EEVENUE — 

From  Taxes .\  .  ,  $8,800  00 


SINKING   FUND HOSPITAL    BONDS. 


Bonds  due  November   1,  1891 

(11  Sinking  Funds  required) 

Bonds  Outstanding $210,000  00 

Less  Cash  on  hand. .  83,500  00 


SINKING     FUND PACIFIC    E.     R.    BONDS. 


Bonds      Due     1894-95       (14 

Sinking  Funds  required) 

Bonds  Outstanding $509,000  00 

Less  Cash  on  hand. .  48,700  00 


One-eleventh  at  par. . . .      $126,500  00         $11,500  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From  Taxes..  $11,500  00 


One-fourteenth  at  par..      $460,300  00         $32,800  00 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE — 

From   Taxes...  $32,80000 


70  AUDITOR'S  REPORT. 

SINKING     FUND PARK     IMPROVEMENT 

BONDS     1872-73. 

Bonds  due  July  1,  1897  (17 
Sinking  Funds  required) 
Bonds  Outstanding $225,000  00 

Less  Loans  out,  and  Cash  on 

hand 23,000  00 


One-seventeenth  at  par.    $202,000  00         $11,900  00 
ESTIMATED  EEVENUE — 

From  Taxes..  $11,900  00 


SINKING    FUND HOUSE  OF    CORRECTION 

BONDS. 

Bonds  due  July  1,  1894  (14 
Sinking  Funds  required), 
Bonds  Outstanding $150,000  00 

Less  Loans  out,  and  Cash  on 
hand. . 


One-fourteenth  at  par $150,00000         $10,70000 

ESTIMATED  REVENUE— 

From  Taxes   .  .  $10,700  00 


ASSESSED    VALUATION. 


71 


<B  O<MlOt-l>-aiGO"rHCO(Mr-IC^as^i— I  CO  CO  t-  CO 

s  ^ 

««= 

,_         ^      0  H|*I  -M^M          ..  H«i 

-^      "c3      €©=  GO  t~  i— I  OS  i— I  i-H 

1 

£  5  i      -    H--*.-  -  *#< 

I  j  E, 
«  m  |     « 

HN 

^ 

<Mr-lrHrHrHrHT— ICN(NrHC<JrHTHTHTHT— li— IrHrHr-l         - 

۩= 

OOrHO"*O^COCNt^OOOOOOOOOOO 

OOOt^t~CO"*t-OOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

r_|  O  UT  li       ^    IX  -  -T 

I     1 

CO 

^«rHCC^COQOOfc;OOO_;0 ^ 

c3 
O  .  & ..__ ___.._^_ 

r4          fH  ^  " 

.go® 

•*^      co      p 

^         O  L3  i-O  ^-O  00  tr^  ^*^  T""i  L"*  w«>  v*^  w«>  ^^     ^o  i_^^  T™n  vj  *^^  r™i  ^«^  "-i-*'        ^  ^' 

p*H  r— I   *^-T   ****•   ^^   *^^   ^^J   *^^   -^JJ   -JJ   ^^^   '^•T   -^™ ^   i"H   ^~\   ,-^\   t —   c.^   \/*\   \/*\   r^»         ^ 

_l 

S    -2  O  00  10  ^D  O  O.QO  CNI  O  O  O  O  O  O  O  O  O  O  O  O 

C^  T— I  -rf)  O 
|  _          ._  , ........... 

rHCNrHiHrHrHrH^H 


Fiscal  Year. 


O 

QO 


OOGOGOOOOOGOOCOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOGOGOQO 
THi—  li—  iTHrHrHiHi—  IrHrHTHr-lTHTHTHr-lTH 


72 


AUDITORS   REPORT. 


FOB  THE 


BEQU 


S 

1. 


ON  OF  ESTIMATES  OF 
FISCAL  YEAB 


I 


M 
$4 
-^ 

O 

H 
S 


ted  Am 
fr 


rom 
0-81 


required 
Taxes,  18 


00  <M  CM  M< 


§§ 

§§ 
o  o 

ss 


00000000 
oooooooo 


CilO 


CO  rH  r-H  rH  T™(  T—\ 


CO  •*  Tfl  i-l 


8 


02 


AUDITED   DEMANDS. 


00  O5  O  C- 

TjT  -<jT  00~  rH~  Tfl"  o"  5<T  rjT  OO~ 
rH  rH          i-t  CO  rH  UO  (N  K3 


T*^OOrHHHO<M^OO 
rHrH         rHCOrHLOOqiO 
CO 


SD 


zss 

00  00    o. 


O    O 
O    O 

<d  ^ 


S 

bp 


^2 


O 

3W 


rH 


O  10 

IO     T-H 

IO  CO 


1T3  O 
t~  CO 


(M  rH  ^  00  O5  O 


: 

I 

:  « 

.' 

J 

•  a 

.  o 

•    03 

:  a 

•  a 

j 

CQ 
<D 

02    03 
CU     > 

i'  ? 

£s 

*^» 

•^  x 

a  S 

aga 

HH 

a  a 


^w 

§o 
2  o 


74 


AUDITOR  S   REPORT. 


INDEX     TO     STATUTES 

HEGARDING    EXPENDITURES,    REVENUE,    ETC.,    OBSERVED    IN 
BUSINESS  IN  THE  AUDITOR'S  OFFICE. 


Advertising 1877-8 

(  1863 

Almshouse  and  Hospital  Building 4  1863-4 

(  1865-6 

Almshouse  and  Hospital  Supplies 1877-8 

Almshouse  Salaries.     Political  Code,  Sec.  3,010 1873-4 

Almshouse  Fund— Moneys  for  Produce  Sold 

Annual  Appropriation — Unexpended  Moneys 1875-6 

Annual  Tax  Settlement.    Codes,  Sec.  97  to  3,797 

Army  Street  Opening 1877-8 

Assessor's  Salary 1861 

Assessor's  Deputies'  Salaries j  1877-8 

Assessor's  Deputies'  Salaries.     Political  Code,  Sec.  3,895 .  . .  (  1869-70 

Assessment  Roll— Copying  same.     Codes,  Sec.  3,727  and  3,893 

Assessment  Expenses — from  State 

Assistant  City  and  County  Attorney 1871-2 

Attorney,  City  and  County— Salary 1862 

Attorney,  City  and  County— Clerks'  Salaries 1871-2 

Attorney,  District— Salary 

Attorney,  District — to  appoint  2d  assistant 

Attorney,  Prosecuting— Salary 1862 

Auditor's  Salary 

Auditor's  Clerk's  Salary |  1869-70 

Auditor's  Deputy— Duties 1875-8 

Auditor's  Office— Extra  Clerks 1871-2 

Avenues — Silver  and  Twentieth 1877-8 

Abating  Nuisance  by  order  of  'Board  of   Health.      Political 
Code,  Section  3,028 

B 

Board  of  Health— Salaries  of  Employees.      Political  Code, 

Sees.  3,009  and  3,010  (of  1877-8  amendments) '.        1873-4,^1377-8 

Bonds-Issue  of  1855 {          Ordinance  846 

Bonds— Issue  of  1858 1858 

Bonds— Issue  of  1862-3,  San  Francisco  and  San  Jose  II.  R 1861 

Bonds-  Issue  of  1863-4-Judgment j     Orderg  \lfand  6SO 

(  1863 

Bonds— Issue  of  1864-5,  Pacific  Railroad 1  1863-4 

(    Orders  582  and  540 

Bonds- Issue  of  1866-7,  School {    orders  Snd  768 

Bonds— Issue  of  1870,  School 1869-70 

Bonds— Issue  1871,  Hospital 1867-8 

Bonds— Issue  of  1872,  School 1871-2 

Bonds— Issue  of  1874,  School 1873-4 

Bonds — House  of  Correction 1871-2 

Bonds— Dupont  Street 1875-6 

Bonds— City  Hall 1873-4 

Books  and  Stationerv  for  City  and  County  Officers 1861 

Burial  of  Indigents 1860 


STATUTES. 


829 

170 
503 
214 

280 

557 

854 

270 
556 
173 
623 

115 
804,  824 


170 
70 
467 
556 
663 
1-22 
852 
786 
915 


183 

198 
265 

386 


302 

80 
458 
852 
848 
878 
434 
831 
559 
273 


INDEX   TO   STATUTES. 


75 


INDEX    TO    STATUTES -CONTINUED. 


STATUTES. 

PAGE. 

c 

168 

1863-4 

162 

75 

Channel  Street  Bridge                                                   

1877—8 

231,  372 

Chief  of  Police-   Salary                                  

1861 

557 

1867  8 

116,  161 

Citjr  and  County  Attorney's  Salary     

1862 

99 

1871  9 

735 

City  Criminal  Court                              

1877  8 

626 

1875  6    1877-8 

626,  829 

City  Hall—  Act  Supplemental  to  Act  of  1874  

1875-6 

1877  8 

863 
82  382,427 

City  Hall  Commissioners                                         

1875  6 

'        461 

Citv  Hall  Porters'  Salaries                                                    .     •] 

1861 
1863  4 

556 
503 

Cit}'  Hall    Provide  for  Completion 

1867-8 
1875  6 

220 
461 

City  Hall  Watchman  

1871  9 

735 

Clerk    County    Salarj' 

1861 

555 

Clerk  of  Auditor  
Clerk  of  City  and  County  Attorney 

1865-6 
1863 

663 

170 

Clerk  of  District  Attorney..                 .         ..         

1863 

170 

Clerk  of  Fire  Commissioners  

1873  4 

942 

Clerk  of  Justices'  Court                                                             1 

1865-6 

428 

Clerk  of  Police  Court    Salarv 

1871-2 

1861 

759 
555 

Clerks  Board  of  Supervisors,  and  1877-8,  pa°-e  556       .            -i 

1863 

169 

Clerks  Paid  out  of  Special  Fee  Fund  
Clerk  to  Prosecuting  Attorney,  Police  Court  

1867-8 

1877-8 
1875  6 

160 
630 
856 

Collector  of  Licenses  and  Deputies'  Salaries                           - 

1867-S 

160 

Comanche  Claim 

1871-2 
1865  6 

736 
809 

Commissions  of  Tax  Collector—  Paym  en  ts  to  State  
Commissions  of  Treasurer  —  Payments  to  State 

1855 
1855 

121 
121 

Compiling  and  Publishing  Laws  and  Ordinances  
Consolidation  Act  .    .        J 

1861 
1856 
1857 
1859 
1861 

478 
145 
209,253,311 
141 
544 

Consolidation  Act—  Annual  Expenditures,  pages  313-2  '} 

Contingent  Expenses  of  Mayor  
Copying  Assessment  Koll—  Political  Code,  Sec.  3,893  1 

Coroner's  Salary,  etc.     1873-4,  908  ;   1875-6,  397  
County  Clerk's  Copyists  

1862 
1863 
1865-6 
1867-8 
1860 
1862 
1863-4 
1871-2 
1867-8 

391 
525 
436,  549 
358 
273 
510 
189 
403,  408 
68 

County  Clerk's  Deputies  •' 

1861 
1863-4 

555 
135 

County  Clerk's  Deputies,  etc  

1867-8 
1880 

68 
90 

County  Clerk's  Deputies  -j 

1869-70 

511 

County  Clerk's  Deputies  

1871-72 

1877  8 

76 
626  944  947 

County  Judge's  Salary..  .    . 

1863 

709 

76 


AUDITOR  S   REPORT. 


INDEX    TO    STATUTES— CONTINUED. 


Deficiency  in  Pound  Fee  Fund 1863-4 

Deficiency  in  Street  Light  Fund 1862 

Delinquent  Tax  List,  Publication  of,  Code,  Sec.  3,764 

Delinquent  Taxes— How  collected 1875-6 

Deputies  to  Superintendent  of  Streets 1877-8 

District  Attorney's  Salary 1863 

District  Attorney's  Clerk's  Salary 1863 

District  Attorney  to  appoint  Assistant 1869-70 

District  Attorney  to  appoint  2d  Assistant 1877-8 

District  Court  Reporters 1867-8 

Drawbridge  Across  Channel  Street 1877-8 

Drawbridge  Across  Islais  Creek 1877-8 

Dupont  Street— Opening 1875-6 

Damages  by  Rioters.  Sec.  4,445  Political  Code 1867-8 

Deputies,  Assistants  and  Copyists  of  County  Clerks 1880 

E 

Election  and  Registration— See  Code,  1,049  to  1,117 

Enclosing  and  Improving  Public  Grounds 1869-70 

Enclosing  City  and  County  Property,  etc 1869-70 

(  1863 

Engine  Houses — Erection  and  Sale  of •<  18P4 

(  1865-6 

Estates  of  Deceased  Persons — Payments  to  State 1855 

Executive  Officers * Hittell 

Extension  and  Repairs  of  Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph  . .  1877-8 

Extra  Deputies— See  Code,  3,895 

Engineers  and  Foreman  in  Public  Buildings 1880 

F 

Free  Dispensary 1877-8 

Filling  in  Mission  Creek  and  Channel  Street 1875-6 

Finance  Committee  Expenses  (C.  Act,  35) 1857 

Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph — Extending  an'd   Repairing  1871-2 

(  1863-4 

Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph  Salaries «  1867-8 

(  1869-70 

Fire  Department  Charitable  Fund - 1857 

Fire  Department— Corporation  Yard  Keeper 1S71-2 

Fire  Department  Employees -I 

Fire  Department  Expenses  and  Material 1877-8 

Fire  Department — Janitor 1873-4 

Fire  Department  Rents 1865-6 

Fire  Department  Salaries,  etc.,  1873-4,  942  (Reorganizing). . .  1871-2-7-8 

Firemen  Disabled 1871-2-7-S 

Fuel  for  Public  Buildings 1871-2 

Free  Public  Libraries 1880 

G 

Gardener  of  Public  Squares « 1869-70 


502 
469 

820,  903 
139 
170 

530 

70 

455 

372 

915,  917 

903, 434-9 

418-419 

20 


240 
240 
171 
502 
141 
221 

Sec.  4385 
556 
736 
114 


597 

74,  76 

190 

735 

504 

160 

240 

91 

736 

685,  855 

685,  942 

556- 

863. 

82 

6S5,  857 

690,  703 

735 

2ai 


240 


INDEX   TO   STATUTES. 


77 


INDEX    TO    STATUTES— CONTINUED 


STATUTES. 

PAGE. 

Gardener    Jefferson  Square  . 

1871  2 

735 

Golden  Gate  Park,  Management  of  and  Appropriations  
Grading  and  Improving  Squares  

1875-6-7-8 
1861 

5,  78,  861 
551 

Gas,  Quality  and  Illuminating'  Power  Regulated 

1877-8 

167 

H 

Health  Department.     Political  Code,  Sees.  3,009  and  3,010  1 
Health  Officer's  Salary.     Political  Code,  Sec.  3,010  

1869-70-7-8  Code 
1873-4 
1873-4 
1863 

717 
574 

Hospital  and  Almshouse  •! 

1865-6 

214 

Hospital  and  Almshouse  Appropriations  
Hospital  Employees'  Salary.      Political  Code,  Sees.  3,009  and 
3,110        

1869-70 

1877-8 

1873  478  Code 

240 

280 

Hospital,  Smallpox  

1863 

169 

House  of  Correction..   . 

1875  6 

63  '7 

House  of  Correction  —  Money  for  Work  Sold  -j 
House  of  Correction  —  To  Provide  Funds 

1877-8 
.  1877-8 
1871  2 

953 

557 

878 

I 
Improving  Plazas  and  Squares 

1877  8 

78 

Industrial  School  Appropriation.                                                -| 

1863-4 

504 

Industrial  School  —  Current  Expenses  . 

1871-2 
1871  2 

545 
545 

Insane—  Examination  of.    Political  Code,  Sec.  2,222 

1871-2 

Interest  Bonds  1855  

1856 

Interest  Bonds  1858. 

1858 

Interest  Bonds  1862  and  1863  —  San  Francisco  and  San  Jose 
Railroad.. 

1861 

Interest  Bonds  1863  and  1864  —  Judgment.'  
Interest  Bonds  1864  and  1865—  Pacific  Railroad 

1862 
1863 

265-6 
383 

Interest  Bonds  1866-7  —  School.. 

1865—6 

Interest  Bonds  1867  

1862 

9ftS 

Interest  Bonds  —  City  Hall 

1873—4 

Interest  Bonds  —  Dupont  Street  

1875-6 

Interest  Bonds  —  Hospital 

1867  8 

Interest  Bonds  —  Montgomery  Avenue 

1871  9 

Interest  Bonds  —  School,  1870  

1869-70 

SO 

Interest  Bonds  —  School,  1872.  .  .  . 

1871  9 

Interest  Bonds—  School,  1874  

1873  4 

04.0 

Interpreters,  Police  Court. 

1863 

Islais  Creek  Improvements  

1877  8 

pi  P; 

Intercepting  Sewers,  Completing  

1880 

61 

J 

Janitor  of  Justices'  Court  

1867  8 

fi70 

Judge,  County  —  Salary  

1863 

Judge,  Police  —  Salary'  [  _    ' 
Judge,  Probate  —  Salary  

1861 
1863 

554 

Jury  Expenses  in  Criminal  Cases.      Penal  Code,  Sees.  923 
924,  1,135  and  1,136  
Justices'  Clerk—  Salary  

1871-2 
1865  6 

Justices'  Salaries  ( 

1865-6 

428 

Jurisdiction  of  Superior  Courts  of  1880  

1869-70 

59 

78 


AUDITOR  S   REPORT. 


INDEX  TO  STATUTES— CONTINUED. 


STATUTES. 

PAGE. 

L 

Law  and  Ordinances  —  Compiling  and  Publishing'  

1861 

478 

Law  Library                                        

1869-70 

238 

Legal  Incumbrances  School  Lots  

1863-4 

163 

Liability  of  Sureties  on  Bonds—  Political  Code,  vol.  1,  220.  . 
License  Collector    Election   etc 

1875-6 

860 

License  Collector—  Salary  

License  Notice  Servers'  Salaries 

1877-8 
1867-8 

556 

160 

Licenses,  Municipal  -' 

1863 

724 

Licenses.     (See  Code  Sec  3  356  to  3,364). 

Order  697,  Chapter  8 

Licenses,  Street  Department  Fund  

1865-6 

438 

Lighting  Public  Buildings                             

1858 

46 

Lighting  Streets,  Repairs  to  Lamps,  etc  -I 
Lobos  Square  -  Improvement  of  
Lots  for  Fire  Department  and  Erection  of  Houses  •< 

1858 
1862 
1865-6 
1877-8 
1863 
1863-4 

46 
468 

437 
70 
161 
502 

M 

Marshal's  Services  (Census)  School  

1865-6 
1863-4 

141 
162 

Matron's  Salary    County  Jail 

1863-4 

474 

Mayor    Power  to  Appoint  

Hittell 

4386 

Mayor's  Clerk's  Salary                 

1877-8 

1093 

1861 

555 

Medical  Services  —  Industrial  School  

1863-4 
1873-4 

505 
863 

Military  Appropriations  on  Account  of  State  
Military  Roll  (Sections  1897   189S  1901,  Political  Code 

1865-6 
1863 

734 
441 

Minors'lneligible  to  Office  

Hittell 

172 

Mission  Street  Improvement 

1875-6 

443' 

Monto-omery  Avenue.     1873-4,  522.     1877-8,  441  

1871-2 

180 

Morgue—  Supervisors  to  Provide  
Municipal  Court    Salaries  and  Rents 

1871-2 
1869  70 

408 
528  530 

Municipal  Court  of  Appeals  ,  

1877-8 
1863 

947 

724 

N 

Order  697,  Chapter  8 
186? 

141 

o 

Oaths  who  may  administer 

Hittell 

Sec  4103  18 

Office  Rent  and  Stationery  for  the  Fire  Commissioners'  
Officers  Leaving  the  State  

1865-6 
Hittell 

139 
536-4190 

Officers  when  hold  over  

Hittell 

879 

P 

Park  Bonds     •] 

1869-70 
1871-2 

802 
706 

1873-4 

334 

INDEX   TO    STATUTES. 


79 


INDEX  TO  STATUTES— CONTINUED. 


STATUTES  . 

PAGE. 

Phonographic  Reporters    (Sections  269,   271,  Civil  Code  o 
Procedure) 

Physician,  Industrial  School  —  Services  

1863-4 

505 

Pioneer  Park    Improvement  of 

1877  8 

78 

Police,  Chief  

1861 

557 

Police  Contingent  Fund  —  Appropriation  

1859-77-8 

57 

Police  Force  —  Increase  and  Regulation  ... 

1871-2-7-8 

512  879 

Police  Force  Salaries  .               .                -1 

1857 
1863 

557 
170 

Police  Court—  Of  Transfer  of  Cases  to 

1863-4-77-S 
1880 

503,  879- 
3. 

Police  Judge  

1861 

Poll  Tax  —  Codes,  Sec.  3,839  to  3,857 

554 

Porters—  City  Hall     .                                       J 

1863-4 
1861 

503- 
554  55Q: 

Porters—  City  Hall  

1867-8 
1880 

220 
114 

Poundkeeper's  Salary  J 

1858 
1863-4 

237 
502 

Prisoners  Provided  For  Under  Penal  Code.     P.    Code,  sec 
1,610  
Probate  Judge    Salary 

Order  697,  Chapter  9 
1863 

702 

Prosecuting  Attornev  —  Salary  

1862 

467 

Public  Parks  and  Squares 

1871  9  7  8 

70  78    706 

Publishing  Delinquent  Tax  Lists.      (See  Codes,  Chap.  3,764) 
Pueblo  Lands    C  Act,  Sec  74  pa<>-e  22 

1866 

521 

Purchase    of     Lots,    Erection    and    Removal    of   Engine  f 
Houses  .                                      "j 

1863 
1864 

177 
502 

Q 

Quarantine    Expenses—  Sees.  3,009-3,010,  Amendts,  1877-8.  . 

R                              ( 

Recorder's  Deputies  -; 

1866-7 

1861 
1862 

141 

556-T 
467 

1 
Recorder's  Newspapers  

1867-8 
1869-70 

170 
348 
696 

Recorder's  Salary  

141 

Redemption  of  Bonds  —  See  Sinking  Fund  
Redemption  of  City  and  County  Property  sold  for  Taxes  
Registration  and  Election  Expenses  —  Codes,  1,094  to  1,117 
Registration  and  Expenses  

1861 

1865-6 

556 

478 
288,509' 

Relief  of  County  Clerk's  Deputies  

299 

Removal  of  Legal  Incumbrances—  School  Property  .  . 
Rent  of  3d,  15th  and  19th  District  Court  Rooms  
Rents  of  School  Houses  

1863-4 
1871-2 
1871 

.  68 
163 
735 

"  1 
Repairs  to  Public  Buildings.  . 

1872 
1862 

847 

467 

'  '    ( 
Repairs  to  Public  Buildings  and  Furniture  

1867-8 

161 

Repairs  to  School  Houses  

Repairs  to  Streets  in  Front  of  School  Lots  

Repairs  to  Streets  —  Water  Front  

Reporters—  Short-hand  

811 

Roads  and  Highways  —  Repairs  

497 

Repealing  Act  Creating  Inspector  Steam  Boilers 

Rent  of  Court  Rooms,  etc  

30 


AUDITORS   REPORT. 


INDEX    TO    STATUTES    CONTINUED. 


s 

'Sailors'  Boarding  Houses  and            .  .                                       I 

941 

Shippin^  Offices  | 

1869-70 

245 

San  Francisco  Benevolent  Association 

1869  70 

579 

San  Francisco  Homoeopathic  Medical  Dispensary,  etc  
School  Expenditures  
School  Fund  —  Consolidation  Act,  page  97  —  Annual  Allowance. 
Schools,  Support  of  Same  
Second  Street  Damages 

1873-4 
1871-2 

1871-2 
1873  4 

711 
846 

846 
750 

Seventh  Street  Opening-,  etc  
Sheriff  —  Additional  Deputies 

1875-6-7-8 
1871-2 

231,  772 
904 

Sheriff—  Horses,  Prison  Purposes  
Sheriff's  Bookkeeper  

1869-70 
1869-70 

221 
696 

Sheriff's  Counsel  Fees 

1867  8 

2"?0 

Sheriff's  Deputies  -| 

1861 
1863-4 

555 
503 

Sheriff's  Deputies 

1865-6 
1867-8 
1871  2 

624 
220 

904 

Sheriff's  Fees  

1871-2 

776 

Sheriff's  Salary 

1861 

555 

Sheriff  to  appoint  Deputies  
Sinking  Fund  —  Bonds  1855  . 

1869-70 
1855 

529 
386 

Sinking  Fund  —  Bonds  1858  

1858 

187 

Sinking  Fund  —  Bonds  1870,  School  . 

1869-70 

80 

Sinkino-  Fund    Bonds  1872,  School 

1871  2 

5.? 

Sinking  Fund—  Bonds  1874,  School  

1873-4 

849 

Sinking  Fund  —  Bonds  1863-4,  Judgment  -' 
Sinking  Fund—  Bonds  1864-5,  Pacific  Railroad  

1862 
Orders  547  and  580 
1863 

265 
65-6 
303 

Sinking  Fund—  Bonds  1862  and  1863,  San  Francisco  and  San 
Jose  Railroad  

1861 

201 

Sinking  Fund—  Bonds  1866-7,  School  
Sinking  Fund—  Bonds,  Hospital  
Sinking  Fund  —  City  Hall  Bonds 

1865-6 
1867-8 
1873-4 

303 

458 
829 

Sinking  Func1  —  Montgomery  Avenue  Bonds  
Sixth  Street  Opening,  etc  

1871-2 
1875  6 

£19 

866 

Small-pox  Hospital  Expenses—  Political  Code,  Sec.  3,012.  .  .  -j 
Special  Counsel  (annual) 

1863 
1869-70 
1861 

169 
240 
479 

Special  Fee  Fund  —  -Statements,  Transfers,  etc. 

1861 

557  8 

Special  Fee  Officers  

1877-8 

630 

Squares,  Grading  and  Improving  (annual)  
State  and  County  Licenses  —  See  different  Classes,  Codes,  Sees. 
3  356  to  3  387 

1861 

551 

State  Moneys  —  Forwarding  same  by  Express  
State  School  Apportionment 

1862 

468 

State  School  Tax  

1863-4 

209 

State  Tax  Levy.     Codes,  Sec.  3,713  

State  Tax  Levy.     Code,  Sees.  3,696  to  3,714. 

Stationery,  etc.,  for  City  and  County  Officers  
Stationery,  etc.,  for  Fire  Commissioners  

1861 
1865-6 

559 
139 

Stationery,  etc.,  for  School  DeDartment 

1863-4 

16'? 

.Street  Account  Expenses,  Cases  of  Epidemic  
Street  Assessments  against  U.  S.  Property  —  Payment  of  
Street  Cleanin^  Act 

1865-6 
1867-8 
1875  6 

437 
148 
795 

Street  Department  

1871  2 

804 

Street  Department  Fund  —  Appropriations  
Street  Light  Fund  J 

1865-6-77-8 
1858 
1862 

4,  66,  437 
46,70,  78,828 
468 

1865-6 

167 

INDEX    TO    STATUTES. 
INDEX    TO    STATUTES-CONCLUDED. 


81 


STATUTES  . 

PAGE. 

Street  Light  Fund  (Illuminating  Power  of  Gas)  
Street  Superintendent  Deputies 

1877-8 
1877  8 

437 
139 

Street  Superintendent's  Salary  

1861 

557 

1856 

173 

Subsistence  of  Prisoners  —  Consolidation  Act  
Superintendent  of  Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph  
Superintendent  of  Schools  —  Salary  

1863-4 
1861 

31,  32 
504 
557 

Superintendent  of  Streets    Deputies'  Salaries 

1871  278 

139  819 

Superintendent  of  Streets  to  appoint  Deputies  

Supervisors,   Acts  conferring  further  powers.    (Statutes 
1871-72,  Pages  43  and  735,  and  1873-74,   588   to  789, 
and  1877-78,  55(3  

1871-2 
1857 
1858 
1860 

1861             | 
1862             j 
1863 

819 
271,  347 
75,  221,  235 
143,  144,  272 
59,  170,  412 
478 
67,  265,  459 
466 
168  540,  560 
574,  724,  763 

Supervisors'  Salaries  
Supreme  Court  —  Attendants,   Fuel,   Lights,   etc.       Amend- 
ment to  the  Code  

1863-4         1 
1865-6 
1867-8 

1869-70 
1867-8 

1873-4 

42,  347,  388 
437,  446,  502 
82,  520,  663 
100,  108,  575 
716 
240 
702 

395 

1861 

555 

T 

Tax  Collector's  Deputies  and  Auctioneer  - 
Tax  Collector's  Deputies    -Extra 

1862 

1867-8 
1871  2 

23!) 
292 
735 

Tax  Collector's  Salary  

1869 

239 

Taxes    City  and  County  Personal  Levy 

1873—4 

477  478 

Taxes—  Refunded.     Political  Codes,  Sec.  3,804  
Tax  Lew  and  Apportionment  —  Real  Estate  and   State. 
Political  Code  .    .                .           ... 

1865-6 

436  8 

Tax  Levy  —  Golden  Gate  Park  

1875  6 

861 

Tax  on  Premiums  of  Insurance     .      ... 

1862 

^44_5 

Tax  Settlement  (annual).     Codes,  Sees.  3,797  and  3,798)  
Teachers'  Salaries 

1863^1 

lg-7 

Training  Ship  

1875  6-7  8 

54  233 

Transfers  —  General  Fund  to  Kearny  Street  Fund  
Transfers  —  School  Fund  to  Sinking  Fund  - 

1867-8 
1860 
1861 

31 
102 
24  ' 

Transfers  —  Special  Fee  to  General  Fund  

1865-6 
1861 

303 
558 

Treasurer's  Deputies'  Salaries     .                                                •! 

1861 

556 

Treasurer's  Salary  .   . 

1863 
1861 

169 
556 

u 

Urgent  Necessity 

1877  8 

«OO 

w 

Water  Supply—  Repealing  Act  Maintaining    Public    Water 
Works  

1880 

1 

Washington  Plaza  Appropriation  

1871  9 

762 

Watchman—  City  Hall 

1871  °' 

Water  Supply  Commission  

1875-6 

501 

Witness  Fees,  Criminal  Cases.     Penal  Code,  Sec.  1,329.. 

JOHN    P.   DUNN,    ATJDITOB, 

WM.  M.  EDGAR,  DEPUTY. 


TREASURER'S  REPORT. 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  TREASURY, 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  August  2 


, 1880. \ 


To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — In  accordance  with  Resolution  No.  14,765  (new 
series)  of  your  Honorable  Board,  I  herewith  hand  you  my  an- 
nual report  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880. 

Very  respectfully, 

W.  E.  SHABEE, 
City  and  County  Treasurer. 


CITY    AND    COUNTY    OF    SAN    FEANCISCO. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance:  Cash  on  hand  June  30, 

1879 $1,731,383  59 

Eeceipts  during  the  year 4,785,646  72 


$6,517,030  31 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands  paid  during  the  year.  .  .  .$5,661,616  62 


Balance $855,413  69 


RECEIPTS    AND    DISBURSEMENTS. 


83 


RECAPITULATION. 


! 

FCXDS. 

AMOUNT. 

General  Fund     ,  

$        41,456  97 

Special  Fee  Fun'  I 

7  000  66     i 

School  Fund  
Street  Li"'ht  Fund 

229,618  61 
18  718  73 

Street  Department  Fund  

21,209  86 
75  00 

Police  Contingent  Fund  
Sinkin""  Fund  Hospital  Bonds 

924  65 
15  058  37 

Sinking  Fund  School  Bonds  1866-67  
Sinking  Fund  School  Bonds  1870 

117,476  63 
19  983  00 

Sinkin"-  Fund  School  Bonds  1872  

3  117  67 

Sinking  Fund  School  Bonds  1874  

8,253  34 

Sinkin"-  Fund  Bonds  1858  

75  631  08 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds   1863-64  
Sinking  Fund  Bonds  1867    . 

6,201  10 
1  942  22 

Sinking  Fund  Park  Improvement  Bonds  
Sinkin(r  Fund  Pacific  R  R    Bonds 

2,689  80 
48  704  90 

Sinking  Fund  City  Hall  Construction  Bonds  
Pac.  Railroad  Interest  Tax  Account  

38,910  91 
11,972  43 

Coupons   Bonds  1858     

9  230  91 

Coupons,  Bonds  1863-64  

23,811  64 

Coupons   Bonds  1887 

1-7  680  81 

Coupons,  Park  Improvement  Bonds  

3  896  97 

Coupons,  Hospital  Bonds  

3,385  48 

Coupons,  School  Bonds  186o-67  

6  581  59 

Coupons   School  Bonds  1870 

6  137  1"' 

Coupons   School  Bonds  1872  

1  842  7? 

Coupons,  School  Bonds  1874  

17,375  14 

Coupons  House  of  Correction  Bonds 

6  170  09 

Coupons,  -City  Hall  Bonds  .... 

21  662  45 

Coupons,  Montgomery  Avenue  Bonds  

5,850  15 

Coupons,  Dupont  Street  Widening  Bonds 

1  831  41 

7  809  °8 

Corporation  Debt  Fund       .... 

49  62 

New  City  Hall  Fund  

22  898  03 

Library  Fund 

91  465  68 

Police  Life  and  Health  Insurance  Fund  

10  704  00 

Sinking  Fund  Dupont  Street  Bonds  

2  114  74 

Disintermenl  Fund  

2  440  00 

$855,413  69 

LOANS    FROM    SINKING    FUNDS    OUTSTANDING 
Sinking  Fund  School  Bonds  1866- 

1867 $66,000  00 

Sinking  Fund  School  Bonds  1870. .  124,500  00 

Sinking  Fund  School  Bonds  1872. .  80,000  00 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  1863-64 248,000  00 

Sinking  Fund  Bonds  1867 110,000  00 

Sinking  Fund  Hospital  Bonds 68,500  00 

Sinking  Fund  Park  Improv.  Bonds  20,500  00 


Total 


$717,500  00 


84  TREASURER'S  REPORT. 

STATE    OF    CALIFORNIA. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance  on  hand  June  30,  1879. .  .  .  $643  32 

Receipts  during  the  year 1,318,201  58 

$1,318,844  90 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements  during  the  year $1,312,298  87 


Balance  June  30,  1880. $6,546  03 


ASSESSMENT. 


Assessment  No.  17 

Assessment  No.  116 

Assessment  No.  117 

Assessment  No.  122 


Assessment  No.  137 .. , 

Assessment  No.  206 

Assessment  No.  209 

Assessment  No.  215 

Assessment  No.  74 


AMOUNT. 


1  29 
3 

1  46 
7  71 
90 
1  97 
4  04 
1  74 
Assessment  No.  327 2  04 

Total |30  86 

Less  amounts  to  debit  of — 

Street  Assessment  No.  109 $9  95 

Street  Assessment  No.  146 6  00 

Street  Assessment  No.  343 9  04 

24  99 


STREET    ASSESSMENT   FUND. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance  June  30,  1879 $5,531  89 

Receipts  during  the  year 1,480  67 

$7,012  56 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements  during  the  year.  .  .  .          7,006  69 

Balance $5  87 

RECAPITULATION. 


$5  87 


RECEIPTS    AND    DISBURSEMENTS. 


85 


MONTGOMERY   AVENUE    FUND. 

Cash  on  hand 

Demand  No.  1,  due  City  and  County 

of  San  Francisco $726  42 

SPECIAL    REDEMPTION    FUND. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance  to  credit  of  Special  Re- 
demption Fund  of  State  and 
County  Taxes,  June  30,  1879.  .  $3,420  19 

Receipts  during  the  year 45,418  06 


DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements  during  the  year   .  . 
Balance .  . 


$48,838  25 
$43,743  39 


$317  51 


$5,094  86 


EECAPITULATION. 


IN   FAVOR   OF. 

XTMHER  OP 
R  flCF.I  PT. 

AMOUNT. 

TAXES  1870-71  . 
F.  Anderson  

633 

8    6  45 

R.  Hopkins  

652 

44  09 

$50  54 

TAXES  1871-72. 
R.  L.  Corcoran  

38 

15  45 

C.  D.  Wheat 

75 

7  50 

Judson    .  .  . 

91 

15  45 

—  .}  udson  

92 

18  25 

W.    M.  Bosworth 

172 

17  79 

J.  P.  Dameron  ....                         

211 

38  84 

J.  C  Tucker 

328 

37  89 

J.  B.  Lewis.  .  . 

359 

4  92 

M.   Kedon  

407 

50  52 

D.  Swett  .... 

538 

106  65 

313  20 

TAXES  1872-73. 
A.  Maver...  . 

4 

13  20 

J   T   Milliken 

21 

35  65 

S.  F.  Sinclair. 

51 

10  84 

59  69 

86 


TREASURERS   REPORT 


KECAPITULATION— CONTINUED. 


IX    FAVOR  OF. 

Nl'MHKR  OF 
KECKIIT. 

AMOUNT. 

TAXES   1873-74. 
S.  Cummin  "s                                                                     

1 

9  -?S 

J.  P.  Dam  tron  
F.  M.  Hart  .           .                                                             

107 

(>  -11 
32  10 

F.  B.  Haswell  
M.  Kedon  
J.  B.  Lewis  

•215 
333 

23  91 

7  80 

TAXES  1874-75. 

97 

2  00 

J.  Napthaly                                  ...             .                

288 

4  80 

289 

4  80 

J.  Napthalv                                                            

293 

4  80 

J    Napthaly 

294 

8  11 

F.  C.  Havens  . 

356 

31  24 

W  B   Swain 

380 

97  36 

J.  B.  Lewis  
F.  B  Haswell                                                                   

389 
463 

19  68 
31  26 

D.  Swett  

516 

5  79 

J.  B.  Lowis                                                                         

519 

3  4!) 

M   J   Kelly 

520 

15  72 

M.  J.  Kelly 

521 

4  33 

H   Farlev 

628 

3  48 

H,  Farley         .  .         

637 

3  48 

B   B   Miner 

663 

16  11 

TAXES  1875-76. 
M   Crooks 

86 

84  53 

I.  N.  Thorn  ,  
E   Sinclair 

3UJ 
349 

5  30 
1  75 

E.  Sinclair  
E.  Sinclair.     ...         .                      ....                               

414 
415 

2   i  (3 
2  76 

E.  Sinclair  

417 

'2  76 

D.  Swett  

432 

44  47 

G  Mearnes 

442 

36  9-> 

J.  G.  Klumpke  
A   Himmelman                                                          .             

460 
£68' 

4  04 
31  45 

S.  F.  Sinclair  

574 

2  46 

S  F   Sinclair  .  .                           .  .                  

587 

52  05 

Q-)$ 

216  38 

W.  Bosworth  
J   G   Klumpke 

664 

674 

73  55 
21  33 

W.  Bosworth  

676 

28  29 

W   B   Swain  .                           .  .           .    .             

695 

2  76 

S  F  Sinclair 

731 

10  42 

543  9 

RECEIPTS    AND    DISBURSEMENTS. 


87 


RECAPITULATION— CONTINUED. 


IX   FAVOR  OF. 

NUMBER  OF 
RECEIPT. 

AMOUNT. 

TAXES  1376-77. 

13 

§2  01 

A  Maceartnev                               

15 

11  55 

97 

2  83 

A   Maceartney                                           

106 

2  84 

C   C   Buller 

155 

25  42 

A  Maceai"tney                                                   .    

192 

8  20 

267 

185  58 

J  H  Colbert                                                       

326 

4  86 

M    Kelsey 

342 

4  18 

M    Kdsey                                                                

343 

4  86 

A   N   Hanna 

384 

28  27 

J    H   Smith                                                              

396 

8   46 

W  Bosworth 

452 

608  95 

898  41 

TAXES  1877-78. 
Winters                                    

100 

88  71 

E.W.Ashley  

367 

2  03 

441 

11  60 

W.  B  Swain                           .     .           

442 

3  23 

J  G  Klumpke 

531 

37  50 

W  Corcoran                                               

571 

3  80 

W  Rollins 

583 

1  92 

G  Mearnes                                                                                 

599 

21  09 

B   Kelsey 

23  68 

W  Corcoran                                                           ...              

788 

79  32 

L   McXeal       

827 

30  31 

y    F    Sinclair 

912 

36  08 

W    Bosworth  ...          

930 

48  48 

950 

58  00 

Farley                                                .   .              

962 

3  24 

J.  G.  Klumpke  

978 

6  55 

Farley                                                                                       .    . 

1029 

1  93 

077  47 

TAXES  1878-79. 

111 

6  08 

J.  P.  Dameron          

215 

8  90 

216 

7  85 

M  B.  Kellou-°-                   .         .                                  

331 

25  77 

D  C  Henderson 

422 

11  14 

D  C  Henderson                                   

423 

3  60 

W.  Nicholls  
W  S  Lyons 

502 
519 

51  94 
5  03 

J.  B.  Lewis  
A    Maceartney 

591 

658 

5  01 
227  29 

R.  George  
B  Kelsev 

663 
726 

1626  15 
89  70 

W.S.Lyons       

771 

2  38 

H    Farlev 

813 

3  61 

J.  P.  Dameron                       .           ....               .     .      .           

818 

2  55 

J.  P  Dameron  

819 

3  60 

J.  P.  Dam  ron       .                                         ,         .  , 

820 

3  60 

821 

3  60 

J.  P.  Dameron^                                   .                            

822 

3  96 

826 

4  68 

J.  P.  Dameron              ....                    .           

827 

4  68 

H.  Farley  

840 

2  22 

TREASURERS    REPROT. 


RECAPITULATION  -  CONCLUDED. 


IN  FAVOR  OF. 

NUMBER  OF 
RECEIl'T. 

AMOUNT. 

TAXES  1879-80. 
J.  G.  Klumpke  

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
-    9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
17 
19 
20 
22 
24 
35 
36 
27 
28 
29 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
62 
63 
65 
66 

$11   25 
6  2L 
2  91 
3  55 
2  29 
4  02 
4  65 
5  58 
22  88 
22  87 
7  78 
10  93 
2  13 
1  98 
1  98 
3  87 
18  35 
2  13 
2-13 
2  13 
2  13 
2  13 
15  01 
5  43 
5  43 
2  91 
1  81 
25  06 
3  55 
2  44 
6  21 
24  75 
5  26 
14  07 
7  51 
8  10 
8  25 
4  65 
4  96 
62  77 
2  31 
4  33 
12  00 
4  33 
8  73 
4  02 
4  65 
23  97 
3  70 

f. 

410  09 

B.  Kelsey  ...                   

B   Kelsey 

W.  Nicol  

W   Nicol 

W.  B.  Swain  

J.  G.  Klumpke 

S  F   Sinclair 

W.  Nicoll  

W  Nicoll 

J.  B.  Lewis  

S  F  Sinclair 

W.  C.  Dufficev  

W.  Nicol  .  . 

W.  Nicol  

W.  Rollins  .    .      . 

B  Kelsey 

State  of  California 

State  of  California  

State  of  California  

State  of  California  

State  of  California  

B.  Kelsey 

B   Kelsey 

B.  Kelsey... 

A  Maceartney 

State  of  California  .   . 

B.  Kelsey 

J.  B.  Lewis  

W    Nicol 

W.  Nicol  

J.  W.  Reay  

W.  Bosworth  

D.  Swett  

D  Swett 

D.  Swett  

W.  Nicol 

A.  Maceartney  

S.  F.  Sinclair  

S.  F.  Sinclair  :  

D.  Swett  

W  Nicoll 

A.  Maceartney  

D  Swett 

D.  Swett  

W.  B  Swain 

W.  B.  Swain  

W.  Rollins  ... 

TOTAL 

5,094  86 

SPECIAL     DEPOSITS. 


89 


SPECIAL  DEPOSITS  FROM  THE  COUNTY  CLERK. 


TREASllRKIl's 
RUM  HER. 

DATE. 

SUITS. 

COURT. 

AMOUNT, 

14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
24 

24 
62 
81 
114 
133 
135 
153 
166 
173 
182 
188 
214 
239 
248 
253 
•256 
262 
263 
264 
268 
287 
288 
289 
290 
295 
296 
319 
340 
443 

454 
460 
461 
467 
531 
536 
566 

575 

576 
577 
579 
591 
595 
597 
600 
603 
604 
605 

1864—  May  21... 
May  23  
May  23  
May  23  
May  23  
May  23 

Turner  vs.  Knott  

12th  Dist. 

8  92  75 
715  05 
300  00 
35  80 
14  00 
7  60 
9  8» 
3  67 
24  00 
5  00 
16  50 
30  00 
20  00 
23  50 
55  90 
20  00 
5  62 
51  25 
75  20 
42  00 
5  85 
3  75 
2  50 
201  20 
28 
12  91 
7  00 
118  10 
7  77 
2  19 
2  20 
5  38 
2  06 
1  96 
12  99 
16  65 

19  07 
5  2£ 
2  78 
5-62 
5  00 
9  65 
4  20 

360  50 

411  84 
75 
60 
21  99- 
2,093  25 
2  03 
1  98 
28  75 
430  00 
3,349  15 
19  83 

S  .  F.  Water  Works  vs.  Landowners  
The  People  vs.  Lopez  and  Bull  
Buckley  vs.  Creditors  
Sparrow  vs  .  Taaff  e  et  al  

County..  . 
Of  Session 
4th  Dist.. 
4th  Dist.. 
4th  Dist.. 
12th  Dist. 
12th  Dist. 
4th  Dist.. 
15th  Dist. 
12th  Dist. 
County.  .  . 
15th  Dist. 
15th  Dist. 
4th  Dist.. 
15th  Dist. 
12th  Dist. 
15th  Dist. 
4th  Dist.. 
12th  Dist. 
4th  Dist.. 
15th  Dist. 

June  6. 

Barker  vs.  Hut-chins  
Bran  nan  vs.  Cook  

June  6  
November  28.. 
1865—  January  26.  .  . 
July  1  
1866  -July  30  
December  8.  .  . 
December  14.  . 
1867—  June  6  
October  2  
November  14.. 
1868—  May  11  
August  8  
1869—  October  30.  ... 
1870—  July  17. 

Calderwood  vs    Hajnes  

Z.  H   Niel  vs.  J  .  K.  Moore  
Dowlin0"  vs   Golack 

Winter  vs.  Hannan  &  Randall  

Burn  vs  Burn 

Eastmann  vs.  Ludlum  

Harris  vs  .  Hay  wood-  
Coffey  vs  Rourke.  ... 

Himmelman  vs.  Cudworth  
Sharpe  vs.  Contra  Costa  County  
Pope  vs.  Dalton  
Nic.  Paving  Company  vs.  G.  L   Gibson... 
Bradt-r  vs.  Schumacher  

1871—  November  10.. 
1872—  February  29.. 
April  19  
May  30 

Marchant  vs   Nunan  .           .  .                   . 

Richardson  vs.  C'onlin  &  Lewis  
Mavne  vs    Freund 

15th  Dist. 
4th  Dist.. 
12th  Dist. 
15th  Dist. 
Probate  .  . 
12th  Dist. 
12th  Dist. 
12th  Dist. 
12th  Dist. 
12th  Dist. 
3d  Dist... 
19th  Dist. 
19th  Dist. 

19th  Dist. 
3d  Dist... 
3d  Dist... 
15th  Dist. 
Mun.Crim 
3d  Dist... 
4th  Dist. 

County.  .  . 

19th  Dist. 
23d  Dist.. 
12th  Dist. 
23d  Dist.. 
15th  Dist. 
12fch  Dist. 
19th  Dist. 
4th  Dist.. 
19th  Dist.. 
19th  Dist.. 
12th  Dist.. 

May  31... 

Kelley  vs.  Johnson  
Borel  vs   Crayton 

May  31  
August  8  
1873—  September  15. 
September  15. 
September  15. 
September  15  . 
November  29. 
November  29. 
1874—  July  13  
November  28. 
1875—  June  10  

Estate  of  A   Rule  

The  People  vs  .   Raymond  
The  People  vs    Raymond 

The  People  vs.  Raymond  
The  People  vs  .  Raymond  

Burr  vs    North  

Dver  vs  .  North  

John  Center  vs  Warner 

W.  Steinhart  vs.  J  .  F.  Eagan  
Nat.  Gold  Bank  Trust  Co.  vs.  J.  D.  Far- 
well  et  al  

November  19. 
December  4.  .  . 
December  18.  . 
1876—  January  15.... 
1877—  June  30  
December  18. 
1878—  August  9  

October  24  

October  28  
October  28  

N.  Levy  vs.  W.  Thurman  et  al  

F.  Tobleman  vs.  J   G   Goldsmith 

J.  Murphy  vs,  P.  F.  O'Neill  
The  People  vs.  J.  Mears  and  T.  WTilson.  . 
O.  F.  Savings  Bank  vs.  Fowler  et  al  
J.  H.  Lowe  vs.  J.  H.  Wise  
15th    Avenue    Commiss'rs    vs.    Unknown 
Owners  

F.  and  M.  Bank  of  Savings  vs.  D.    F.  Mc- 
Carthy   

McCormick  vs.  Kenny  
Lvons  vs  .  Holt            

Novembers..  . 
1879—  January  8  
February  12.. 
February  20  .  . 
February  21  .  . 
March  22  
March  26  
April  9  

F.  M.  Manning  vs.  Mundeliff  R.  &  Co  
J.  Emeric  vs   J   B.  Alvarado 

G.  Raabe  vs.  W.  Hahn  et  al  
Fireman's  Fund  Ins.  Co.  vs.  Staple  etal.. 
J.  H.  Burke  vs.  O.  Hay  

J.  H.  Wood  vs.  John  Cany  

J.  J.  McCallion  vs.  Hibernia  S   &  L.  Soc.  .  . 
J.  M.  Pike  vs.  G.  B.  Stewart  

90 


TREASURER  S    REPORT. 


SPECIAL    DEPOSITS— CONCLUDED. 


TRKASURKR'S 

NUMBER. 

DATE. 

SUITS. 

COURT. 

AMOUNT. 

607 
614 
621 
672 
703 
706 
716 

1879—  May  9  

The  People  vs  .  C  .  Knauth  
Win.  McFeevs.  Pac.  C.  I).  &  R.  Co  ... 
The  People  vs.  T.  King  
P.  H.  McElhinney  vs.  M.  Klune  
L.  A.  Garnett  vs.  S.  A.  Stone  
J  Schreiber  vs  J.  Maas                        .   .   . 

County.  .. 
12th  Dist.. 

City  Grin. 
of  Appeals 
loth  Dist. 
County  .  .  . 
Superior.  . 

§25  00 
259  20 
10  00 
94  00 
3,200  03 
9  05 
933  07 

May  15  
June  18  

September  22  . 
November  20.. 
November  24.. 
18SO—  March  8  

Wm.  Doolan  vs.  Hsnrv  Hyde  

£13,253  11 

ACCOUNT    WITH    PUBLIC     ADMINISTRATOR. 

RECEIPTS . 

Balance  at  credit  of  Public  Admin- 
istrator, June  30,  1879 $47,419  26 

Eeceipts  during  the  year 56,979  37 

$104,398  63 


DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements  during  the  year. .       $46,265  71 
Balance  Cash  011  hand.. . 


;583132  92 


ACCOUNT  WITH  ADMINISTRATOR. 


91 


RECAPITULATION 

OF     ESTATES     UNTDER    THE     ADMINISTRATION     OF    EX-PUBLIC    ADMINISTRATOR 

S.    MAYER. 


Estate  of  Charles  Genthner ?2,044  38 

E.  Marceline 5  90 

E.  Sauvcir 19  12 

J.  Cowrie 134  46 

J .  Dahlen 68 

J.  Kipp 

N.  M.  Potter 64  85 

M.  Canas 39  00 

P.  Fisher 3  00 

E.  Stray 4  44 

W.  Shubert 54  95 

C.  Robertson 35  74 

G.  D.  Schick 19  19 

G.  Everett 01 

J.  M.  Gueguon 14  10 

James  Floyd 405  10 

H.  Rdnhardt 02 

J.  Herstand 5  60 

E.  Revero 268  61 

M.  T.  Trogero 106  27 

E.  W.  Polkinghorn 

T.  B.  Bordien 6  20 

P.  Leg  Marie 7  56 

L.  Cheely 305  40 

J.  H.  Heard 3  71 

E.  H.  Brandt 74  00 

A.  H.  We-gand 13  12 

M.  Manning 445  50 

J .  Tonry 1  30" 

F.  Gohlke 31  50 

G.  Busch 220  00 

J.  H.  Ramierez 1.294  21 

F.  Gonzalez 1,639  19 

A.  Miller 17  96 

D.  Barry 2  8S 

J.  M.  Blake 2  36 

F:  Ellin 20  30 

P.  Schrieder 68  69 

Total $7,456  60 


92 


TREASURER  S    REPORT. 


ESTATES   UNDER   THE   ADMINISTRATION    OF    EX-PUBLIC   ADMINISTRATOR 
WILLIAM  DOOLAN. 


Estate  of  A.  C.  Hoerman 

J.  Bordelongue . .      

M.  Kelleher 

C.  Benjamin 

G .  Sbarboro 

J.  R.  Hamilton 

P.  J.  McCarthy 

A.  P.  Lube 

J.  R,  Lambert 

G.  Peritz 

C.  L.  Phillips... 

H.  Nash 

F.  Bates 

P.  Peterson 

N.  McGraw . . . 


Total . 


$1,826  23 

1  00 

274  90 

9  90 

9,900  00 

26  81 

714  00 

6  66 

792  00 

990  00 

594  00 

13  21 

1,980   00 

31  61 

198  00 


$17,358  32 


EECAPITULATION— CONCLUDED. 

ESTATES  UNDER  THE  ADMINISTRATION  OF  PUBLIC  ADMINISTRATOR 
B.  A.  REYNOLDS. 


Estate  of  Bridget  Gardiner $  1,085  80 

Maud  A.  Coslin 339  65 

H.  D .  Logemann 700  65 

A.  G.  Crowell 699  00 

J.  B.  Butler 1,498  48 

P.  Bradley 920  00 

John  Walsh 4,087  00 

B.  Urbain ,  243  75 

J.  Labourdette 360  60 

J.  Schloosman -. 541  00 

T.   Ellurott 4,096  25 

F.  Martin 9,138  00 

Mary  A.  Buckley 97  98 

J.  M.  A.  Rush 381  89 

E.  Bahlhouse 257  40 

P.  Sullivan 1,980  00 

J.  Castend 158  97 

J.  Panache 239  90 

E.  Seipel 14850 

S.  P.  Pique 198  00 

G.  Taylor,  Jr 537  43 

P.  A.  Broenson 1,237   50 

J.  Barron 3,861  00 

C.  Vandall 272  25 

J.  A.  Bergstaat 74  00 

M.  J.  Miller 163  00 

Total , $33,318  00 

GRAND  TOTAL $58,132  92 


RECEIPTS    AND    DISBURSEMENTS.  93 

LEIDESDORFF    STREET    OPENING    FUND. 
Balance  Cash  on  hand $124  91 


SECOND    STREET    GRADING    FUND. 
Balance  Cash  011  hand $15  00 


FIFTEENTH    AVENUE    EXTENSION    FUND. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance  Cash  on  hand  June  30,  1879        $504  59 
Receipts  during  year 1,203  13 


$1,707  72 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Disbursements  during  year $1,705  00 

Balance $2  72 


DUPONT    STREET    WIDENING    FUND. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance  on  hand  June  30,  1879 $10,316  16 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements  during  year $8,446  98 


Balance  Cash  on  hand $1,869  18 


BRIDGE    SILVER    MEDAL    FUND. 

On    special    deposit   with   Hibernia 

Savings  and  Loan  Society $2,000  00 


94  TREASURER'S  REPORT. 

MONTGOMERY  AVENUE  CHANGE  OF  GEADE  FUND. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance  on  hand  June  30,  1879 $334  41 

Receipts  during  the  year 385  14 


$719  55 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements  during  the  year 584  30 


Balance..  $135  25 


SPECIAL  DEPOSIT 


SPECIAL  DEPOSIT 


SPECIAL  DEPOSIT. 

PUBLIC    COLORED    SCHOOL    PIANO    FUND. 

One  sealed  package  containing $29  00 


Of   G.  Reis  for  redemption  of  prop- 
erty sold  in  1874  and  '75 $177  02 


Of  S.  C.  Hastings,  March  9,  1866,  on 
account  of  his  purchase  of  city  slip 
lot  sold  by  Cobb  £  Sinton  at  auc- 
tion, February  24,  1866  . : $337  50 


SPECIAL  DEPOSIT 

Of  money  paid  under  protest  for  taxes 
of  1863  and  '64  to  E.  H.  Wash- 
burne,  Tax  Collector $44  60 


SPECIAL     DEPOSITS. 


95 


SPECIAL  DEPOSIT 

By  order  of  the  County  Court  for  the 
payment  of  taxes  of  1872  and  '73 
and  1873  and  '74  on  money  paid 
out  of  the  fund  collected  for  the 
widening  of  Kearney  and  Third 
streets 

POLICE  MONEY. 

Keceipts  during  the  year  from  Prop- 
erty Clerk,  Police  Department $348  86 

Net  proceeds  of  auction  sale 250  50 


$203  31 


Advertising  auction  sale 
Balance .  . 


$599  36 
38  35 


$561  01 


MONEY  BELONGING  TO  INSANE  PEESONS. 

Deposits  by  Chief  of  Police  Crowley, 
November  29,  1873 


$570  68 


EECAPITULATION. 


DATE. 

NAMES. 

AMOUNT. 

1868—  October  6  ... 
1869  —  January  24  .  . 

Aug  .  Do/old  
Henry  Ormand  

8        20 
3  50 

March  3  .... 

Edward  Ryan  

2  25 

April  1 

W    B     Blake 

2  45 

April  10 

Margaret  Boyer 

90 

May  2  

J.  C.  Clark  

6  00 

May  8 

Gottfried  F    Wilier 

12  10 

July  20  
September  16 

Felix  Iserdale  
Emma  Howard 

17  35 
10 

October  14  

John  Edwards  

301  25 

October  15  

Joseph  Hollbrook  

3  20 

November  12  . 

P.  J    McMillan     

1  60 

December  26  .  . 

Adolf  Kurtz  

2  50 

1870  —  January  14  

Samuel  Hill 

6  25 

January  23  ... 

Edw  .  McGaran  

50 

January  27    .  . 

S.  F    Otis  .   . 

6  45 

February  14  .  . 

John  Gilbey  Weleto  

1  05 

March  10 

Hu^h  Hare 

10  25 

April  23  ... 

Daniel  McGinness.  .  . 

2  35 

96 


TREASURER  S    REPORT. 


RECAPITULATION— CONCLUDED. 


DATE. 

NAME. 

AMOUXT. 

1870—  July  15  

Thos    Fitzgerald 

$  6  80 

August  8  

Chas.  Fischer  

3  00 

September  14. 

Chas.  Padden 

39  00 

October  20  
December  18  . 

Samuel  Levy  
John  McCabe  

13  85 
23  55 

1871—  February  1    . 

Corn.   Kelly  

25 

February  5  . 

James  Dodire  

50 

July  17  

Samuel   Hewese 

2  50 

August  13.    . 

L.    Johnson  

2  98 

August  17  .   . 

J  ohn   Ross 

4  50 

September  29. 

Daniel  Mullen  

2  35 

October  18  

Adelia  Cohen 

2  80 

November  27  . 

Thos  .  Dooley  

41  10 

December  20  .  . 

Dan    G    J    Echeagary 

9  65 

1872  --January  1  
April  13  ... 

Lady  E  .  R  .  Alverson  
Horace  Kamp 

2  70 
5  60 

May  1 

9  Q5 

June  25  

William  Martin 

7  95 

August  16  

Nicholas  Brogge  

1  15 

1873  —  January  1  .  .  .  . 

Sophia  Busle 

11  ^0 

April  9  

Jerry  Crowley  

6  35 

May  26  

Thomas  Noonan.             

1  00 

May  29  

James  Reynolds 

1  65 

June  1  

F.  Phillips  

6  05 

Balanca                          .   . 

$570  68 

BONDS  REDEEMED  AND  PAID  DURING  THE  YEAR. 

DUPONT    STREET    BONDS. 

Redeemed  12  Bonds— Nos.  258,  803,  881,  891,  892,  893,  253, 
254,  256,  257,  259,  541. 


WESTERN    PACIFIC   RAILROAD    BONDS. 


Redeemed  25  Bonds— Nos.  30,  43,  44,  18,  54,  55,  56,  57,  58,  59, 
60,  28,  29,  47,  49,  48,  52,  53,  37,  31,  24,  38,  17,  19,  21. 


CENTRAL    PACIFIC    RAILROAD    BONDS. 


Redeemed  47  Bonds— Nos.  43,  54,  35,  21,  22,  23,  24,  25,  26,  27, 
28,  29,  30,  31,  32,  33,  34,  35,  48,  64,  38,  39,  46,  37,  40,  1, 
2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9,  10,  11,  12,  13,  14,  15,  16,  17,  18,  19, 
20,  60. 


BONDS   REDEEMED.  97 


CITY    HALL    CONSTRUCTION    BONDS. 

Eedeemed  193  Bonds— Nos.  69,  80,  84,  87,  89,  100,  101,  102, 
119,  121,  126,  127,  2,  107,  1,  7,  8,  15,  16,  23,  24,  25,  26,  27, 
28,  29,  30,  31,  67,  155,  156,  177,  178,  137,  138,  17,  18,  19, 
20,  21,  22,  114,  139,  140,  159,  157,  175,  176,  182,  183,  184, 
187,  4,  5,  181,  133,  134,  135,  136,  188,  12,  179,  180,  159, 
160,  161,  162,  163,  164,  151,  152,  153,  154,  128,  130,  141, 
142,  143,  144,  145,  146,  11,  85,  86,  88,  90,  96,  99,  103,  104, 
105,106,  111,  186,  189,  190,  194,  13,14,33,44,45,46,47,48, 
51,  52,  53,  91,  92,  93,  94,  108,  109,  110,  112,  113,  115,  116, 
117,  118,  120,  122,  123,  124,  125,  129,  131,  132,  191,  192, 
193,  78,  79,  81,  82,  83,  98,  55,  56,  57,  58,  59,  60,  61,  62,  63, 
64,  65,  32,  34,  35,  36,  37,  38,  39,  40,  41,  42,  43,  54,  70,  71, 
72,  73,  74,  75,  76,  77,  195,  196,  197,  198,  199,  200,  201,  202, 
203,  204,  205,  206,  207,  366,  367,  368,  49,  50,  208,  209,  147, 
148,  149,  150. 


BONDS — ISSUE    OF    1858. 

Redeemed  143  Bonds— Nos.  628,  629,  641,  408,  267,  423,  110, 
477,  68,  98,  359,  390,  441,  10,  49,  76,  83,  120,  197,  355,  356, 
357,  358,  388,  434, 30,  43,  173,  400,  429, 432,  433, 18,  28, 145, 
149, 154, 161, 162, 166,  214,  216,  217,  218,  219,  236,  251,  252, 
253,  320,  352,  353,  354,  456,  498,  454,  428,  108,  426,  427, 
127,  303,  326,  327,  329,  349,  445,  471,  521,  307,  137,  210, 
211,  249,  82,  141,  220,  23,  237,  404,  414,  27,  51,  156,  158, 
165,  378,  314,  368,  266,  380,  381,  53,  54,  55,  56,  57,  58,  178, 
309,  179,  184,  312,  48,  155,  100,  369,  226, 105, 109, 113,  159, 
232,  102,  348,  42,  2,  5,  473,  22,  4,  78,  157,  410,  366,  233, 
234,  235,  360,  25,  478,  437,  501, 177,  81,  84,  7,  231,  407,  384, 
452,  1231,  1274. 

IN    TRUST   FOR    THE    CITY    AND    COUNTY    OF    SAN    FRANCISCO. 

12  Montgomery  Avenue  Bonds— Nos.  1  to  12,  inclusive. 


98  TREASURER'S  REPORT. 

GENERAL  RECAPITULATION. 

BALANCES    TO    CKEDIT    OF    THE    DIFFERENT   FUNDS,    JUNE  30,   1880. 

City  and  County  of  San  Francisco $855,413  69 

State  of  California 6,546  03 

Street  Assessment  Fund 5  87 

Montgomery  Avenue  Fund 317  51 

Special  Kedemption  Fund '. .  .  5,094  86 

Special  Deposits,  County  Clerk 13,253  11 

Public  Administrators 58,132  92 

Leidesdorff  Street  Opening  Fund 124  91 

Second  Street  Grading  Fund 15  00 

Fifteenth  Avenue  Extension  Fund 2  72 

Dupont  Street  Widening  Fund 1,869  18 

Hibernia  Savings  and  Loan  Society 2,000  00 

Montgomery  Avenue  Change  of  Grade  Fund 135  25 

Public  Colored  School  Piano  Fund 29  00 

Special  Deposit  of  G.  Eeis 177  02 

Special  Deposit  of  S.  C.  Hastings 337  50 

Special  Deposit  of  Taxes  paid  under  Protest 44  60 

Special  Deposit,  Taxes  1872-73  and  1873-74 203  31 

Police  Money 561  01 

Money  belonging  to  Insane  Persons 570  68 


Total $944,834  17 

San  Francisco,  July  26,  1880. 

W.  K.  SHABEK, 
City  and  County  Treasurer. 


LIST  OP  PROPERTY. 


99 


LIST    OF    PROPERTY 

RECEIVED   DURING   THE    LAST  FIVE    YEARS    FROM   THE   DIFFERENT    CORONERS 
AND  NOT  YET  DISPOSED  OF. 


DATE. 

NAME. 

DESCRIPTION  OF   PROPERTY. 

1876    October  27 

C  A  Arnold 

One  knife 

1878    November  20 

A  Andrews 

Pocketknife  police  whistle  memorandum  book 

1880  —  January  17 

AhGnee  

and  papers  . 

January  17.  .. 
April  30  

April  30 

Daniel  Abbott  

John    G.    Adolph,    alias 
Charles  Hartman  

Johanes  Andrea  

Twenty  cents. 

61  80  (coin),  key  and  pocket-knife. 
$2  50  (gold  coin)  five  cents    4  keys    locket  and 

1875—  March  8  ... 

E.  R  .  Buckline  

chain,  open  faced  watch. 

October  22 

E  Bullock        ..   . 

one  breastpin  and  one  purse. 

876  February  12 

A.  H.  Bryant 

1877    September  25 

Peter  Bachler 

Co.,  No.  90,   two  and  one-half  shares  De- 
groot  G.  and  S.  M.  Co.,  No.  631,  ten  shares 
Liverpool  G.  and  S.  Mining  Co.,  No.  58. 

Watch  and  chain 

1878—  March  7  
880  —  June  29 

E.  Bushwick  
John  N.  Beneken  

Watch,  chain  and  ring. 
Not  mentioned. 

1879  —  November  10 

Henry  H.  Berry  

$5  (gold  coin),  $2  70  (silver  coin),  pocket-knife. 

1880    February  28 

Samuel  Brice  

Eighty  cents,  jack-knife. 

1874—  Julv  1 

G.  Campbell  

Three  studs,  two  sloeve-buttons,  one  watch  and 

J    J.  Clark  

one  chain. 
One  pocket-book,  four  Havana  lottery  tickets, 

1877—  July  3  

N.  T.  Cutter  

Nos.   22,206,   8,517,  5,202  and  28,280,    and 
three  China  lottery  tickets. 

One  pair  sleeve-buttons. 

December  1.  .  . 
1879    January  9  

May  12 

?.  Crozier  
J.  H.  Cover  

rhree  studs  and  one  bible. 

One  ring,  shirtstud,  two  knives,   photographs, 
spectacles,  three  keys. 

One  jack-knife. 

1879    Auf^ust  °0 

Henrv  E  Cooper 

Copy  of  deed  and  letters. 

November  10  . 

Chin  Man  Leone:  .  .  . 

Sixtv  cents. 

100 


TREASURER  S    REPORT. 


PEOPERTY  RECEIVED  FROM  CORONERS- CONTINUED. 


DESCRIPTION   OF   PROPERTY. 


1880- January  17... 

April  30 

April  30 

1878— April  13 

November  20. 

1875— June  24 

1877— June  6 

July3 

1877— November  12. 

1879— November  10. 
1880— January  17... 


February  28. 
June  29. . . 


Augustin  Celiz. . . 
Joseph  Chambers 
Chin  Chin  . . , 


John  Dunn . 


John  Dewbline. 
-  Donahue.. 
Thos.  Dudley.. 

J.  Durham 

Annie  Durrin . . 


Richard  Dunn 


Darng  Ah  On. 


Daniel  Desmond. 
Wm.  G.  Davis. . . 


1874-  -November  25  . 
1880— January  17... 

January  17 ... 
June  29 

1878— March  7 

1879— February  28.. 
May  12 


Bridget  Eckman. 
David  Erhardt... 


William  Ellsworth 
Arthur  J.  Evans . . 

Wm.  H.  Fox 

Oscar  Fleishmann. 
A.  Field... 


"  National  Arms  Co."  derringer. 

$1  25  (coin),  one  key  and  memorandum  book. 

Fifteen  cents. 


Spectacles,  pocketknife,  revolver,  pistol,  scab- 
bard and  belt,  knif  e,handkerchief  and  papers. 

Watch,  watchchain,  knife  and  papers. 

One  knife. 

175  shares  South  Comstock  G.  and  S.  Mining  Co. 

One  derringer. 

One  locket,  one  pair  sleeve-buttons,  one  ear- 
ring, charms,  breastpin,  two  pawn  tickets, 
No.  24,444  and  No.  25,005. 

$5  (gold  coin),  $1  35  (silver  coin),  silver  watch, 
pair  sleeve  buttons,  collar  button,  2  studs, 
pocket-knife,  medal,  key  and  2  watch  keys. 

Ten  cents,  sight  draft  60  days  after  sight,  dated 
Cufrey's  Cove,  Cala.,  Aug.  2,  1879  (No.  96), 
drawn  by  Clark  &  Rutherford  per  A.  H.  R., 
and  payable  to  the  order  of  Charley  Duck, 
for  $20,  drawn  on  J .  F .  Byxbee,  No .  10  Cali- 
fornia street,  S.  F.;  indorsed  on  face,  ''Ac- 
cepted Aug.  12th,  1879— John  F.  Byxbee 
per  J.  H.  Witham." 

Eighty -five  cents,  United  States  Navy  discharge 
papers  in  name  of  Thos.  J.  Jackson. 

Two  shirt  studs,  2  collar  buttons,  4  keys. 

One  ring  and  one  thimble. 

Thirty  cents,  2  brass  keys,  pocket-knife  and 
pair  sleeve-buttons. 

One  gold  ring. 

Pair  sleeve-buttons,  2  studs,  pocket-knife  and 
corkscrew. 


One  revolver. 

One  revolver  and  one  key. 

One  pocket-knife. 


1877— March  8 

1879 — January  9 


Sam.  L.  Goss One  revolver,  one  knife  and  one  flute. 

G.  Gardeneir One  revolver. 


LIST  OF  PROPERTY. 


101 


PROPERTY  RECEIVED  FROM  CORONERS— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 

NAME. 

DESCRIPTION   OF  PROPERTY. 

1879    September  30 

Benino  Galindo 

1874—  June  19  
1875—  September  13. 
1876  —  January  8 

Michael  Heydinger  
Michael  Herron  
Pat  Heaney  

One  pistol  and  one  pair  spectacles. 
One  knife. 
Gasburners  and  one  knife 

1877_May  3 

Thos.  Hopwood  .  .  . 

One  ring. 

May  3        .  . 

B.  Heffern  

Pocketknife  and  keys 

1878—  June  7  

L    Heyman 

One  revolver  and  pocketknife 

1879    January  9 

J    Hussey 

Five  shares  Coquette  G  S  and  Copper  Mining 

1879—  August  20 

Benj.  Hallett  

Co.,  No.  192,  papers  and  letters. 
&1  55  (silver  coin)    brass  key    sheath-knife   and 

September  30. 
1880—  February  28.. 
February  28  — 

Jonas  P.  Hult  
Henry  Hartman  
Martin  A.  Heavey.  .  . 

silk  handkerchief. 
Ten  cents. 
Ten  cents,  jack-knife  and  papers. 

June  29 

Edda  H  Hoin 

knife. 

June  29  

Axel  T.  Hartzell..  . 

rings. 

1877—  February  13.. 
1879—  February  28.. 

1877—  February  13.. 

John  Irwing  
Walter  Irvine  

C  .  Josephson  

Four  foreign  coins,  pocketknife  and  purse  .     * 

Three  collar  buttons;  two  studs,   pass  key,  let- 
ters and  papers. 

One  watch,  chain,  and  one  ring 

1878—  March  7 

Peter  Jackson 

June  7  

J.  A.  Johnson  

tons,  one  key  and  two  sleeve  buttons. 
H  .  P  .  B  .  A  .  badge  and  scarfpin  . 

1879—  April  5  

—  Jack 

May  12  

Jorgen  Johnson 

May  12  . 

\V    Johnson 

June  29  

Edward  Johnson 

1876—  April  5  

Aug.  Kammeran  

One  purse 

1878—  January  10.  .. 

A.  Kofer 

1879—  June  30  

Chas.  H.  Kriel  

Three  studs,   collar  button,   papers,   memoran- 
dum books  and  photographs. 

102 


TREASURER  S  REPORT. 


PEOPERTY  RECEIVED  FKOM  CORONERS— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 

NAME. 

DESCRIPTION  OF  PROPERTY. 

1879—  May  12  

1879  —  November  10 
1874—  September  23 
1876—  January  8... 
1877—  July  3  

J.  C.  H.  Kraenzlein  
Martin  Kelly  

One  revolver,  memorandum  book,  pocket  book, 
knife,  pipe,  letters  and  papers. 

Twenty  cents,  5-cent  nickel  and  pocket-knife. 
One  watch  and  chain. 
One  collar  button  and  one  ring. 
One  revolver. 
One  note  for  $35,  dated  Oct.  7,  1877. 
Keys,  padlock,  knife  and  whistle. 

Two  watchchains,  memorandum  book,  photo- 
graphs, knife,  two  studs,  three  collar  but- 
tons, one  sleeve  button  and  one  key. 

Papers. 
Letters  and  papers. 

Papers,  warranty  deed  from  J.  A.  Walz  and  wife 
to  Jacob  Lehmag,  all  of  Jackson  City  and 
County,   Michigan,  for  a  certain  piece  of 
land  in  said  city  and  county. 

Cloth  bag  containing  personal  effects. 
$4  (silver  coin). 
$1  75  (silver  coin),  silver  watch  and  watch-key. 
One  key. 
One  ring. 
One  knife. 

Twenty  shares  Wyoming  Cons.  M.  Co.,   No.  97, 
one  knife,  one  pocketbook  and  one  match- 
box. 

One  revolver. 
One  watch. 
Three  studs. 

One  revolver,  five  studs,   three  sleeve  buttons, 
one  gold  ring,  two  silver  rings,   penholder, 
pencil,   memorandum    book,  photographs, 
papers  and  three  keys. 

Papers  and  keys, 
il  85  (coin),  2  pocket-knives  and  2  keys. 

Twenty  cents,  pair  sleeve-buttons,  pocket-knife, 
3  studs,  lead  pencil  and  tin-type. 

W.  A.  Lightfoot  
T.  Lamprecht  

G.  Levdecker  

1878—  April  13  
June  7  
September  21. 

1879—  February  28.. 
May  12.     . 

Lea  AhHahn  
H.  C  .  Ludennann  

Lee  Yoon  
P.  A.  Larsen  

June  80  

1879—  August  20.... 
November  10. 
November  10' 
1874—  December  9.  .  . 
1875—  June  25  ... 

Jacob  Lehman  

Lee  Ah  You  

Lee  Foo  Won  

Edward  Low 

James  McLaren 

Fr.  Mulvihill 

1875—  December  3.  .  . 
1876—  January  8.... 

August  24  
October  27.... 
1878—  Julys  
November  20  . 

1879—  May  9  

1880—  January  17... 
January  17  ... 

D.  W.  Mannery....  
Chas.  G.  Meyer....  

Fred.  Meyer  
James  McCabe 

Chr.  Myrtelus  
Jas.  H.  Montgomery  

Thos.  McFarland     ... 

James  McGinnis 

ohn  McDonnell    

1 

LIST  OF  PROPERTY. 


103 


PEOPEETY  EECEIVED  FEOM  COEONEES— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 

NAME. 

DESCRIPTION  OF  PROPERTY. 

1880—  January  17  ... 
April  30  

Michael  Mooney  
Joseph  Malcolm  

Thirty-five  cents. 
One  ring,  pair  cuff-buttons,  one  collar-button 

April  12  

Frank  Moore  

and  3  studs. 
$1  15  (coin),   meerschaum    pipe,   pocket-knife, 

June  29 

William  Musgrave 

nickel  case  open-faced  watch,  5  keys. 

June  29  

Martin  McQueeney  

cles  and  memorandum  book  . 

1879-  July  5 

Pierre  Nea°"le  

Sealrin01    two  shirtstuds    collar  button      two 

1880—  February  28.. 

Joshua  A   Norton 

sleeve  buttons,   knife,   revolver  and  bank- 
book No.  18,539  of  San  Francisco  Savings 
Union,  in  the  name  of  J.  Y.  Hayes. 
$2  50  (gold  coin),  $3  00  (silver  coin),  five  fiunc 

1875—  January  12... 
1876    Aprils  

Frank  O'Brien  

silver  coin,  two  car  tickets,  pair  eye  glasses, 
door  key. 
One  collar  button. 

1879—  August  20.... 
November  10  . 
January  17  ... 
1875—  December  3... 

Joseph  Oatley  
Mary  O'Grady  
John  O'Connor  
Thos.  Pickham  

Purse  containing  twenty  cents  and  jack-knife. 
$4  05  (coin)  and  two  earrings. 
Ten  cents,  putty  knife  and  pocketknife. 

1878—  March  7  

W  Peterson 

1879—  May  12  

June  10  

Gaston  Pupat  

1880  —  January  17..  .. 

Bertholdt  Pusch  

ver,  one  pair  sleeve-buttons  and  letters. 

April  30  

John  Powell 

and    three    keys.     The   following    named 
property  was  found  in  room  of  deceased  at 
No.    317   Bush  street:   §1000  (gold  coin), 
$5  55  (silver  coin),  three  foreign  silver  coins, 
twenty  cents  (nickel  coin),  open-faced  silver 
watch,  watchchain,  open-faced  watch. 
Eighty  cents  note  dated  April  29th    1876    for 

1874—  January  24..  .  . 
1875  -October  22.... 

187  8—  September  21  . 

Geo.  Rex  
Peter  Riley.  

Hattie  L.  Russell  

$3000,   fifty  shares  Gold    Mountain    Gold 
Mining  Co.,  note  dated  San  Francisco,  Jan. 
3d,  1865,  for  $105  00,   ten  shares  Ball  Gold 
and   Silver  Mining  Co.,   pawn  ticket  831, 
bankbook  No.    3536,   National  Gold  Bank 
and  Trust  Co.,   in  name  of  J.  G.  Powell, 
showing  credit  of  $16,297  05,   (?)  "Eureka" 
revolver,  trunk  containing  clothing,  papers 
and  personal  effects. 

One  watch  . 
One  rule. 

Three  car  tickets,   one  pair  sleeve  buttons    one 

pair  earrings,  two  breastpins,  one  eardrop, 
locket  and  chain,   neckchain  and    charm, 
black  necklace  and    cross,   clock,   satchel, 
three  memorandum  books,  pawn  ticket  No. 
1,064,  comb,  chemise  stud  and  two  purses. 

104 


TREASURERS    REPORT. 


PROPERTY  RECEIVED  FROM  CORONERS— CONCLUDED. 


DATE. 

NAME. 

DESCRIPTION  OF  PROPERTY. 

1880—  January  17... 
1874    September  23 

John  Rob  Roy  
Jacob  Sohn 

Twenty  cents  and  two  keys  . 
One  watch,  one  chain    two  penknives  and  one 

1875  —  July  30 

Thos.  S.  Shapcott  .  .  . 

key. 
One  matchbox. 

1877  —  January  4  
January  4  
May  3 

Sarah  Sloan  
Jos.  Swallow  
Emma  C    Souther. 

Sleeve  buttons,  collar  buttons,  ring  and  purse. 
Keys. 
Ladv's  watch  chain  with  $2  50  gold  piece  at- 

May 3 

Adolph  F  Souther 

tached,  two  rings  and  pocket  book. 
Watch,  pistol  Masonic  pin  three  studs,  one  col- 

1878   July  5 

W.  E.  Sturgis  

lar  button  and  one  ring. 
Eve  glass,  one  pair  sleeve  buttons,  two  studs, 

July  5 

Michael  Sheehan 

one  collar  button,     pocketknife,     nipper, 
bunch  of  keys  and  papers. 
Watch    broken  chain    ring  two  cuff  buttons, 

1879    January  9 

Rob    Shalladay 

pass  key,  two  watch  keys,  nine  meal  tickets 
collar  button  and  hnif  e. 

Shirt  studs    three  collar  buttons    one  pair  of 

April  5  . 

John  Smith  

sleeve  buttons  and  one  knife. 
One  ring 

May  12 

Jnne  30.  ..    . 

J.  A.  Shoener     

Watchchain,  police  whistle  steel  ring,  with  five 

1879—  September  30. 
September  30. 
1880—  April  30  

Stine  (?)  
Christian  Schneider  
G.  H.  South  

keys,  two  knives,  one  pair  spectacles,   and 
receipt  from  S.  F.  Gas  Light  Go.  for  $10  de- 
posit,   two    memorandum    books,    papers, 
watchchain  and  charms. 
.$2  65  (silver  coin),  "British  Lion"  revolver. 
Twenty  cents. 
"Derringer  Phila"  revolver 

1875    January  12- 

Wm  Trettin..   .  . 

1879—  February  12.. 
1880  —  January  17 

H.  Taureck  
Henry  Thompson 

One  knife. 

1879—  September  36. 
1878    May  6 

Unknown  Man  
Dekka  Vanderpool 

Twenty  cents  (silver  coin),  five  cent  nickel. 

1874—  September  23. 

John  West  

One  purse. 

September  23. 
1876    February  12 

W.  Schroeder  
A   Wiener 

One  pair  sleeve  buttons  and  three  studs. 

July  27 

S   M.  Whiting 

No.  57. 

1877—  May  3  

Chas.  Werner  

Knife  and  ring. 

November  12. 

Jos.  Walker  

November  12. 

Huey  Ah  Wee  

Memorandum  book,  papers,  knife  and  three  keys 

1878  —  November  20  . 
1879    August  20 

D.  Williams  
Wong  Ah  Sik 

One  key. 

1880—  January  17... 

February  28.. 

February  28.. 
April  30     

John  T.  Wolfe  

H.  A.  Woodman  

Louis  A.  Winzig  
John  Wilson  

Colt's  derringer,  pair  cuff  buttons,  two  studs, 
collar  button,  pocketknife,    tobacco    box, 
wooden  pipe,   ring  containing  three  keys, 
silver  ring,  photograph  album  and  photo- 
graphs . 
Pair  spectacles,   rule,   whistle,  sleeve  buttons 
and  papers. 

Pair  of  cuff  buttons,  two  studs  and  letters  . 
$2  25  (silver  coin),  silver  watch,  silver  chain,  po- 

1874   September  23 

C.  F.  Yelverton  

lice    whistle,     pocketknife,    memorandum 
book  and  papers. 
One  purse  . 

1878    September  21 

Yee  \h  Ping 

Police  whistle. 

1876—  Aoril  5.  .  . 

J.  C.  T.  Zaffev... 

Two  rings. 

TAX  COLLECTOR'S  REPORT. 


TAX  COLLECTOR'S  OFFICE, 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  August  14,  1880. 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 


GENTLEMEN — I  have  the  honor  herewith  to  submit,  in  accord- 
ance with  Resolution  No.  14,765  (new  series),  adopted  at  a  meet- 
ing of  the  Board  of  Supervisors  held  July  6,  1880,  my  annual 
Report  for  the  Fiscal  Year  of  1879-1880. 

Respectfully, 

CHAS.  TILLSON, 

Tax  Collector. 


Dr. 

Total  amount  of  Real  Estate  Roll. 


Cr. 

By  Assessments  collected  and  paid  into  Treasury 

By  Erroneous  Assessments 

By  Property  sold  to  State 

By  Delinquent  Taxes 


$3,318,483  54 


1,378  49 
334  76 


$3,320,323  47 


18,890,828  47" 


106 


TAX    COLLECTORS   REPORT. 


Dr. 

Total  Amount  of  City  and  County  Personal  Property 
Roll 

Cr. 

By  Assessments  collected  and  paid  into  Treasury $467,983  33 

By  Erroneous  Assessments 12,434  46 

By  Delinquent  Taxes 219,066  26 

Total  Amount  of  State  Personal  Property  Roll 

Cr. 

By  Assessments  collected  and  paid  into  Treasury $210,187  41 

By  Erroneous  Assessments 5,672  66 

By  Delinquent  Taxes 103,247  61 

Dr. 

Total  Amount  of  Montgomery  Avenue  Real  Estate 
Roll 

Cr. 

By  Assessments  collected  and  paid  into  Treasury 860,158  74 

By  Delinquent  Taxes 84,594  93 


,484  05 


05 


$319,107  68 


$319,107  68 


$94,753  67 


894,753  67 


TAXES    COLLECTED. 


107 


Dr. 

Total  Amount  of  Dupont  Street  Real  Estate  Roll 

Cr. 

By  Assessments  collected  and  paid  into  Treasury 

By  Delinquent  Taxes 


$14,755  82 
93,071  11 


$107,826  93 


$107,826  93 


Total  Amount  of  Fees  and  Penalties  collected  and 

$36,687  10 

89,112  10 

Commissions  on  State  Taxes 

8  355  55 

Penalties  on  Real  Estate  Taxes  1879-80 

14,539  39 

Penalties  on  City  and  County  P.  P.  Taxes,  1879-80  .  . 
Penalties  on  State  P  P  Taxes    1879  80 

3,742  94 
937  12 

$36,687  10 

OTHER  TAXES  COLLECTED  DURING  THE  FISCAL  YEAR  1879-80. 


Taxes  and  Penalties  of  Former  Years 

Montgomery  Avenue  Taxes  of  Former  Years 

By  Sale  of  23  Polltax  Receipts  at  $4  each,  less  25  per 
cent  Commission . . . 


$170,430  92 
164  09 

69  00 


$170,664  01 


108 


TAX   COLLECTOR  S    REPORT. 


SUMMARY  OF  COLLECTIONS  DURING  THE  FISCAL  YEAR  1879-80. 


Total  Amount  collected  and  paid  into  Treasury 


Received  from  Real  Estate  Taxes,  1879-80 83,318,483  54 

Received  from  City  and  County  Taxes,  1879-80 467,983  33 

Received  from  State  Taxes 210,187  41 

Received  from  Montgomery  Avenue  Taxes.  1879-80. .  60,158  74 

Received  from  Dupont  Street  Taxes,  1879-80 14,755  82 

Received  from  Advertising  and  Fees,  1879-80 9,112  10 

Received  from  Commissions  on  State  Taxes,  1879-80.  8,355  55 

Received  from  Penalties  on  Real  Estate  Taxes,  '79-80  14,539  39 

Received  from  Penalties  on  City  and  County  Taxes, 

1879-80 3,742  94 

Received  from  Penalties  on  State  Taxes,  1879-80 937  12 

Received  from  Taxes  and  Penalties  of  Former  Years.  170,430  92 

Received  from  Montgomery  Avenue  Taxes  of  Former 

Years 164  09 

Received  from  Sale  of  23  Polltax  Receipts  at  §4,  less 

25  per  cent  Commission 69  00 


$4,278,919  95 


$4,278,919  95 


EXPENSES     OF    OFFICE. 


Tax  Collector's  Salary 

Salaries  of  Deputies,  Clerks  and  Porter  . . , 

Auctioneer  for  Tax  Sale 

Printing  and  Publishing  Delinquent  List. , 

Advertising 

Books,  Stationery,  etc 


$4,000  00 

46,772  77 

200  00 

2,732  28 

1,230  75 

5,262  87 


$60,198  67 


TAXES   COLLECTED. 


109 


WILLIAM  MITCHELL'S  ADMINISTRATION. 


Expenses.  Salaries $1,454  16 

Amount  collected  during  Term  of  Fifteen  (15)  Days. . 

WILLIAM  FORD'S  ADMINISTRATION. 

Expenses,  Salaries $19,680  27 

Advertising 511  75 

Books,  Stationery,  etc. 3,303 

23,495  66 

Amount  collected  during  Term  of  Four  (4)  Months. . 

CHARLES  TILLSON'S  ADMINISTRATION. 

Expenses,  Salaries $29,638  34 

Advertising 719  00 

Books  and  Stationery 1,959  23 

Printing  Delinquent  List 2,732  28 

Auctioneer's  Fees 200  00 

35,248  85 

Amount  collected  during  Term  of  Seven  and  One- 
half  C7i)  Months. 


,198  67 


$22,295  37 


568,093  70 


3,688,530  88 


$4,728,919  95 


As  the  revenue  law  enforces  the  payment  of  all  taxes  and  as- 
sessments on  real  estate  at  the  office,  I  have  given  special  atten- 
tion to  the  collection  of  personal  property  taxes.  I  find  for  the 
present  fiscal  year  a  smaller  percentage  of  delinquents  than 
usual.  Bearing  in  mind  that  from  this  delinquency  is  to  be  de- 
ducted the  long  list  of  arbitrary  assessments,  taxes  on  shipping 
payable  elsewhere,  estates  in  probate,  failures,  fires  and  prop- 
erty not  to  be  found,  very  little  that  is  really  collectable  will 
find  its  way  to  the  special  counsel  having  the  matter  in  hand. 

Respectfully, 

CHAS.  TILLSON, 

Tax  Collector. 


LICENSE  COLLECTOR'S  REPORT 


OFFICE  OF' THE  COLLECTOR  OF  LICENSES,  ) 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  24,  1880.          j 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — Herewith  please  receive  the  annual  report  of  the 
operations  and  results  of  this  office  for  the  fiscal  year  ending 
June  30,  1880. 

Very  respectfully, 

B.  H.  SINTON, 

Collector  of  Licenses. 


GENERAL  FUND. 

CITY  AND  COUNTY  LICENSES  ISSUED  QUARTERLY. 


LICENSES   ISSUED. 


14,018       Merchandise $79,533  00 

194        Bankers 34,650  00 

461        Brokers 11,43000 

221        Billiard  Tables 2,050  00 

Auctioneers - 1,695  00 

158       Livery  Stables 474  00 

19       Bowling  Alleys 170  00 

150       Pawn-brokers 4,500  00 

Theaters  and  Exhibitions 2,856  00 

Intelligence 525  00 

7,217       Retail  Liquor  Dealers 144,34000 

1,477       Grocery  and  Retail  Liquor  Dealers 29,540  00 

$311,763  00 

24,146       One  Dollar  on  each  of  the  above  Licenses  paid  into  the  Spe 

cial  Fee  Fund 24,146  00 

$335,909  00 

2,405       Exemption  Merchandise  Licenses,  where  business  was  less 
than  $600  per  quarter,  for  which  no  money  was  received. 


LICENSES    ISSUED. 


Ill 


GENERAL  FUND  MUNICIPAL. 

ISSUED   QUARTERLY. 


NUMBER. 

LICENSES    ISSUED. 

AMOUNT. 

4  409 

Municipal  Licenses  

$34,754  50 

300 

3  COO  00 

674 

Produce  Basket  Peddlers  

6,740  00 

o  939 

Dog  Tao'S 

5  878  00 

400 

Duplicate  Do°"  Ta°-s        .       .  .         .... 

200  00 

250 

8,972 

§50,572  50 

GENEKAL  FUND. 

TEN  CENT  STOCK  CERTIFICATE  TAX. 


NUMBER. 

LICENSES    ISSUED. 

AMOUNT. 

266,258 
13  416 

Transfer  and  Original  Issues,  General  Fund.     
Transfer  and  Original  Issues  Minin0'  Bureau  Fund 

$26,625  80 
1  341  60 

279  674 

Total  Issues  at  10  cents  each 

§27  967  40 

STREET  DEPARTMENT  FUND. 

LICENSES  ISSUED  YEARLY. 


NUMBER. 

LICENSES    ISSUED. 

AMOUNT. 

4,024 

Municipal  Licenses  for  Vehicles,  yearly  

$12,467  75 

717 

Vehicle  Numbers  and  Drivers'  Cards  

717  00 

21 

Drivers  Badges  Hacks  and  Coupes 

52  50 

45 

Street  Railroad  Caro,  issued  quarterly  .          1     , 

2  792  75 

4,807 

$16,030  00 

112 


LICENSE    COLLECTOR  S    REPORT. 


RECAPITULATION. 


24,146 

•8,972 
4,807 


2,405 


,     40,330 


LICENSES    ISSUED. 


DR. 

City  and  County  Licenses,  General  Fund 

City  and  County  Licenses,  Special  Fee  Fund 

Municipal  Licenses,  General  Fund 

Municipal  Licenses,  Street  Department  Fund 

Stock  Certificate  Tax,  General  Fund 

Stock  Certificate  Tax,  Mining  Bureau  Fund. , 

Exemption  Merchandise  Licenses 


OR. 


By  Amount  paid  to  City  and  County  Treasurer. 
By  Amount  paid  State  Treasurer 


$311,763  00 
24,146  00 
50,572  50 
16,030  00 
26,625  80 
1,341  60 


$430,478  90 


$429,137  30 
1,341  60 


$430,478  90 


E.  H.  SINTON, 

License  Collector  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco 


REPORT 


OF    THE 


ATTORNEY  iND  COUNSELOR. 

FOE  THE  FISCAL  YEAE  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


OFFICE  OF  THE  ATTORNEY  AND  COUNSELOR 
For  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco, 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  31,  1880. 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco  : 

GENTLEMEN — I  have  the  honor  of  reporting  to  your  Honorable 
Body,  in  compliance  with  your  resolution  No.  14,765  (new  series), 
the  condition  of  the  litigation  of  the  City  and  County  of  San 
Francisco  during  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880,  including 
all  of  the  proceedings  had  in  cases  in  which  said  City  and  County 
is  a  party  or  in  any  manner  interested. 

JOHN  LUTTKELL  MUEPHY, 

Attorney  and  Counselor 
For  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  "]  Superior  Court, 
cisco, 

Plaintiff,    |  Department  2. 
vs. 

From  12th  District  Court. 
Thomas  Mooney  and  600  others. 

Defendants.  J  No.  16,646. 

This  is  a  suit  in  ejectment  commenced  April  16,  1868,  to  recover  every 
portion  of  land  situated  within  the  statutory  boundaries  of  the  city  and 
county  of  San  Francisco,  belonging  to  or  claimed  by  said  city  and  county, 
No  action  appears  to  have  been  taken  in  this  case  since  February  28,  1877. 

8 


114       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

and  I  have  made  preparations  to  recover  the  remaining  parcels  of  land  Tin- 
recovered  at  that  date,  so  that  the  whole  matter  will  be  disposed  of  in  a  short 
time  and  the  suit  dismissed. 


Wm.  H.  Jessup,  ^  4th  District  Court, 

Plaintiff,     No.  15,049. 
vs. 

f  B.  F.  Brooks, 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  Plaintiff's  Attorney 

cisco.  J  No.  in  Supreme  Court,  6,842. 

Action  to  recover  $20,000  damages  to  plaintiff's  premises,  alleged  to  have 
been  occasioned  by  overflowing  of  sewers.  Complaint  filed  March  31,  1869. 
Answer  filed  August  14,  1869.  August  26,  27,  1872,  cause  partially  tried,  but 
continued  upon  plaintiff's  motion  for  leave  to  amend  complaint  and  paying 
costs  of  term.  September  20,  1872,  amended  complaint  filed.  October  31, 
1872,  demurrer  to  amended  complaint  filed.  December  13,  1872,  demurrer 
submitted  on  briefs.  January  21,  1873,  demurrer  overruled.  March  14,  1873, 
answer  to  amended  complaint  filed.  October  22,  23,  24,  27,  1873,  trial;  ver- 
dict for  plaintiff  for  $3,500. 

December  15,  1873,  both  parties  having  moved  for  a  new  trial,  plaintiff's 
motion  was  granted  and  defendant's  withdrawn.  February  24,  1875,  nonsuit 
on  opening  statement.  February  26,  1875,  notice  of  rendition  of  judgment 
served  and  memorandum  of  costs  filed.  March  8,  1875,  received  notice  of 
plaintiff's  intention  to  move  for  a  new  trial.  April  6,  1875,  bill  of  exceptions 
filed.  September  3,  1875,  motion  for  new  trial  argued  and  submitted.  Sep- 
tember 10,  1875,  plaintiff's  motion  for  new  trial  granted. 

1879— April  30  and  May  5,  6,  7,  8,  9,  10,  12,  14  and  15,  trial  by  jury,  and 
•verdict  for  plaintiff  for  $3,500. 

May  26,  1879,  served  and  filed  notice  of  defendant's  intention  to  move  for 
a  new  trial  and  notice  of  motion  to  retax  costs.  June  30,  1879,  served  de- 
fendant's proposed  bill  of  exceptions  and  statement  of  the  case.  July  2d, 
plaintiff's  proposed  amendments  to  defendant's  bill  of  exceptions  and  state- 
ment filed.  July  5,  notice  to  settle  bill  of  exceptions  served  and  filed.  Au- 
gust 1st,  bill  of  exceptions  and  statement  settled  and  filed.  August  29th, 
motion  for  new  trial  submitted  on  briefs.  September  19th,  motion  for  new 
trial  denied.  October  27th,  notice  of  appeal  from  judgment  and  order  refus- 
ing new  trial  served  and  filed.  December  1st,  transcript  on  appeal  served 
and  filed  in  Supreme  Court. 


CITY   LITIGATION.  115 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-"^  Wallace  and  Temple, 

cisco,     *  Defendants'  Attorneys. 

vs. 

f  4th  District  Court. 
San   Francisco    Gas   Co.    and    the 

Citizens'  Gas  Co.  J  No.  15,106. 

This  is  an  action  to  recover  certain  lands,  rights,  franchises  and  privileges, 
on  account  of  violation  of  charter  of  defendants. 

This  action  is  at  issue  and  awaiting  action  in  a  similar  case  against  the 
City  Gas  Company.  This  cause  was  on  January  23,  1880,  assigned  to  De- 
partment 7,  Superior  Court. 


Milo  Hoadley,  >>  12th  District  Court. 

vs.  I  Porter  &  Holladay, 

'Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 
The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. J  No.  15,332. 

Action  to  quiet  title  to  portions  of  Alta  Plaza  and  Hamilton  Square.  A 
decree  for  plaintiff  was  entered  in  July,  1871,  and  the  case  taken  to  the  Su- 
preme Court  of  California.  February  23,  1875,  judgment  and  order  reversed 
and  cause  remanded  for  a  new  trial.  July  28,  1875,  rehearing  denied,  and 
on  September  25th,  bill  of  costs  and  remittitur  filed  and  entered.  November 
29th,  notice  was  given  that  cause  had  been  transferred  to  the  United  States 
Circuit  Court.  December  25th,  defendant's  motion  that  cause  be  remanded 
to  State  court  denied.  January  12,  1876,  amended  bill  in  equity  filed;  17th, 
demurrer  to  amended  bill  in  equity  filed.  June  12th  and  14th,  argument 
had  on  demurrer  to  amended  bill  and  submitted  on  briefs.  September  4, 
1876,  demurrer  to  bill  sustained,  and  ordered  that  cause  be  remanded  to  the 
State  court,  but  judgment  stayed  pending  plaintiff's  proposed  appeal  to  Su- 
preme Court  of  the  United  States.  October  5th,  transcript  of  record  filed  in 
Supreme  Court  of  the  United  States  on  plaintiff's  appeal;  26th,  appellants' 
brief  served;  November  llth,  respondent's  brief  served.  December,  1876, 
judgment  and  order  of  United  States  Circuit  Court  remanding  cause  to  State 
court  for  a  new  trial  affirmed  in  the  United  States  Supreme  Court.  August 
21,  1877,  mandate  of  United  States  Supreme  Court  filed  in  Circuit  Court 
affirming  its  decision.  September  27,  1877,  papers  and  cause  restored  to 
Twelfth  District  Court  for  trial. 

October  15,  1878,  amended  complaint  filed.  October  28th,  answer  to 
amended  complaint  filed.  December  24th,  trial  to  court  and  decree  for  de- 
fendant. September,  1879,  findings  filed.  September  18th,  decree  for  de- 


116       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

fendant  entered.  September  19th,  notice  of  decree  and  judgment  served  and 
filed.  September  29th,  plaintiff's  motion  for  new  trial  tiled.  October  17th, 
plaintiff's  statement  on  motion  for  new  trial  received.  November  5th,  plaintiff's 
motion  for  new  trial  denied.  November  6th,  notice  of  appeal  served.  November 
28th,  time  for  filing  transcript  in  Supreme  Court  extended  sixty  days  from 
date.  Cause  now  on  calendar  of  Supreme  Court. 


Jacob  H.  Blumeiiberg,  ^  Alexander  Campbell, 

Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

f  15th  District  Court. 
Alexander  Austin.  )  No.  6,174. 

Action  to  recover  $3,516  25,  paid  as  a  tax  on  mortgage.  At  issue.  Jury 
waived.  These  moneys  have  been  paid  into  the  Treasury.  September  24,  1875, 
plaintiff  died.  March  14,  1877,  ordered  that  Simon  Mayer,  administrator  of 
estate  of  plaintiff,  deceased,  be  substituted  as  plaintiff.  February  10,  1880, 
cause  dismissed  for  want  of  prosecution.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning 
cause  to  Department  5,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


Edward  Martin,  ^  Winans  &  Belknap, 

Plaintiff's  Attorney. 
vs.  I 

(  4th  District  Court. 
The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. J  No.  17,813. 

Action  to  quiet  title  to  a  lot  northeast  corner  O'Farrell  and  Scott  streets, 
portion  of  Hamilton  Square.  This  cause  being  at  issue  was  transferred  to  the 
United  States  Circuit  Court  December  13,  1875,  on  motion  of  plaintiff.  No. 
in  Circuit  Court,  1452.  The  Circuit  Court  decided  that  it  had  no  jurisdic- 
tion and  cause  ordered  remanded  to  Fourth  District  Court,  but  ordered 
stayed  for  an  appeal  to  the  United  States  Supreme  Court. 


CITY    LITIGATION.  117 

William  Trenouth,  "j   W.  W.  Foote, 

Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

vs. 


John   H.  Baird,  Executor,  etc.,  of 


3d  District  Court. 


the  Estate  of  David  W.  Connolly, 
deceased,  The  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco  et  al.  j  No.  84. 

Action  to  set  aside  deed  made  by  the  city  and  county  of  San  Francisco  to 
defendant  John  H.  Baird.  A  judgment  for  nonsuit  was  entered  April  26, 
1875,  and  the  same  recorded  in  Book  A,  page  365,  for  defendants  for  costs, 
and  roll  filed.  September  24,  1875,  motion  for  new  trial  denied  and  appeal 
taken  to  Supreme  Court  of  California,  in  which  court  the  judgment  of  the 
lower  court  was  affirmed  March  1,  1877.  March  14,  1877,  writ  of  error  from 
United  States  Supreme  Court  filed  and  copy  of  same  lodged  with  clerk  of 
Supreme  Court  for  defendant  in  error;  bond  filed.  April  23,  1877,  assign- 
ment of  error  filed.  April  24,  1877,  clerk  of  Supreme  Court  of  California  de- 
livered record  to  William  Trenouth  for  clerk  of  United  States  Supreme  Court. 
Action  pending  in  United  States  Supreme  Court. 


George  Davidson,  ^  McCullough  &  Boyd, 

Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 
vs. 

f  4th  District  Court. 
The  City  and  County  of    San  Fran- 
cisco. J  No.  18,293. 

Action  to  quiet  title  to.  premises  situated  in  the  southerly  line  of  Lombard 
street  and  a  part  thereof  being  a  portion  of  what  is  generally  known  as  Good 
Children  street.  At  issue  April  2,  1873. 

August  8,  1876,  Cope  &  Boyd  substituted  for  plaintiff's  attorneys.  Janu- 
ary 23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  7,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


John  J.  Levy,  >  15th  District  Court. 

vs.  (No.  7,953. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     Barstow,  S.  &  H., 

cisco,  Peter  Donahue  et  al.  j  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

Action  brought  to  recover  possession  of  an  undivided  one-tenth  interest  in 
certain  real  estate,  together  with  damages  in  the  sum  of  $1,000  for  withhold- 
ing the  same,  and  for  rents  and  profits  thereof  at  the  rate  of  $100  per  month 
from  January  1,  1870.  At  issue  September  13,  1873.  April  29,  1880,  or- 
der assigning  cause  to  Department  4,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


118  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-^  19th  District  Court, 
cisco, 

vs.  I  No.  1,230. 

The   Spring  Valley   Water  Works     S.  M.  Wilson, 

and  Joseph  Lawlor.  J  Defendants'  Attorney. 

Action  in  ejectment  to  recover  from  defendant  part  of  a  public  square  of 
the  city  and  county  of  San  Francisco,  called  and  known  as  Franklin  Park, 
and  for  the  sum  of  $10,000  damages  for  the  withholding  thereof  and  for 
$15,000  damages  caused  by  the  loss  of  the  value  of  the  rents  and  profits  there- 
of; also  for  costs  of  suit.  July  2,  1873,  answer  of  Spring  Valley  Waterworks 
filed.  July  8,  1873,  trial  of  cause  and  judgment  for  plaintiff  as  against  the 
Spring  Valley  Water  Work%.  July  22,  1872,  demurrer  of  Joseph  Lawlor  filed. 
July  22,  1874,  judgment  against  the  Spring  Valley  Water  Works  entered  in 
Book  A,  page  800.  Submitted  on  demurrer  of  defendant  Lawlor,  September  5, 
1874.  March  31,  1876,  Lawlor's  demurrer  overruled.  April  1,  1876,  notice 
of  overruling  of  demurrer  served  and  filed.  September  18,  1876,  answer  of 
Lawlor  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  4,  Su- 
perior Court,  filed. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-^i  19th  District  Court, 
cisco, 

vs.  f  No.  1,229. 

Joseph  Lawlor.  J 

Ejectment  to  recover  part  of  Franklin  Park;   $1,500  damages  for  with- 
holding same  and  $5,000  damages  rents  and  profits; 

April  17,  1873,  complaint  filed.     August  8th,  receipt  for  fees  filed. 


The  Board  of  Education  of  the  City  ]    19th  District  Court, 
and  County  of  San  Francisco, 

I   No.  687. 
vs. 

I 
Patrick  Donahue   and    Charles  E.    |   Jarboe  &  Harrison, 

Krause.  Defendants'  Attorneys. 

Action  to  recover  portion  of  Mission  Block  No.  21  and  for  $500  damages. 

February  20  and  21,  1878,  cause  tried  and  submitted.  March  1st,  judg- 
ment for  defendants;  13th,  notice  of  motion  for  new  trial  filed.  March  26th, 
statement  of  the  case  filed.  April  1st,  findings  filed.  April  19th,  new  trial 
refused.  May  3d,  judgment  recorded  in  book  D,  page  13.  May  6th,  notice 


CITY    LITIGATION. 


119 


of  appeal^filed.  May  14th,  transcript  filed  in  Supreme  Court.  August  28th, 
appellant's  points  and  authorities  filed.  September  23d,  cause  ordered  on 
calendar.  September  24th,  respondents'  points  and  authorities  argued  and 
submitted.  October  9th,  judgment  reversed  and  cause  remanded  for  new 
trial.  November  2d,  defendants'  petition  for  rehearing  filed  in  Supreme 
Court.  December  2d,  rehearing  denied. 

1879 — January  10th,  remittitur  from  Supreme  Court  reversing  judgment 
and  order  with  costs,  and  cause  remanded  for  new  trial.  January  18th, 
cost  bill  filed;  21st,  notice  of  motion  to  retax  costs  filed.  April  24th,  order 
on  trial.  May  6th,  order  judgment  for  plaintiff  as  prayed  for;  thirty  days' 
stay;  three  stipulations  filed;  cost  bill  filed.  June  6th,  notice  of  motion  for 
new  trial  filed.  June  12th,  findings  filed;  19th,  judgment  recorded  (D  585) 
favor  of  plaintiff.  Roll  filed  and  judgment  docketed.  July  7th,  order  ex- 
tending time  to  file  statement  filed;  31st,  bill  of  exceptions  filed.  Plaintiff's 
proposed  amendments  to  bill  of  exceptions  filed. 


The   People,    on    the    relaticjn    of 
James    Otis, 


Hypp  olite  Audiffred  et  al. 


15th  District  Court. 
No.  8,636. 
^E.  J.  Pringle, 


Defendants'  Attorney. 


Action  to  abate  nuisance,  to  wit:  to  remove  certain  obstructions  from  East 
street  placed  there  by  defendants. 

February  7,  1878,  cause  at  issue.  March  28th,  jury  waived  and  cause 
placed  on  equity  calendar.  1880 — January  23d,  order  assigning  cause  to 
Department  5,  Superior  Court,  filed.  July  13th,  cause  dismissed  for  want  of 
prosecution. 


Hugh  McClosky, 


J.  M.  Wood, 


vs. 


Plaintiff's  Attorney. 


3d  District  Court. 

The  City  and  County  of   San  Fran- 
cisco. J  No.  855. 


Action  brought  to  recover  the  sum  of  $1,260  gold  coin,  with  interest  from 
April  6,  1874,  claimed  to  be  due  from  defendant  upon  a  contract  for  grading 
Jefferson  Square.  June  11,  1874,  complaint  filed.  July  3,  1874,  demurrer 
to  complaint  filed.  August  17th,  demurrer  sustained.  November  24th, 


120       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

amended  complaint  filed.  December  2,  1874,  answer  filed.  September  15, 
1875,  trial  had  and  cause  submitted  on  briefs.  April  11,  1878,  submission 
set  aside  and  cause  directed  to  be  re-tried.  February  10,  1880,  cause  re- 
served, to  be  taken  up  on  notice  to  either  party.  January  23,  1880,  order  as- 
signing cause  to  Department  3,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


Andrew  Hinimelman,  ]  M.  A.  Edmonds, 

Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

}•  3d  District  Court. 
No.  892. 


The  City  and  County  of   San  Fran- 

cisco.  J   No.  in  Supreme  Court,  5,895. 

To  quiet  title  to  certain  premises  described  in  the  complaint,  which  are  a 
part  of  Alta  Plaza,  a  Western  Addition  reservation.  July  14,  1874,  complaint 
filed.  September  16th,  answer  filed.  September  19,  1876,  trial  had.  De- 
cember 19,  1876,  judgment  rendered  for  defendant.  December  26th,  motion 
for  new  trial.  January  19,  1877,  judgment  entered  (A,  732).  January  23, 
1877,  certified  copy  of  judgment  recorded  in  County  Kecorder's  office  in  liber 
864  of  deeds,  page  145.  April  30th,  motion  for  new  trial  submitted.  July 
12th,  motion  for  new  trial  refused.  September  6,  notice  of  appeal  given. 
October  12th,  transcript  on  appeal  filed.  February  11,  1879,  appellant's 
points  and  authorities  filed.  February  15th,  respondent's  points  and  author- 
ities filed.  February  27th,  cause  argued  and  submitted  on  briefs.  March 
15th,  stipulation  filed  allowing  appellant  to  April  7th  to  file  brief.  April  7th, 
appellant's  brief  filed.  April  28th,  stipulation  allowing  respondent  ten  days 
to  file  brief  filed.  May  10th,  stipulation  allowing  respondent  thirty  days  to 
file  brief  filed.  June  9th,  stipulation  allowing  respondent  twenty  days  to 
file  brief  filed.  June  30th,  stipulation  allowing  respondent  fifteen  days  to  file 
brief  filed.  July  14th,  stipulation  allowing  respondent  thirty  days  to  file 
brief  filed.  January  26,  1880,  continued  —  no  appearance. 


Hallett  Swift,  -\  James  McCabe, 

Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

f  3d  District  Court. 
P.  H.  Canavan  et  al.  J  No.  555. 

Suit  to  recover  a  judgment  for  damages  claimed  to  have  been  sustained  by 
the  plaintiff  in  consequence  of  the  removal  of  a  dwelling  house  occupied  by 


CITY    LITIGATION.  121 

him  from  certain  premises,  part  of  Yerba  Buena  Park,  by  direction  of  the 
defendants,  who  were  acting  as  City  Hall  Commissioners.  Cause  tried  May 
3  and  4,  1875,  and  submitted  on  briefs.  January  3,  1876,  judgment  for 
plaintiff  for  $750  and  costs.  January  15th,  notice  of  intention  to  move  for 
a  new  trial  served  and  tiled.  April  21,  1876,  motion  for  new  trial  submitted. 
September  22d,  motion  for  new  trial  denied.  October  4th,  judgment  en- 
tered (A,  666).  October  5th,  defendants'  notice  of  appeal  filed.  November 
3,  1876,  transcript  on  appeal  filed.  May  29,  1877,  appellant's  brief  filed. 
July  5th,  respondent's  brief  filed.  July  10th,  cause  submitted.  October 
25th,  judgment  reversed  and  cause  remanded,  with  directions  for  new  trial. 
August  3,  1878,  served  and  filed  notice  of  motion  for  judgment.  August  9th, 
motion  for  judgment  denied  and  cause  ordered  on  calendar  for  trial. 


The  Board  of  Education,  ^    19th  District  Court. 


Ursula  Ky an  et  al.  )   No.  2,716. 

Ejectment  for  school  lot,  being  50-vara  lot  5  of  block  123,  Western  Addi- 
tion, and  for  $4,000  damages.  June  16,  1874,  complaint  filed.  February  5, 
1875,  answer  of  Satterlee  filed.  April  19,  1876,  death  of  Satterlee  suggested. 
September  18,  1879,  stipulation  and  disclaimer  as  to  certain  lands  filed. 
January  23,  1880,  order  cause  assigned  to  Department  5,  Superior  Comt. 
July  22,  1880,  ordered  over. 


The   Board   of    Education,  ^  19th  District  Court. 

vs. 
W.  L.  Urton  et  al.  J  No.  2,715. 

Ejectment  for  school  lot,  being  50-vara  lot  No.  2  in  block  325,  Western 
Addition,  and  to  recover  $4,000  damages.  June  16,  1874,  complaint  filed. 
July  21,  1874,  complaint  amended.  February  26,  1879,  answer  of  W.  L. 
Urton  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  4  filed. 


122       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

The  Board  of  Education,  ]  19th  District  Court. 

I 
vs. 


Frederick  Mason  et  al.  J  No.  2,750. 

Ejectment  for  school  lot  in  Potrero  Block  No.  163  and  to  recover  $4,000 
damages. 

June  29,  1874,  complaint  filed.  August  12,  1874,  appearance  of  defend- 
ants filed.  March  20,  1878,  summons  returned  and  same  filed. 


The  Board  of  Education,  ^    19th  District  Court. 

No.  2,751. 

Cope  &  Boyd, 
Bernard  B.  Keenan  et  al.  J  Defendants'  Attorneys . 

Ejectment  for  school  lot  in  Mission  Block  No.  61,  and  to  recover  $4,000 
damages. 

June  29,  1874,  complaint  filed.  December  15,  1874,  answer  filed.  August 
14  and  15,  1877,  trial  by  the  court  and  judgment  of  nonsuit.  August  22d, 
judgment  recorded,  "  C,"  page  448.  November  20th,  bill  of  exceptions 
filed.  December  7th,  notice  of  plaintiff's  appeal  filed  and  transcript  filed  in 
Supreme  Court.  August  29,  1878,  appellant's  pt>ints  and  authorities  filed. 
August  20,  1879,  argued  and  submitted.  No.  in  Supreme  Court,  5,898. 

1880— January  19th,  order  to  be  heard  in  Department  1.  January  20th, 
O.  H.  Parker  substituted  as  appellant's  attorney.  January  24th,  respond- 
ent's points  and  authorities  filed;  29th,  argued  and  continued.  February  3d, 
argued  and  submitted.  April  6th,  submission  set  aside  and  ordered  to  be 
heard  in  bane. 


Board  of  Education,  ^  19th  District  Court. 


John  Bensley  et  als.  J  No.  2,755. 

Ejectment  for  school  lot  in  Potrero  Block  No.  46,  and  to  recover  $4,000 
damages.  June  30,  1874,  complaint  filed.  August  11,  1874,  served  Sheriff 
with  notice  as  to  service  of  summons. 


CITY    LITIGATION.  123 

Board  of  Education,  ^    19tli  District  Court. 

... 

John  Center  et  al.  }   No.  2,756. 

Ejectment  for  school  lot  in  Potrero  Block  No.  39,  and  to  recover  $4,000 
damages.  June  30,  1874,  complaint  filed.  August  11,  1874,  served  Sheriff 
with  notice  as  to  service  of  summons. 


Board  of  Education,  ^    19th  District  Court. 

vs. 

Wheeler  Martin  et  al,  J   No.  2,740. 

Ejectment  for  school  lot  in  Mission  Block  104,  and  to  recover  $4,000  dam- 
ages. 

June  26,  1874,  complaint  filed.  August  14  and  15,  1877,  trial  by  court 
and  nonsuit.  August  25th,  judgment  recorded,  "  C,"  454.  November  20th, 
bill  of  exceptions  filed.  December  7th,  notice  of  plaintiff's  appeal  filed. 
December  7th,  dismissed  as  to  West  Evans.  December  7th,  notice  of  appeal 
filed.  August  27,  1879,  cause  appealed,  argued  and  submitted.  No.  in  Su- 
preme Court,  5,899. 

1880 — January  19th,  order  to  be  heard  in  Department  1.  January  20,  C. 
H.  Parker  substituted  as  appellant's  attorney.  January  24th,  respondents' 
points  and  authorities  filed;  29th,  argued  and  continued.  February  3d,  ar- 
gued and  submitted.  April  6th,  submission  set  aside  and  ordered  to  be 
heard  in  bane. 


Board  of  Education,  ^    ]  9th  District  Court . 

vs. 

James  P.  Dameron  et  al.  J   No.  2,741. 

Ejectment  for  school  lot,  being  50-vara  lot  5  in  Block  29,  Western  Addi- 
tion, and  to  recover  $4,000  damages. 

June  26,  1874,  complaint  filed.  September  5th,  answer  filed.  September 
22,  1875,  amended  answer  filed.  August  28,  1876,  stipulation  waiving  jury 
filed.  June  6,  1878,  restraining  order  filed.  August  12,  1879,  amended  an- 


124       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

swer  filed;  19th,  cause  tried  and  submitted.  September  loth,  judgment  for 
plaintiff;  9th,  cost  bill  filed.  October  4th,  notice  for  motion  for  new  trial 
filed  ;6th,  motion  for  new  trial  denied. 


Board  of  Education,  ^    19th  District  Court. 

vs. 

Jesse  Franklin  et  al.  J    No.  2,742. 

Ejectment  to  obtain  possession  of  school  lot  in  Block  374,  Western  Addi- 
tion, and  $4,000  damages. 

This  case  was  commenced  June  26,  1874,  and  after  a  trial  by  jury  a  judg- 
ment was  rendered  for  plaintiff,  and  the  same  recorded  July  5,  1877,  in 
Judgment  Book  "  C,"  page  404.  July  12,  1877,  writ  of  possession  issued 
and  order  staying  execution  three  days  filed,  and  notice  of  appeal  and  under- 
taking filed. 


Board  of  Education,  •>    19th  District  Court. 


James  McMahon  et  al.  J   No.  2,749. 

Ejectment  for  school  lot  in  Mission  Block  No.  34,  and  to  recover  $4,000 
damages. 

June  29,  1874,  complaint  filed.  August  11,  1874,  dismissed  as  to  defend- 
ant Baldwin.  April  3,  1875,  summons  returned  served.  March  29,  1880, 
dismissal  as  to  certain  lands  and  owners  thereof  filed. 


David  Carroll,  >>  19th  District  Court. 


Peter  O'Keily.  J  No.  730. 

Action  brought  to  recover  $10,000  damages  against  a  policeman  for  an  al- 
leged assault  and  false  imprisonment. 


CITY    LITIGATION.  125 

November  27,  1872,  copy  of  summons  and  complaint  served  on  defendant. 
December  17,  1872.  answer  filed. 

1880- -January  23d,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  5,  Superior 
Court,  filed.  February  llth,  dismissed  for  want  of  prosecution. 


The  San  Francisco  LakeWater  Com-^  4th  District  Court, 
pany, 

vs. 

David    Mahoney,     The    City    and 

County  of  San  Francisco  et  al.      J  No.  19,423. 

Action  brought  to  procure  the  condemnation  for  the  use  of  plaintiff  of  the  wa- 
ters of  the  Laguna  de  la  Merced,  situate  in  this  city  and  county,  with  the  spring  s 
which  feed  and  streams  which  empty  into  the  same,  and  its  arms,  branches 
and  outlet,  as  delineated  on  a  map  attached  to  the  complaint,  and  the  spring 
or  stream  flowing  into  said  laguna  from  the  eastward  near  its  southern  ex- 
tremity, on  land  owned  by  defendant  Mahoney  and  others,  together  with  a 
strip  of  land  owned  by  defendant  Mahouey  and  others,  together  with  a  strip 
of  land  around  said  laguna  four  rods  in  width. 

December  30,  1874,  suit  commenced  and  summons  served  on  Mayor  Otis. 
January  9,  1875,  demurrer  of  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco  filed.  July 
20,  1877,  demurrer  of  city  and  county  overruled.  August  2d,  answer  of  city 
and  county  filed.  September  24,  1877,  supplemental  answer  of  Spring  Val- 
ley Water  Works  filed.  ' 

1880 — January  23d,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  6  filed.  Febru- 
ary 9,  order  case  dismissed. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-^  3d  District  Court, 
cisco, 

I  No.  3,650. 
vs. 

Wilson  &  Wilson, 
David  F.  McCarthy.  J  Defendants'  Attorneys. 

To  recover  judgment  for  the  sum  of  $24,906.50,  gold  and  silver  coin,  mon- 
eys alleged  to  have  been  had  and  received  by  defendant  in  his  official  capacity  as 
clerk  of  the  Police  Judge's  Court  and  converted  to  his  own  use,  and  interest 
thereon  from  January  11,  1875.  June  14,  1875,  complaint  filed  and  sum- 
mons and  writ  of  attachment  issued.  Written  instructions  delivered  to 
Sheriff  McKibbin,  and  attachment  levied  in  this  city  and  county.  Summons 
published.  March  30,  1876,  answer  filed.  June  9th,  verified  answer  filed. 
Wilson  &  Wilson  substituted  as  attorneys,  February  11,  1879. 


126       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

Geo.    F.    Sharp    and    Mary     Ann   |   G.  F.  &  W.  H.  Sharp, 
Sprotil,      Administratrix    of    the   I 
estate  of  John  Sproul,  deceased,    |  Plaintiffs'  Attorneys. 

vs.  I   12th  District  Court. 

A.  Austin,  Tax  Collector,  et  al.          j  No.  19,014. 

To  recover  $50,379  87,  gold  coin,  with  legal  interest,  alleged  to  be  due  for 
so  much  money  had  and  received  by  defendant  to  plaintiffs'  use  in  the  col- 
lection of  outside  land  assessments,  etc.,  which  said  lands,  on  March  8,  1866, 
were  in  possession  of  plaintiffs  and  their  predecessors  in  interest. 

September  29,  1875,  summons  served  on  defendant,  Austin. 

October  5,  1875,  summons  served  on  Mayor  Otis.  October  16,  separate 
demurrers  to  complaint  filed.  October  29,  demurrers  argued  and  submit- 
ted. November  12,  1875,  demurrers  overruled,  with  ten  days  to  answer. 
January  24,  1876,  answer  filed.  November  15,  16,  22,  trial  commenced,  and 
further  hearing  continued.  November  24,  bill  of  particulars  demanded 
December  2,  bill  of  items  demanded.  January  11,  1877,  order  continuing 
trial  of  cause  to  February  6,  1877.  April  7,  notice  of  motion  filed.  April  18, 
order  continuing  cause  until  April  24,  1877.  October  20,  21,  1879,  trial 
commenced,  and  on  plaintiff's  motion  continued  till  November  10,  1879, 
with  leave  to  plaintiff  to  file  amended  complaint.  January  5,  1880,  amended 
complaint  filed.  January  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  1  of  Su- 
perior Court  filed.  February  16,  order  continued  to  day  to  be  fixed. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  ]   No.  in  Supreme  Court,  6,187. 
cisco, 

4th  District  Court. 

vs.  }-  No.  20,107. 

McCabe,  Patterson  et  al., 
George  W.  Ellis  et  al.  j  Defendants'  Attorneys. 

Suit  brought  to  obtain  a  decree  declaring  the  conveyance  to  defendant 
Ellis,  made  by  the  State  Board  of  Tide  Land  Commissioners,  of  certain 
lands,  being  what  is  known  as  Mission  Creek  and  Channel  Street,  from 
Ninth  to  Eighteenth  Street,  to  be  null  and  of  no  effect,  etc. 

January  6,  1876,  complaint  filed.  After  the  disposal  of  legal  points  aris- 
ing upon  demurrers  and  motions,  the  case  was  brought  to  trial  on  December 
5,  1874,  and  judgment  rendered  for  all  the  defendants,  except  H.  P.  Kent, 
Aaron  Miller,  William  Miller,  James  McCabe,  George  J.  Stinson  and  Frank 
Pierce  McLean.  February  9,  1878,  judgment  recorded  "N"  500.  May  22, 
plaintiff's  motion  for  a  new  trial  refused.  June  21,  1878,  filed  notice  of  ap- 


CITY    LITIGATION.  127 

peal  by  plaintiff.  July  25,  1878,  served  and  filed  transcript  on  appeal. 
August  16,  Walter  Van  Dyke  substituted  as  attorney  for  George  W.  Ellis,  in 
place  of  James  McCabe.  1879,  May  27,  received  copies  of  respondents* 
points  and  authorities.  June  3,  appellant's  points  and  authorities  filed. 
June  3  and  4,  City  and  County  Attorney  attended  the  Supreme  Court,  at 
Sacramento,  and  cause  continued  for  the  term.  September  9,  respondents' 
points  and  authorities  filed  by  W.  Van  Dyke.  September  15  and  16,  argued 
in  Supreme  Court,  with  leave  to  appellant  to  file  further  brief  in  twenty 
days  on  the  effect  of  the  act  of  March  27,  1874,  as  to  title.  October  16, 
appellant's  brief  filed.  October  27,  respondents'  brief  in  reply  filed.  De- 
cember 29,  1879,  decision  of  the  Court  filed.  Judgment  and  order  affirmed. 
31,  remittitur  and  opinion  of  Supreme  Court  filed  and  entered  in  Fourth. 
District  Court. 


Wm.  Schad  et  al.  ]    S.  A.  Sharp, 

Plaintiffs'  Attorney, 
vs. 

12th  District  Court. 

The  City  and  County.  J  No.  19,520. 

To  obtain  a  decree  declaring  that  certain  water-closets  of  defendant  be  re- 
moved, as  alleged  in  the  complaint,  be  abated,  and  that  plaintiffs  have  judg- 
ment for  $5,000  damages.  April  21,  1876,  complaint  filed  and  summons 
served.  May  1,  1876,  demurrer  filed.  July  28,  demurrer  overruled.  August  7, 
1876,  answer  filed.  3878,  S.  A.  Sharp,  plaintiffs'  attorney,  died.  Jan.  15,  1879, 
Henry  Schwerin  and  Teresa  Schad  substituted  as  executor  and  executrix  of 
the  estate  of  William  Schad,  deceased,  as  plaintiff  in  his  stead.  February 
27,  1879,  order  continued  over  term.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning 
cause  to  Department  1  of  Superior  Court  filed. 


The  City  and  County  of   San  Fran-  ^ 

Cisco,  12th  District  Court. 

vs.  > 

No.  19,652. 
John  Nightingale  et  al.  J 

Ejectment  for  part  of  Alamo  Square,  and  to  recover  damages  in  the  sum 
of  $10,000  for  the  withholding  thereof,  and  $10,000  damages  for  the  loss  of 
the  value  of  the  rents  and  profits. 

May  25,  1876,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  May  27,  summons 
returned  served  on  all  defendants.  November  9,  1876,  answer  of  defendants 
filed.  October  27,  1879,  order  continued  over  term.  January  23,  1880, 
order  assigning  cause  to  Department  2  filed. 


128  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  Califor-  ^ 

ma  ex  rel.  A.  J.  Bryant,  12th  District  Court. 

vs.  f 

No.  19,658. 
John  Nightingale  et  al.  J 

To  obtain  a  decree  that  certain  obstructions  upon  Alamo  Square  are  nuis- 
ances, and  that  the  same  be  abated.  Same  as  preceding.  November  9,  1876, 
answer  filed.  October  27,  1879,  order  continued  over  term.  January  23 
1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  2  filed. 


Joseph  M.  Wood,  ] 

I    3d  District  Court. 
vs. 

|   No.  4,562. 
City  and  County  et  al.  J 

Action  to  obtain  a  decree  quieting  the  plaintiff's  title  to  land  claimed  by 
some  of  the  defendants  to  be  part  of  Columbia  street. 

February  9,  1876,  summons  served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  February  19,  1876, 
answer  of  City  and  County  filed;  also,  that  of  John  Hagan,  Superintendent 
of  Streets,  etc.  March  8th,  answer  of  Gottig  and  German  Savings  and  Loan 
Society  filed.  March  16th,  demurrer  of  Heritage  and  Wensinger  filed.  March 
20th,  stipulation  dismissing  as  to  F.  S.  Wensinger  filed.  April  21st,  demur- 
rer of  Heritage  overruled  and  10  days  to  answer;  dismissed  as  to  Wensinger. 
December  18th,  cause  set  for  trial  February  6,  1877.  July  31,  1879,  trial 
continued  to  August  7th.  August  18th,  default  against  defendant  O.  E. 
Brady.  January  3,  1880,  received  notice  of  judgment  for  plaintiff,  rendered 
December  3,  1879.  January  9th,  notice  of  motion  for  new  trial  on  behalf  of 
certain  defendants  filed  and  ten  days  further  time  given  to  prepare  statement 
of  the  case. 


Otis  J.  Preston  et  al.,  •>    12th  District  Court. 

vs.  I    No.  19,278. 

J.  B.  Haggin,  City  and  County  of 

San  Francisco  et  al.  J   No.  in  Supreme  Court,  6,444. 

Suit  brought  to  obtain  a  decree  quieting  title  to  portion  of  block  207,  Po- 
trero  Nuevo,  and  which  includes  fractional  lots  Nos.  5  and  6  of  the  Tide 
Land  survey. 

Suit  commenced  in  February,  1876,  and  was  tried,  argued  and  submitted 
September  26,  1877.  October  29,  judgment  rendered  for  defendants.  No- 
vember 8,  1877,  plaintiffs'  notice  of  intention  to  move  for  a  new  trial  filed. 


CITY    LITIGATION  129 

October  25,  1878,  motion  for  new  trial  refused.  November  23,  1878,  plain- 
tiffs' notice  of  appeal  filed.  December  23,  1878,  received  copy  of  transcript 
on  plaintiffs'  appeal.  1879,  January  20,  transcript  on  appeal  certified.  Jan- 
uary 24,  leave  granted  plaintiff  to  file  specification  of  errors  nunc  pro  tune 
April  5,  1878.  February  6,  notice  of  motion  to  vacate  order  of  January  24 
filed  and  denied.  No.  in  Supreme  Court,  6,444. 

January  29,  transcript  on  appeal  filed.  1880,  March  2,  appellants'  points 
and  authorities  filed.  March  4,  respondents'  points  and  authorities  filed. 
March  8,  respondents'  points  and  authorities  on  behalf  of  Hearst  and  Hag- 
gin  filed.  March  15,  argued  and  appeal  dismissed  as  to  judgment,  and  order 
denying  motion  for  new  trial  affirmed.  The  appeal  was  dismissed  without 
prejudice.  April  17,  remittitur  to  County  Clerk.  22,  order  cause  assigned 
to  Department  2,  Superior  Court.  24,  remittitur  filed  in  Department  2,  Su- 
perior Court. 


E.  F.  Morrow  et  al.,  ^    12th  District  Court. 

vs. 

John  Bensley,  The  City  and  County 

of  San  Francisco  et  al.  '  )   No.  19,724. 

To  obtain  a  decree  quieting  title  to  premises  known  as  the  Felt  Tract,  in 
the  Potrero  Nuevo,  including  Blocks  128  and  140,  and  parts  of  Blocks  104, 
105,  126,  139,  141  and  162. 

June  23,  1876,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  June  28,  1876,  sum- 
mons served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  July  10,  1879,  answer  of  the  city  and  county 
filed.  April  8,  1876,  order,  continued  over  term.  January  23,  1880,  order 
assigning  cause  to  Department  2  filed. 


Chas.  H.  Sawyer,  ]   4th  District  Court. 

No.  14,823. 
vs. 

Wm.  M.  Pierson, 

Plaintiff's  Attorney. 
The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. J   No.  in  Supreme  Court,  3,845. 

Action  to  quiet  title  to  a  piece  of  land  coinoienciug  at  the  southwest  cor- 
ner of  Steiner  and  Jackson  streets;  thence  south  along  Steiner  street  440 
feet,  and  to  the  north  line  of  the  Welton  and  Horstefall  or  United  States  Ar- 
bor Claim;  thence  westerly  along  said  last  mentioned  line  275  feet,  more  or 
less,  to  a  point  on  the  south  side  of  Jackson  street,  which  is  145  feet  west  of 
the  southwest  corner  of  Jackson  and  Sterner  sfcreuts,  and  thence  along  the 
south  line  of  Jackson  street  to  place  of  beginning. 

9 


130       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

1869,  January  5,  complaint  filed  and  summons  served.  February  19,  an- 
swer filed.  July  14,  referred  to  Lewis  Shearer.  December  5,  1870,  judg- 
xnenffor  plaintiff.  May  6,  1873,  defendant's  motion  for  a  new  trial  denied. 
May  9,  1873,  notice  of  appeal  filed.  June  17,  1873,  filed  transcript  and 
appeal.  October  17,  1873,  filed  appellants'  brief.  September  10,  1874,  re- 
ceived copy  of  respondent's  brief.  March  9,  1875,  received  copy  further 
brief  of  respondent.  .  November  4,  1875,  filed  appellant's  brief  to  point  that 
notice  of  intention  to  move  for  a  new  trial  was  given  in  time  and  cause  sub- 
mitted on  briefs  on  file.  November  27,  1875,  order  denying  new  trial 
reversed  as  of  the  day  of  the  submission  of  the  cause  in  Supreme  Court,  and 
cause  remanded  for  a  new  trial.  April  23,  1877,  remittitur  filed.  Plaintiff 
has  deceased. 

July  12,  1877,  received  notice  of  appearance  of  H.  H.  Haight  as  attorney 
for  Lucy  H.  Sawyer  and  Edward  Hackett,  executrix  and  executor  of  the  es- 
tate of  plaintiff,  deceased.  Death  of  plaintiff  suggested,  and  the  representa- 
tives of  his  estate  substituted.  1878,  H.  H.  Haight,  plaintiff's  attorney, 
deceased. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  ^  12th  District  Court, 
cisco, 

I  No.  12,736. 
vs. 

E.  A.  Lawrence, 
Henry  E.  Reed  et  al.  J  Defendants'  Attorney. 

Ejectment  for  City  Slip  Lot  No.  92.  At  issue.  1879,  February  10,  11,  12 
and  13,  trial  by  jury.  Jury,  disagreeing,  were  discharged,  and  no  further 
action  has  been  taken  in  the  case.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause 
to  Department  1  of  Superior  Court  filed. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  ^  15th  District  Court; 
cisco, 

I  No.  3,809. 
vs. 

Walter  Van  Dyke, 
Orson  Felt  et  al.  J  Att'y  for  defts.  Preston  and  wife. 

Ejectment  for  lot  on  Potrero.  At  issue,  and  awaiting  proceedings  in  an- 
other cause.  1880,  January  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  6  filed. 
February  17,  case  dismissed. 


CITY    LITIGATION.  131 

Edwin  P.  Eeed,  ]  15th  District  Court, 

No.  4,687. 


John  Doe,  Kichard  Koe,  John  Doe, 
Jr.,  Kichard  Roe,  Jr.,  John  Bens- 


W.  H.  Patterson, 


ley,  Frederick   Mason,   Jr.,  Alex-  Plaintiff's  Attorney; 

ander   E.   Frazer,    J.  T.    Shelby,    | 
Alexander  R.  Walsh,    L.  M.  Bur- 


son,  The  City  and  County  of  San 


No.   in    3d    District   Court,   Alameda 


Francisco,  and  John  C.  Bower.      J       County,  2,298. 

Action  to  quiet  title  to  land  situate  in  San  Francisco  and  described  as  fol- 
lows, viz:  Commencing  southeast  corner  land  inclosed  and  occupied  by  Val- 
entine Ellis;  thence  along  the  east  line  of  Ellis'  land,  of  R.  Chatain's  and  of 
uninclosed  lands  N.  3°  15',  E.  19  chains  and  75  links  to  a  post;  thence  N. 
37°,  E.  3  chains  and  17  links  to  a  post;  thence  S.  41°  45',  E.  7  chains  and  9 
links  to  a  post;  thence  S.  19°  45',  W.  18  chains  to  a  post  at  the  NE.  corner 
of  land  inclosed  and  occupied  by  John  Dugan;  thence  N.  74°  45',  W. 
chains  and  76  links  to  place  of  beginning — containing  10.56  acres,  being  part 
of  the  new  Potrero  Blocks  Nos.  209,  210,  231,  232,  234,  243,  244  and  all  of 
233. 

February  19,  1869,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  February  23, 
1869,  summons  served.  April  19,  1869,  answer  of  city  and  county  served, 
and  20,  same  filed.  This  cause  has  been  transferred  to  Third  District  Court 
for  Alameda  County  for  trial.  August  26,  papers  sent  by  Bainber's  Express 
to  County  Clerk  of  Alameda  County.  October  27,  judgment  for  plaintiff. 
November  9,  order  judgment  set  aside  upon  the  payment  by  defendant  of 
costs. 


Louis  Joseph  H<imm,  "]   U.  S.  Circuit  Court,  9th  Circuit  Dis- 

trict, 

vs'  \-  No.  1,626. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  |   Solomon  A.  Sharp, 

cisco  and  Thomas  King.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

Ejectment  for  easterly  part  of  Union  Square,  to  the  depth  of  137%  feet 
westerly  from  Stockton  street,  $20,000  damages  for  the  withholding  thereof, 
and  $100,000  damages  caused  by  the  loss  of  the  value  of  the  rents  and  profits 
thereof;  also,  costs  and  general  relief.  July  11,  1876,  complaint  filed,  sum- 
mons issued  and  summons  served  on  Mayor  Andrew  J.  Bryant  and  on  defen- 
dant King,  the  gardener  of  Union  Square.  September  1,  1876,  answer  filed. 
1878,  Solomon  A.  Sharp,  plaintiff's  attorney,  deceased.  1879,  August  12,  on 
motion  of  R.  H.  Lloyd,  plaintiff's  attorney,  cause  continued  on  payment  of 
$24  jury  fees.  July  12,  1880,  ordered  cause  continued.  [No  answer.] 


132       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

Dennis  Jordan,  *\  15th  District  Court, 

vs.  I  No.  9,693. 

Chas.  Hubert,  Treasurer  of  the  City     J.  M.  Nougues, 

and  County  of  San  Francisco.       J  Att'y  for  Petitioner. 

Application  for  alternative  writ  of  mandate,  etc.,  to  compel  defendant  to 
pay  five  several  sums  as  interest  claimed  to  be  due  on  five  New  City  Hall 
warrants.  1876,  August  17.  copy  of  petition  and  alternative  writ  served. 
August  25,  answer  filed.  October  20,  jury  waived.  1878,  March  19,  trial, 
and  cause  argued  and  submitted,  and  judgment  rendered  for  defendant;  al- 
ternative writ  of  mandate  discharged,  and  for  costs  $25  80.  March  25, 
plaintiff's  motion  for  new  trial  denied;  26,  judgment  recorded  [E.  page  429]; 
notice  of  plaintiff's  appeal  filed.  April  8,  received  copy  of  transcript.  April 
12,  transcript  filed.  1880,  March  4,  argued  in  Supreme  Court,  and  judgment 
below  reversed,  with  directions.  Writ  of  peremptory  mandate  having  been 
ordered  and  issued,  the  demands  have  all  been  paid. 


In  the  matter  of  the  application  of  ]  4th  District  Court. 
Mary  Doud, 

Leauder  Quint, 

Att'y  for  Petitioner. 

No.  20,663^. 

For  the  issuance  of  a  writ  of  man- 
date. J  No.  in  Supreme  Court,  6,003. 

Application  for  writ  of  mandate  commanding  City  and  County  Auditor 
George  F.  Maynard  to  audit  and  allow  claim  for  $1,000,  pursuant  to  an  Act 
of  the  Legislature,  as  damages  for  personal  injuries  received  at  a  Fourth  of 
July  celebration,  in  1867. 

1876,  August  23,  petition,  etc.,  served  on  Mr.  Maynard.  September  1, 
1876,  answer  filed.  February  23,  1877,  tried  and  submitted  on  briefs  to  be 
filed.  March  16,  1877,  respondent's  brief  delivered.  April  24,  1877,  judg- 
ment, as  prayed,  that  writ  issue.  May  2,  1877,  decree  filed  and  recorded  in 
Book  N,  page  109.  May  14,  1877,  served  and  filed  notice  of  intention  to 
move  for  a  new  trial.  June  12,  1877,  delivered  bill  of  exceptions,  etc.  to 
court-room  clerk,  in  accordance  with  notice  filed  June  7,  1877.  December 
3,  1877,  defendant's  motion  for  new  trial  refused.  1878,  January  31,  filed 
notice  of  defendant's  appeal.  March  11,  transcript  filed.  February  4,  1880, 
motion  to  dismiss  appeal  argued  and  submitted. 


CITY    LITIGATION.  133 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-^  12th  District  Court, 
cisco, 

I  No.  20,069. 
vs. 

Charles  N.  Fox, 
The  Spring  Valley  Water  Works.     J  Defendant's  Attorney. 

To  recover  $500  damages,  alleged  to  have  accrued  by  reason  of  the  neglect 
and  refusal  of  defendant  to  furnish  water  to  the  houses  of  one  H.  N.  Heine- 
mann,  at  the  rates  established  by  the  Board  of  Water  Commissioners,  pur- 
suant to  "an  Act  to  establish  water  rates  in  the  city  and  county  of  San 
Francisco,"  approved  March  1,  1876.  (See  Statutes  1875-76,  page  82.) 

1876,  October  18,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  October  20,  received 
notice  of  motion  to  strike  out  portion  of  complaint  as  irrelevant.  November 
3,  motion  to  strike  out  argued  and  submitted.  November  9,  motion  to  strike 
out  denied.  November  16,  received  ccpy  of  demurrer  to  complaint.  1877, 
January  20,  27,  demurrer  to  complaint  argued  and  submitted,  with  leave  to 
plaintiff  to  furnish  brief  in  ten  days.  February  6,  served  and  delivered 
plaintiff's  brief  on  demurrer  to  complaint.  February  7,  received  copy  of  de- 
fendant's brief  on  demurrer  to  complaint.  March  1,  demurrer  to  complaint 
sustained,  and  received  notice  of  order  sustaining  the  same.  March  12,  re- 
ceived notice  of  rendition  of  judgment  for  defendant.  March  16,  judgment 
recorded  [J,  43]  in  favor  of  defendant.  March  17,  filed  bill  of  exceptions 
and  statement  on  appeal.  March  19,  served  and  filed  notice  of  ap- 
peal. March  28,  filed  transcript  on  appeal  in  the  Supreme  Court. 
August  17th,  respondent's  points  and  authorities  filed.  February  15, 
1878,  appellant's  points  and  authorities  filed.  September  2,  1878,  cause 
argued  in  Supreme  Court,  and  submitted,  with  leave  to  file  briefs.  Jan- 
uary 29,  1879,  appellant's  final  brief  filed.  September  13,  1879,  judg- 
ment affirmed.  October  9,  1879,  remittitur  to  County  Clerk. 


Benjamin  Kichardson,  ^  U.  S.  Circuit  Court,  9th   Circuit,   Dis- 

trict of  California. 
vs.  I 

f  J.  B.  Felton, 

The  City  and  County  of   San  Fran-  Plaintiff's  Attorney, 

cisco.  J  No.  1,681. 

Ejectment  for  the  southerly  part  of  Alamo  Square,  412%x275  feet.  No- 
vember 1,  1876,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  November  3,  1876, 
summons  served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  May  2,  1877,  J.  B.  Felton  deceased. 
December  31,  1877,  plea  in  abatement  filed.  February  24,  1879,  notice  of 
motion  to  amend  plea  and  affidavit  filed  and  served.  March  3,  1879,  ordered 
accordingly  and  certificate  made.  July  15,  order  plea  continued.  August  4, 
order  cause  continued.  September  1,  order  plea  continued.  October  6,  order 


134       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY  S  REPORT. 

bearing  on  plea  continued.  November  25  and  December  1,  same  order  made. 
January  5,  1880,  order  bearing  on  plea  continued.  February  3,  order  bear- 
ing on  plea  continued.  May  3,  order  plea  continued.  July  12,  order  plea 
continued. 


G.  Raisch,  ^  12tb  District  Court. 

No.  20,262. 

Tbe  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  I  D.  H.  Wbittemore, 
cisco.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

To  recover  judgment  for  $3,728  50,  alleged  to  be  due  for  street  work  upon 
sidewalks  upon  an  accepted  street.  Tbe  work  was  done  on  Tbird  street,  and 
tbe  question  is  whether  the  acceptance  of  the  street  included  the  sidewalk. 
1877,  January  4,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  January  6,  summons 
served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  January  17,  demurrer  to  complaint  filed.  Janu- 
ary 19,  demurrer  argued  and  submitted.  January  20,  received  copy  of 
amended  complaint  as  per  order  of  court,  demurrer  as  previously  filed  to 
stand  as  to  amended  complaint.  February  6,  demurrer  to  amended  com- 
plaint overruled.  February  8,  received  notice  of  overruling  of  said  demur- 
rer. February  26,  judgment  rendered  for  plaintiff  as  prayed.  March  2, 
judgment  recorded  (J,  13)  for  $3,728  50,  besides  legal  interest  and  costs — 
$113 — all  in  gold  coin.  March  15,  bill  of  exceptions  filed,  March  15,  no- 
tice of  defendant's  appeal  to  the  Supreme  Court  filed  April  9,  transcript  on 
appeal  filed. 

1878,  February  16,  appellant's  points  and  authorities  filed;  20,  received 
copy  respondent's  points  and  authorities.  April  12,  argued  and  submitted, 
with  leave  to  file  briefs ;  17,  respondent's  brief  received;  22,  filed  appellant's 
brief  in  reply.  May  1,  re-argument  ordered.  September  2  and  3,  re-argued 
and  judgment  reversed  and  cause  remitted  for  further  proceedings.  Novem- 
ber 15,  remittitur  filed.  December  11,  amended  complaint  filed;  22,  demur- 
rer to  amended  complaint  filed.  1879,  March  1,  received  plaintiff's  notice 
of  demurrer  being  restored  to  calendar  on  March  7  for  argument.  August  8, 
demurrer  to  complaint  overruled,  with  20  days  to  answer.  August  28,  served 
and  filed  answer  to  amended  complaint.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning 
cause  to  Department  2,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


CITY  LITIGATION.  135 


The  Spring  Valley  Water  Works,     ]    15th  District  Court. 

I  No.  9,995. 
vs. 

Chas.  N.  Fox, 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 


Lloyd  &  Newlands, 


Att'y  for  Plaintiff. 


Of  Counsel  for  Plaintiffs. 


Action  to  recover  $169,015  55,  gold  coin,  claimed  to  be  due  for  water  sup- 
plied by  plaintiff,  a  private  corporation,  to  the  defendant  for  municipal  pur- 
poses, with  interest  upon  the  several  monthly  bills  as  specified  in  the 
complaint.  1877,  April  3,  summons  served  upon  Mayor  A.  J.  Bryant.  May 
17,  demurrer  filed.  December  13,  1879,  stipulation  signed  that  either  party 
may  take  up  the  demurrer  on  notice.  January  23,  order  assigning  cause  to 
Department  5  filed. 


Michael  Guerin,  ]   12th  District  Court. 

|  No.  20,599. 
vs. 

j   Supreme  Court  No.  6,090. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-       Sharpstein  &  Travers, 

cisco.  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

To  recover  $2,500,  damages  alleged  to  have  been  sustained  by  plaintiff  by 
reason  of  plaintiff's  premises  becoming  flooded  through  the  ill  construction 
of  a  brick  sewer  in  Bryant  street,  between  Third  and  Fourth  streets.  1877, 
April  20,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued;  21,  summons  served  on  May- 
or Bryant.  May  31,  demurrer  to  complaint  filed.  September  14,  demurrer 
submitted  on  briefs;  17,  demurrer  overruled.  October  15,  answer  filed. 
November  5,  6  and  7,  tried,  and  verdict  for  $600.  February  18,  1878,  de- 
fendant's motion  for  new  trial  refused.  1878,  April  16,  filed  notice  of  defen- 
dant's appeal.  May  25,  filed  transcript.  December  2,  received  copy  of 
respondent's  points  and  authorities;  9,  served  and  filed  appellant's  points 
and  authorities;  10  and  11,  argued  and  submitted  in  Supreme  Court,  with 
leave  to  file  briefs.  1879,  January  3,  received  copy  of  respondent's  brief, 
July  3,  served  and  filed  appellant's  brief.  November  6,  judgment  and  order 
affirmed,  remittitur  forthwith.  November  7,  remittitur  filed  in  12th  District 
Court.  January  31,  1880,  satisfaction  piece  filed  and  entered. 


136  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

The  Spring  Valley  Water  Works,     ^  15th  District  Court. 
vs.  I  No.  10,046. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     Chas.  N.  Fox, 

cisco.  J  Defendant's  Attorney. 

To  obtain  a  decree  quieting  title  to  what  is  known  as  the  Lobos  Creek 
property. 

1877,  April  26,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  April  27,  summons 
served.  June  18,  answer  filed.  June  26,  received  copy  of  demurrer  to  an- 
swer. September  16,  1879,  order  cause  struck  from  jury  calendar.  January 
23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  5,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


George  F.  Sharp,  1  19th  District  Court. 

vs.  [  No.  5,052. 

William  Ford,  Tax  Collector  of  the  j  G.  F.  &  W.  H.  Sharp, 

City  and  County  of  San  Francisco.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

To  recover  $3,128  77,  gold  coin,  and  legal  interest,  for  money  alleged  to 
have  been  paid  to  defendant  by  plaintiff  and  his  assignors  under  protest 
upon  the  Montgomery  avenue  assessment,  upon  the  ground  that  said  assess- 
ment is  excessive  and  invalid.  1877,  June  21,  complaint  filed  and  summons 
issued.  June  23,  summons  served.  August  6,  answer  filed.  January  23, 
1880,  order  assigning  caase  to  Department  4  filed. 


George  F.  Sharp,  ^  19th  District  Court. 

vs.  I  No.  5,080. 

Wm.  Ford,   Tax   Collector   of  the     G.  F.  &  W.  H.  Sharp, 

City  and  County  of  San  Francisco  J  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

To  obtain  a  decree  that  the  Montgomery  avenue  assessment  is  invalid, 
and  that  plaintiff  recover  $3,411  82,  gold  coin,  with  legal  interest,  for  mon- 
eys paid  under  protest  upon  said  Montgomery  avenue  assessment. 

1877,  June  30,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued  and  served.  August 
6,  answer  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  4, 
Superior  Court,  filed. 


CITY  LITIGATION. 


137 


Jos.  S.  Simmons  and  Wm.  B.  Rowe,^  19th  District  Court. 
vs.  I  No.  3,311. 


A.  Austin, 


Tax  Collector. 


T.  F.  Batchelder, 


Plaintiffs'  Attorney. 


To  obtain  a  decree  enjoining  defendant  from  executing  a  tax  deed  of  lot  3, 
in  Block  231,  Western  Addition,  pursuant  to  tax  sale  of  March  13,  1874, 
1875,  March  12,  summons  and  temporary  injunction  papers  served.  March 
29,  demurrer  to  complaint  filed.  April  23,  demurrer  to  complaint  argued 
and  overruled.  May  4,  1875,  answer  filed.  August  27,  1877,  jury  waived 
and  cause  ordered  on  equity  calendar.  1880,  January  23,  order  cause  as- 
signed to  Department  5  and  order  filed.  1880,  February  17th,  action  dismissed 
for  want  of  prosecution. 


Henry  Voorman, 


Li  Po  Tai,  and  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco. 


12th  District  Court. 
No.  20,820. 

Jarboe  &  Harrison, 

Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 


To  recover  $13,000  and  to  foreclose  a  mortgage  given  by  Li  Po  Tai.  1877r 
July  23,  complaint  filed  and  summons  served.  .  August  2,  1877,  answer  of 
city  and  county  filed.  November  18,  1878,  ordered  off  calendar;  not  at 


Jane  Scott 


vs. 


}  4th  District  Court. 
No.  21,563. 
No.  in  Supreme  Court,  5,909. 


James  P.  Dyer  and  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco. 


S.  V.  Smith  &  Son, 


Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 


To  obtain  a  decree  that  an  order  of  the  Board  of  Supervisors,  providing 
that  Green  street,  from  Polk  to  Gough  street,  be  graded,  and  an  order 
awarding  the  contract  for  such  grading  to  defendant  Dyer,  and  the  contract 
entered  into  pursuant  to  such  orders  be  declared  void,  so  far  as  they  affect 
lot  No.  11  of  the  Laguna  Survey,  and  that  said  Dyer  and  all  persons  acting 
under  him  be  enjoined  from  grading  said  street  under  such  contract.  1877,, 
August  27,  complaint  filed  and  k summons  issued.  August  28,  summons. 


138       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  September  10,  received  copy  of  amended  com- 
plaint. September  17,  tiled  answer  of  city  and  county  to  amended  com- 
plaint. October  5,  cause  tried  and  judgment  for  plaintiff.  October  10,  bill 
of  exceptions  filed.  October  12,  decree  recorded  (Book  N,  page  353).  De- 
cember 8,  defendants'  notice  of  appeal  filed.  December  22,  transcript  on 
appeal  filed. 

1879,  February  26,  received  copy  respondent's  points  and  authorities. 
March  10,  served  and  filed  appellants'  points  and  authorities.  July  14,  re- 
ceived copy  of  respondent's  brief.  March  26,  1880,  judgment  and  order 
affirmed.  April  8,  petition  for  rehearing  filed.  April  15,  petition  denied. 
April  27,  remittitur  to  County  Clerk.  May  11,  remittitur  filed  in  4th  Dis- 
trict Court. 


Andrew  V.  Smith,  1   4th  District  Court. 

No.  21,554. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, Andrew  J.  Bryant,  Henry 
H.  Ellis,  John  Hagan  and  Joseph 


McAllisters  &  Bergiii, 


Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 


H.   Baker. 

To  recover  $3,000,  damages  alleged  to  be  due  for  the  unlawful  entry  upon 
and  the  withholding  of  the  possession  of  a  lot  on  the  southeast  line  of  East 
street,  between  Washington  and  Jackson  streets,  and  for  the  possession  of 
the  premises.  1877,  August"  23,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  Au- 
gust 29,  summons  served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  October  8,  answer  filed.  1880, 
January  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  7  filed.  March  13,  cause 
tried,  argued  and  submitted,  Judge  Head  presiding.  Plaintiff  waived  all 
claim  for  damages,  and  dismissed  as  to  all  defendants,  except  the  city  and 
county  of  San  Francisco.  May  13,  received  notice  of  judgment  and  memor- 
andum of  costs  and  disbursements.  May  21,  served  and  filed  notice  of  in- 
tention to  move  for  ajiew  trial.  June  1,  stipulated  that  time  be  extended  to 
July  3  for  filing  and  serving  statement  of  case  and  bill  of  exceptions.  July 
3,  served  bill  of  exceptions  and  statement  of  the  case. 


Pierre   Priet   and    Antoine   Quin-  "]   12th  District  Court, 
quinet, 


No.  20,922. 

•Chas.    Hubert,    Treasurer   of    the 
City  and  County  of   San  Fran- 
cisco,      Thos.      H.     Reynolds,    | 
County  Clerk  of    said  City  and   |   T.  J.  Gallagher, 
County,  and  David  Hunter.  Plaintiffs'  Attorney 

To  recover  $5,000,  gold  coin,  damages  for  certain  premises  belonging  t 


CITY  LITIGATION  139 

plaintiffs,  alleged  to  have  been  taken  possession  of  Toy  the  Board  of  Commis- 
sioners duly  appointed  under  an  act  for  the  widening  of  Dupont  street,  and 
asking  that  the  claims  of  the  plaintiffs  and  the  defendant  Hunter  to  the  dam- 
ages awarded  for  the  said  premises  be  adjusted,  and  for  the  proper  distribu- 
tion of  the  sum  of  $10,932,  now  in  the  hands  of  defendants  and  awarded  by 
such  Commissioners  for  such  damages. 

1877,  August  27,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  September  19,  an- 
swer of  Hubert  and  Reynolds  served. 

The  pleadings  being  all  in,  September  17,  18,  19,  22,  23,  24,  and  Novem- 
ber 7,  1879,  cause  tried,  argued  and  submitted,  and  November  10,  1879, 
opinion  filed  and  judgment  ordered  for  defendants  Hubert  and  Reynolds  vs. 
plaintiffs  and  defendant  Hunter  for  costs,  and  in  favor  of  plaintiffs  vs.  defen- 
dant Hunter  for  the  value  of  their  leasehold  interest.  November  15,  1879, 
served  and  filed  memorandum  of  costs,  $33  50,  and  notice  of  decision.  No- 
vember 24,  findings  filed  and  decree  filed.  November  25,  received  copy 
notice  of  motion  for  new  trial.  December  5,  received  defendant  Hunter's 
statement  on  motion  for  new  trial.  1880,  January  2,  amendments  to  state- 
ment served  and  filed.  January  12,  notice  of  substitution  of  attorneys 
served,  and  notice  that  defendant  Hunter  does  not  accept  the  amendments  to 
his  statement.  February  27,  motion  for  new  trial  denied.  March  17,  stipu- 
lation substituting  Wm.  A.  Stuart,  County  Clerk,  for  Keynolds,  and  W.  R. 
Shaber,  Treasurer,  for  C.  Hubert,  as  defendants.  March  27,  received 
copy  of  notice  of  appeal  of  defendant  Hunter.  Stipulation  signed  permit- 
ting detachment  of  photographic  copies,  etc.,  and  also  stipulation  signed 
allowing  certain  books  to  be  inspected  on  argument  before  the  Supreme 
Court.  May  6,  received  copy  of  transcript  on  appeal.  February  21,  1880, 
order  assigning  cause  to  Department  1,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-"^  3d  District  Court, 
cisco, 

I  No.  6,238. 
vs. 

C.  N.  Fox, 
The  Spring  Valley  Wnter  Works.     J  Defendants'  Attorney. 

To  obtain  a  decree  setting  aside  an  outside  land  grant  to  the  Lobos  Creek 
property  and  adjudging  that  the  property  be  declared  to  be  dedicated  to  the 
use  of  plaintiff  forever  for  the  purpose  of  a  public  water  works.  1877,  Sep- 
tember 10,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  September  21,  demurrer 
filed.  1878,  October  18,  argument  on  demurrer  commenced  by  Mr.  Fox. 
October  29,  demurrer  argued  by  Mr.  Burnett.  January  9,  1879,  demurrer 
argued  by  Mr.  Swift,  and  reply  by  Mr.  Fox,  and  submitted.  July  7,  1879, 


140  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

demurrer  overruled.  July  8,  1879,  served  and  filed  notice  of  overruling  de- 
murrer to  complaint.  August  18,  received  copy  of  defendants'  answer. 
January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  2  filed. 


James  Phelan,  ^  3d  District  Court. 

No.  6,267. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  I  J.  M.  Wood. 

cisco.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

To  recover  $2,244  05,  with  interest  at  ten  per  cent  per  annum,  from  Feb- 
ruary 19,  1877,  for  street  work.  1877,  October  8,  complaint  filed  and  sum- 
mons issued.  October  12,  summons  served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  October  13, 
answer  filed.  1879,  March  31,  trial  commenced  and  continued  for  further 
testimony.  July  23,  trial  resumed  and  continued  for  argument.  April  11, 
paid  Charles  Whitney  transcribing  testimony,  19  folios,  at  25  cents,  $3  80. 
December  12,  cause  argued  and  submitted,  and  judgment  rendered  for  plain- 
tiff. December  19,  received  copy  of  notice  of  decision  and  memorandum  of 
costs.  December  27,  notice  of  intention  to  move  for  a  new  trial  served  and 
filed.  1880,  January  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  3,  Superior 
Court,  filed.  March  1,  statement  of  the  case  and  bill  of  exceptions  served. 
March  29,  statement  settled  and  signed  by  Judge  Thornton,  and  same  filed. 
April  2,  motion  for  new  trial  submitted,  with  ten  days  to  defendant  to  file 
brief.  May  10,  brief  of  defendant  served  and  filed.  May  19,  received  plain- 
tiff's brief  in  reply.  June  12,  motion  for  new  trial  denied,  ten  days  stay. 
June  22,  served  and  filed  defendant's  notice  of  appeal. 


The  California  Artificial  Stone  Pav-  1    3d  District  Court, 
ing  Company,  I 

I   No.  6,268. 
vs. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-    |   J.  M.  Wood, 

cisco.  J  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

To  recover  $1,937  93  and  interest  at  ten  per  cent  per  annum,  from  March 
9,  1877,  for  street  work  done  by  Thos.  E.  Finley,  assignor  of  plaintiff. 

1877,  October  8,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  October  12,  sum- 
mons served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  October  13,  answer  filed.  March  31,  1879, 
trial  commenced  and  continued  for  further  testimony.  1879,  July  23,  trial 
resumed  and  continued  for  argument.  Paid  Chas.  F.  Whitney  for  trans- 
scribing  testimony  taken  March  31,  1879,  $3. 


CITY  LITIGATION.  141 

December  12,  cause  argued  and  submitted,  and  judgment  rendered  for 
plaintiff.  December  19,  received  copy  notice  of  decision  and  memorandum 
of  costs.  December  27,  notice  of  intention  to  move  for  a  new  trial  served 
and  filed.  Stipulation  signed  holding  this  case  in  abeyance  until  such  time 
as  a  decision  may  be  rendered  in  case  of  Phelan  vs.  City  and  County  (case 
above  reported),  and  that  the  decision  in  the  case  of  Phelan  vs.  City  and 
County,  when  rendered,  to  act  and  operate  as  the  decision  in  this  case,  as 
the  points  involved  are  identical.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause 
to  Department  3  filed. 


Andrew  Himmelman,  ^  4th  District  Court. 

No.  21,688. 

I  No.  in  Supreme  Court,  6,193. 
The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-    Robert  Y.  Hayne, 

cisco.  J  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

To  recover  $810  39,  with  interest  at  one  per  cent  per  month,  from  Novem- 
ber 29,  1870,  damages  for  the  failure  of  the  Superintendent  of  Streets  to  cor- 
rectly record  a  diagram  attached  to  a  street  assessment,  by  means  whereof 
the  plaintiff  lost  his  lien.  1877,  October  13,  complaint  filed  and  summons 
issued.  October  22,  answer  filed.  December  3,  tried  and  submitted.  1878, 
January  30,  served  and  delivered  defendant's  brief.  February  6,  received 
plaintiff's  brief.  February  9,  served  and  delivered  defendant's  brief  in 
reply.  February  11,  judgment  rendered  for  defendant.  February  16,  deci- 
sion and  findings  filed.  February  19,  judgment  recorded  (N%,  513).  June 
24,  received  plaintiff's  notice  of  appeal  to  the  Supreme.  Court.  July  29, 
transcript  filed  in  the  Supreme  Court.  August  7,  stipulation  to  pluce  on 
July  calendar  filed.  Ordered  to  foot  of  calendar.  February  18,  1880,  stipu- 
lation continuing  case  filed  and  case  continued. 


Henry  Pierce,  ^  19th  District  Court. 

vs.  I  No.  5,351. 

Van  Dyke  &  Wells, 
John  Hagan.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

To  obtain  decree  enjoining  the  defendant,  Superintendent  of  Streets,  from 
entering  upon  premises  north  side  Pine  street,  197.6  feet  from  northwest 


142  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

corner  of  Pine  and  Stockton  streets,   27x137%,  and  removing  the  fences 
therefrom  or  throwing  same  open  for  public  use  or  travel,  etc. 

1877,  October  16,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued  and  order  of  injunction 
issued.  October  19,  copies  of  summons,  complaint  and  order  of  injunction 
served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  November  13,  answer  filed.  April  1,  1880,  order 
assigning  cause  to  Department  4,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


Thomas  Carey,  ]  19th  District  Court. 

No.  5,399. 
John    Hagan,     Superintendent    of   }• 
Public    Streets,    Highways    and 
Squares  of  the  City  and  County      E.  N.  Deuprey, 
of  San  Francisco,  State  of   Cali- 
fornia. 


Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

To  obtain  an  injunction  restraining  defendant  from  molesting  the  property 
of  plaintiff  on  the  lot  275x93.6  in  the  east  half  of  100-vara  lot  No.  17  of  the 
Laguna  Survey.  Said  premises  are  claimed  by  the  public  as  part  of  a 
street  laid  down  on  the  Van  Ness  Map. 

1877,  November  1,  complaint  filed,  summons  and  order  to  show  cause  and 
restraining  order  issued,  and,  November  6,  same  served.  November  9,  order 
injunction  granted.  November  16,  answered  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order 
assigning  cause  to  Department  4  filed. 


G.  Eaisch,  ^  4th  District  Court. 

No.  21,734. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  |  D.  H.  Whittemore, 

Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

To  recover  $4,351,  gold  coin,  alleged  to  be  due  for  constructing  745  feet  of 
asphaltum  sidewalk  and  ten  corners  complete,  and  for  advertising.  1877, 
October  25,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  November  27,  answer 
filed. 


CITY  LITIGATION. 


143 


Andrew  J.  Pope,  and 
W.  C.  Talbot, 


]  19th  District  Court. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, John  C.  Roberts,  John  H. 
Wise,  Fleet  F.  Strother,  Com-  \- 
mittee  on  Streets,  Wharves  and 
Public  Squares  of  the  Board  of 
Supervisors  of  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco,  and 
Wm.  J.  Adams  and  Peter  Taylor, 
co-partners  under  the  firm  name 
of  Adams  &  Taylor. 


No.  5,480. 


Hoyt  &  McKee, 


Plaintiffs'  Attorneys. 


To  obtain  decree  restraining  the  execution  of  a  lease  on  the  part  of  defen- 
dant, the  City  and  County,  in  favor  of  defendants  Adams  &  Taylor,  co- 
partners, of  China  Basin,  for  five  years,  at  $510  per  month. 

1877,  November  26,  complaint  filed  and  summons  and  order  of  injunction 
issued  and  papers  served.  November  28,  demurrer  of  all  defendants,  except 
Adams  &  Taylor,  filed.  December  6,  demurrer  of  Adams  &  Taylor  filed. 
1878,  March  20,  summons  returned  served  on  defendants  Bryant,  President 
Board  of  Supervisors,  Roberts,  Wise  and  Strother,  members  of  said  Board, 
and  Peter  Taylor  and  Wm.  J.  Adams.  1879,  November  20,  demurrer  filed. 
December  16,  dismissal  filed. 


H.  C.  Murphy, 


vs. 


Justices'  Court,  No.  34,723. 

Before  Justice  Joachimsen. 

No.  in  Municipal  Court  of  Appeals,  533. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     Frank  &  Carson, 


oisco. 


Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 


To  recover  $250,  damages  claimed  to  have  been  caused  to  plaintiff's 
property  by  defective  sewer  in  a  public  street,  whereby  plaintiff's  premises 
were  damaged. 

1878,  January  15,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  January  19,  answer 
served  and  filed.  January  21,  tried  and  submitted.  February  18,  judgment 
for  plaintiff  for  $80  damages  and  $10  50  costs.  February  28,  notice  of  ap- 
peal filed.  March  4,  appeal  papers  from  Justices'  Court  filed  in  Municipal 
Court  of  Appeals.  1880,  March  11,  cause  tried  and  submitted,  with  ten 


144 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY  S  REPORT. 


days  to  plaintiff  to  file  brief.  April  16,  judgment  for  plaintiff,  ten  days  stay. 
April  19,  notice  of  decision  received  and  memorandum  of  costs  received. 
April  27,  notice  of  motion  for  new  trial  served  and  filed.  May  5,  statement 
on  motion  for  new  trial  served,  and  also  two  affidavits.  May  13,  received 
copy  of  amendments  to  statement.  May  17,  served  and  filed  notice  of  re- 
fusal to  accept  plaintiff's  amendments  to  statement.  May  20,  delivered  to 
Clerk  of  Department  No.  8,  Superior  Court,  defendant's  proposed  statement 
and  plaintiff's  amendments  thereto.  July  16,  statement  signed  and  settled 
by  Judge  Allen,  and  same  filed. 


Wong  Gaw, 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. 


15th  District  Court. 
No.  10,447,, 

Howe  &  Eosenbaum, 

Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 


To  recover  $2,932  50,  damages  alleged  to  have  been  sustained  by  plaintiff 
and  his  assignors  through  the  injury  and  destruction  of  property  by  a  mob, 
July  23,  1877. 

1878,  February  27,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  March  1,  sum- 
mons served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  March  11,  answer  filed.  October  9  and  10, 
trial  by  jury  and  verdict  for  $985  57,  costs  $270  37.  Judgment  recorded 
(E,  598),  verdict  filed;  11,  memorandum  of  costs  filed.  October  25,  roll 
filed  and  judgment  docketed.  November  12,  defendant's  bill  of  exceptions 
filed. 


The  People  of  the  State  of   Cali-  ]  15th  District  Court, 
fornia,  by  Jo.  Hamilton,  Attorney- 
General,  ex  rel  A.  J.  Bryant, 


No.  10,459. 


Samuel  W.  Holladay,  Georgia  C.  0. 
Holladay,  S.  L.  Mastic  and  K.  G. 
Davisson. 


S.  W.  Holladay,  W.  C.  Belcher  and  H. 
Haight, 

Defendants'  Attorneys. 


To  obtain  a  decree  declaring  certain  fences,  dwelling-house  and  out- 
buildings, and  other  things  in  and  upon  a  part  of  La  Fayette  Park,  to  be 
common,  public  nuisances,  and  requiring  defendants  to  remove  the  same. 

1878,  March  5,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  March  29,  received 
copy  answer  of  all  defendants.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause  to 
Department  5  filed. 


CITY    LITIGATION. 


145 


R.    C.    Hopkins   and  Margaret  A.  ]  19th    District  Court. 
Hopkins,  his  wife, 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, The  Board  of  Education 
of  the  City  and  County  of  San 
Francisco,  John  Kirkpatrick, 
Chief  of  Police  of  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco,  L.  M. 
Manzer,  Superintendent  of  Pub- 
lic Streets,  Highways  and  Squares 
of  the  City  and  County  of  San 
Francisco,  Patrick  Donahue,  John 
Doe  and  Richard  Roe. 


No.  5,755. 


E.  B.  Drake, 


Attorney  for  Plaintiffs. 


To  quiet  title  to  premises  on  the  westerly  line  of  West  Mission  street,  134 
feet  5%  inches  north  from  northwest  corner  of  Ridley  and  West  Mission 
streets,  thence  north  80°  30',  west  272  feet  7%  inches,  thence  north  90°  30', 
east  132  feet  6  inches,  thence  73°  12',  east  249  feet  6%  inches,  to  said  line  of 
West  Mission  street,  and  thence  south  4°  30',  east  104  feet,  to  beginning,  be- 
ing part  of  Mission  Block  21,  and  to  enjoin  the  Board  of  Education  from 
prosecuting  a  certain  action  of  ejectment  in  this  court  against  P.  Donahue 
and  Chas.  E.  Kraus. 

1878,  March  1,  complaint  filed,  summons  and  restraining  order  issued. 
March  8,  summons  and  other  papers  served.  March  29,  demurrer  of  City 
and  County  of  San  Francisco,  Kirkpatrick  and  Manzer  filed.  July  1,  answer 
of  the  Board  of  Education  filed.  October  11,  demurrer  of  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco  and  Kirkpatrick  and  Manzer  overruled.  October 
19,  answer  of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco  and  of  Kirkpatrick  and 
Manzer  overruled,  ten  days  to  answer.  October  19,  answer  of  City  and 
County,  Kirkpatrick  and  Manzer  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning 
cause  to  Department  4,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


Jane  Busse, 


TS. 


")  Justices'  Court. 

Before  Justice  H.  L.  Joachimsen. 
{-•No.  35,550. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 


cisco. 


Gunnison  &  Booth, 


Plaintiff's  Attorneys 


To  recover  $290,  damages  alleged  to  have  been  caused  by  a  mob,  in  July, 
1877. 


10 


146       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

1878,  March  9,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.     March  4,  answer  filed. 
March  28,  trial  and  judgment  for  plaintiff  for  $140  damages  and  $10  25 
costs.     April  11,  notice  of  appeal  filed. 

1879,  July  29,  cause  tried  in  Municipal  Court  of  Appeals  and  submitted. 
Judgment  for  plaintiff  for  $240  and  costs.     July  30,  received  copy  of  notice 
of  judgment.     July  30,  received  memorandum  of   costs  and   disbursements, 
amounting  to  $35.     August  2,  judgment  entered  and  docketed,  and  roll  filed. 


Patrick  Donahue,  ^  4th  District  Court. 

No.  21,881. 

Jarboe  &  Harrison, 
John  Hagan.  )  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

To  recover  $6,000,  damages  alleged  to  have  been  sustained  by  means  of 
the  acts  of  defendant  in  tearing  down  and  destroying  certain  fences  upon  a 
lot  in  Mission  Block  21,  which  is  claimed  by  the  Board  of  Education  to  be  a 
school  lot. 

1877,  December  21,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  1878,  April  1, 
summons  served.  May  21,  demurrer  to  complaint  filed.  July  12,  demurrer 
overruled.  July  25,  answer  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause 
to  Department  7,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


Amos  Mecartney  and  Henry  Smith,  ")    19th  District  Court, 
vs.  No.  5,873. 


William  Mitchell,  Tax  Collector,  and 

the    City    and    County    of    San   |   William,  Leviston, 

Francisco.  Plaintiffs'  Attorney. 

To  restrain  sale  of  a  lot  of  land  under  the  assessment  for  the  widening  of 
Dupont  street. 

1878,  April  4,  complaint  filed.  Order  to  show  cause  made  and  summons 
issued,  and  summons  and  other  papers  served.  April  17,  default  entered. 
April  20,  demurrer  filed.  April  25,  stipulation  vacating  default  filed. 


CITY   LITIGATION. 


147 


T.  H.  Blythe  et  als., 

vs. 

William  Mitchell,  Tax  Collector  of 
the  City  and  County  of  San 
Francisco . 


19th  District  Court. 
No.  5,905. 


Geo.  L.  Beaver, 


Plaintiffs'  Attorney, 


To  obtain  a  decree  restraining  the  sale  of  lands  under  the  assessment  for 
the  widening  of  Dupont  street. 

1878,  April  15,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued,  restraining  order  made, 
order  to  show  cause  issued,  and  summons  and  other  papers  served.  April 
16,  restraining  order  and  order  to  show  cause  filed. 


D.  McLea  et  als., 


William  Mitchell,  Tax  Collector  of 
the  City  and  County  of  San 
Francisco. 


19th  District  Court. 
No.  5,906. 


Geo.  L.  Beaver, 

Plaintiffs'  Attorney. 

To  restrain  a  sale  of  land  under  the  assessment  for  the  widening  of  Du- 
pont street. 

1878,  April  15,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  Restraining  order  and 
order  to  show  cause  made.  Summons  and  other  papers  served.  April  16, 
restraining  order  and  order  to  show  cause  filed. 


Henry  Schwerin, and  Henry  Schwer-  ~|    12th  District  Court.] 
in  and  Theresa  Schadd,  executors 
of  the  last  will  of  J.  M.  William 
Schadd,   deceased,  and  E.  Kauf-    | 
mann   and  W.    H.   Philpot,   co-       No.  21,704. 
partners  under  the  name  of  E. 
Kaufinann  &  Co., 


vs. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco and  A.  J.  Bryant. 


B.  Ash, 


Plaintiffs'  Attorney. 


To  obtain  decree  restraining  the  defendants  from  closing  up  and  obstruct- 
ing a  doorway  leading  from  the  rear  of  plaintiffs'  building  upon  the  court  in 
the  rear  of  the  old  City  Hall.  1878,  April  24,  complaint  filed,  summons 


CITY  AM)  CGUXTY  ATTOr.NEY's  REPORT. 


I?-  .:  :.  -i  :.  :.-::.  :i.:^_  ;::.rr  r....:r  :.:_.".  f.i..L_  .  n~  ..n.:  :—  ::.;L:I._  :  :.rr 
served.  May  4,  answer  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order  •ssigni^g  cause  to 
Deportee*!  ..  Bvperin  Oowrt,  Had. 


In  the  matter  of  the  opening  of  Val-  }  County  Court, 
encia  street,  in  the  City  and  County 
of   San    Francisco,  from  a  point 
about  400  feet  north  of  Mission 
street  to  the  northwesterly  line  of 

tion  of  property  for  the  roadway 

of  Mi  fataaft  -:—:.  j  No.  15,811. 

Proceeding  to  condemn  certain  lands  for  the  roadway  of  Valencia  street, 
[tended  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  an  Act  of  the  Legisla- 
approved  April  1,  1878.     (Stat.,  p.  933.) 

1878,  May  10,  petition  filed.  May  20,  order  setting  Monday,  July  8,  as 
the  time  to  hear  application  for  the  appointment  of  Commissioners.  Service 
of  this  order  was  made  in  due  time.  July  8,  order  appointing  Commission- 
ers filed.  Jury  15,  oath  of  Commissioners  filed.  August  8,  order  extending 
time  to  file  report  filed.  September  7,  order  extending  time  to  file  report 
filed,  time  extended  sixty  days.  November  7,  order  extending  time  to  file 
report  filed,  time  extended  ninety  days.  1879,  February  6,  order  extending 
time  to  fife  report  filed,  time  extended  sixty  days.  February  25,  report  of 
Commissioners  (book  form)  and  map  filed.  March  20,  aider  confirming  re- 
port. Order  on  Treasurer  to  pay  Commissioners'  salaries  filed,  certified 
copy  delivered  to  T.  H.  Reynolds.  April  1,  order  made  that  judgment  be 
entered  against  certain  property  described  in  report  of  Commissioners  of  Ap- 
praisal,  aad  that  this  order  be  filed  nunc  pro  tune  as  of  March  20,  etc.;  order 
that  judgment  be  entered  filed.  June  17,  order  staying  proceedings  in  rela- 
tion to  certain  property;  20,  affidavit  of  Commissioners,  with  affidavit  of 
service,  etc.,  filed.  Jury  8,  motion  to  set  aside  judgment  No.  269,  and  refer 
report  back  to  Commissioners  to  modify  said  judgment  by  striking  out  the 
figures  $4  50  and  inserting  $450,  argued  and  submitted.  Under  advisement. 
August  26,  ordered  that  motion  to  refer  back  be  withdrawn  and  stay  of  proceed- 
ings racated;  30,  oro^  on  Treasurer  made  to  pay  to  certain  parties  the  amount 
allowed  by  the  Commissioners  as  compensation  for  lands,  etc.  September 
29,  motion  made  by  attorney  for  Commissioners  that  order  of  sale  issue 
herein  against  drfiaqwnt  property-owners.  Order  made  and  issued  to  the 


CITY    LITIGATION.  149 

A.  Fleishacker,  ^    4th  District  Court. 

j    Xo.  16,029. 

A.  Austin,  I    Jarboe,  Harrison  «fe  Bobinson, 

Tax  Collector.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

Noticed  on  page  348,  Municipal  Reports  of  1869-70,  at  issue.  1870,  June 
25,  complaint  for  injunction  filed.  Order  granted  and  writ  issued.  June  25, 
summons  served.  June  27,  filed  on  return.  1872,  January  5,  answer  of 
Austin  filed.  July  15,  1879,  stipulation  filed  exten  ling  time  to  plead.  1880, 
February  9,  case  dismissed  on  motion  of  K.  C.  Hairison. 


G.  F.  Sharp  et  al.,  ^    loth  District  Court. 

No.  5,931. 

A.  Austin,  I    Sharp  &  Sharp, 

Tax  Collector.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

1*70.  M.-.y  25,  petition  for  mandamus  and  order  to  show  cause  filed  and 
alternative  mandamus  issued.  May  30,  served.  June  3,  returned  and  filed. 
August  3,  answer  and  demurrer  filed.  August  13,  demurrer  argued  and  con- 
tinued. August  29,  demurrer  submitted.  December  8,  1874,  cause  ordered 
on  calendar.  December  14,  1874,  order  demurrer  to  complaint  submitted, 
March  5,  1875,  order  demurrer  to  petition  for  mandamus  submitted.  March 
rder  J.  P.  Hoge  substituted  in  place  of  J.  B.  Felton  as  attorney 
for  the  defendant,  B.  Richardson.  April  16,  1575,  order  demurrer  sus- 
tained. October  6,  order  substitution  of  W.  C.  Burnett  aa  attorney  for 
defendant  Austin,  and  consent  thereto  filed.  October  11,  notice  of  sustain- 
ing of  demurrer  and  of  substitution  of  attorney  served  and  filed.  January 
23,  18SO,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  6  filed.  July  6,  1880,  notice 
of  readiness  for  trial  filed. 


Richard  Brown,  ^    19th  District  Court. 

TS.  I    No.  6,138. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-      A.  <fc  H.  C.  Campbell, 

o.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

To  recover  $800,  claimed  as  damages  to  property  by  reason  of  a  riot,  stated 
to  have  occurred  in  1877,  and  $200  loss  of  rents.  1878,  July  6,  complaint 
filed  and  summons  issued.  July  17,  answer  filed.  1880,  January  23,  order 
assigning  cause  to  Department  4,  Superior  Court,  filed.  March  1,  stipula- 


150  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTOENEY's  REPORT. 

tion  signed  setting  cause  for  trial  on  March  18,  1880.  April  29,  order  that 
said  cause  be  transferred  from  equity  calendar  to  jury  calendar.  May  28, 
stipulated  that  the  depositions  of  certain  witnesses  be  taken,  to  be  used  on 
the  trial.  Depositions  of  Ah  Wau,  Ah  Dock,  John  C.  Minkel  and  Mr.  Har- 
riman  taken  before  Notary  Public. 


Henry  W.  Seale,  *s    12th  District  Court,  for  San  Mateo  Co. 

No.  1,063. 

Stewart  &  Greathouse, 
The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  Plaintiff's  Attorneys, 

cisco.  J    No.  in  Supreme  Court,  6,826. 

To  recover  $50,000  in  gold  coin,  claimed  to  be  due  for  materials  supplied 
and  labor  performed  under  a  contract  with  the  first  Board  of  City  Hall  Com- 
missioners, besides  costs.  1876,  January  21,  complaint  filed  and  summons 
issued.  July  15,  1878,  summons  served.  August  13th,  answer  filed.  March 
31  and  April  1,  2,  1879,  trial  by  jury  and  verdict  for  $30,083.49  principal 
and  $6,960.99  interest  to  April  2,  1879,  date  of  verdict,  amounting  to  the 
sum  of  $37,044.48,  besides  costs,  $138.50  gold  coin.  April  12th,  served  and 
filed  notice  of  intention  to  move  for  a  new  trial.  April  22d,  served  copy  of 
proposed  bill  of  exceptions  and  statement  of  the  case.  August  13th,  bill  of 
exceptions  and  statement  of  the  case  filed.  August  23d,  motion  for  new 
trial  argued,  submitted  and  denied.  October  21st,  served  and  filed  defend- 
ant's notice  of  appeal.  November  17th,  transcript  on  appeal  served  and 
filed  in  Supreme  Court. 


J.  C.  Smith,  ^    15th  District  Court. 

No.  10,660. 

King  &  Rogers, 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  I  Plaintiff's  Attorneys, 

cisco."  J    No.  in  Supreme  Court,  7,010. 

To  recover  $68,937.22  damages  occasioned  by  the  riot  on  Beale  street  wharf 
in  July,  1877. 

1878 — July  13th,  summons  issued.  July  15th,  summons  served.  August 
28th,  answer  filed.  1879-  August  12th,  13th,  14th,  18th,  19th  and  20th,  by 
jury,  tried,  argued  and  submitted,  and  verdict  for  the  plaintiff  for  the  sum  of 
$65,273.76.  August  23d,  received  copy  of  memorandum  of  costs  and  dis- 


CITY  LITIGATION. 


151 


bursements,  $912.50.  August  30th,  served  and  filed  notice  of  intention  to 
move  for  new  trial.  September  19th,  defendant's  proposed  bill  of  excep- 
tions and  statement  of  the  case  served  and  filed.  September  20th,  received 
plaintiff's  notice  of  argument  on  motion  for  new  trial  to  take  place  September 
26,  1879.  September  23d,  bill  of  exceptions  and  statement  of  the  case  filed. 
October  3d,  defendant's  motion  for  new  trial  on  briefs  in  one  day.  October 
6th,  defendant's  motion  for  new  trial  overruled.  .Received  notice  of  order 
denying  motion  for  new  trial.  Received  notice  of  rendition  of  judgment. 
January  15,  1880,  notice  of  appeal  served  and  filed.  February  24,  1880, 
transcript  on  appeal  served  and  filed. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cibco. 


Frank  Quale. 


15th  District  Court. 
No.  10,676. 

Theodore  Hittell, 

Defendant's  Attorney. 


Ejectment  for  Western  Addition  engine  lot,  situate  on  south  side  of  McAl- 
lister street,  between  Van  Ness  avenue  and  Polk  street,  besides  damages  for 
use  and  occupation. 

1878 — July  22d,  complaint  and  summons  issued.  July  31st,  summons 
served.  September  9th,  copy  of  answer  received.  January  23,  1880,  order 
assigning  cause  to  Department  6,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-^     15th  District  Court, 
cisco, 

vs.  I    No.  10,678. 

Wm.  B.  Bradbury,  J.  A.  Magagnos      Bishop  &  Fifield, 

and  A.  W.  Stowe.  J  Defendant  Bradbury's  Attorneys. 

Ejectment  for  a  Western  Addition  engine  lot  situated  on  the  north  side  of 
Bush  street,  between  Polk  street  and  Van  Ness  avenue,  also  damages  for 
use  and  occupation. 

1878 — July  22d,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  August  5th,  re- 
ceived answer  and  disclaimer  of  defendant  Stowe.  July  30th,  summons 
served  on  defendant  Bradbury.  August  20th,  received  copy  of  demurrer  of 


152  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

defendants  Bradbury  and  Magagnos.  August  30th,  demurrer  overruled,  and 
served  and  filed  notice  thereof.  September  28th,  received  copy  answer  of 
defendants  Bradbury  and  Magagnos. 


Stephen  S.  Culverwell,  "]    19th  District  Court 


vs. 


No.  6, 148. 


John  Treat,  the  City  and  County  of 

San    Francisco,    A.    J.    Bryant,  |    Geo.  Turner, 

Mayor.  Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

To  obtain  a  decree  that  defendants,  other  than  the  City  and  County  of 
San  Francisco,  hold  certain  outside  lands  in  trust  for  plaintiff  and  that  they 
convey  same  to  them,  and  that  said  city  and  county  also  make  a  conveyance 
thereof  to  plaintiffs  and  others. 

1878 — July  10th,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued;  30th,  summons  served 
on  Mayor.  August  17th,  filed  demurrer  of  city  and  county  and  defendant 
Bryant.  1879 — October  27th,  demurrer  of  city  and  county  and  Bryant  sus- 
tained, and  notice  thereof  served  and  filed. 


George  C.  Arnold,  >j   12th  District  Court, 

vs.  I   No.  22,086. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     Eugene  N.  Deuprey, 

cisco.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

To  recover  $2,000  damages  alleged  to  have  been  sustained  by  destruction 
of  property  by  a  mob  at  the  riot  in  July,  1877. 

1878 — August  30th,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  September 
3,  summons  served.  September  5,  answer  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order 
assigning  cause  to  Department  2  filed.  March  10,  1880,  ordered  off  calendar, 
to  be  restored  on  one  month's  notice. 


Richard  S.  Drummond,  ^  4th  District  Court. 

No.  22,478. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  I  E.  J.  &  J.  H.  Moore, 

cisco.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

To  quiet  title  to  lot  30x20  in  Mission  Block  35.    The  premises  are  claimed 
by  the  public  as  a  part  of  the  public  street. 


CITY  LITIGATION. 


153 


1878— August  5th,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  September  3d,  sum- 
mons served.  September  llth,  answer  filed.  1880— January  23d,  order 
assigning  cause  to  Department  7  filed.  February  17th,  dismissed  in  Depart- 
ment 7,  on  motion  of  City  and  County  Attorney,  for  want  of  prosecution. 


Thomas  Powers, 


12th  District  Court. 
No.  22,122. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     Gallagher  &  Whittemore, 

cisco.  _)  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

*'  To  recover  $5,000  damages  to  premises  on  south  side  Fourteenth  street, 
100  feet  east  of  Folsom,  claimed  to  have  been  incurred  by  reason  of  defective 
sewers. 

1878 — September  12th,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  September  16th, 
summons  served.  October  16th,  answer  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order  as- 
signing cause  to  Department  1  filed. 


F.  Hofling, 


vs. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, M.  Nunan  and  J.  B.  Harri- 
son. 


Justices'  Court. 

George  D.  Buckley, 

Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

No.  38,799. 


To  recover  $15  for  repairing  clock  in  Sheriff's  office.  1878,  September  20, 
summons  issued,  complaintr  filed.  September  23,  summons  served.  Sep- 
tember 25,  answer  filed.  November  19,  cause  dismissed  by  Judge  Wright 
for  want  of  prosecution. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-^  Justices'  Court, 
cisco, 

vs.  I  No.  39,459. 


Paul  Keyser,  H.M.  Blumenthal and  |  John  Wade, 
John  Breen. 


Attorney  for  Defendants. 


To  recover  $75  29  on  bond  and  forage  contract.  1878,  November  1,  com- 
plaint filed  and  summons  issued.  November  4,  answer  filed.  December  17, 
cause  continued  to  time  to  be  stipulated. 


154 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY  S  REPORT. 


Charles  E.  Blake, 


vs. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, David  Scannell,  A.  J.  Bry- 
ant, G.  E.  Sloss,  Gus  Keis, 
Edward  Flaherty,  Peter  Hopkins 
and  Charles  Field. 


U.  S.  Circuit  Court. 

9th  Circuit. 

District  of  California. 

{-No.  2,009. 

Boone  &  Waymire, 

Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 
Greathouse  &  Blanding, 
j  of  Counsel  for  Plaintiff. 


To  enjoin  use  of  "automatic  relief  valve"  on  fire  engines  of  the  paid  Fire 
Department,  and  to  have  the  damages  for  past  use  assessed  and  payment 
compelled  as  for  an  infringement.  1878,  December  10,  summons  and  com- 
plaint served.  February  25,  1879,  answer  filed.  General  denial.  April  9, 
1879,  amended  answer  filed.  April  23,  1879,  received  copy  of  replication  to 
answer.  August  16,  1879,  W.  H.  L.  Barnes  substituted  as  attorney  for  com- 
plainant. October  30,  testimony  filed;  31,  opened  and  refiled.  November 
26,  1879,  cause  argued  and  submitted,  with  leave  to  file  briefs.  December  1, 
receipt  for  testimony  filed;  16,  stipulation  allowing  time,  etc.,  filed.  1880, 
June  14,  order  decree  for  complaint,  etc.;  28,  order  cause  reopened,  etc. 
July  12,  filed  additional  testimony.  July  13,  cause  set  for  14;  14,  order 
cause  reheard,  argued  and  submitted. 


J.  H.  Bartlett  and  George  F.  Bart-  "j   12th  District  Court, 
lett,  partners,  doing  business  as 


J.  H.  Bartlett  &  Co., 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. 


No.  21,954. 

Milton  Andros  &•  Chas.  Page, 

Plaintiffs'  Attorneys. 
Gray  &  Havens, 

Substituted  as  Plaintiffs'  Attorneys. 


To  recover  $8,153.50  for  whale  oil  and  shooks,  alleged  to  have  been  de- 
stroyed by  a  mob  during  the  riots  of  July,  1877.  July  24,  1878,  complaint 
filed.  January  11,  1879,  summons  issued.  January  17,  summons  served. 
February  15,  answer  filed.  April  1,  received  notice  of  substitution  of  Gray 
&  Havens  as  attorneys  for  plaintiffs. 

January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  1  filed. 


John  Garrity, 


4th  District  Court. 


I  No.  22,708. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     C.  H.  Parker, 
cisco. 


Plaintiff's  Attorney. 


To  recover  $1,000,  gold  coin,  amount  of  certified  check  deposited  with  the 


CITY    LITIGATION 


155 


Clerk  of  the  Board  of  Supervisors,  with  plaintiff's  bid  for  certain  street 
cleaning,  and  collected  and  paid  into  the  Treasury,  on  the  ground  that  the 
same  had  become  forfeited  to  defendant  under  the  statute  and  the  call  for 
bids. 

1879,  January  2,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  January  20,  summons 
served.  March  13,  answer  filed.  1880,  January  23,  order  assigning  cause 
to  Department  7,  Superior  Court,  filed.  March  18,  cause  tried,  argued  and 
submitted,  five  days  to  file  briefs.  April  2,  ten  days  further  time  to  file 
briefs.  June  21,  judgment  rendered  in  favor  of  plaintiff,  and  order  for  find- 
ings and  judgment. 


William  Shiels, 


12th  District  Court. 
No.  22,485. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     Joseph  M.  Nougues, 

cisco.  J  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

To  quiet  title  to  premises  on  the  northwest  corner  of  Ninth  and  Brannan 
streets. 

1879,  January  16,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  January  20,  sum- 
mons served.  February  24,  answer  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order  assign- 
ing cause  to  Department  1  filed.  April  28,  case  ordered  to  foot  of  ready 
equity  calendar. 


Edward  Ehret, 


John  L.  Meares,  H.  H.  Toland,  J. 
Campbell  Shorb  and  Isaac  S. 
Titus. 


15th  District  Court. 


No.  10,973. 

E.  A.  Lawrence, 


Plaintiff's  Attorney. 


To  recover  $6,000  for  malicious  arrest  and  imprisonment,  under  the  claim 
that  defendants  were  acting  as  a  Board  of  Health,  and  had  plaintiff  arrested 
under  claim  that  he  was  using  the  "Antique  Castle"  as  a  lodging-house,  and 
under-letting  the  same  while  it  was  unsafe  for  human  habitation.  1879,  Jan- 
uary 18,  complaint  and  summons  issued.  January  22,  summons  served. 
February  19,  demurrer  to  complaint  filed.  March  7,  demurrer  argued  and 
submitted.  April  4,  received  notice  of  overruling  demurrer.  May  24,  an- 
swer filed.  1880,  March  17,  order  cause  placed  on  calendar  of  passed  cases. 
January  23,  1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  5,  Superior  Court, 
filed. 


156  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

Pacific  Submarine  and  Earthquake-  ]  II.  S   Circuit  Court, 
proof  Wall  Co.  |  9th  Circuit. 

I  District  of  California, 
vs.  }•  No.  2,067. 

A.  J.  Bryant,  G-.  F.  Maynard  and     McAllister  &  Bergin, 

W.  C.  Burnett.  J  Plaintiffs'  Attorneys. 

To  recover  $25,000,  damages  alleged  to  have  been  incurred  by  reason  of 
an  infringement  of  a  patent  used  in  the  construction  of  the  new  City  Hall. 
The  iron-work  claimed  to  have  caused  the  infringement  was  wholly  used  by 
former  boards  of  officers.  1879,  March  25,  complaint  filed  and  summons 
issued.  March  28,  summons  served.  May  28,  answer  filed.  July  15, 
served  and  filed  specific  answer.  August  21,  filed  stipulation  waiving  jury. 
1880,  February,  notice  to  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco  and  the 
Board  of  Supervisors  to  defend  said  action  received.  July  7,  case  specially 
set  for  July  15,  1880,  at  11  A.  M.  Issued  10  originals  and  11  copies  of  sub- 
penas. 


George  Hearst,  "\  12th  District  Court, 

vs. 

I  No.  22,724. 
Munroe    Greenwood,     John    Doe,  f 

Richard  Roe,  and  the   City  and     Craig  &Meredith  and  Eugene  B.  Drake, 
County  of  San  Francisco.  J  Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 

To  quiet  title  to  premises  commencing  at  NW.  corner  of  Jackson  and 
Cherry  streets,  and  running  thence  W.  29  feet  9  inches,  thence  N.  30°  E. 
158.6  feet,  thence  N.  77  feet,  E.  6  feet  to  Cherry  street,  thence  S.  157  feet  to 
beginning,  in  Block  851  of  outside  lands.  1879,  March  20,  complaint  filed 
and  summons  issued.  March  29,  summons  served.  April  4,  answer  of  the 
City  and  County  filed.  June  14,  answer  of  Greenwood  filed.  September  11, 
summons  returned,  with  affidavit  of  service,  and  same  filed.  January  23, 
1880,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  2  filed.  April  15,  case  ordered  to 
foot  of  equity  calendar. 


Pacific  Submarine  and  Earthquake- ")   U.  S.  Circuit  Court. 


proof  Wall  Company, 


9th  Circuit. 

District  of  California. 

No.  2,066. 


D.  A.  Macdonald,    John  Sims   and  |   McAllister  &  Bergin, 

W.  C.  Pease.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiffs. 

To  recover  $4,000  damages,  and  the  same  trebled,  for  an  alleged  infringe- 
ment of  a  patent  in  the  construction  of  the  new  City  Hall. 


CITY  LITIGATION.  157 

1879,  May  28,  answer  filed.  July  15,  served  and  filed  specific  answer  and 
notice.  August  21  and  22,  tried  by  court  and  submitted,  with  thirty  days  to 
defendants  to  file  briefs  and  five  days  to  plaintiff  to  reply.  August  27,  judg- 
ment entered  J.  K.  C.  L.  No.  2,  page  405.  September  5,  served  and  filed 
experts'  brief  and  brief  of  counsel.  October  11,  served  and  filed  defendants' 
brief.  October  27,  judgment  rendered  in  favor  of  plaintiff  for  $3,703.  Oc- 
tober 30,  received  copy  memorandum  of  costs  and  disbursements,  $101  30; 
also,  notice  of  motion  that  on  Saturday,  November  1,  plaintiff's  attorneys 
will  apply  to  Clerk  of  court  to  have  the  within  memorandum  of  costs  and 
disbursements  taxed  pursuant  to  the  rules  of  said  court.  November  6,  served 
and  filed  defendants'  notice  of  intention  to  move  for  a  new  trial.  November 
8,  served  and  filed  copy  of  facts  and  points  on  defendants'  motion  for  a  new 
trial.  November  17,  motion  for  new  trial  argued,  submitted  and  denied. 
November  18,  filed  praecipe  for  bond,  etc.  December  26,  bond  filed.  Issued 
writ  of  error,  lodged,  copy  do.  Issued  citation  and  one  copy. 


W.  M.  Lent  and  23  others,  ^  12th  District  Court. 

No.  22,809. 

Bishop  &  Fifield,  T.H.  Hittell,  Garber 
Wm.  Mitchell,  Tax  Collector  of  the         &  Thornton  and  Sharp  &  Sharp, 
City  and  County  of  San  Francisco.  J  Plaintiffs'  Attorneys. 

To  enjoin  sale  of  property  for  Dupont  street  assessment. 

1879,  April  5,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued  and  served,  and  restrain- 
ing order  and  order  to  show  cause  issued  and  served.  April  15,  five  affi- 
davits filed.  Answer  filed.  April  17,  summons  and  order  to  show  cause 
returned  with  affidavit  of  service,  and  filed.  April  18,  order  application  for 
injunction  continued  to  April  30,  1879.  April  30,  continued  till  to-morrow. 
Affidavit  of  P.  J.  Murphy  filed.  May  1,  order  for  injunction  continued  till 
July  11,  1879,  and  that  bond  be  filed.  May  2,  ten  affidavits  on  part  of  plain- 
tiffs filed.  1880,  January  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  1,  Supe- 
rior Court,  filed.  March  23,  Charles  Tillson  substituted  as  defendant. 
April  30,  cause  specially  set  for  July  12,  1880.  July  7, 1880,  order  assigning 
cause  to  Department  6,  Superioi  Court,  filed. 


Cornelius  O'Connor  and  11  others,^  12th  District  Court. 

No.  22,817. 
vs. 

( Bishop  &  Fifield,  T.  H.  Hittell,  Gar- 

Wm.  Mitchell,  Tax  Collector  of  the         ber  &  Thornton  and  Sharp  &  Sharp, 
City  and  County  of  San  Francisco  J  Plaintiffs'  Attorneys. 

To  enjoin  sale  of  real  estate  for  Dupont  street  assessment. 


158 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY  S  REPORT. 


1879 — April  7th,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued  and  served;  and  re- 
straining order  and  order  to  show  cause  issued  and  served.  Otherwise  same 
as  Lent  vs.  Mitchell. 


David  Hunter  and  P.  Marsicano, 
vs. 

Win.  Mitchell,  Tax  Collector  of  the 
City  and  County  of  San  Francisco., 


12th  District  Court. 
No.  22,816. 

Bishop  &  Fifield,    T.  H.  Hittell,    Gar- 

ber  &  Thornton,  and  Sharp  &  Sharp, 

Plaintiffs'  Attorneys. 


To  enjoin  sale  of  real  estate  for  the  widening  of  Dupont  street. 

1879 — April  7,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued,  and  restraining  order 
and  order  to  show  cause  issued.  Otherwise  proceedings  same  as  in  Lent  vs. 
Mitchell. 


George  W.  Osborne,  Jacob  Schweit-  ]    12th  District  Court, 
zer  and  Josephine  Pelet, 

|   Bishop  &  Fifield,    T.  H.  Hittell,   Gar- 
vs.  ber  &  Thornton  and  Sharp  &  Sharp, 

{Plaintiffs'  Attorneys. 
No.  22,827. 

To  enjoin  sale  of  real  estate  for  the  assessment  for  widening  Dupont 
street. 

April  9,  1879,  complaint  filed,  and  summons,  restraining  order  and  order 
to  show  cause  issued  and  served.  Otherwise  same  as  Lent  vs.  Mitchell. 


James  Phelan, 


Win.  Mitchell,  Tax  Collector  of  the 
City  and  County  of  San  Francisco., 


12th  District  Court. 
No.  22,837. 

Bishop  &  Fifield,  Garber  &  Thornton, 
T.  H.  Hittell  and  Sharp  &  Sharp, 

Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 


To  enjoin  sale  of  real  estate  under  assessment  for  the  widening  of  Dupont 
street. 

April  11,  1879,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued  and  served,  and  restrain- 
ing order  and  order  to  show  cause  issued  and  served.  Otherwise  same  as 
Lent  vs.  Mitchell. 


CITY   LITIGATION. 


159 


B.  Bonnett, 


vs. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. 


4th  District  Court. 
No   22,828. 
C.  H.  Parker, 


Plaintiff's  Attorney. 

To  recover  $2,090,  with  interest  from  October  1,  1878,  at  10  per  cent,  per 
annum,  alleged  to  be  due  for  the  construction  of  asphaltum  sidewalks  on 
Montgomery  avenue  from  Jackson  to  Pacific  streets,  as  upon  an  accepted 
street. 

1879 — March  1,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  April  9,  summons 
served.  April  18,  demurrer  filed.  Sept.  12,  demurrer  overruled,  10  days 
to  answer.  Sept.  13,  received  copy  notice  overruling  demurrer.  Sept.  30, 
served  and  filed  answer.  1880— Jan.  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Dep.  7, 
Superior  Court,  filed. 


John  Jlindmann, 


Mary  Molloy  and 

L.  M.  Manzer,  Superintendent  of 
Public  Streets,  Highways  and 
Squares  of  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco. 


15th  District  Court. 


No.  11,212. 


Hale  Eix, 


Plaintiff's  Attorney. 


To  recover  $5,000  damages  alleged  to  have  been  sustained  by  an  accident 
to  plaintiff,  resulting  from  a  defective  sidewalk  on  Howard  street,  near  Sixth 
street. 

1879 — May  1,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  May  2,  summons 
served  on  defendant  Molloy.  May  6,  summons  served  on  defendant  Manzer. 
May  22,  notice  of  motion  to  set  aside  default  and  affidavits  thereon  filled. 
Oct.  3,  order,  default  set  aside,  and  defendants'  demurrer  filed.  Stipulation 
to  try  cause  filed.  1880 — Jan.  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Dep.  6,  filed. 
Feb.  12,  demurrer  submitted.  Feb.  17,  demurrer  sustained.  March  29, 
notice  of  sustaining  of  demurrer  filed.  Order,  default  entered  and  judg- 
ment for  defendants  for  costs. 


Charles  H.  Parker, 


^  4th  District  Court. 


VNo.  22,997. 

The  City  and  County  of   San  Fran- 
cisco. J  Plaintiff  in  person. 

To  recover  $4,460.86  with  interest  at  one  per  cent,  per  month,  from  llth 


160 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY  S  REPORT. 


December,  1876,  claimed  to  be  due  upon  a  contract  for  the  construction  of 
asphaltum  sidewalks  on  Second  street,  between  Mission  and  Folsom  streets. 
April  28,  1879,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  May  8,  Summons  served. 
May  19,  demurrer  to  complaint  filed.  July  25,  demurrer  argued  and  submit- 
ted. Sept  12,  demurrer  overruled,  ten  days  to  answer.  Sept.  13,  received 
notice  of  overruling  demurrer.  Sept.  30,  answer  served  and  filed.  1880 — 
January  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  7,  Superior  Court  filed. 


The  People,    on    the    relation    of  ]    15th  District  Court. 
George  H.  Kogers, 

No.  11,321. 
vs. 


Chas.  Hubert,  Treasurer  of  the 
City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. 


Sawyer  &  Ball, 


Plaintiff's  Attorneys. 


Application  for  writ  of  mandate  requiring  the  payment  of  $23,977.50  from 
the  General  Fund,  claimed  to  have  been  placed  there  for  the  use  of  the  Free 
Library  Fund. 

1879— June  24,  petition  and  affidavit  filed  and  order  to  show  cause  issued 
and  served.  July  11,  answer  served  and  filed.  July  23  and  24,  trial  and 
judgment  for  plaintiff  as  prayed.  July  26,  bill  of  costs  filed.  July  28,  find 
ings  and  judgment  filed. 


Joseph  P.  Cantin  and  Caroline  T.  ]  4th  District  Court. 
Everett,   Executrix  and  Trustee 
of    Augustus    T.     Everett,    de- 
ceased, 


vs. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. J 


No.  23,113. 


G.  F.  &  W.  H.  Sharp, 

Plaintiffs'  Attorneys 


To  recover  $20,000  damages,  claimed  to  have  been  incurred  by  reason  of 
improper  construction  of  sewers,  whereby  large  quantities  of  water  were 
caused  to  flow  upon  premises  in  the  Mission  Addition. 

1879— June  12,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  July  9,  summons 
served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  July  19,  demurrer  served  and  filed.  Nov.  4,  de- 
murrer submitted  on  briefs  to-day  by  defendant,  and  five  days  to  plaintiff, 
and  defendant's  brief  delivered.  Nov.  14,  demurrer  overruled  with  ten  days 
to  answer.  Nov.  22,  answer  served  and  filed.  Jan.  23,  1880,  order  assigning 
cause  to  Department  7,  Superior  Court  filed. 


CITY  LITIGATION 


161 


Alice  Dorland, 


J.  S.  Alemany,  City  and  County  of 
San  Francisco. 


23d  District  Court. 
No.  8,172. 
J.  M.  Wood, 


Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $328.27  for  alleged  street  work  in  grading  Mission  street 
between  Serpentine  avenue  and  Precita  street. 

1879 — May  13,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  June  18,  summons 
served  on  Mayor  Bryant.  July  5,  served  and  filed  demurrer  of  City  and 
County.  July  15,  received  copy  notice  demurrer  overruled.  Oct.  9,  cause 
dismissed  as  to  City  and  County. 


Charles  Stedman, 

vs. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. 


12th  District  Court. 
No.  23,143. 

M.  G.  Cobb  and  G.  W.  Charaberlin, 

Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 


Suit  to  recover  $60,000  damages  to  person  and  property  by  Police  Depart- 
ment. 

1879 — July  10,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  July  15,  summons  re- 
turned with  affidavit  of  service  Juty  11.  July  21,  demurrer  served  and  filed. 
Oct.  10,  order,  demurrer  submitted.  Oct.  22,  order,  demurrer  sustained. 
1880 — April  15,  order  assigning  cause  to  Dep.  1,  Superior  Court  filed.  April 
15,  stipulation  etc.  filed. 


Susan  M.  Blumenberg,  Administra-  ] 
trix  of  the  Estate  of  J.  H.  Blum- 
enberg, deceased. 


15th  District  Court. 


No.  10,679. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  j  Wade  &  Quint, 

cisco.  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $8,150  damages  to  property  by  riots  on  July  25th,  1877. 

1878 — July  23,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  1879— July  2,  Affidavit 
of  John  Wade  as  to  loss  of  summons  filed.  July  2,  alias  summons  issued. 
July  29,  answer  filed  and  served.  1880 — May  26,  order  assigning  cause  to 
Dep.  5,  Superior  Court  filed. 

11 


162  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

Charles  Lehue,  ">  4th  District  Court, 

vs.  I  No.  23,204. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     Geo.  W.  Tyler, 
cisco.  J  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $11,000  damages  by  overflow  from  street  sewers. 

1879 — July  28,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  Aug.  11,  demurrer 
served  and  filed.  Aug.  15,  demurrer  overruled,  twenty  days  to  answer. 
Sept.  10,  affidavit  filed,  order  entering  default  of  defendant  filed.  Sept.  15, 
stipulation  setting  aside  default  filed,  answer  filed,  order  opening  default. 
1880 — Jan.  28,  order  assigning  cause  to  Dep.  7,  filed. 


Anson  P.  Hotaling,  >>  15th  District  Court, 

vs.  I  No.  11,386. 

The  Board   of   Supervisors    of   the     Edmunds  &  Reynolds, 

City  and  County  of  San  Francisco.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  enjoin  defendant  from  awarding  a  certain  contract  to  c  onstruct  a 
cement  pipe  sewer  in  Chestnut  street,  from  Jones  to  Leavenworth. 

1879,  July  28,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  July  31,  summons  re- 
turned and  filed.  July  31,  order  to  show  cause  and  restraining  order  filed. 
August  8,  demurrer  served  and  filed.  October  24,  demurrer  argued  and  sub- 
mitted on  briefs.  'November  17,  demurrer  overruled.  Injunction  granted 
on  filing  undertaking  in  the  sum  of  $500.  November  20,  undertaking  on 
injunction  filed.  November  20,  injunction  issued  upon  filing  undertaking 
as  per  order  of  court.  November  24,  notice  of  decision  of  court  on  demur- 
rer filed.  November  25,  injunction,  with  proof  of  service,  returned  and 
filed.  November  24,  stipulation  for  20  days  to  answer  filed.  1880,  May  10, 
answer  filed.  July  1,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  5,  Superior 
Court,  filed. 


Patrick  Moyles  and  John  Moyles      ]    19th  District  Court. 


I   No.  6,823. 

T.  Sullivan,  Edmund  Foley,  Ann 
Winters,  John  Cooney  and  the 
City  and  County  of   San  Fran-       Geo.  W.  Tyler, 
cisco.  Attorney  for  Plaintiffs. 

Suit  to  quiet  title  to  certain  real  estate  on  Montgomery  and  Filbert  streets. 


CITY  LITIGATION.  163 

1879,  April  25,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  May  5,  summons  and 
order  to  show  cause  returned,  with  affidavit  of  service,  and  filed.  May  12, 
affidavits  of  Michael  Hodge,  P.  Doury,  Edmund  Foley,  Jno.  Cooney,  Ann 
Winters  and  T.  Sullivan  filed.  Order  to  show  cause  submitted  on  affidavits, 
to  be  filed  in  one  week.  May  12,  demurrer  filed.  May  17,  affidavits  of  P. 
Moyles  and  J.  Moyles  and  M.  Galvin  filed.  June  27,  order  to  show  cause 
discharged,  and  restraining  order  vacated  and  set  aside.  July  7,  demurrer 
submitted.  July  14,  demurrer  sustained,  and  alias  summons  ordered  issued 
to  bring  in  the  City  and  County  as  defendant.  July  19,  notice  .'of  sustaining 
of  demurrer  filed.  July  28,  amended  complaint  filed.  July  31,  alias  sum- 
mons issued.  August  9,  answer  of  City  and  County  served  and  filed.  Au- 
gust 15,  demurrer  of  defendants  (except  City  and  County)  to  amended 
complaint  filed.  August  18,  demurrer  overruled.  September  9,  disclaimer 
of  all  defendants  (except  City  and  County)  filed.  January  23,  1880,  order 
assigning  cause  to  Department  4,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


John  D.  Swift  and  James  Gossling,  ]   15th  District  Court. 

vs. 

|   No.  11,387. 

C.  E.  Kelly,  E.  W.  Gosselin,  Thos.    J- 
Boyce,  the   City  and  County  of 
San    Francisco,   Chas.    Hubert, 


Treasurer,  etc.,  John  Doe,  Rich- 


E.  Kirkpatrick  and  E.  B.  Drake, 


ard  Roe  and  Peter  Doe.  Attorneys  for  Plaintiffs. 

Suit  to  determine  the  rights  and  interests  of  the  several  parties  in  and  to  a 
certain  patent  and  contracts  for  the  construction  of  the  "Vierra  Street 
Guides." 

1879,  July  28,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued. .  August  4,  demurrer  of 
City  and  County  and  C.  Hubert  served  and  filed.  August  9,  appearance  for 
defendant  Kelly  and  extension  of  time  filed.  August  8,  order  demurrer  sus- 
tained, with  leave  to  amend,  and  restraining  order  and  order  to  show  cause 
discharged.  August  11,  notice  of  sustaining  demurrer  of  City  and  County 
and  Hubert  filed  and  served.  September  12,  order  to  show  cause  and  re- 
straining order,  with  Sheriff's  return  thereon,  filed.  September  15,  memor- 
andum of  costs  and  disbursements  and  notice  of  judgment  filed.  September 
15,  plaintiffs'  default  entered  and  judgment  rendered  in  favor  of  defendants 
Hubert  and  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco. 


164       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

C.  L.  Taylor,  on  his  own  behalf  ]   23d  District  Court, 
and  in  behalf  of  the  Real  Estate 
Protective     Association,     peti- 


tioner, 


A.  J.  Bryant,  Mayor,  etc.,  and  the 


No.  8,363. 


Eobert  Ash, 


Board  of  Supervisors.  Attorney  for  Petitioner. 

Action  for  writ  of  review  requiring  defendants  to  certify  fully  to  Resolu- 
tion No.  13,725  (N.  S.)t  and  to  set  aside  the  contract  entered  into  by  defen- 
dants with  the  San  Francisco  Gaslight  Company. 

1879,  August  12,  affidavit  and  petition  for  writ  of  review  filed.  Order  that 
writ  issue.  Writ  issued.  August  25,  order  defendant  have  until  August  29  to 
make  return  to  writ.  August  29,  ordered  time  to  make  return  extended  un- 
til decision  of  motion  to  quash  application  for  writ  of  review.  September  5, 
order  motion  to  quash  application  for  writ  submitted.  September  30,  motion 
to  quash  writ  granted  and  writ  dismissed.  September  30,  bill  of  exceptions 
filed.  October  1,  notice  of  appeal  filed.  Undertaking  on  appeal  filed.  Oc- 
tober 6,  received  copy  transcript  on  appeal.  November  1,  transcript  filed  in 
Supreme  Court. 


The  People  of  the   State  of   Cali-  ]   Supreme  Court, 
fornia,  by  Jo.  Hamilton,  Attor- 
ney General,  etc., 

vs. 

The  Board  of  Water  Commission- 
ers of  the  City  and  County  of 
San  Francisco.  J  No.  6,704. 

Petition  for  writ  of  mandate  to  compel  Mayor,  Auditor  and  District  At- 
torney to  proceed  under  the  "Rogers  Water  Act"  to  appoint  three  persons 
on  behalf  of  the  city  and  county,  to  compose  members  of  a  commission  to 
assess  the  value  and  amount  to  be  paid  to  parties  entitled  thereto  in  that 
property  known  as  the  Lako  Laguna  de  la  Merced. 

1879,  July  21,  petition  for  mandamus  filed.  Permit  to  sue  in  name  ot 
people  filed.  Ordered  that  writ  issue,  returnable  July  31,  at  eleven  A.  M. 
July  22,  bond  of  indemnity  for  costs  filed.  July  23,  writ  issued.  July  25, 
return  to  writ  filed.  July  31,  continued  to  August  22. 

August  21,  demurrer  and  answer  filed,  and  cause  continued  to  September 
8.  September  8,  respondent's  points  and  authorities  filed.  September  10, 
cause  continued  to  September  15,  by  consent.  September  23,  argued  and 


CITY   LITIGATION.  165 

submitted.     December  23,  stipulation  dismissing  proceedings  filed.     Decem- 
ber 23,  proceedings  dismissed  as  per  stipulation. 


The   German   Savings  and  Loan 


Society, 

No.  23,154. 
Fanny  Murray,    B.   Bernard,  Jo- 


seph Figel    and    the  City  and 
County  of  San  Franci&co. 


12th  District  Court. 


Jarboe  &  Harrison, 


Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 


Suit  to  foreclose  mortgage  on  property  situated  on  Twenty-first  street, 
near  Valencia. 

1879,  July  12,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  September  12,  summons 
returned  fully  served  August  26  and  27.  October  3,  answer  of  City  and 
County  served  and  filed.  November  11,  dismissal  of  action  filed. 


C.  L.  Taylor,   on  his  own  behalf  ]   23d  District  Court, 
and  in  behalf  of  the  Real  Estate    ' 
Protective  Association, 

I   No.  8,413. 


A.  J.  Bryant,  Mayor,  etc.,  and  the   |  Kobert  Ash, 

Board  of  Supervisors.  Attorney  for  Petitioner. 

Suit  to  obtain  writ  of  prohibition  restraining  the  Board  of  Supervisors 
from  any  further  action  in  the  claim  of  Kelly  and  Gosselin  for  the  "Vierra 
street  guides." 

1879,  September  1,  petition  and  affidavit  for  writ  of  prohibition  to  issue, 
restraining  order  thereon,  filed.  Alternative  writ  of  prohibition  issued. 
September  2,  alternative  writ  of  prohibition  returned,  with  proof  of  service 
September  1,  and  filed.  November  12,  ordered  motion  to  dismiss  writ  of 
prohibition  granted,  and  writ  dismissed. 


George  Hearst,  1    12th  District  Court. 


'   No.  22,841. 

Geo.  W.  Frink,  John  Doe,  Kich-   I 

ard  Eoe,  Peter  Doe  and  the  City   |   E.  B.  Drake  and  Craig  &  Meredith, 

and  County  of  San  Francisco.       J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  quiet  title  to  about  30  acres  of  land  situated  on  the  Daniel  Eyan 
pre-emption  claim. 

1879,  April  12,  complaint  filed,  summous  issued.     September  15,  answer 


166       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

of  City  and  County  served  and  filed.  1880,  January  23,  order  assigning 
cause  to  Department  1,  Superior  Court,  filed.  April  28,  ordered  to  foot  of 
equity  calendar. 


George  Hearst, 


12th  District  Court. 


No.  23,382. 

Stephen  H.  Smith,  Geo.  W.  Frink, 
John  Doe,  Richard  Roe  and  the 


City  and  County  of   San   Fran- 


E.  B.  Drake  and  Craig  &  Meredith, 


cisco.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  quiet  title  to  certain  property  situated  on  First  avenue. 

1879,  September  8,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  September  24,  an- 
swer of  city  and  county  served  and  filed.  1880,  January  23,  order  assigning 
cause  to  Department  1,  Superior  Court,  filed.  April  29,  ordered  to  foot  of 
equity  calendar. 


George  Hearst,  ]   12th  District  Court, 

vs.  No.  22,845. 


Clotilde  Ullman,  John  Doe,  Rich- 
ard Roe,  Peter  Doe  and  the  City 


E.  B.  Drake  and  Craig  &  Meredith, 

Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 


and  County  of  San  Francisco.        J 

Suit  to  quiet  title  to  certain  property  in  Block  841  of  Outside  Lands. 

1879 — April  14,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  Sept.  24,  answer  of 
City  and  County  served  and  filed.  Oct.  20,  demurrer  of  defendant  Ullman 
filed.  1880 — Jan.  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Dep.  1,  Superior  Court,  filed. 
April  29,  ordered  to  foot  of  equity  calendar. 


George  Hearst,  ")    12th  District  Court. 

!   No.  23,381. 

Thomas  Downing,  John  Doe,  Rich- 
ard Roe,  Peter  Doe  and  the  City  |   E.  B.  Drake  and  Craig  &  Meredith, 
and  County  of  San  Francisco.        J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  quiet  title  to  a  portion  of  Block  852. 

1879 — Sept.  8,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.     Sept.  24,  answer  of  City 
and  County  filed  and  served.     Sept.    29,    demurrer   of   defendant   Downing 


CITY    LITIGATION.  167 

filed.  Sept.  29,  admission  of  service  of  demurrer  filed.  1880 — Jan.  23,  order 
assigning  cause  to  Dep.  1,  Superior  Court,  filed.  April  29,  ordered  to  foot 
of  equity  calendar. 


John  P.  Dunn,  ]   23d  District  Court, 

vs.  No.  8.451. 


The  Board  of  Election  Commission-      D.  L.  Smoot, 

ers  of  the  City  and  County  of  San  |  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

Francisco. 

Application  for  writ  of  mandate  commanding  defendants  to  proceed  to 
canvass  the  returns  of  the  general  election  held  September  3,  1879,  without 
adjournment. 

1879 — Sept.  19,  affidavit  and  petition  for  writ  of  mandate  filed,  order  for  alter- 
native writ  of  mandate  to  issue,  alternative  writ  of  mandate  issued.  Sept. 
23,  alternative  writ  returned  with  proof  of  service  and  filed.  Sept.  25,  affi- 
davit for  writ  of  attachment  for  contempt  filed.  Sept.  30,  ordered  writ  of 
alternative  mandate  dismissed. 


Globe  Gas  Light  Company  of   Cal. }   15th  District  Court. 

vs. 

No.  11,458. 

The  San  Francisco  Gas  Light  Co.,  }- 
the  Board  of  Supervisors  and  the 


Treasurer    and    Auditor   of    the 
City  and  County  of  San  Francis- 


W.  H.  Patterson  and  E.  B.  Drake, 

Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 


co.  J 

Action  brought  to  obtain  an  order  and  judgment  restraining  and  enjoining 
the  Auditor  from  auditing  or  approving  any  demand  in  favor  of  the  S.  F. 
Gas  Light  Co.  against  said  City  and  County  and  for  $59,000  against  said 
City  and  County,  the  amount  which  could  have  been  realized  if  plaintiffs' 
proposition  had  been  accepted. 

1879 — Sept.  2,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  Sept.  22,  stipulation 
extending  time  to  plead  filed.  Oct.  1,  demurrer  of  S.  F.  Gas  Light  Co,  filed. 
Oct.  1,  notice  of  motion  to  strike  out  certain  portions  of  complaint  filed. 
Oct.  3,  second  notice  of  motion  to  strike  out  certain  portions  of  complaint 
filed.  Oct.  24,  demurrer  of  S.  F.  Gas  Light  Co.  submitted.  Nov.  3,  order 
extending  time  to  file  brief,  filed.  Nov.  14,  order,  demurrer  to  complaint 
sustained.  Dec.  1,  notice  of  order  sustaining  demurrer  filed.  Dec.  10,  order 
extending  time  to  amended  complaint  filed. 


168 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY  S  REPORT. 


Benjamin  Schloss, 


^  12th  District  Court. 
No.  23,510. 


Napthaly,  Friedenrich  and  Ackerman, 
John  Curran.  )  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $384.50  for  alleged  damages  to  property  of  plaintiff  by  de- 
fendant leaving  certain  Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph  wires  to  remain  in 
and  across  a  public  highway  known  as  Octavia  street. 

1879 — Oct.  8,  Complaint  for  damages  filed,  summons  issued.  Oct.  20, 
answer  served  and  filed.  1880 — Jan.  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Dep.  2> 
Superior  Court  filed.  May  4,  summons  returned  with  affidavit  of  service  on 
Oct.  9,  1879. 


Spring  Valley  Water  Works, 


15th  District  Court. 
No.  11,519. 


The  City  and  County  of   San  Fran-  I  Fox  &  Kellogg, 

cisco.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $92,000,  for  water  furnished  defendant  for  its  family  use 
in  public  buildings,  etc.,  etc.,  between  the  1st  day  of  Feb.,  1869,  and  the  20th 
day  of  Nov.  1872. 

1879 — Oct.  8,  complaint  in  assumpsit  filed,  summons  issued.  Oct.  21, 
summons  returned  as  served  Oct.  10,  and  filed;  default  of  City  and  County 
entered  and  bill  of  costs  filed.  Oct.  21,  notice  of  motion  to  set  aside  default 
and  affidavits  of  W.  C.  Burnett  and  G.  H.  Miller  and  order  shortening  time 
and  staying  proceedings  served  and  filed.  Oct.  21,  order,  stay  of  proceed- 
ings for  ten  dayg.  Oct.  24,  default  set  aside  and  answer  served  and  filed. 
1880— Jan  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Dep.  5,  Superior  Court,  filed. 


John  Boyle, 


]   4th  District  Court. 


Michael  Hyde,  I.  W.  Lees,  D.  Cal- 
laghan,  Win.  Rollins,  J.  Meagher, 
the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, Geo.  K.  Porter,  T.  G.  Mc- 
Levan,  John  Doe  and  R.  Roe. 


No.  22,851. 


C.  H.  Parker, 


Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 


Suit  to  recover  $186.97  and  interest  on  a  certain  street  assessment  re- 
corded in  the  office  of  the  Superintendent  of  Streets  in  Vol.  79  of  Street 
Assessments,  page  70. 


CITY   LITIGATION. 


1879— March  7,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  Oct.  21,  demurrer  of 
City  and  County  filed  and  served.  Oct.  23,  demurrer  of  City  and  County 
withdrawn  and  action  as  to  City  and  County  dismissed. 


The  People  of  the  State  of  Califor- 
nia, ex  rel.  Jo.  Hamilton,  Attor- 
ney General, 

vs. 
Patrick  Moyle  and  John  Moyle. 


4th  District  Court. 


No.  23,374. 


Action  brought  to  prevent  obstructions  on  Alta  street. 

1879 — Oct.  30,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  Nov.  13,  order  for  in- 
junction. Nov.  21,  injunction  issued.  Nov.  29,  injunction  and  Sheriffs- 
return  thereon  filed.  Dec.  4,  order  extending  time  to  plead  filed.  Dec.  5. 
demurrer  filed.  1880 — Jan.  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Dep.  7,  Superior 
Court,  filed. 


Eugene  Lies, 


C.  Hubert,    Treasurer,  etc.,  and 
Thirty-four  others. 


12th  District  Court, 


No.  23,752. 
K.  R.  Provines, 


Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 


Suit  to  recover  $8,080.62  on  Montgomery  avenue  warrant. 

1879 — Nov.  22,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  Nov.  28,  demurrer  of 
defendants,  except  De  Fries,  served  and  filed.  Dec.  13,  summons  returned 
served  on  twenty-three  defendants  and  filed.  Dec.  24,  order,  demurrer  sus- 
tained, twenty  days  to  amend.  1880— Jan.  17,  amended  complaint  filed. 
Jan.  20,  notice  of  substitution  of  attorney  for  certain  defendants  filed.  Jan. 
23,  order  assigning  case  to  Dep.  1,  Superior  Court  filed.  Feb.  3,  demurrer 
of  Chas.  Hubert  served  and  filed.  Feb.  3,  demurrer  of  defendants  filed.. 
April  23,  order  demurrer  of  defendants  (except  Hubert)  submitted.  April 
28,  order  demurrer  of  defendants  (except  Hubert)  overruled  and  twenty  day& 
to  answer.  April  28,  decision  on  demurrer  to  amended  complaint  filed,  and 
demurrer  overruled.  April  29,  notice  of  overruling  demurrer  to  amended, 
complaint  filed.  April  29,  order,  thirty  days  to  defendants  to  answer  (ex- 
cept Hubert).  June  7,  answer  filed.  July  12,  stipulation  to  place  demurrer 
on  calendar  for  argument  filed. 


170  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

Wm.  Hollis,  ]  4th  District  Court. 

No.  23,436. 
A.    J.    Bryant,    Mayor,    etc.,    the   f 

Board  of   Supervisors,  Chas.  E. 
.    Kelly,  E.  W.  Gosselin,  John  Lee    {   Robert  Ash, 

and  N.  J.  McMurray.  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

Action  brought  to  enjoin  and  restrain  defendants  Bryant  and  Board  of 
Supervisors  from  passing,  etc.,  the  claim  of  John  Lee  and  N.  J.  McMurray 
for  erecting  3892  Vierra  Street  Guides,  amounting  to  $7,200. 

1879 — Dec.  1,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued,  undertaking  on  injunction 
filed,  order  for  injunction  filed,  and  writ  of  injunction  issued.  Dec.  4,  sum- 
mons returned  served  Dec.  3,  1879,  and  filed.  Dec.  13,  writ  of  injunction 
returned  served  on  Mayor  Bryant,  Board  of  Supervisors  and  John  A.  Russell, 
Clerk,  on  Dec.  1,  1879,  and  filed.  Dec.  17,  demurrer  of  defendants  Kelly, 
Lee  and  McMurray  filed.  1880 — Jan.  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Dep.  6, 
Superior  Court,  filed.  Feb.  16,  dismissal  of  action  filed. 


Charles  Geddcs,  ^  12th  District  Court. 

I  No.  23,831. 

McAllister  &  Bergin, 
John  P.  Dunn,  Auditor,  etc.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Application  for  writ  of  mandate  to  show  cause  why  defendant  should  not 
allow  plaintiff's  demand  for  $1,000,  for  preparing  plans,  etc.,  for  School  De- 
partment. 

1879,  December  13,  affidavit  and  petition  for  mandamus  filed.  December 
13,  order  that  writ  issue.  Writ  issued.  December  16,  alternative  writ  of 
mandate  returned,  served  on  December  13,  1879,  and  filed.  December  19, 
order  application  for  writ  of  mandate  continued  until  December  22,  1879. 
December  23,  answer  filed  and  served.  December  24,  order  application  for 
writ  of  mandate  dismissed. 


Benjamin  E.  Harris,  ^  15th  District  Court. 

No.  11,643. 

} 

Joseph  M.  Nougues  and  M.  Mullany. 
John  P.  Dunn,  Auditor,  etc.  J  Attorneys  for  Petitioner. 

Application  for  writ  of  mandate  to  show  cause  why  defendant  should  not 
audit  the  demand  of  petitioner  for  extra  services  rendered  by  him  while  he 
was  Assessor. 


CITY    LITIGATION. 


171 


1879,  December  15,  writ  served  on  defendant  Dunn.  December  19,  case 
transferred  to  12th  District  Court.  December  23,  stipulation  transferring 
cause  to  12th  District  Court  filed.  December  29,  answer  served  and  filed. 
December  29,  received  copy  of  demurrer  to  answer.  December  30,  cause 
continued  to  January  16,  1880,  and  stipulation  transferring  cause  to  Depart- 
ment 6  filed.  1880,  February  2,  order  demurrer  to  answer  overruled.  April 
21,  notice  of  motion  for  a  peremptory  writ  of  mandate  filed.  April  21,  set- 
tled statement  of  the  facts,  etc.,  filed.  April  30,  motion  for  peremptory  writ 
of  mandate  submitted  on  agreed  statement  of  facts.  July  14,  peremptory 
writ  of  mandamus  granted. 


Eugene  Lies, 


vs. 


12th  District  Court. 
No.  23,849. 


The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     R.  R.  Provines, 
cisco.  )  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

Action  brought  to  recover  $8,080  62  on  Montgomery  avenue  warrant. 

1879,  December  17,  complaint  in  assumpsit  filed,  summons  issued.  1880, 
January  17,  notice  of  appearance  for  defendant  filed.  February  2,  demurrer 
served  and  filed.  January  23,  order  assigning  cause  to  Department  1,  Supe- 
rior Court,  filed. 


San  Francisco  Gaslight  Company,  "^  Supreme  Court. 
vs.  I  No.  6,953. 


W.  E.  Shaber,  Treasurer  of  the  City 
and  County  of  San  Francisco. 


R.  P.  and  H.  N.  Clement, 

Attorneys  for  Petitioner. 


Application  for  writ  of  mandamus  commanding  respondent  to  register  de- 
mands Nos.  7,533  and  7,534,  amounting  to  the  sum  of  $43,462  55,  and  for 
$2,000  damages,  for  lighting  streets  during  months  of  August  and  Septem- 
ber, 1879. 

1880,  February  3,  petition  filed.  Order  that  writ  issue.  Writ  issued.  Feb- 
ruary 4,  return  to  writ  filed.  February  9,  continued  to  February  13.  Feb- 
ruary 13,  stipulation  filed  and  continued  to  February  20.  February  20, 
answer  served  and  filed.  Case  argued  and  submitted  on  briefs.  February 
26,  respondent's  points  and  authorities  filed  and  served.  February  28,  peti- 
tioner's points,  etc.,  filed.  March  12,  submission  set  aside  and  case  dis- 
missed. 


172       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY^  REPORT. 

The  City  and  County  of   San  Fran-"^  Superior  Court,  Department  2. 
cisco, 

I  No.  306. 
vs. 

Wm.  M.  Pierson, 
K.  H.  Sinton,  License  Collector.      J  Attorney  for  Defendant. 

Suit  to  recover  $840,  collected  by  defendant  as  License  Collector  between 
January  1,  1878,  and  January  1,  1880,  and  not  turned  over  to  the  City  and 
County  Treasury. 

1880,  February  9,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  February  11,  answer 
filed.  February  13,  order  granting  leave  to  intervene  filed.  February  13, 
complaint  of  intervention  filed.  February  24,  notice  of  motion  to  strike 
complaint  of  intervention  from  files  filed.  Order  filed. 


William  Coffey,  ]    Superior  Court,  Department  7. 

vs.  No.  271. 


Wm.  Patterson,  Superintendent  of 

Streets,   etc.,  and  the   City  and   I  D.  Louderback, 

County  of  San  Francisco.  J  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $500,  damages  to  property  by  reason  of  defendants'  taking 
away  a  certain  board  fence  and  brick  wall. 

1880,  February  5,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  February  13,  sum- 
mons returned,  with  affidavit  of  service,  and  filed.  March  1,  stipulation 
extending  time  to  plead  filed.  March  5,  answer  served  and  filed. 


John  McDonald,  ^  Supreme  Court, 

vs. 

Wm.  Patterson,  Superintendent  of 

Streets,  etc.  J  No.  6,! 

Application  for  writ  of  mandate  directed  to  defendant  to  show  cause  why 
he  should  not  enter  into  a  certain  contract  with  petitioner  for  street  work. 

1880,  February  12,  petition  filed.  Order  that  writ  issue.  Writ  issued. 
February  16,  argued  and  submitted,  with  five  days  to  respondent  to  file  brief. 
February  21,  respondent's  brief  served  and  filed.  March  2,  writ  quashed 
and  proceedings  dismissed. 


CITY    LITIGATION.  173 

Newton  Morgan,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department' 1. 

vs.  I  No.  153. 

Stewart  Menzies  and  Monroe  Ash-  I  Sharp  &  Sharp, 

bury.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $15,000,  as  sureties  upon  a  certain  undertaking  on  attach- 
ment as  damages  sustained  by  reason  of  the  levy  and  attachment  in  a  certain 
suit  in  the  late  19th  District  Court. 

1880,  January  22,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  February  19,  demurrer 
served  and  filed.  March  5,  demurrer  overruled,  with  ten  days  to  answer. 
March  5,  notice  of  overruling  of  demurrer  filed.  April  7,  answer  served  and 
filed. 


Charles  Geddes,  >j  Superior  Court,  Department  7. 

I  No.  295. 

McAllister  &  Bergin, 
John  P.  Dunn,  Auditor,  etc.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Application  for  writ  of  mandate  directed  to  defendant  to  show  cause  why 
he  should  not  allow  plaintiff's  demand  for  $1,000  for  plans,  etc.,  prepared 
for  School  Department. 

1880,  February  7,  petition  for  mandamus  filed.  Writ  issued.  February 
12,  alternative  mandamus  filed.  February  28,  answer  served  and  filed. 
March  5,  application  for  writ  of  mandate  submitted;  12,  order  granting  writ 
of  peremptory  mandate;  16,  judgment  and  findings  filed,  and  judgment  re- 
corded (B.  1,  p.  34)  in  favor  of  plaintiff,  costs  $17  25.  Eoll  filed  and  judg- 
ment docketed,  and  writ  of  peremptory  mandate  issued  and  memorandum  of 
costs  filed  and  notice  of  judgment  filed.  March  20,  peremptory  writ  of  man- 
date filed. 


The  People  of  the  State  of  Califor-"^  Superior  Court,  Department  2. 
nia,  ex  rel.  J.  P.  Manrow, 

I  No.  594. 
vs. 

Harmon  &  Galpin, 
Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Application  for  writ   of  mandate   directed  to  Chas.  Tillson  to  show  cause 
why  he  should  not  strike  off  the  property  of  petitioner  from  the  Delinquent 

Tax  List. 


174 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY  S  REPORT. 


1880,  March  12,  petition  for  writ  of  mandate  filed.  Order  writ  of  mandate 
issue.  Writ  of  mandate  issued.  March  15,  writ  of  mandate  returned  served, 
and  filed.  March  15,  order  defendant  have  until  March  17  to  make  return  to 
writ,  and  hearing  continued  to  March  18  at  7.30  p.  M.  March  16,  demurrer 
served.  March  17,  demurrer  filed.  March  18,  ordered, demurrer  argued  and 
submitted.  March  22,  ordered  demurrer  sustained,  ten  days  stay.  April  1, 
judgment  filed.  Judgment  recorded  in  B.  1,  p.  62,  in  favor  of  defendant 
for  cost«,  $7  50.  April  1,  roll  filed.  Judgment  docketed.  April  2,  notice 
of  appeal  filed.  Undertaking  on  appeal  filed. 


The  Bank  of  California,  Kelator,        "]   Supreme  Court, 
vs.  [   No.  7,060. 


W.   B.    Shaber,    Treasurer   of    the   I 

City  and   County  of   San   Fran-   I   Wilson  &  Wilson, 


cisco,  Respondent, 


Attorneys  for  Kelator. 


Application  for  writ  of  mandate  directed  to  respondent  to  show  cause  why 
he  should  not  pay  the  claim  of  relator,  amounting  to  $66,186  26,  and  com- 
monly known  as  the  "Biot  Claim." 

1880,  March  15,  petition  filed.  Order  writ  of  mandate  to  issue.  March 
16,  writ  returned  and  filed.  March  19,  demurrer  filed.  Argued  and  ordered 
that  respondent  file  his  answer  to-morrow.  March  20,  answer  served  and 
filed.  March  25,  affidavit  of  John  A.  Bussell  filed.  Cause  argued  and  sub- 
mitted. June  22,  order  that  writ  issue.  June  23,  peremptory  writ  issued. 
June  25,  return  to  writ  filed. 


The  People  of  the  State  of   Cali-  ]    Supreme  Court, 
fornia,  ex  rel.  C.  L.  Taylor,  Pe- 


tioner, 


The  Board  of  Election  Commis- 
sioners of  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  Bespondents. 


No.  7,066. 

A.  L.  Hart, 
A.  A.  Cohen, 


Attorney  General. 
Of  Counsel. 


Application  for  writ  of  prohibition  to  show  cause  why  defendants  and  re- 
spondents should  not  be  absolutely  restrained  and  prohibited  from  further 


CITY    LITIGATION.  175 

proceedings  in  the  matter  of  holding  a  special  election  on  March  30,  1880, 
for  the  election  of  a  Board  of  Fifteen  Freeholders. 

1880,  March  16,  petition  filed.  Order  writ  issued.  Writ  issued.  March 
17,  undertaking  filed.  March  19,  demurrer  filed,  and  argued  and  submitted. 
March  23,  demurrer  sustained  and  writ  denied. 


Fitel  Phillips  and  10  others,  >  Superior  Court,  Department  8. 

No.  688. 

K.  Ash  and  E.  Kirkpatrick, 
Charles  Tlllson,  Tax  Collector.        J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiffs. 

Action  brought  to  obtain  a  decree  of  perpetual  injunction  and  to  perpet- 
ually enjoin  the  defendant  from  selling  the  real  estate,  etc.,  of  plaintiffs  for 
delinquent  taxes. 

1880,  March  22,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  Undertaking  on  in  junc- 
tion filed  and  order  to  show  cause  issued.  25,  order  to  show  cause  and^re- 
straining  order  filed.  Summons  served,  and  returned  and  filed.  March  26, 
order  cause  submitted  on  briefs.  Demurrer  of  defendant  served  and  filed. 
April  9,  demurrer  submitted.  April  12,  order  injunction  refused  and 
restraining  order  vacated.  April  13,  notice  of  appeal  filed  and  undertaking 
on  appeal  filed. 


John  Boyle,  "\  Justices'  Court. 

vs.  I  Noi.  46,608'. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-  j  J.  M.  Wood, 

CISCO.  J 


Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 


Suit  to  recover  $242  72  upon  a  certain  contract  for  the  performance  of 
street  work  on  an  accepted  street,  to  wit:  Ellis  street,  from  Powell  to  Mason. 

1880,  February  20,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  April  2,  answer 
served  and  filed.  Case  tried  and  judgment  rendered  for  plaintiff  for  $242  77, 
with  $38  84  interest  and  $14  08  percentage  and  $12  75  costs.  April  12,  no- 
tice of  appeal  served.  May  24,  notice  of  appeal  filed. 


1  76  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

John  Doyle,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  7. 

vs.  I  No.  695. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-    J.  M.  Wood, 

Cisco.  J  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $2,429  90  for  work  and  labor  performed  by  plaintiff  for  de- 
fendant. 

1880,  March  22,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  May  10,  demurrer 
served  and  filed.  July  8,  demurrer  overruled,  with  twenty  days  to  answer. 


Philip  Heuer  and  40  others,  ]   Superior  Court,  Department  8. 

I   No.  896. 

H.  C.  Newhall, 

Attorney  for  Plaintiffs. 
P.  G.  Galpin, 
Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.  j  Of  Counsel. 

Suit  to  enjoin  sale  for  Montgomery  avenue  assessment. 

1880,  April  8,  complaint  filed.  Summons  issued.  Undertaking  on  in- 
junction filed.  Eestraining  order  issued.  April  9,  motion  to  vacate  restrain- 
ing order  submitted.  April  11,  summons  returned  and  filed,  and  same 
served  on  April  9.  April  11,  restraining  order  filed.  Order  vacating  re- 
straining order  filed.  April  12,  dismissal  filed. 


E.  M.  Sherman  et  als.,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  1, 

vs. 

Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.  J  No.  929. 

Suit  to  enjoin  sale  of  Dupont  street  assessment. 

1880,  April  12,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued,  and  restraining  order  and 
order  to  show  cause  issued  and  same  served.  Undertaking  on  injunction 
filed.  Order  application  to  vacate  restraining  order  submitted.  April  13, 
restraining  order  filed  and  summons  returned  and  filed.  Order  setting  aside 
restraining  order  filed  and  restraining  order  vacated.  April  30,  cause  con- 
tinued to  July  12,  1880.  May  15,  substitution  of  attorney  for  plaintiffs 
filed. 


CITY    LITIGATION.  177 

David  Hunter  et  als.,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  5. 

I  No.  813. 

Garber,  Thornton  &  Bishop, 
Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiffs. 

Suit  to  enjoin  sale  of  Dupont  street  assessment. 

1880,  April  2,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.     April  9,  restraining  order 
and  order  to  show  cause  filed. 


Cornelius  O'Connor  and  13  others,^  Superior  Court,  Department  6. 

No.  814. 

Garber,  Thornton  &  Bishop, 
Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.  J  Attorneys  for  Plainffts. 

Suit  to  enjoin  sale  of  Dupont  street  assessment. 

1880,  April  2,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.     April  9,  restraining  order 
and  order  to  show  cause,  with  affidavit  of  service,  filed. 


\V.  M.  Lent  and  37  others,  >  Superior  Court,  Department  1. 

I  No.  817. 

Garber,  Thornton  &  Bishop, 
Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiffs. 

Suit  to  enjoin  sale  of  Dupont  street  assessment. 

1880,  April  2,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  April  9,  restraining 
order  and  order  to  show  cause  filed.  April  9,  continued  to  April  16.  April 
30,  continued  to  July  12. 


Thomas  Adams  et  al.,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  1. 

No.  857. 

John  Wade  and  K.  M.  Smith, 
Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiffs. 

Suit  to  enjoin  sale  of  Dupont  street  assessment. 

1880,  April  6,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued  and  same  served,  re- 

12 


178       CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT. 

turned  and  filed.  April  8,  restraining  order  issued.  Undertaking  filed,  and 
restraining  order  and  order  to  show  cause  filed.  April  30,  continued  to 
July  12. 


">  Superior 
I  No.  871. 
A.  Mecartney, 


Amos  Mecartney,  ">  Superior  Court,  Department  7. 

vs. 
Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.         "  J  In  person. 


Suit  to  enjoin  sale  of  Dupont  street  assessment. 

1880,  April  7,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  April  8,  bond  to  obtain 
restraining  order  filed.  Restraining  order  issued.  April  10,  summons  re- 
turned, with  affidavit  of  service,  and  also  restraining  order,  on  April  8,  and 
filed. 


James  Phelan,  *^  Superior  Court,  Department  5. 

No.  885. 

John  Wade  and  K.  M.  Smith, 
Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.  J  Attorneys  «f or  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  enjoin  sale  of  Dupont  street  assessment. 

1880,  April  8,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  Undertaking  on  injunc- 
tion filed.  Restraining  order  and  order  to  show  cause,  with  affidavit  of  ser- 
vice, filed.  April  8,  summons  returned,  with  affidavit  of  service  on  April  8, 
and  same  filed. 


Richard  Ivers  et  al.,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  6. 

vs.  CN°- 918' 

Garber,  Thornton  &  Bishop, 
Chas.  Tillson,  Tax  Collector.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiffs. 

Suit  to  enjoin  sale  of  Dupont  street  assessment. 

1880,  April  10,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.     April  16,  restraining 
order  and  order  to  show  cause,  with  affidavit  of  service,  filed. 


CITY   LITIGATION.  179 


Samuel  Bloom,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  2. 

vs.  I  No.  994. 

The  City  and  County  of    San  Fran-     Joseph  Leggett, 

cisco.  j  Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  abate  nuisance  and  to  recover  $20,000  damages  to  property  caused 
by  excrements,  etc.,  issuing  from  the  City  and  County  Hospital  upon  plain- 
tiff's premises. 

1880,  April  17,  complaint  filed,  summons  issued.  April  20,  summons  re- 
turned, with  affidavit  of  service  on  Mayor  Kalloch,  April  19,  and  filed. 
April  20,  order  to  show  cause  and  affidavit  of  service  filed.  April  21,  ordered 
motion  continued  to  Friday,  23d  instant.  April  29,  demurrer  filed  and 
served. 


John  Noonen,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  3. 

vs.  I  No.  1,019. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     McClure,  Dwinelle  &  Plaisance, 

cisco.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $2,766  65,  for  cleaning  sewers. 

1880,  April  21,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  April  23,  summons 
(served  on  April  22)  returned,  and  same  filed.  June  15,  demurrer  served 
and  filed.  July  17,  demurrer  sustained,  with  ten  days  to  amend. 


John  Hagan,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  7. 

vs.  I  No.  1,023. 

The  City  and  County  of  San  Fran-     McClure,  Dwinelle  &  Plaisance, 

cisco.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Suit  to  recover  $1,927  91,  for  cleaning  sewers . 

1880,  April  22,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  April  23,  summons 
(served  on  April  22)  returned,  and  same  filed.  June  15,  demurrer  served 
and  filed.  July  8,  demurrer  sustained,  with  ten  days  to  amend. 


180  CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY'S  REPORT, 

N.  J.  McMurray  and  H.   T.   Hol-^  Superior  Court,  Department  1. 
brook, 

'  No.  1,081. 

W.  C.  Burnett, 
John  P.  Dunn,  Auditor,  etc.  J  Attorney  for  Plaintiffs. 

Application  for  writ  of  mandate  directed  to  defendant  to  show  cause  why 
he  should  not  audit  plaintiffs'  claim  for  $3,008  10,  for  erecting  street  guides. 

1880,  April  28,  affidavit  and  petition  for  writ  of  mandate  filed.  Order  that 
alternative  writ  issue.  Writ  issued.  29,  writ  returned  and  filed.  April  30, 
answer  served  and  filed.  Order  trial  and  peremptory  writ  ordered  to  issue. 
May  3,  decision  in  writing  and  decree  filed.  Memorandum  of  costs  filed.  4, 
decree  for  peremptory  writ  of  mandate  recorded  (vol.  1,  page  159)  in  favor 
of  plaintiff  and  for  costs,  $30.  Koll  filed  and  decree  docketed.  5,  peremp- 
tory writ  issued.  May  10,  execution  for  costs  issued.  May  10,  notice  of 
appeal  filed.  May  14,  peremptory  writ  of  mandate  returned  (same  having 
been  served),  and  filed.  May  19,  order  extending  time  filed. 


David  Calderwood,  >  Superior  Court,  Department  4. 

vs.  I  No.  996. 

Geo.  F.   Sharp  and  the  City  and    D.  Calderwood, 

County  of  San  Francisco.  J  In  person. 

Suit  to  quiet  title,  and  for  $50,000  damages,  and  to  set  aside  a  judgment 
in  an  action,  No.  14,679,  in  the  late  4th  District  Court. 

1880,  April  19,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  April  21,  demurrer 
of  Sharp  filed.  April  30,  order  demurrer  sustained,  five  days  to  amend. 
April  30,  demurrer  of  City  and  County  served  and  filed.  May  1,  notice  of 
sustaining  of  demurrer  of  Sharp  filed.  May  4,  amended  complaint  filed. 
May  4,  demurrer  of  City  and  County  filed.  May  4,  demurrer  of  Sharp  filed. 


N.  P.  Cole,  "\  Superior  Court,  Department  1. 

VSi  I  No.  1,225. 

Sawyer  &  Ball, 
John  P.  Dunn,  Auditor,  etc.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Application  for  mandamus  directed  to  defendant  to  show  cause  why  he 
should  not  audit  the  demand  of  plaintiff  for  fixing  up  Superior  Court  rooms, 
in  old  City  Hall. 


CITY  LITIGATION.  181 

1880,  May  19,  affidavit  and  petition  for  writ  of  mandate  filed.  Order  that 
writ  issue.  Writ  issued.  May  24,  writ  of  mandate  returned,  with  proof  of 
service,  and  same  filed.  May  28,  continued  to  June  1.  June  1,  continued 
to  June  4.  June  1,  demurrer  served  and  filed.  June  4,  demurrer  argued 
and  submitted.  June  16,  demurrer  overruled,  five  days  to  answer.  June  17, 
notice  of  overruling  demurrer  filed.  June  21,  answer  served  and  filed.  July 
13,  notice  of  motion  to  set  cause  for  trial  filed.  Cause  set  for  August  16. 


N.  P.  Cole,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  1. 

vs.  U°-  !'24L 

Sawyer  &  Ball, 
John  P.  Dunn,  Auditor,  etc.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Application  for  mandamus  directed  to  defendant  to  show  cause  why  he 
should  not  audit  the  demand  of  plaintiff  for  furnishing,  etc.,  Superior  Court 
rooms,  in  old  City  Hall. 

1880,  May  20,  affidavit  and  petition  for  writ  of  mandate  filed.  May  21, 
ordered  that  writ  issue.  Writ  issued.  May  24,  writ  of  mandate  served,  re 
turned  and  filed.  May  28,  continued  to  June  1.  June  1,  continued  to  June 
4.  June  1,  demurrer  served  and  filed.  June  4,  demurrer  argued  and  sub- 
mitted. June  16,  demurrer  overruled,  five  days  to  answer.  June  17,  notice 
of  overruling  demurrer  filed.  June  21,  answer  served  and  filed. 


C.  J.  Reilly,  ^  Superior  Court,  Department  1. 

No.  1,377. 

Sawyer  &  Ball, 
John  P.  Dunn,  Auditor,  etc.  J  Attorneys  for  Plaintiff. 

Application  for  mandamus  directed  to  defendant  to  show  cause  why  he 
should  not  audit  the  demand  of  plaintiff  for  fixing  up,  etc.,  the  Superior 
Court  rooms,  in  old  City  Hall. 

1880,  June  5,  affidavit  and  petition  for  writ  of  mandate  filed.  Order  that 
writ  issue'.  Writ  issued.  June  7,  writ  served,  returned  and  filed.  Demur- 
rer served  and  filed.  June  14,  stipulation  to  submit  on  demurrer  filed. 
Order  demurrer  submitted.  June  16,  demurrer  overruled,  five  days  to  an- 
swer. June  17,  notice  of  overruling  demurrer  filed.  June  21,  answer  served 
and  filed. 


182 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  ATTORNEY  S  REPORT. 


Philip  Hayes, 


vs. 


The  City  and  County  of   San  Fran- 
cisco. 


Justices'  Court. 
No.  704. 
John  "Wade, 


Attorney  for  Plaintiff. 


Suit  to  recover  $60,  for  superintending  the  paving  of  crosswalks  on  cross- 
ing of  Ellis  and  Jones  streets. 

1880,  June  10,  complaint  filed  and  summons  issued.  June  15,  demurrer 
served  and  filed.  June  22,  demurrer  sustained  in  part  and  complaint 
amended,  and  cause  argued  and  submitted  before  Justice  Burke,  and  same 
taken  under  advisement. 


CHABACTEK  OF  ACTIONS. 


CHARACTER   OF  ACTIONS 

?! 

?i 

£ 

?l 

s?1 

20 

ss 

d 

QJa 

c  o 

02 

oc 

0^ 

?t 

?! 

sl 

c  « 

| 

AND   IN   WHAT   COURT   COMMENCED. 

?i 

a-  ft 

'  2. 
i 

a 

3-g- 

*      1-1 

?i 

0 

*f 

ft" 

r1"  3 

^4 

H 

r| 

6 

e> 

9 

5 

4 

5 

2" 

1 

4 

4 

14 

1 

9 

2( 

s 

fi 

9 

1 

10 

21 

For  Writ  of  Mandate  

1 

1 

4 

1 

4 

6 

1 

For  False  Imprisonment 

1 

i 

i 

4 

7 

s 

i 

1 

9 

1 

1< 

1 

] 

To  Quiet  Title  

4 

10 
1 

2 
1 

i 

2 

3 

1 

2 

1 

2 

o 

1 

I 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

2 

1 

1 

1 

For  Writ  of  Prohibition 

1 

1 

2 

Totals 

22 

38 

23 

27 

14 

5 

5 

1 

6 

94 

16 

CITY   LITIGATION.  183 


STEEET  ASSESSMENT   SUITS. 

There  are  now  pending  in  the  Superior  Court  of  this  city  and  county  889 
suits  on  street  assessments.  These  actions  are  brought  in  the  name  of  the 
"People  of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,"  under  the  Acts  of  April 
4,  1870,  and  April  1,  1872.  The  amounts,  when  collected,  are  paid  into  the 
City  and  County  Treasury  for  the  contractors. 

The  records  of  this  office  show  that  in  nearly  all  of  these  cases  second 
suits  have  been  instituted  under  the  Act  of  March  19,  1874,  known  as  the 
"Curative  Act." 

Since  the  date  of  last  report  judgment  has  been  rendered  in  some  73  suits, 
and,  whether  or  not  it  may  be  the  duty  of  this  office,  under  the  law,  to  take 
these  cases  on  appeal  to  the  Supreme  Court  of  this  State,  is  a  question  yet  to 
be  decided. 

Since  date  of  last  report  the  amount  claimed  under  one  assessment  has 
been  paid  into  the  City  and  County  Treasury,  and  the  judgment  satisfied. 

In  order  to  facilitate  the  trial  of  these  cases,  most  of  which  have  been  long 
pending,  it  was  decided  by  the  Presiding  Judge  of  the  Superior  Court  that 
each  case,  when  reached  upon  the  several  calendars,  should  be  at  once 
transferred  to  Department  No.  10,  at  the  new  City  Hall,  and  whenever  any 
of  these  cases  are  placed  upon  the  calendar  this  office  is  prepared  and  ready 
to  try  them.  Respectfully  submitted, 

JOHN  LUTTEELL  MUEPHY, 

Attorney  and  Counselor  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco. 


REPORT 


OF 


THE  BOARD  OF 


FIRE  COMMISSIONERS'  OFFICE, 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  1,  1880. 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — In  conformity  with  Resolution  No.  14,765  (new 
series),  the  Board  of  Fire  Commissioners  have  the  honor  to  sub- 
mit this,  their  fourteenth  annual  report  of  the  condition  of  the 
Paid  Fire  Department  of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco 
for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880. 

There  have  been  two  changes  in  the  Board  since  our  last  re- 
port, viz. :  the  appointment  of  Frank  G.  Edwards  vice  Charles 
Field,  term  expired,  and  the  appointment  by  your  honorable 
Board  of  Edward  B.  Cotter  vice  Peter  Hopkins,  term  expired. 

By  reference  to  the  financial  report  it  will  be  seen  that  the 
total  expenditures  of  the  Department  for  the  fiscal  year  ending 
June  30,  1880,  as  shown  by  the  books  of  the  Department  are  as 
follows . 

Running  expenses $47,908  79 

Material  purchased 24,779  95 


Total $72,688  74 

Salaries  of  officers  and  employees 193,660  00 


Total  cost  of  Department  for  year $266,348  74 


FIRE  COMMISSIONERS'  REPORT.  185 

VALUE    OP    FIKE    DEPARTMENT    PROPERTY. 

Total  valuation  of  the  property  held  in  trust  by  the  Commis- 
sioners is  $462,180  00,  as  will  appear  by  reference  to  the  state- 
ment accompanying  this  report. 

We  call  the  attention  of  your  honorable  body  to  the  several 
recommendations  contained  in  the  Chief  Engineer's  Report,  and 
respectfully  urge  their  adoption. 

For  a  detailed  statement  of  the  workings  of  the  Department 
for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880,  we  refer  your  honorable 
body  to  the  report  of  the  Chief  Engineer  accompanying  this  re- 
port. 

Very  respectfully, 

GORDON  E.  SLOSS. 
EDWARD  FLAHERTY. 
GUS  REIS. 

FRANK  G.  EDWARDS. 
EDWARD  B.  COTTER. 


186  FIRE  COMMISSIONERS'  REPORT. 


GENERAL  DEPARTMENT— CORPORATION  YARD. 

Setting  and  re-setting  hydrants $3,935  00 

Hydrants  and  hydrant  bends 2,522  01 

Repairs  to  apparatus 3,998  12 

Horse-shoeing 657  00 

Harness  and  repairs  to  same 661  65 

Oats,  bran  and  carrots 989  26 

Hay 446  43 

Straw 143  60 

Medicines  for  horses '. 230  50 

Wood 17  60 

Coal '  92  37 

Stores , 123  40 

Bepairs  to  houses  and  fixtures 260  63 

Telephone  expenses 192  15 

Boarding  horses  for  Chief  and  Assistant  Chief. .  . .-.  720  00 

Pasturage  and  freight  on  horses 298  15 

Ounny  sacks 35  00 

Stationery  and  printing 240  73 

Bent  of  office  for  Commissioners 450  00 

$16,013  60 


PAY  ROLL  OF  OFFICERS  AND  EMPLOYEES. 

1  Chief  Engineer $3,000  00 

1  Assistant  Chief  Engineer 2,400  00 

4  District  Engineers,  $1,800  each 7,200  00 

1  Clerk  to  Commissioners 1,800  00 

1  Janitor  and  Messenger 900  00 

1  Superintendent  of  Steam  Fire  Engines 1,800  00 

1  Assistant  Superintendent  of  Steam  Fire  Engines.  1,680  00 

1  Sub-Engineer  and  Machinist 1,680  00 

1  Clerk  of  Corporation  yard 1,500  00 

2  Hydrantmen,  $1,080  each 2,160  00 

1  Carpenter 1,200  00 

1  Veterinary  Surgeon 720  00 

1  Corporation  Yard  Watchman 900  00 

1  Corporation  Yard  Drayman 1,080  00 

28,020  00 


Total $44.033  60 


RECAPITULATION  OF  EXPENDITURES.  187 


MATERIAL  PURCHASED  DURING  THE  YEAR. 

1  second-class  Amoskeag  engine $4,789  85 

1  Hayes  truck 3,250  00 

1  hose  carriage 1,000  00 

14  horses 4,075  00 

8,000  feet  2%-inch  carbolized  hose 10,000  00 

Couplings 659  75 

Pompier  apparatus 524  60 

Suction  hose,  nozzles,  etc 480  75 

$24,779  95 


RECAPITULATION  OF  EXPENDITURES. 

Total  amount  of  company  expenditures $31,895  19 

Total  amount  of  pay  roll  of  companies 165,640  00 

$197,535  19 

Total  amount  expenditures  General  Department.  . .   $16,013  60 
Total  amount  of  pay  roll  of  officers  and  employees.      28,020  00 

44,033  60 
Total  amount  of  material  purchased 24,779  95 


Total  cost  of  Department  for  year  ending  June  30,  1880.  $266,348  74 


AMOUNTS    ALLOWED    BY  LAW. 

Amount  allowed  for  running  expenses $80,000  00 

Amount  allowed  for  material . .  ...      30,000  00 


$110,000  00 

Amount  expended  for  running  expenses $47,908  79 

Amount  expended  for  material 24,779  95 


72,688  74 
Amount  unexpended $37,311  26 


188 


FIRE    COMMISSIONERS    REPORT. 


EXPENDITURES    OF  FIRE    DEPARTMENT 


No.  1. 

No.  2. 

No.  3. 

No.  4. 

Repairs  to  apparatus  

$1,560  77 
89  25 

$371  05 
94  00 

$330  82 
108  00 

$2,003  76 
105  25 

Harness  and  repairs  
Oats  bran  and  carrots 

94  50 
184  33 

45  75 
189  22 

115  25 
218  57 

45  25 
214  07 

Hay  
Straw                                                    .... 

96  09 
32  20 

85  92 
29  40 

107  67 
39  90 

121  85 
38  50 

Medicines  for  horses  

4  50 

10  50 

6  00 

5  50 

Coal            

94  47 

132  00 

126  98 

109  70 

Wood 

20  19 

19  60 

5  44 

19  60 

Small  stores  
Repairs  to  house  and  fixtures 

120  42 
451  32 

145  85 
85  10 

137  34 
114  03 

154  95 
112  25 

5  00 

5  00 

Telephone  expenses 

35  50 

50  50 

Salaries  

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

TOTALS 

$10  544  04 

$9  048  89 

$9  160  50 

$10,735  63 

HOSE    COMPANIES. 


No.  1. 

No.  2. 

No.  3. 

No.  4. 

No.  5. 

No.  6. 

Repairs  to  apparatus 

$311  37 

$157  -60 

$75  00 

$46  50 

$63  75 

$260  79 

Horse-shoeing  

26  00 

53  00 

33  00 

28  00 

29  00 

56  00 

Harness  and  repairs  
Oats,  bran  and  carrots  
Hay                             

21  25 
70  16 
32  42 

174  00 
149  38 
66  18 

149  50 
114  40 
45  16 

12  75 

72  88 
34  50 

51  00 
64  35 
30  10 

38  25 
139  66 

74  38, 

Straw  

8  40 
3  00 

24  50 
13  00 

17  50 
10  50 

9  80 

8  40 
3  00 

23  10 

7  50 

Coal                         •         

48  13 

45  00 

25  19 

78  24 

31  85 

51  23 

Wood 

3  90 

9  80 

4  90 

3  90 

Small  stores  
Repairs  to  house  and  fixtures 
Chemicals  

68  89 
192  75 
10  00 

174  67 
54  73 

69  83 
169  69 

52  06 
80  80 

117  66 
26  89 

209  29 
92  48 

Telephone  expenses  

5,160  00 

5,160  00 

5,160  00 

5,160  00 

5,160  00 

5,160  00 

TOTALS             '    .      ... 

$5,956  27 

$6,081  86 

$5,869  77 

$5,580  43 

$5,589  90 

$6,112  68 

EXPENDITURES. 


189 


FKOM    JULY   1,    1879,    TO    JUNE    30,    1880. 


ENGINE    COMPANIES. 


No.  5. 

No.  6. 

No.  7. 

No.  8. 

No.  9. 

No.  10. 

No.  11. 

No.  12. 

$966  57 

$274  51 

$650  80 

$402  68 

$493  45 

§177  00 

$186  25 

$1,473  32 

88  00 

81  00 

83  00 

81  00 

96  25 

78  00 

135  00 

59  00 

94  25 

54  50 

63  25 

78  75 

69  00 

107  25 

13  25 

63  50 

191  51 

170  60 

229  20 

173  35 

218  05 

174  34 

173  65 

143  65 

86  91 

86  43 

114  67 

87  14 

90  00 

79  70 

79  69 

66  20 

32  90 

32  20 

40  60 

28  00 

32  90 

29  40 

31  50 

22  40 

10  50 

18  00 

12  50 

6  00 

16  00 

2  00 

10  50 

6  50 

149  66 

157  47 

23  94 

151  96 

124  68 

125  19 

88  92 

134  98 

9  80 

19  60 

9  80 

14  70 

19  60 

20  15 

19  60 

146  90 

118  27 

121  37 

102  63 

118  95 

124  75 

"'ioe'jji 

288  30 

138  64 

2,664  95 

97  57 

177  61 

83  94 

68  83 

13  51 

420  96 

5  00 

5  00 

5  00 

5  00 

5  00 

50  5C 

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

"7,806  '66 

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

"6,500  '66 

$9,715  64 

811,477  53 

$9,302  20 

$9,108  80 

$9,167  82 

$8,789  61 

$8,644  18 

$9,198  41 

TRUCK  COMPANIES. 

TOTALS. 

No.  7. 

No.  8. 

No.  9.* 

No.  1. 

No.  2. 

No.  3. 

No.  4. 

$9  75 
99  50 
27  75 
130  86 
72  31 
•25  90 
4  50 
16  24 

$13  25 
55  00 
50  00 
117  34 
56  72 
21  70 
1  00 
33  27 

$98  65 
58  00 
24  00 
133  00 
63  55 
17  50 
1  50 
38  75 
5  85 
108  66 
408  48 
15  00 

$976  52 
56  00 
43  75 
131  29 
57  56 
23  80 
3  00 
17  50 
3  90 
118  88 
182  61 
15  00 

$119  75 
58  00 
21  00 
107  30 
60  19 
23  80 
8  00 
8  75 

io6'73 
356  59 
15  00 

$61  85 
54  00 
57  00 
123  00 
61  46 
23  10 
2  00 
8  75 
3  90 
103  03 
36  87 
15  00 

$11,085  74 
1,703  25 
1,514  75 
3,630  16 
1,756  80 
617  40 
165  50 
1,826  60 
214  23 
2,982  50 
6,144  26 
117  50 
136  50 
165,640  00 

••••••••• 

3  75 

68  09 
33  64 

7  50 

66  29 

28  87 

'32  78 
51  15 

5,160  00 

5,160  00 

860  00 

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

7,800  00 

$5,656  04 

$5,603  44 

$947  68 

$8,772  94 

$9,429  81 

$8,695  11 

$8,349  96 

$197,535  19 

Fire-boat . 


190 


FIRE    COMMISSIONERS    REPORT. 


FIRE  DEPARTMENT  SALARIES  PER  ANNUM. 


Chief  Engineer 

Assistant  Chief  Engineer 

Four  (4)  Assistant  Engineers,  $1,800  each 

Clerk  to  Board  of  Commissioners 

Janitor  and  Messenger 

Superintendent  of  Steam  Fire  Engines 

Assistant  Superintendent  of  Steam  Fire  Engines 

Clerk  Corporation  Yard 

Corporation  Yard  Drayman 

Two  Hydrantmen,  $1,080  each 

Veterinary  Surgeon 

Substitute  Engineer  and  Machinist 

Carpenter 

Corporation  Yard  Watchman 

Twelve  (12)  steam  engine  companies 

Nine  (9)  hose  companies 

Four  (4)  hook  and  ladder  companies 


$3,000  00 

2,400  00 

7,200  00 

1,800  00 

900  00 

1,800  00 

1,680  00 

1,500  00 

1,080  00 

2,160  00 

720  00 

1,680  00 

1,200  00 

900  00 

93,600  00 

46,440  00 

31,200  00 


Total $199,260  00 


STATEMENT  OF  THE  VALUE   OF  PROPERTY 

In  use  by  the  Fire  Department  and  held  by  the  Commissioners,  June  30,  1880- 


REAL  ESTATE. 


IMPROVEMENTS. 


House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  1 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  2 15,000 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  3 6,000 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  4 6,500 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  5 3,000 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  6 6,000 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  7 5,003 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  8 3,000 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  9 5,000 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  10 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  11 700 

House  and  lot  of  Steamer  Company  No.  12 6,000 

House  and  lot  of  Hoi,e  Company  No.  1 4,000 

House  and  lot  of  Hose  Company  No.  2 , 4,000 

House  and  lot  of  Hose  Company  No.  3 3,000 

House  and  lot  of  Hose  Company  No.  4 2,000 

House  and  lot  of  Hose  Company  No.  5 15,000 

House  and  lot  of  Hose  Company  No.  6  3,600 

House  and  lot  of  Hose  Company  No.  7 

House  and  lot  of  Hose  Company  No.  8 3,000 

House  and  lot  of  Hose  Company  No.  9 

House  and  lot  of  Truck  Company  No.  1 3,000 

House  and  lot  of  Truck  Company  No.  2 5,000 

House  and  lot  of  Truck  Company  No.  3 : 

House  and  lot  of  Truck  Company  No.  4 2,000 

House  and  lot  of  Corporation  Yard 10,000 

52  lots  not  in  use  by  the  Department  (estimated  value).  76,900 


$195,700 


$4,500 
5,000 


7,000 
3,500 
6,500 
5,000 
5,000 
4,500 

"  1,500 
11,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
4,000 
3,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,800 
1,000 
7,000 
4,000 

'  i',866 

1,000 


£100,900 
395,700 


Total. 


$296,600 


VALUE  OF  PROPERTY.  191 


HORSES  AND  HARNESS. 

There  are  72   horses  in  the   Department,  the  average   cost   of 

which  was  $300;   they  are  fully  worth $21,600  00 

21  sets  double  harness  at  $80 1,680  §0 

15  sets  single  harness  at  $40 600  00 

Total. .                                                                                       .  $23,880  00 


HOSE  AND  HOSE  DEPOT. 

Hose  and  hose  depot  fixtures,  leather,  tools,  etc.,  24,100  feet  of 

hose,  average  value  of  $1 .25  per  foot $30,125  00 

Brass  couplings  and  rivets 550  00 


Total $30,675  00 


SUPPLY   DEPARTMENT. 

The  supply  department  contains  a  variety  of  articles  requisite 
for  the  purposes  of  the  Department  and  enumerated  in  the 
inventory  to  be  found  elsewhere,  including  steamer  oils,  extra 
wheels  for  engines  and  tenders,  extra  springs,  etc.,  the  ag- 
gregate value  of  which  may  be  fairly  stated  at. . . . ' $6,775  00 


FURNITURE,  FIXTURES,  ETC. 

The  inventories  published  herewith  show  in  detail  the  number 
and  description  of  articles  of  furniture  and  fixtures  in  the 
various  houses  of  the  Department,  also  the  tools,  etc.  It  is 
not  possible  to  state  the  actual  value,  but  we  consider  the  es- 
timate a  reasonable  one  at $1,800  00 


APPARATUS. 

Steamer  No.  1  and  tender , $4,650  00 

Steamer  No.  2  and  tender „„ .,  4,650  00 

Steamer  No.  3  and  tender    , , , . . .  4,300  00 

Steamer  No.  4  and  tender 4,65Q  00 

Steamer  No.  5  and  tender  . 4,400  00 

Steamer  No.  6  and  tender 4,650  00 


192  FIRE  COMMISSIONER'S  REPORT. 

Steamer  No.  7  and  tender '. 4,650  00 

Steamer  No.  8  and  tender  4,300  00 

Steamer  No.  9  and  tender ; 4,650  00 

Steamer  No.  10  and  tender 4,650  00 

Steamer  No.  11  and  tender 4,650  00 

Steamer  No.  12  and  tender 5,300  00 

Hose  Cart  No.  1  and  tender 350  00 

Hose  Cart  No.  2  and  tender 750  00 

Hose  Cart  No.  3  and  tender 800  00 

Hose  Cart  No.  4  and  tender 350  00 

Hose  Cart  No.  5  and  tender 350  00 

Hose  Cart  No.  6  and  tender 800  00 

Hose  Cart  No.  7  and  tender 800  00 

Hose  Cart  No.  8  and  tender 800  00 

Truck  No.  1  and  tender 3,250  00 

Truck  No.  2  and  tender 3,250  00 

Truck  No.  3  and  tender 3,000  00 

Truck  No.  4  and  tender 2,000  00 

5  reserve  steamers 23,250  00 

5  reserve  hose  carts i 1,750  00 

2  reserve  trucks 4,250  00 

1  supply  wagon .....    450  00 

1  buggy,  Chief 250  00 

1  buggy,  Assistant  Chief 250  00 

1  buggy,  relief 200  00 

1  dray 50  00 


Total $102,450  00 


RECAPITULATION. 

Eeal  estate $296,600  00 

Apparatus , 102,450  00 

Horses  and  harness 23,880  00 

Hose  and  depot,  fixtures,  leather 30,675  00 

Couplings,  tools,  etc 

Supply  department 6.775  00 

Furniture,  fixtures,  etc 1,800  00 


Total..  $462,180  00 


STANDING    COMMITTEE.  193 

OF  Flip  COMMISSIONS. 


Headquarters No.  235  Kearny  street,  corner  Bush 


GORDON  E.  SLOSS, 
PRESIDENT. 

Term  expires December,  1881 

EDWARD  FLAHERTY. 

Term  expires December,  1883 

GITS  KEIS. 

Term  expires December,  1881 

FRANK  G.  EDWARDS. 

Term  expires   December,  1883 

EDWARD  B.  COTTER. 

Term  expires December,  1883 

E.  B.  VREELAND, 

CLERK  OP  THE  BOARD  OF  FIRE  COMMISSIONERS. 

Office No.  235  Kearny  street,  corner  Bush 

GEORGE  W.  L.  POST, 

MESSENGER. 


STANDING  COMMITTEES  OF  THE  BOj^D, 

ON  FINANCE: 

MESSRS    COTTER,  REIS,  FLAHERTY 

ON  DISCIPLINE  AND  APPOINTMENTS: 

MESSRS.  FLAHERTY,  EDWARDS,  COTTER. 

ON   BUILDING: 

MESSRS.  REIS,  EDWARDS,  COTTER. 

ON  HOSE  AND  APPARATUS: 

MESSRS.  EDWARDS,  REIS,  FLAHERTY. 
13 


194  FIRE  COMMISSIONERS'  REPORT. 

FII|E  DEPAPEHT  COMMITTEE 


OF    BOAKD    OF    SUPERVISORS. 


HUGH  FEASEB. 
EEASTUS  N.  TOEEEY. 
ANTONE  SCHOTTLEE. 


ENGINEERS. 


DAVID  SCANNELL, 
CHIEF  ENGINEEE. 

Headquarters No.  235  Kearny  street,  corner  Bush 

MATHEW  BEADY, 

ASSISTANT  CHIEF  ENGINEER. 

Headquarters No.  235  Kearny  street,  corner  Bush 

ASSISTANT  ENGINEERS: 
JAMES  EILEY, 

DISTRICT  No.  1. 
Headquarters Engine  House  No.  2,  Bush  street  near  Kearny 

JOHN  E.  EOSS. 

DISTRICT  No.   2. 
Headquarters,  Engine  House  No.  4,  Second  street  bet.  Howard  and  Mission 

A.  C.  IMBEIE. 

DISTRICT  No.  3. 
Headquarters,  Engine  House  No.  3,  California  st.  b.  Leavenworth  and  Hyde 

GEOBGE  W.  KENNABD, 

DISTRICT  No.  4. 
Headquarters   Engine  House  No.  7,  Sixteenth  street  above  Valencia 


REPORT 

OP 

THE      CHIEF     ENGINEER 

OF  THE 

San  Francisco  Paid  Fire  Department. 


To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Fire  Commissioners 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — I  have  the  honor  to  present  to  you  this  the  fourteenth  an- 
nual report  of  the  San  Francisco  Paid  Fire  Department  for  the  fiscal  year 
ending  June  30,  1880. 

The  report  contains  a  statement  of  the  condition  and  workings  of  the  De- 
partment; also,  a  complete  roll  of  the  companies  in  the  Department,  with 
the  property  under  their  charge,  including  engines,  hose-reels,  hook-and- 
ladder  trucks,  and  appurtenances,  material  and  property  belonging  to  the 
Department  contained  in  the  Corporation  Yard,  the  number  and  location  of 
the  fire  hydrants  in  the  different  portions  of  the  city,  a  list  of  the  number, 
location  and  capacity  of  the  cisterns,  the  number  of  alarms  responded  to  by 
each  company,  number  of  times  in  service  and  time  at  work  at  fires. 

HOSE. 

There  have  been  purchased  for  the  use  of  the  Department  during  the  year 
eight  thousand  feet  of  new  hose.  In  the  report  will  be  found  a  statement  of 
the  quantity  and  location  of  all  of  the  hose  in  the  Department  available  for 
fire  purposes.  Our  supply  of  hose  is  ample  and  in  excellent  order. 

CISTEENS. 

In  the  report  will  be  found  a  statement  of  the  number,  location  and -capac- 
ity of  cisterns  from  which  the  Department  can,  in  case  of  necessity,  obtain  a 
supply  of  water. 


196  CHIEF  ENGINEER'S  REPORT. 

HYDBANTS. 

Herewith  will  be  found  a  report  of  the  number  and  location  of  the  hy- 
drants. There  are  thirteen  hundred  and  fifty-two  (1,352)  fire  hydrants 
located  in  different  portions  of  the  city,  of  which  thirteen  hundred  and  nine 
(1,309)  are  the  property  of  the  city  and  forty-three  (43)  are  owned  by  pri- 
vate parties.  The  hydrants  that  are  the  property  of  the  city  are  kept  in 
repair  and  paid  for  out  of  the  running  expenses  of  the  Department. 

DEPAETMENT  APPARATUS. 

The  apparatus  of  the  department  is  in  first  class  order,  having  been  thor- 
oughly overhauled  and  repaired  during  the  year. 

I  would  recommend  the  sale  of  the  old  Leverich  Belief  Truck  and  the 
purchase  of  a  new  one  with  all  new  inventions  and  improvements  for  use  of 
Truck  Company  No.  4.  I  would  also  recommend  the  purchase  of  a  new  third 
class  Amoskeag  engine  for  use  in  the  upper  portion  of  the  city.  Engine  Com- 
panies 3,  5  and  8  are  all  third  class  engines,  and  we  have  no  relief  engine  of 
the  size  to  be  used  in  case  of  necessity.  I  would  also  recommend  the  forma- 
tion and  location  of  a  hose  company  in  the  vicinity  of  Mission,  Valencia  and 
Twenty-sixth  streets, — hose  carriage  to  be  four-wheeled  and  capable  of  carry- 
ing 1,000  feet  of  hose.  That  portion  of  the  city  requires  some  protection,  as 
the  nearest  company  is  No.  7  Engine,  located  on  Sixteenth  street. 

DEPAETMENT   HOUSES. 

The  houses  of  the  Department  are  all  in  excellent  state  of  repair.  I  would 
urgently  recommend  the  exchange  of  the  lot  of  Engine  Company  No.  11,  lo- 
cated on  Fourteenth  avenue,  South  San  Francisco,  for  one  situated  on  Rail- 
road avenue,  and  the  erection  of  a  suitable  house  on  the  same  for  the  use  of 
the  company,  as  the  present  one  is  unfitted  for  use  on  account  of  the  street 
not  being  graded,  thereby  rendering  it  difficult  for  liie  company  to  respond 
promptly  to  alarms  of  fire. 

STREET    LAMPS. 

I  would  recommend  that  the  upper-  part  of  street  lamps  in  the  immediate 
vicinity  of  fire  alarm  boxes  be  fitted  with  red  glass  having  ground  thereon 
the  letters  "F.  A.,"  and  that  the  lamps  be  kept  burning  during  the  entire 
night,  so  that  any  person  having  a  key  may,  upon  discovery  of  a  fire,  be  im- 
mediately apprised  by  means  of  this  signal  of  the  locality  of  a  fire  alarm  box. 
I  would  also  recommend  that  for  the  use  of  firemen  the  upper  part  of  street 
lamps  nearest  to  hydrants  be  fitted  up  with  plain  blue  glass,  so  that  firemen  in 
going  to  a  fire  may  at  a  glance  determine  the  location  of  hydrants. 

FIEE    BOAT. 

Since' my  last  report  the  tug-boat  Governor  Irwin,  used  as  a  fire-boat  when 
occasion  required,  was  withdrawn  from  the  service  by  the  State  Board  of 
Harbor  Commissioners.  Subsequently  a  serious  fire  occurring  among  the 


REMARKS.  197 

shipping  at  the  Pacific  Mail  Dock  demonstrated  the  necessity  of  a  fire-boat 
for  the  protection  of  shipping  from  fire.  Through  the  exertions  of  the  Board 
of  Underwriters  and  others,  they  succeeded,  through  the  kindness  of  the 
Board  of  Harbor  Commissioners,  in  again  placing  the  tug  Governor  Irwin  at 
the  service  of  the  Department.  A  company  was  organized  by  authority  of 
the  honorable  Board  of  Supervisors  which  has  been  in  service  since  the  1st 
of  May  and  responds  promptly  to  all  alarms  on  the  water  front.  I  would 
strongly  urge  upon  you  the  necessity  of  applying  to  the  proper  authorities 
for  authority  to  build  a  complete  fire-boat,  with  all  modern  improvements 
and  with  machinery  for  generating  carbonic  acid  gas  for  the  extinguishing  of 
fires  on  shipboard,  as  the  use  of  water  as  a  means  of  extinguishing  fires 
proves  wholly  inadequate,  for  it  is  a  well-known  fact  that  a  fire  afloat,  unless 
promptly  overcome,  is  almost  certain  to  result  in  large  loss  of  property.  The 
use  of  chemicals  on  shipboard  for  extinguishment  of  fires  has  proved  very 
successful  isi  New  Orleans  and  elsewhere,  and  it  has  been  fully  demonstrated 
that  by  battening  down  of  hatches  tightly  and  a  free  use  of  carbonic  acid  gas 
forced  in  the  holds  of  vessels  on  fire  has  proved  a  great  success  in  every  case 
where  applied,  and  is  not  injurious  to  cargo. 

BEMARKS. 

There  is  just  cause -for  congratulation  at  our  exemption  from  large  con- 
flagrations during  the  past  year.  When  we  consider  the  great  number  of 
frame  buildings  throughout  the  city,  it  is  more  than  remarkable  that  we  have 
not  met  with  more  serious  losses  by  fire. 

The  fire  law  is  practically  inoperative.  It  is  violated  daily  with  impunity, 
and  although  we  have  endeavored  to  enforce  the  penalty,  we  have  been  unsuc- 
cessful through  lax  administration  of  the  law  by  the  officers  thereof,  fires 
constantly  occurring  through  carelessness  in  depositing  ashes  in  wooden  bar- 
rels or  alongside  buildings.  Neglect  in  not  cleaning  chimneys  is  the  cause 
of  many  alarms,  and  a  consequent  loss  to  the  city  in  the  wear  of  apparatus. 

There  having  been  considerable  controversy  the  past  year  in  relation  to  the 
reduction  of  the  salaries  and  expenses  of  the  Department,  I  deem  it  proper 
now  to  enter  my  protest  against  such  action,  and  I  think  it  would  be  well 
that  the  public  should  be  informed  of  the  reasons  why  any  proposed  reduc- 
tion would  be  unwise  and  impolitic.  The  time  of  our  permanent  men  is  en- 
tirely occupied  day  and  night,  their  absence  from  their  posts  on  any  ac- 
count being  prohibited,  except  upon  the  employment  of  substitutes,  whose 
wages  have  to  be  paid  by  them.  The  extramen,  who  have  to  leave  their  em- 
ployment at  a  moment's  notice,  who  literally  have  to  face  death  and  injuries 
in  a  far  greater  ratio  than  the  soldier,  certainly  receive  too  moderate  a 
compensation  to  admit  of  any  serious  argument.  The  advantages  of  disci- 
pline and  experience,  the  danger  and  troubles  incident  to  too  frequent 
changes  and  ignorance  of  their  duty  are  too  important  to  be  overlooked,  and 


198  CHIEF  ENGINEER'S  REPORT. 

I  feel  assured  that  it  would  endanger  the  efficiency  of  the  Department,  should 
a  reduction  of  salaries  be  enforced. 

In  the  matter  of  economy  and  a  reduction  of  the  expenses  of  the  Depart- 
ment, I  feel  justified  in  challenging  comparison  with  any  other  branch  of  the 
State  or  city  government.  Economy  is  defined  as  getting  the  full  value  of 
your  money,  and  if  there  are  any  disbursements  made  for  materials  and  sup- 
plies that  this  Department  did  not  get  the  worth  of,  you  would  certainly  be 
cognizant  of  it.  Kegarding  the  necessity  of  those  expenditures,  you  and  the 
honorable  Board  of  Supervisors  have  been  the  judges.  That  nothing  has 
been  ordered  for  the  use  of  the  Department  that  was  unnecessary,  and  that 
nothing  has  been  paid  for  beyond  its  value  are  facts  that  the  records  and 
your  personal  knowledge  will  readily  sustain;  yet  I  regret  to  observe  that 
there  is  an  evident  disposition  to  curtail  and  reduce  our  appropriation,  and 
in  a  measure  depriving  you  of  the  credit  of  promoting  efficiency  and  economy 
in  the  interests  of  the  Department. 

I  wish  to  tender  my  thanks  to  the  honorable  the  Mayor,  the  Board  of 
Supervisors  and  the  Fire  Department  Committee  of  the  Board  of  Supervisors 
for  their  cordial  support  and  prompt  response  to  all  requests  made  to  them 
to  provide  for  the  Department,  to  which  hearty  co-operation  is  due  in  a  great 
measure  the  success  attending  the  efforts  of  the  Department  during  the  year. 
To  Chief  Crowley  and  the  Police  Department,  who  have  during  the  year 
rendered  such  service  as  has  been  required  of  them  in.  the  most  satisfactory 
manner,  and  it  is  gratifying  to  know  that  the  most  friendly  relations  exist 
between  the  two  departments.  To  Captain  White,  of  the  Fire  Patrol,  and 
this  company,  for  the  very  great  aid  rendered  the  Department  on  many  occa- 
sions. To  Superintendent  Curran  and  his  assistants  for  the  efficiency  dis- 
played by  them  in  their  department.  To  Mr.  Lohse,  of  the  Spring  Valley 
Water  Works,  for  the  prompt  and  efficient  manner  in  which  the  water  pipes 
and  hydrants  have  been  attended  to  during  the  year. 

I  wish  to  compliment  the  officers  and  members  of  the  Department  for-  the 
promptness  with  which  they  have  responded  to  all  alarms  during  the  year 
and  the  efficient  manner  in  which  they  have  labored  in  subduing  fires,  and  I 
can  say  that  the  department  is  fully  equal  to  any  emergency  likely  to  arise. 

In  conclusion,  allow  me  to  return  thanks  to  your  honorable  Board  for  your 
untiring  efforts  to  maintain  discipline  and  efficiency  in  the  Department,  and 
aid  me  in  the  discharge  of  my  duties — a  credit  to  your  management  in  the 
interest  of  the  city  and  taxpayers. 

All  of  which  is  respectfully  submitted, 

DAVID  SCANNELL, 

Chief  Engineer  San  Francisco  Fire  Department. 
San  Francisco,  July  1,  1880. 


DEPARTMENT  STATISTICS. 


199 


FOBCE  OF  THE  DEPABTMENT. 


1  Chief  Engineer. 

1  Assistant  Chief  Engineer. 

4  Assistant  Engineers. 

1  Clerk  to  Commissioners. 

1  Janitor  and  Messenger. 
25  Foremen  of  Companies. 
12  Engineers  of  Steam  Fire  Engines. 
12  Stokers  of  Steam  Fire  Engines. 
12  Drivers  of  Steam  Fire  Engines. 

9  Drivers  of  Hose  Carriages. 

9  Stewards  of  Hose  Carriages. 

4  Drivers  of  Trucks . 

4  Tillermen  of  Trucks. 


150  Hosemen. 
48  Hook  and  Ladder  Men. 
1  Superintendent  of  Steam  Fire  Engines. 
1  Assistant  Superintendent  of  Steam  Fire 

Engines. 

1  Clerk  of  Corporation  Tard. 
1  Sub-Engineer  and  Machinist. 

1  Veterinary  Surgeon. 

2  Hydrantmen. 
1  Carpenter. 

1  Corporation  Yard  Watchman. 
1  Corporation  Yard  Drayman. 

303— Total. 


12  Steam  Fire  Engines. 

5  Steam  Fire  Engines,  reserve. 
12  Tenders,  two-wheeled. 

6  Tenders,  two-wheeled,  reserve. 
5  Four-wheeled  Hose  Carriages . 


APPABATUS 


1  Four-wheeled  Hose  Carriage,  reserve. 

4  Hook  and  Ladder  Trucks. 

1  Hook  and  Ladder  Tiu^k,  reserve. 

1  Chief  Engineer's  Bugjfy. 

1  Assistant  Chief  Engineer's  Buggy. 


HOBSES. 


36  Horses  with  Steamers  and  Tenders. 
13  Horses  with  Hose  Companies. 

8  Horses  with  Hook  and  Ladder  Companies . 

1  Horse  with  Chief  Engineer. 


1  Horse  with  Assistant  Chief  Engin9er. 
13  Extra  Horses,  Corporation  Yard. 

72  Horses— Total. 


COBPOEATION  YABD  EMPLOYEES. 

SAMUEL  RAINBY .' Superintendent  of  Steam  Fire  Engines 

JAMBS  STODDARD Assistant  Superintendent  of  Steam  Fire  Engines 

WILLIAM  EYRE Clerk  of  Corporation  Yard 

JOHN  RKILLY Substitute  Engineer  and  Machinist 

PETER  BURNS Veterinary  Surgeon 

JOHN  MCCARTHY Hydrantman 

PH ILIP  G.  O'NEiL Hydrantman 

JOHN  WILLS Carpenter 

CHARLES  LYONS Drayman 

CORNELIUS  GUINEE ...  Watchman 


200  CHIEF  ENGINEER'S  REPORT. 

HOSE. 

STATEMENT  OF  THE  QUANTITY  AND  LOCATION  OF  HOSE  IN  POSSESSION 
OF   DEPARTMENT. 

Engine  Company  No.  1 700  feet  2%-inch  Carbolized  Hose 

Engine  Company  No .  2 800  do  do 

Engine  Company  No.  3 700  do  do 

Engine  Company  No    4 : 750  do  do 

Engine  Company  No .  5 700  do  do 

Engine  Company  No .  6 700  do  do 

Engine  Company  No  .7 700  do  do 

Engine  Company  No.  8 700  do  do 

Engine  Company  No .  9 ; 750  do  do 

Engine  Company  No.  10 750  do  do 

EngineCompanyNo.il 750  do  do 

Engine  Company  No.  12 750  do  do 

Hose  Company  No.  1 700  do  do 

Hose  Company  No.  2 1000  do  do 

Hose  Company  No.  3 1000  do  do 

Hose  Company  No.  4 700  do  do 

Hose  Company  No.  5 700  do  do 

Hose  Company  No.  6 1000  do  do 

Hose  Company  No.  7 1000  do  do 

Hose  Company  No.  8 1000  do  do 

Hose  Company  No.  9 800  do  do 

Hose  Depot,  Corporation  Yard 7500  do  do 


FIRE   APPARATUS    STATIONED  AT  POINTS   DESIGNATED    BELOW,  AND    USED   FOR 
THE  PROTECTION  OF  PROPERTY  IN  ITS  IMMEDIATE  VICINITY. 

One  Hand  Engine  and  Hose  Reel,  with  eight  hundred  feet  of  hose,  at  the  Almshouse.  This 
Engine  was  Knickerbocker  No.  5,  of  the  Volunteer  Fire  Department. 

One  Hose-Reel,  with  seven  hundred  feet  of  hose,  at  Central  Railroad  Company's  stables,  on 
Brannan  street,  between  Eighth  and  Ninth. 

At  San  Francisco  and  Pacific  Sugar  Refinery,  four  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

One  Hose-Reel,  with  five  hundred  feet  of  hose,  at  the  Mission  Woolen  Mills. 

One  Hose-Reel,  with  five  hundred  feet  of  hose,  at  Gas  Works  on  King  street. 

One  Hose-Reel,  with  three  hundred  feet  of  hose,- at  Metropolitan  Gas  Company's  Works. 

One  Hose  Reel,  with  four  hundred  feet  of  hose,  at  L.  Emanuel's  Mills,  Berry  street. 

At  County  Jail,  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

At  Robert  Cushing's  distillery,  South  San  Francisco,  two  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

At  R.  Morton's  stables,  corner  of  Ellis  and  Taylor  streets,  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

At  Kennedy  Brothers',  corner  of  Ellis  and  Larkin  streets,  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

At  Gough's  wood  yard,  corner  of  Russ  and  Howard  streets,  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet 
of  hose. 

At  Mechanics'  Mills,  corner  of  Mission  and  Fremont  streets,  two  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

At  JEtna  Foundry,  three  hundred  feet  of  hose, 

One  Hose  Reel,  with  six  hundred  feet  of  hose,  at  City  and  County  Hospital. 

One  Hand  Hose-Reel,  with  five  hundred  feet  of  hose,  at  House  of  Hose  Company  No.  3,. 
Folsom  street,  near  Twenty-second . 

At  City  Gas  Company's  Works,  Potrero,  two  hundred  feet  of  hose . 

At  Sugar  House,  Eighth  and  Harrison  streets,  five  hundred  feet  of  hose. 


LOCATION    OF    ENGINES.  201 


At  Beale  Street  Mill  (Richardson  &  Hall's),  two  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

At  Pacific  Rolling  Mills,  five  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

At  South  San  Francisco  Distillery,  three  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

At  Eighth  Street  School  House,  two  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

At  Buckingham  &  Hecht's  Shoe  Factory,  Haight  and  Gough  streets,  five  hundred  feet 
of  hose. 

At  Slocum  &  Bowen's  stables,  Sutter  street,  between  Leavenworth>nd  Hyde  streets,  four 
hundred  feet  of  hose. 

Frederick  MacCrellish  has  three  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

George  D.  Nagle  has  two  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

S.  P.  Taylor  has  three  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

At  San  Francisco  Candle  Company's  Works,  three  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

At  Bay  Sugar  Refinery,  four  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

Mechanics'  Mills,  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

Mechanics'  Fair  Pavilion,  six  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

At  Branch  County  Jail,  three  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

William  Ashton,  Pier  4,  three  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

Clay  Street  Railroad,  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

Fred  Eggers,  two  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

South  Point  Milk  Company,  four  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

Charles  Metzler,  one  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

Silk  Factory,  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

Pioneer  Woolen  Mills,  five  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

California  Theater,  one  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

Thos  Ryan,  two  hundred  feet  of  hose, 

Spring  Valley  Water  Works,  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

F.  P.  Curry,  two  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

Pioneer  Woolen  Mills,  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

James  Graham,  three  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

Three  hundred  feet  of  hose  to  Street  Department. 

A.  J.  Suppet,  four  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

At  Mission,  four  hundred  feet  of  hose  and  reel. 

At  Alhambra  Theater,  one  hundred  feet  of  hose. 

Street  Department,  four  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 

At  House  of  Correction,  four'hundred  feet  of  hose. 

South  Point  Mills,  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  of  hose. 


LOCATION   OF   STEAM    FIKE    ENGINES,  HOSE    COMPANIES    ANI> 
TKUCK  COMPANIES. 

Steamer  No.  1— Pacific  street  between  Montgomery  and  Sansome. 

Steamer  No.  2— North  side  of  Bush  street,  between  Kearny  and  Dupont  streets. 

Steamer  No.  3— South  side  of  California  street,  between  Leavenworth  and  Hyde. 

Steamer  No.  4 — West  side  of  Second  street,  between  Natoma  and  Howard. 

Steamer  No.  5 — West  side  of  Stockton  street,  between  Pacific  and  Broadway. 

Steamer  No.  6— East  side  of  Sixth  street,  south  of  Folsom. 

Steamer  No.  7— Sixteenth  street,  above  Valencia. 

Steamer  No.  8— North  side  of  Pacific  avenue,  between  Polk  and  Van  Ness  avenue. 

Steamer  No.  9 — West  side  of  Main,  near  Folsom. 

Steamer  No.  10 — Bryant  street,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 

Steemer  No.  11— Fourteenth  avenue  near  Railroad  avenue,  South  San  Francisco. 

Steamer  No.  12— Drumm  street,  southwest  corner  Commercial  street. 


202 


CHIEF  ENGINEER  S  REPORT. 


Hose  Company  No.  1— North  side  of  Jackson  street,  between  Front  and  Davis. 

Hose  Company  No.  2-  Post  street,  near  Fillmore. 

Hose  Company  No.  3 — Folsom  street,  between  Twenty-first  and  Twenty-second . 

Hose  Company  No.  4— East  side  of  Stockton  street,  north  of  Greenwich  street. 

Hose  Company  No.  5— South  side  of  Market  street,  between  Tenth  and  Eleventh. 

Hose  Company  No.  6— McAllister  street,  between  Webster  and  Buchanan. 

Hose  Company  No.  7 — Tennessee  street,  between  Sierra  and  Napa. 

Hose  Company  No.  8 — South  side  of  Filbert  street,  between  Webster  and  Fillmore. 

Hose  Company  No.  9  (Fire  Boat) — Broadway  wharf,  foot  of  Broadway. 

Truck  No.  1— North  side  of  O'Farrell  street,  west  of  Dupont. 

Truck  No.  2— South  side  of  Broadway  street,  between  Dupont  and  Stockton. 

Truck  No.  3— South  side  of  Market,  between  Tenth  and  Eleventh. 

Truck  No.  4 — North  side  of  Pacific  street,  between  Jones  and  Leavenworth. 

Corporation  Yard — No.  50  Sacramento  street,  between  East  and  Drumm. 


INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  CORPORATION  YARD. 


1  second-class   Double-acting 

Engine  made  by  Kimball 
Manufacturing  Company. 

2  second-class  Double-acting 

Engines  made  by  Amos- 
keag  Manufacturing  Com- 
pany. 

2  second-class  U  tank  engines 
made  by  Amoskeag  Man- 
ufacturing Company. 

€  Relief  JHose  Carts. 

875  Boiler  Tubes. 

2  Water  Tanks  for  Engines. 

2  New  Fly  Wheels. 
123  Pump  Valves. 

3  third-class  Axles  for  Engine. 
1  Forward  Gear  for  second- 

class  Engine. 

1  Forward  Axle  for  second- 

class  Engine. 

2  Hind  Axles  for  second-class 

Engine. 

1  Hind  Axle  for  first-class  En- 
gine. 

3  Cart  Axle  Anns. 

I  Engine  Axle  Arm. 

II  Engine  Wheel  Hubs. 

3  Parts  of  Hubs  for  Engine 
Wheels. 

10  Wheel  Caps. 

I  Set  Brass  Yoke  Blocks. 

6  Lignum  Vitae  Yoke  Blocks. 

11  Relief  Valve  Handles. 

II  Belief  Valve  Swivels. 


12  Relief  Wheels. 
2  Hammers. 

2  Hammer  Handles. 

24  Hydrant  Wrenches. 

8,800  feet  New  Hose. 

1,000  feet  Department  Hose. 

7  Blunderbusses. 

150  feet  y2 -inch  Hose. 

3  Rubber  Buckets. 

8  Monkey  Wrenches. 
14  Hose  Patches. 

7  Brass  Oilers. 

5  Hose  Clamps 

8  Plain  Nozzles. 

4  Spray  Nozzles. 

6  Shut-off  Nozzles. 

12  Curry  Combs. 

14  Scrubbing  Brushes. 

13  Stove  Brushes. 

17  Dandruff  Brushes. 
16  Horse  Brushes. 
29  House  Brooms . 
Y2  barrel  Rosin. 
6  pounds  Stove  Polish. 
16  cans  Axle  Grease. 
4  pounds  Lamp-black. 
220  pounds  Brown  Soap. 
244  pounds  French  Castile 
Soap. 

31  pounds  1-inch  Wrought 

Nails. 
4  New  Lanterns. 

32  Lamp  Bottoms. 
28  Lamp  Tops. 


330  pounds  Ground  Flaxseed. 
10  Pick-axes. 

5  Plain  Axes. 

81  pounds  Sponge . 

9  Stable  Buckets. 

6  Cedar  Pails . 

7  Squill  Gee. 

3  Garden  Rakes. 

10  Stable  Forks. 
9  Scoop  Shovels. 

1  Round-pointed  Shovel. 

12  Ax  Handles. 

5  Maul  Handles. 

53    2-inch    Malleable    Iron 

Snaps. 
43    If-inch    Malleable   Iron 

Snaps . 
64    If  inch    Malleable  Iron 

Snaps. 
80    1-inch    Malleable    Iron 


101  1-inch  Malleable  Steel 

Snaps. 
13    f-inch    malleable    Steel 

Snaps. 

9  finch    Malleable     Steel 

Snaps. 

66  If  inch  Buckles. 
22  Ifinch  Buckles. 
87  1-inch  Buckles. 
17  IJ-inch  Rings. 
32  If  inch  Rings. 

10  pounds  Copper  Rivets. 
4  pounds  Iron  Rivets. 


DEPARTMENT    STATISTICS. 


203 


1  Safety  Whistle. 

11  Springs  for  Relief  Valve. 
8  Tube  Scrapers. 

2  Gauge  Cocks. 

6  Handles  for  Relief  Valve. 

I  Set  Valve  Slides. 

II  3-way  Cocks. 

1  Set  Grate  Bars  for  Engine. 

2  Steam  Gauges. 
1  Vacuum  Gauge . 

1  Crank  Shaft  for  Double  En- 

gine. 
4  Jackscrews. 

2  four-ton  Hydraulic  Jacks. 
1  Double-acting  Test  Pump. 
1  Engine  Signal  Lamp. 

6  Engine  Side  Lights. 

18  stained    glass    for    signal 

Lamps . 

3  dozen  Patent  Links .  j 

1  Faucet  for  Hydrant. 
Complete  Set  of  Tools  for  Re- 
pairing Department. 

2  Complete  Sets  of  Tools  for 

Hydrantmen. 

1  Complete  Set  of  Tools  for 

Horse-shoeing. 
31  pounds  Copper  Wire. 
6  pounds  Rubber  Packing. 
10  pounds  Sheet  Brass. 
15  pounds  Sheet  Lead. 

2  Rubber  Bumpers. 
210  Rings  for  Couplings. 

19  Sets  Couplings. 


54  Lamp  Globes. 

12  Lamp  Burners . 

6  gallons  Alcohol. 
1  box  Candles. 

1  gross  Matches. 

2  1-gallon  Tin  Cans. 

7  ^-gallon  Tin  Cans. 

250  pounds  Chloride  Lime. 

200  pounds  Salt. 

21  quires  Emory  Cloth. 

19  dozen  Tripoli. 

4  pounds  Lamp  Yarn. 

1  gross  Lamp  Wick. 

17  Mops. 

4  Mop  Handles. 

15  pounds  Mustard. 

1  barrel  Cement. 

242  pounds  Washing  Soda. 

2  bottles  Harness  Dressing. 
77  gallons  Coal  Oil. 

5  gallons  Lard  Oil. 

8  gallons  Neat's  Foot  Oil. 

13  gallons  Castor  Oil. 
5  gallons  Downer  Oil. 

9  gallons  Boiled  Linseed  Oil. 
4  gallons  Raw  Linseed  Oil. 

3  gallons  Black  Varnish. 
3  gallons  Tar  Oil. 

3  gallons  Arnica  Tr. 

2  gallons  Sp.  Turpentine, 
150  pounds  Cotton  Waste. 
110  pounds  White  Rags. 

3  Crowbars. 

13  Chamois  Skins. 


28  Hame  Straps. 
56  Bridle  Straps. 
23  Miscellaneous  Straps. 
11  Hitching  Straps. 
7  Ladder  Hose  Straps. 
5  Hose  Holders. 
11  Iron  Snaps. 

I  Johnson  Pump . 

II  pouuds  Leather. 
3  tons  Coal. 

22  New  Hydrants,  2  in  good 
repair . 

224  Double-discharge  Hy- 
drants . 

33  Hydrant  Binds. 

250  feet  Rope. 

3  Blocks. 

1  Flag. 

3  Chairs. 

1  Stove. 

1  Grindstone. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

1  Fire-proof  Safe. 

1  Gong. 

350  feet  Condemned  Hose. 

18  Condemned  Suctions. 

3  Condemned  Blunderbusses. 

3  Condemned  Stoves. 

4,820  pounds  Old  Iron. 

1,742  pounds  Old  Brass. 


Corporation  Yard  Stable  contains : 

13  Relief  Horses. 
1  Supply  Wagon. 
1  Buggy. 

1  Dray. 

13  Horse  Collars. 

2  New  Bridles. 


2  Sets  Cart  Hames. 

Lot  of  Condemned  Harness. 

1  Hay-cutter. 

2  Chamois. 

3  Stable  Buckets. 
1  Curry  Comb. 


1  Dandruff  Brush. 

1  Horse  Brush. 

\  dozen  Horse  Bandages. 

2  Stable  Forks. 

1  Shovel. 

2  Blankets. 


During  the  last  fiscal  year,  sold  by  order  of  the  Mayor,  5,390  pounds  old  iron,  at  1£  cents  per 
pound,  $60  64. 


204 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S   REPORT. 


COMPANY     STATISTICS. 


STEAMER    COMPANY    NO.     1. 

LOCATION — PACIFIC   STEEET,    BETWEEN   MONTGOMERY   AND    SANSOME. 

Amoskeag  second-class  double  engine.     Hose  reel,  two-wheeled,   carries 
600  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

w 

IP 

H 

OCCUPATION. 

Charles  Kimball. 

45 

1 

Weigher 

William  Clair 

96 

Ass't     "          " 

2 

John  Hewston  

SI 

^ 

Clerk 

Geo  Hackett 

28 

4 

Bar-tender 

Jas.  Lannigan  

SI 

5 

Felix  Desmond                                    .          ... 

27 

6 

Painter 

31 

7 

L    Langan                                     

45 

g 

Police  Officer 

O    F    Baker 

40 

9 

EMPLOYEES. 

29 

10 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Eugene  Sullivan  .'  
William  Wilson  

27 
35 

Fireman         " 
Driver             " 

11 
12 

Blacksmith. 

Teamster. 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM    FIRE   ENGINE    COMPANY  "NO.  1. 


1  Ladder. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

3  Water  Buckets. 

1  Clock. 

1  Flag,  18  feet. 

1  Whitewash  Brush. 

1  Alarm  Gong. 

1  Stove. 
50feetCarbolized  Hose,  3-inch, 

bad  condition. 
SO  feet  Roofing  Rope . 
800  feat  2}  Carbolized  Hose. 
3  Hydrant  Spanners. 

2  Hose  Spanners. 
1  Hose  Strap. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

1  H-inch  Nozzle. 

1  Unhitching  Apparatus. 

1  Babcock  Extingusher. 


1  Amoskeag  Engine. 

50  fest  Suction  Rope. 

50  feet  Carbolized  Hose,  f  -in. 

2  Brooms. 

1  Amoskeag  Hose  Reel. 

2  Oil  Feeders;  1  Feeder,  bad 

1  Hose  Washer. 

condition. 

1  Small  Suction. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

4  Lanterns. 

1'Table. 

2  Oil  Cans. 

6  Chairs. 

1  Monkey  Wrench. 

3  Horses. 

1  Suction  Spanner. 

2  Fenders. 

1  Ax. 

2  Sets    Double    Harness,    bad 

1  Hammer. 

condition. 

2  Stuffing  Box  Wrenches. 

1  Set  Single  Harness. 

2  Assorted  Box  Wrenches. 

3  Horse  Blankets. 

1  f  -inch  Brass  Pipe. 

2  Whips,  bid  condition. 

1  Reducing  Coupling. 

3  Horse  Brushes. 

1  Crowbar. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

1  Jackscrew. 

1  Stable  Fork. 

2  Cranks  for  Hose  Reel. 

1  Rake. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

1  Wheelbarrow. 

1  Coal  Shovel. 

COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


205 


STEAMEE    COMPANY  No.  2. 

LOCATION — NORTH    SIDE    OF   BUSH    STREET,    BETWEEN   KEARNY   AND   DUPONT. 

Amoskeag,  second  class,  crane  neck,  nickel  plated,  double  engine.     Hose 
reel,  two-wheeled,  carries  600  feet  of  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

1? 

K 

OCCUPATION. 

Thomas  Sands  

34 
33 

Foreman,  at  Call.  . 

Ass't     "          " 

13 

]4 

Painter. 
Holder. 

H.   0.  Rodgers  

34 

44 

Hoseman       " 

15 

Ifi 

Teamster. 
Teamster. 

Geo.  R.  Lawson  

25 
39 

" 

17 
18 

Sailmaker. 
Porter. 

Joseph  Bowman  

32 
25 

tl 

19 
90 

Painter. 
Stevedore. 

Jno  Porter          

99 

{< 

?1 

Bagmaker. 

EMPLOYEES. 

Thomas  Sullivan  
James  Johnson  

30 
3fi 

Engineer  Perm'n't 
Fireman         " 

22 
?3 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Engineer 
Teamster. 

John  A    Mahone                       .                

9q 

Driver            " 

94 

Teamster  . 

December  22,  1879,  James  H.  Carmody  died  of  typhoid  fever,  aged  twenty 
four  years. 


INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM    FIRE   ENGINE   COMPANY  No.  2. 


1  Amoskeag  Engine,  2d  class. 

1  Set  of  Engine  Tools  (com- 
plete). 

1  Two- Wheel  Hose-Cart. 

3  Horses. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

1  Set  Single  Harness. 

800  feet  Carbolized  Hose,  2£- 
inch. 

6  Hydrant  Spanners. 

1  Blunderbuss,  spray  nozzle. 

1  Blunderbuss,  shut-  off  nozzle 

22  feet  Suction  Hose. 

100  feet  f-inch  Rubber  Hose. 

3  Horse  Blankets. 


1  Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Coal  Scuttle. 

3  Oil  Cans. 

1  Reducing  Coupling. 

1  Maul. 

1  Patent  Fire  Lighter. 

1  Ax. 

4  Globe  Lanterns. 

1  Jackscrew. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

7  Chairs. 

1  Oil  Feeder. 

1  Roofing  Rope. 

1  Flag,  16  feet. 

1  Suction  Rope. 

3  Buckets. 

2  Shovels. 

7  Spittoons. 

2  Pitchforks. 

2  Brooms. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

2  Clocks. 

1  Babcock  Fire  Extinguisher. 

3  Horse  Mats. 

1  Hayes  Hydrant  Suction. 

1  Heater  Stove. 

1  Horse  Brush. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

1  Curr}^  Comb. 

1  Steel  Crowbar. 

206 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S    REPORT. 


STEAMER  COMPANY  No.  3. 


LOCATION— SOUTH    SIDE    OF   CALIFORNIA    STKEET,  BET.    LEAVENWOKTH   AND  HYDE. 

Amoskeag,    third  class,  "harp   tank,"   single   engine.     Hose  reel,  two- 
wheeled;   carries  600  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS  . 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

NO. 
|  BADGE 

OCCUPATION. 

M  J  Dolan  

Sfi 

Foreman,  at  Call.  . 

25 

Carriage-maker 

J  Farrell                                          .  . 

36 

Ass't     "         " 

26 

Painter 

G  Lawton  

S9 

Hoseman        " 

27 

Chas    Dusenberg          "         .           ... 

36 

28 

William  Fuselier  

31 

n 

29 

Lamp-lighter 

M    J    Jennings             .             

37 

(i 

30 

J    Sullivan 

32 

(( 

31 

Gasfitter 

D    Gallagher          

28 

« 

32 

Butcher 

William  Kobertson 

26 

(( 

33 

Clerk 

EMPLOYEES. 
J    Holloway                     .           

44 

Engineer  Perm'n't 

34 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

L  .  Fuselier  

26 

Fireman         " 

BE 

Clerk. 

J   Moloney             

97 

Driver            " 

36 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM   FIRE  ENGINE  COMPANY  No.  3. 


1  Amoskeag  Engine,  3d 

3  Horses. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

20  feet  Suction  Hose. 

1  Hydrant  Suction  Hose. 

1  set  Engine  Tools. 

6  Hydrant  Spanners. 

3  Hose  Spanners. 

1  Lead  Bar. 

3  Blunderbusses. 

3  Horse  Blankets 

3  Whips. 

100  feet  3<-inch  hose. 

3  Buckets. 

9  Chairs. 

1  Patent  Nozzle. 

1  Set  Lead  Ropes. 

1  Hayes  Hose  Clamp. 

1  Galvanized  Ash  Barrel. 

1  Coal  Scuttle. 


2  Flags. 

1  Set  Single  Harness. 

1  Gong. 

1  Feed  Measure. 

2  Sponges. 

1  Unhitching  Apparatus. 

2  Hitching  Straps. 

1  Squeegee. 

2  Horses' Boots . 
4  Lanterns. 

1  Hose-Reel. 

2  Shovels. 

2  Brooms. 

3  Oil  Cans. 

1  Jackscrew. 

2  Tables. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

1  Ax. 

2  Pitchforks. 

1  Curry  Comb. 


1  Bristle  Brush. 

1  Dandruff  Brush. 

1  Spittoon. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

3  Stoves. 

850    feet    2f inch    Carbolized 

Hose. 

1  Suction  Rope. 
1  Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Reducer. 

2  Hose  Lifters. 

1  Fire  Shovel. 
12  Badges. 

2  Clocks. 

1  Mop  and  Handle. 

1  Vise. 

1  Telephone  and  Battery. 

1  Sling  Rope. 

1  Relief  Hydrant. 


COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


207 


STEAMER   COMPANY  No.  4. 

LOCATION — WEST    SIDE    OF   SECOND    STEEET,    BETWEEN   NATOMA   AND   HOWABJX 

Amoskeag  engine,  second  class.     Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;   carries  600  feet 
hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

NO. 
BADGE 

OCCUPATION. 

Edward  Keating  

34 

Foreman,  at  Call.  . 

87 

Silver  Plater. 

?°» 

Ass't    "          ' 

88 

Clerk. 

David  DeGroote     

45 

Hoseman 

89 

Laborer. 

40 

40 

Silver  Plater 

William  T  Tracy                

93 

41 

Gas  Fitter. 

84 

4? 

Caulker 

Pat  Sullivan                 

9q 

48 

Paver. 

Pat   Cur  ran 

88 

44 

Carpenter 

George  L  Darling               

81 

45 

Clerk. 

EMPLOYEES. 

Jno    J  Murphy            

41 

Engineer  Perm'n't 

4fi 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Engineer 

Chaa  Bell 

31 

47 

John  Robertson                      

9q 

Driver            " 

48 

Teamster 

November  4,  1879,  at  a  fire  on  Jackson  street,  William  Harrigan,  Isaac 
Shields  and  F.  Kiernan  were  injured  by  a  falling  chimney. 


INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM  FIRE  ENGINE  COMPANY  No.  4. 


1  Two-wheel  Hose  Cart. 
50  feet  2<-inch  Hose. 
3  Horses. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 
1  Set  Single  Harness. 
3  Horse  Blankets. 

1  Curry  Comb  and  Brush. 

2  Brooms— 1  Stable,  1  Corn. 
1  Sponge. 

1  Pitchfork. 

1  Shovel. 

1  Hydrant  Reducer. 

I  Hayes  Patent  Hose  Clamp. 

1  Heater  and  Connections. 

1  Stove,  with  Pipe. 

1  Copper  Boiler. 

3  Hitching  Lines. 


3  Water  Buckets. 

4  One  Gallon  Cans. 

4  Lanterns. 

1  Squirt  Can. 

1  Jackscrew. 

•I  Hose  Washer. 

4  Hydrant  Spanners. 

5  Spittoons. 

1  Suction  Spanner. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

1  Crowbar. 

1  Round  Table. 

1  Monkey  Wrench. 

1  Step  Ladder. 

1  Suction  Rope. 

1  Bragg's  Patent  Unhitching 

1  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

Apparatus. 

9  Chairs. 

1  Front-door  Chain. 

1  y±  Brass  Pipe. 

1  Fairbanks  Scales. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

1  Vise. 

1  Ax. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Rainey  Hydrant  Coupling. 

3  Hose  Straps  . 

1  Rainey  Hydrant  Wrench. 

2  Fancy  Engine  Lamps. 

1  Stoddart  Patent  Suction  . 

1  American  Flag. 

1  Hydrant  Key. 

1  Gong. 

208 


CHIEF  ENGINEER'S  REPORT. 


STEAMER   COMPANY  No.  5. 


LOCATION — WEST   SIDE    OF    STOCKTON   STREET,  BETWEEN   PACIFIC  AND   BKOADWAY. 

Amoskeag  engine,  third  class.     Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;   carries  600  feet 
hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

41 
31 
35 
34 
41 
36 
27 
24 
30 

44 
30 
39 

POSITION. 

h 

H 

49 
50 
51 
52 
63 
54 
55 
56 
57 

58 
59 
60 

OCCUPATION. 

Jno    J  Mahoney  

Foreman,  at  Call.. 

Ass't    "         " 
Hoseman       '  ' 

c 

Engineer  Perm'n't 
Fireman         " 
Driver            " 

Lamplighter. 
Caulker. 
Advertiser. 
Lamplighter. 
Bartender. 
Advertiser. 
Boatman. 
Bartender. 
Harness-maker. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Engineer. 
Harness-maker. 
Teamster. 

Jno  .  J.  Colvin  

Fred   Rose        

J   D    Wilson                             

Bernard  Golden             

Edward  Reiley  

EMPLOYEES. 

H    J    Colvin 

J    M    Stroud                  

D    McNally 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CI  ARGE  OF  STEAM  FIRE  ENGINE  COMPANY  No.  5. 


1  Amoskeag  Engine,  3d  class . 
1  Set  Engine  Tools  (complete) 
700  feet  Carbolized  Hose,  2J- 

inch. 

1  Hydrant  Reducer. 
1  Set  Lead  Bars. 
1  Jackscrew. 
1  Hose  Clamp. 
6  Lanterns. 
3  Hydrant  Spanners. 
1  Shovel. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

1  Patent  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

2  House  Brooms. 
2  Cylinder  Stoves. 
10  feet  Stove  Pipe. 


1  Kettle. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

1  Whip. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

3  Wooden  Buckets: 

1  Water  Trough. 

4  Iron  Spittoons. 

1  Feed  Box. 

1  Table. 

I  Stable  Broom. 

12  Chairs,  6  in  bad  condition. 

1  Stable  Fork. 

1  Ax. 

1  Curry  Comb  . 

1  Pair  Rope  Traces. 

1  Hair  Brush. 

150  feet  ^-inch  Hose. 

1  Chamois  Skin  . 

1  Pipe. 

1  Corn  Brush. 

4  Oil  Cans. 

1  Horse  Brush. 

1  Crowbar. 

2  Sponges. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

1  Feed  Measure. 

3  Horses. 

1  Oat  Sampler. 

3  Horse  Blankets. 

1  Coal  Scuttle,  bad  condition. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

1  Flag,  30  feet  long. 

1  Set  Single  Harness. 

12  Badges. 

COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


209 


STEAMEE   COMPANY    No.  6. 

LOCATION,    EAST   SIDE    OF    SIXTH   STEEET,    SOUTH    OF   FOLSOM. 

Amoskeag  engine,  second  class.     Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;    carries  600  feet 
hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

$? 

a 

OCCUPATION. 

35 

Foreman   at  Call 

61 

Gasfitter 

J.  McGee  
B    F    Currier 

22 
42 

Ass't     " 
ose  iiai 

62 
63 

Hardware  Store. 
Go'd  beater 

j    Reilly                         

96 

64 

Butcher 

Wm    Gasset 

25 

65 

Geo  .  Reorden  
F.  Loane       

24 
40 

66 
67 

Gasfitter. 

24 

68 

Artist 

J.  F.  Reilly  

EMPLOYEES. 

*• 

William  P  Simpson 

30 
43 

69 
70 

Mason. 

FORMER  OPCUPATION. 

F.  Atkinson  

40 

71 

Machinist 

Edward  Reilly  

*>R 

Driver            '  ' 

72 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM  FIRE  ENGINE  COMPANY  No.  6. 


1  Second-class  Amoskeag  En- 
gine. 

1  Hose-Reel. 

750  feet  Carbolized  Hose. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

3  Horses. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 
1  Set  Single  Harness. 
1  Hose  Washer. 

3  Corn  Brooms. 

1  Hydrant  Suction. 

4  Hydrant  Spanners. 
100  feet  Garden  Hose. 


2  Oil  Cans. 

3  1-Gallon  Oil  Cans. 

3  Buckets. 
2  Shovels. 

1  Platform  Scale. 
1  Curry  Comb. 
1  Horse  Brush. 
1  Pitchfork. 

4  Spittoons. 
1  Stove. 

1  Ladder. 

2  Jackscrews. 
4  Lamps. 


12  Chairs. 

1  Patent  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

1  Hay  Fork. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

3  Horse  Blankets. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

1  Table. 

1  Set  of  Engine  Tools. 

1  Crowbar. 

1  Ax. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

1  Coal  Scuttle. 

1  Reducer. 


14 


210 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S   REPORT. 


STEAMER  COMPANY  No.  7. 


LOCATION — SIXTEENTH    STREET,    ABOVE   VALENCIA    STKEET. 

Amoskeag  engine,  second  class.     Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;   carries  600  feet 
hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

NO. 

[BADGE 

OCCUPATION. 

J    J    Skehan 

39 

73 

John  O'Neil                    

86 

Asst  " 

74 

Lamplighter 

Theodore  Schulte 

50 

75 

Coal  Dealer 

Brvan  Burns                          

44 

76 

Teamster 

24 

« 

77 

Sail  Maker 

D   Coyne                                

82 

« 

78 

Clerk 

Edward  O'Neil                                .   . 

« 

79 

James  Lynch               

">6 

80 

Cabinet  Maker. 

William  Fitzgerald 

28 

i 

81 

EMPLOYEES. 

P    H    Fleming                                      .  .   . 

41 

82 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

John  Cook  

46 

Fireman,         " 

83 

Machinist. 

Charles  Vincent.  .  . 

32 

Driver.           " 

84 

Teamster. 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEA.M  FIRE  ENGINE   COMPANY  No.  7. 


1  Amoskeag  Engine,  2d-class  . 

1  Halter. 

1  Ladder. 

1  Set     of     Engineer's    Tools 

Hay-fork. 

1  CoalScuttle. 

(complete). 

Shovel. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

1  Hose-Reel. 

Horse  Rope. 

1  Horse  Brush. 

600   feet    2J-inch    Carbolized 

Jackscrew. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

Hose. 

Reducer. 

1  Feed  Box. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

Brass  Lanterns. 

2  Oil  Feeders. 

200  feet  Extra  Hose 

Whips. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

50  feet  Garden  Hose. 

Stable  Buckets. 

1  Ax. 

3  Horses. 

Platform  Scale. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

1  Set  Single  Harness. 

3  One-Gallon  Oil  Cans. 

3  Spittoons. 

1  Table. 

6  Hose  Spanners. 

12  Badges. 

1  Dozen  Chairs. 

1  Stove  and  Kettle. 

1  Lead  Bar  and  Rope. 

3  Horse  Blankets. 

2  Corn  Brooms. 

1  Eight-Day  Clock. 

COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


211 


STEAMER   COMPANY  No.   8. 


LOCATION — NORTH    SIDE   PACIFIC  AVENUE,  BETWEEN  POLK  AND  VAN  NESS  AVENUE. 

Kimball  engine,  third  class.    Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;  carries  600  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

IP 

& 

OCCUPATION. 

Jas    Grady  

40 

Foreman,  at  call.  . 

85 

Clerk 

R  J  Courtier 

81 

Ass't     "          " 

86 

Gasfltter 

S-  O    Robinson  

94 

Hoseman,       " 

87 

Painter. 

S9 

88 

Thos.  Canty     

9S 

« 

89 

Lamplighter. 

31 

( 

90 

Gasfitter 

Thos   Fox            .          

•18 

. 

91 

Coppersmith 

M.  J.  Horigen  

99 

» 

9'? 

Gasfitter. 

James  Connell                             .... 

34 

93 

Porter 

EMPLOYEES. 

D  D  Hayes 

Engineer  Perm'n't 

94 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

D.  H.  Kennard  

49 

Fireman,        " 

9*1 

Carpenter. 

Jos  Hess 

22 

96 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM  FIRE  ENGINE    COMPANY  No.  8. 


1  Kimball  Engine.  3d  class. 

1  Set  of  Engineer's  Tools  (com- 
plete). 

1  Hose  Reel. 

3  Horses. 

1  Set  of  Double  Harness. 

1  Set  of  Single  Harness. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

800  feet  of  2^ -inch  Carbolized 
Hose. 

25  feet  of  ^-inch  Hose. 


|    3  Horse  Blankets. 

10  Chairs. 

1  Set  of  Blocks  and  Tackle. 

1  Lead  Bar  and  Ropes. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

1  Suction  Rope. 

2  1-inch  Nozzles. 

2  Shovels. 

1  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

4  Lanterns. 

2  Jackscrews. 

1  Table. 

1  Flag. 

4  Oil  Cans. 

1  Ax. 

3  Buckets. 

3  Brooms. 

4  Hydrant  Spanners. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

2  Horse  Brushes. 

12  Badges. 

2  Spittoons. 

1  Crowbar. 

212 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S    REPORT. 


STEAMER   COMPANY  No.  9. 

LOCATION — WEST    SIDE    OF    MAIN    STKEET,    NEAK   FOLSOM. 

Amoskeag  engine,  second  class.     Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;   carries  600  feet 
hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

I* 

OCCUPATION. 

Edward  Scott  
J.  Campbell  

37 
34 
29 
35 
24 
42 
25 
36 
35 

49 
30 
33 

Foreman,  at  call.  . 

Ass't     " 
Hoseman 

Engineer,  Perm'n't 
Fireman,        " 
Driver,           " 

97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 

106 
107 
108 

Saloon-keeper. 
Boxmaker. 
Machinist. 
Machinist. 
Laborer. 
Printer. 
Boilermaker. 
Teamster. 
File-maker. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Engineer. 
Gasfitter. 
Teamster. 

F.  Johnson  .,  
Jno.  Clarke  

M.  Courtney  
J.  F.   Lyons 

M.  Quinn  
S.  Lauder 

M.  Kelly  

EMPLOYEES.  ' 

S.  Bridgewood  

M.  Dougherty  
P.  J.  Mahan.  

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM  FIRE  ENGINE  COMPANY  NO.  0. 


1  Amoskeag  Engine,  2d  class. 

1  Set  of  Tools  for  Engine. 

1  Hose  Reel. 

3  Horses. 

3  Horse  Blankets. 

1  Set  of  Double  Harness. 

1  Set  of  Single  Harness. 

750  feet  of  2£-inch  Carbolized 

Hose. 
50  feet  f-inch  Hose. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

2  Hose  Spanners. 

1  Jackscrew. 

2  Hydrant  Spanners. 

I  Hydrant  Brass  Suction. 
1  Curry  Comb. 
1  Reducer. 


1  Horse  Brush. 
1  Corn  Brush. 
1  Stable  Broom. 
1  House  Broom. 
3  Buckets. 
1  Block  and  Tackle. 
1  Table. 
12  Badges. 

1  Ax. 

2  Blunderbusses. 
2  Stoves. 

2  Shovels. 

2  Ladders. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

1  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 


1  Crowbar. 

1  Suction  Rope. 

2  Oil  Feeders. 

2  Oil  Cans. 
1  Squegee. 

1  Coal  Scuttle. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

3  Hose  Buckets. 
6  Chairs. 

1  Clock. 

1  Galvanized  Ash  Barrel . 

1  Pitchfork. 

2  Iron  Spittoons. 

4  Lanterns. 

1  Hydrant  Wrench . 
1  Flag. 


COMPANY     STATISTICS. 


213 


STEAMEK   COMPANY   No.  10. 


LOCATION— BEYANT    STEEET,    BETWEEN   THIED    AND    FOUETH. 


Amoskeag  engine,  second  class.     Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;  carries  600  feet 
hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

i? 

«L- 

109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 

118 
119 
120 

OCCUPATION. 

Thos.  O'Reilly  
Daniel  Kirby                   

32 

26 
27 
29 
39 
26 
26 
30 
36 

30 
32 
26 

Foreman,  at  call.  . 

Ass't     " 
Hoseman 

Engineer,  Perm'n't 
Fireman, 
Driver, 

Bootmaker. 
Lumberman. 
Lumberman. 
Jeweler. 
Salesman. 
Shipjoiner. 
Mason. 
Gasfitter. 
Shipliner. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION 

Engineer. 
Roofer. 
Teamster. 

Philip  McMahon                 

William  Erbin 

Bernard  Rawle  

James  Dever  

J   F  Harrison 

EMPLOYEES. 

Jos.  Bridgwood  
William  Willock 

J.  R.  Lawson  

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM  FIRE  ENGINE  COMPANY  No.  10. 


1  Amoskeag  Engine,  2d  class. 
1  Hose-Reel. 
1  Flag. 
1  Ax. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 
12  Badges. 

Blocks  and  Rope  for  Tackle. 

2  Blunderbusses. 
2  Brooms. 

2  Hammers. 

3  Horse  Blankets. 
1  Head  Light. 

3  Horses. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 
1  Hose  Washer. 
1  Dock  Hydrant  Reducer. 

4  Hydrant  Spanners. 

1  Jackscrew. 

2  Buckets. 
6  Chairs. 

1  Chamois. 


2  Clocks. 

1  Corn  Brush. 

2  Cranks  for  Hose  Reel. 
1  Crowbar. 

1  Horse  Brush. 
1  Curry  Comb. 
1  Cylinder  Stuffing-Box 

Wrench. 

1  Hydrant  Reducer. 
4  Engine  Side  Lights. 
1  Platform  Scale. 
850  feet  Carbolized  Hose. 
50  feet  Small   Hose,  in- bad 

condition. 

1  Galvanized  Ash  Barrel. 
1  Suction  Spanner. 
1  American  District  Gong. 
1  Fire  Alarm  Gong. 
4  Lanterns. 
1  Oil  Feeder. 
4  Oil  Cans. 


1  Patent  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

1  Patent  Unhitching  Appar- 

atus. 

2  Pitchforks. 

1  Roof  Rope,  in  bad  condition. 
1  Set  of  Double  Harness. 

1  Set  of  Single  Harness. 

2  Large  Suctions. 
1  Small  Suction. 
1  Table. 

1  Stove. 

2  Sponges. 

1  Valve  Stuffing-Box  Wrench. 
1  Wheel  Wrench. 

1  Wheel  Cup  Spanner. 

2  Ladder  Buckets. 

28  feet  Galvanized  Stove  Pipe. 
14  feet  Stove  Pipe  and  Elbow. 

1  Bell  and  Striking  Apparatus 

2  Shovels  (bad). 

1  Suction  Rope  (bad). 


214 


CHIEF    ENGINEERS    REPORT. 


STEAMER   COMPANY  No.   11. 

LOCATION — FOURTEENTH    AVENUE    NEAE   RAILROAD    AVENUE,    SOUTH    SAN 
FRANCISCO. 

Amoskeag  engine,  second  class.     Hose  reel,  two- wheeled:   carries  600  feet 
hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

jb 

OCCUPATION. 

C.  J.  Gilien....!  
Jno  J   Ford 

33 

29 

42 
42 

38 
39 
24 

Foreman,  at  call  .  . 
Ass't     " 
Hoseman, 

Engineer,  Perm'n't 
Fireman,        " 
Driver,           " 

196 
197 
198 
199 

201 
202 
203 

204 

205 

206 
207 

Butcher. 
Butcher. 
Butcher. 
Butcher. 
Butcher. 
Butcher. 
Butcher. 
Saddler. 
Blacksmith. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION  . 

Engineer. 
Engineer. 
Teamster. 

C  W.  Smith  

C    Windrow                                          

R.  Windrow  

j  j   Dooley                                        

George  Welsh 

P    W    Lahanev.              .             

Thos  McTiernan 

EMPLOYEES. 

Jno  .  J  .  Jackson  
A   B   Brandt 

J.  F.  Finn  

Died,  Hugh  McTiernan,  April  11,  1880. 


INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM  FIRE  ENGINE  COMPANY  NO.   11. 


1  Amoskeag  Engine. 

2  Hose-Reels. 

3  Horses. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 
1  Set  Single  Harness. 
1,250  feet  Carbolized  Hose. 
50  feet  Garden  Hose. 

1  Wheel  Wrench. 

2  Shovels. 

1  Large  Reducer. 

1  Small  Reducer. 

1  Ax. 

1  Oil  Feeder. 

1  Squirt  Can. 

1  Bucket. 

1  Corn  Brush. 


1  Hay  Fork. 

1  Feed  Box. 

1.  Battery  and  Gong. 

1  Monkey  Wrench. 


1  Hose  Washer. 


1  Large  Bell. 

1  Table. 

2  Sponges. 

6  Hitching  Straps. 
1  Screw  Wrench. 
1  Hammer. 
1  Wheel  Wrench. 
1  Cylinder  Wrench. 
1  Valve  Wrench. 
1  Cold  Chisel. 
1  Crowbar. 


1  Jackscrew. 

4  Lanterns. 

1  Blunderbuss. 

1  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

6  Spanners. 

3  Oil  Cans. 

3  Horse  Blankets. 

1  Howe  Scale. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Curry  Comb  and  Brush. 

1  Flag  and  Halliards. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

1  Suction  and  Roof  Rope. 

6  Chairs. 

6  Hydrant  Wrenches. 

1  Hair  Brush.  . 


COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


215 


STEAMEK   COMPANY  No.   12. 

LOCATION — COENEE    COMMEECIAL   AND   DEUMM   STEEETS. 

Amoskeag  engine,  first  class.   Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;  carries  600  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE 

POSITION. 

l? 

OCCUPATION. 

George  Maxwell  

24 
31 
22 
42 

28 
47 
40 
22 
26 

32 

28 
34 

Foreman,  at  Call  .  . 
Asst.  "           " 
Hoseman, 

Engineer,  Perm'n't 
fireman,         " 
driver, 

244 
251 
252 

253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 

248 
250 
259 

Salesman  . 
Gunsmith  . 
Boatman  . 
Teamster. 
Clerk. 
Janitor. 
Fireman. 
PI  amber. 
Marble-cutter. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Engineer. 
Fireman  . 
Teamster  . 

Jacob  Kran<rwill 

Thos.  Mathews  

Jas    O'Connor 

William  Barnie  

William  H   Loclo-e 

Bernard  Donnelly  

Thomas  M.  Fernandez  

Jno    Laverona  ....          •    .... 

EMPLOYEES. 

Frank  Crockett  

Dennis  Sullivan  

James  Ronwi  ,  . 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  STEAM  FIRE  ENGINE  COMPANY  No.  12. 


1  Amoskeag  Engine. 

1  Clock. 

2  Cranks  for  Hose-Reel. 

1  Hose  Cart. 

2  Whitewash  Brushes. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

100  feetCarbolized  Hose,  f-in- 

3  Water  Buckets. 

1  Coal  Shovel. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

1  Chamois  Skin. 

3  Horses. 

600  feet  Carbolized  Hose,  2l/2. 

1  Pitchfork. 

2  Brooms. 

inch. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

1  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

1  Small  Suction. 

4  Hydrant  Spanners. 

2  Oil  Feeders. 

2  Large  Suctions. 

1  Coal  Scuttle. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

4  Lanterns. 

1  Stove  Shovel. 

1  Table. 

1  Ax. 

1  Set  Engine  Tools. 

12  Chairs. 

2  Oil  Cans. 

2  Hose  Lifters. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

1  Monkey  Wrench. 

1  Feed  Box. 

1  Set  Single  Harness. 

2  Suction  Spanners. 

6  Sponges. 

3  Horse  Blankets. 

2  Stuffing  Box  Wrenches. 

4  Hitching  Straps. 

1  Whip. 

1  Hammer. 

2  Mops  and  Handles. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

1  Galvanized  Ash  Barrel. 

2  One-Gallon  Oil  Cans. 

2  Ladders. 

6  Rubber  Mats. 

2  i-  Gallon  Oil  Cans. 

1  Stable  Fork. 

1  Clerk's  Desk. 

2  Reducing  Couplings. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Alarm  Gong. 

1  Crowbar. 

1  Blackboard. 

1  Stove. 

1  Jackscrew. 

216 


CHIEF   ENGINEER  S    REPORT. 


HOSE   COMPANY   NO.    1. 


LOCATION — NORTH    SIDE   JACKSON,    BETWEEN   FRONT   AND    DAVIS. 


Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;  carries  600  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

NO. 
|  BADGE 

OCCUPATION: 

Jno    B    Warner 

00 

T>1 

Hostler 

John  Hayes  
William  Liddle 

36 
34 

Asst.   " 

122 
T>?S 

Expressman  . 

Richard  Hammond  
Miles  Gill                                                    .   . 

31 
36 

124 
125 

Boatman. 

John  J.  Shay  
Jno    Coles 

37 
24 

;; 

126 
127 

Pressman  . 
Caulker 

EMPLOYEES  . 

James  Conniff                  .       .                    ... 

SI 

Driver  Permanent 

128 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Caulker 

Jno    J    Smith 

23 

Steward          '  ' 

199 

Butcher 

John  Tuby,    on    sick  list   1   month  and  5  days  ;    died    of  consumption 
August  5,  1879. 

Miles  Gill,  on  sick  list  28  days;  injured  at  fire  on  May  20,  1880. 


INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOSE  COMPANY  No.  1. 


Hose  Cart,  good  order. 

Horse. 
650  feet  Carbolized  Hose. 

Jackscrew. 

Set  Single  Harness. 

Monkey  Wrench . 
(>  Chairs,  bad  order. 

1  Platform -Scale. 

2  Blunderbusses. 
2  Lanterns. 


1  Oil  Can. 

1  Curry  Comb  and  Brush. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

50  feet  Garden  Hose,  bad  or- 

1 Fall  and  Tackle. 

der. 

1  Ax. 

2  Iron  Spittoons. 

1  Top  Maul. 

2  Stable  Buckets. 

1  Stove  and  Boiler. 

1  Fork. 

1  Clock. 

1  Shovel. 

1  Desk. 

8  Spanners. 

1  Hose  Rope. 

2  Brooms 

1  Table,  bad  order. 

COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


217 


HOSE   COMPANY   NO.   2. 

LOCATION — POST    STEEET,    NEAB    FILLMOKE. 

Hose  reel,  four-wheeled;  carries  900  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

Is 

OCCUPATION. 

a 

M.  Lavell  

37 

Foreman,  at  Call.  . 

130 

Shoemaker. 

Jas  F  Byrne 

37 

Asst    " 

131 

John  Clement  

39 

Hoseman, 

132 

Printer 

Con.  Shine  

41 

133 

Milkman. 

Charles  Oram  

41 

« 

134 

Coppersmith. 

R    O'Connor 

25 

cc 

135 

Thomas  Mcagher  

40 

" 

136 

Laborer. 

EMPLOYEES  . 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Jas.  Talbot                      

f^9 

Driver  Permanent 

137 

36 

Steward,        " 

138 

Teamster. 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  FOSE  COMPANY  No.  2. 


1  Four-wheeled    Hose   Car- 

riage. 

2  Horses. 

1,000  feet  2|-inch  Carbolized 

Hose. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 
1  Hook  and  Ladder  Truck. 

1  Hand  Engine. 

2  Blundei-busses. 
2  Hose  Spanners. 

2  Hydrant  Spanners. 
2  Lanterns. 

1  Ax. 

2  Horse  Brushes. 


2  Buckets. 

2  Oil  Cans. 

12  Chairs. 

1  Stove  and  Fixtures. 

50  feet  Hose  Rope. 

1  Jackscrew. 

5  Extra  Ladders. 

1  Hook  and  Chain. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Hay  Fork. 

1  Shovel. 

2  Brooms. 

2  Horse  Blankets. 


100  feet  |-inch  Hose,  in  bad 

condition. 
1  Curry  Comb. 
1  Sponge. 
1  Oil  Feeder. 
1  Gas  Lighter. 
1  Alarm  Bell  and  Rope. 
3  Spittoons. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 
1  Hose  Clamp. 
1  Table. 
1  Gong. 

1  Platform  Scale. 
1  Extra  Hydrant. 


218 


CHIEF    ENGINEERS   REPORT. 


HOSE   COMPANY  NO.    3. 

IX)CATION— FOLSOM   STKEET,    BETWEEN   TWENTY-FIBST   AND    TWENTY-SECOND. 

Hose  reel,  four-wheeled;  carries  900  feet  hose. 


-       MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

i? 

M 

OCCUPATION. 

J.  V.  Denniston  

50 

Foreman  at  call 

139 

Silver  Plater 

T.  Cavanagh  .... 

40 

Ass't    " 

140 

Caulker 

R.  T.  Brown  
William  Grant. 

46 
33 

Hoseman  , 

141 
142 

Whitener. 

E.  T.  Twohig  

25 

« 

143 

Jas.  McGreevy  

27 

« 

144 

Clerk 

Win.  Ludlow. 

35 

<( 

145 

EMPLOYEES. 

Thos.  H.  Bowlin 

35 

146 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

J.  P.  Adams  .... 

26 

Steward          " 

147 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOSE  COMPANY  No.  3. 


1  Four-wheeled    Hose    Car- 

1 Hair  Brush. 

1  Clock. 

riage. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

1  Monkey  Wrench. 

2  Horses. 

1  Jackscrew. 

1  Hammer. 

1,150  feet  2J-  inch  Carbolized 

6  Chairs  (new). 

£  cord  of  Wood. 

Hose. 

7  Chairs  (old). 

1  Mop  and  Handle. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

1  Flag. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

\Yz  tons  Soft  Coal. 

1  Hose  Strap. 

2  Lanterns. 

Yz  ton  Hard  Coal. 

50  feet  Hose  Rope. 

4  Hose  Spanners. 

1  Platform  Scale  (Fairbanks). 

2  Oil  Cans. 

4  Hydrant  Spanners. 

1  Stove,  "Veto"  No.  12. 

1  Oil  Feeder. 

1  Whip. 

12  feet  of  Stove  Pipe. 

1  box  Charges  for  Fire  Ex- 

1 Shut-off  Nozzle. 

2  House  Ladders. 

tinguisher. 

2  Horse  Blankets. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

2  Hay  Hooks. 

1  Scrubbing  Brush  . 

1  Ax. 

3  Spittoons. 

50  feet  of  f  -inch  Hose. 

2  Brooms. 

1  Table. 

1  Coal  Scuttle. 

1  Hay  Fork. 

2  Buckets. 

1  Reducer. 

1  Shovel. 

3  Sponges. 

1  Alarm  Bell  and  Rope. 

1  Corn  Brush. 

COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


219 


HOSE   COMPANY  NO.   4. 

LOCATION — EAST   SIDE    OF   STOCKTON   STEEET,    NOKTH    OF    GREENWICH. 

Hose  reel,  two- wheeled ;  carries  600  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

35 
38 
33 
35 
29 
40 
31 

27 
41 

POSITION. 

NO. 

1  BADGE 

OCCUPATION. 

Foreman,  at  call.  . 
Ass't*    " 
Hoseman, 

Driver,  Permanent 
Steward, 

148 
149 
150 
151 

152 
153 
154 

155 
156 

Porter. 
Cooper. 
Metal  Roofer. 
Upholsterer. 
Silver  Plater. 
Pressman. 
Salesman. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Teamster. 
Fireman. 

B    T    Butler.       .  .              

J  W    Brady 

Fred    Jackson                            .         

F.  W.  Keene  

D    A    Finn 

William  Durham 

EMPLOYEES. 

B.  F.  Lanfair  
J   E   Donovan 

INVENTORY  OF   ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOSE  COMPANY  No.  4. 


1  Two-wheeled  Hose  Cart. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

2  Pitchforks. 

1  Horse. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

2  Brooms. 

1  Set  Single  Harness. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher. 

2  Buckets. 

1  Horse  Blanket. 

1  Fire  Alarm  Gong. 

1  Shovel. 

1  Whip. 

1  "Veto"  No.  12  Stove. 

1  Jackscrcw. 

750  feet  2|-inch  Carbolized 

1  Ax. 

1  Wrench. 

Hose. 

1  Coal  Scuttle. 

2  Spittoons. 

6  Spanners. 

50  feet  %-inch  Hose. 

2  Oil  Cans. 

3  Hose  Straps. 

9  Chairs. 

1  Grain  Tester. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

1  Flag. 

1  Horse  Brush. 

2  Lanterns. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Corn  Brush. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

1  ton  Coal. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

1  Straight  Nozzle. 

1  Clock. 

1  Mop. 

1  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

2  Ladders. 

220 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S  REPORT. 


HOSE   COMPANY  NO.   5. 

LOCATION — SOUTH    SIDE    MARKET   STREET,    BETWEEN    TENTH    AND    ELEVENTH. 

Hose  reel,  two-wheeled;  carries  600  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

IP 

a 

157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 

164 
165 

OCCUPATION. 

James  Riley  
Jno.  Chester  

40 

39 
30 
32 
32 

27 
34 

45 
37 

Foreman,  at  call  .  . 
Ass't    " 
Hoseman, 

Driver,  Permanent 
Steward,         " 

Porter. 
Special  Officer. 
Turner. 
Clerk. 
Engineer. 
Clerk. 
Cooper. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Teamster. 
Plumber. 

Chas.  Crockett  

T.  R.  Carew  

G.  E.  Wilson  

F.  Dietz  

Jno  .  Wilkinson  

EMPLOYEES. 

N.  H.  Arnott 

G.  G.  Gordon  

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOSE  COMPANY  No.  5. 


1  Two-wheeled  Hose  Cart. 

3  Spittoons. 

1  Wheelbarrow. 

1  Horse. 

2  Brooms. 

1  Bucket. 

600  feet  of  Carbolized  Hose. 

1  Pitchfork. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

4  Spanners. 

1  Shut-off  Nozzle. 

150  feet  Carbolized  Hose  (on 

1  Horse  Brush. 

2  Lanterns. 

storage.) 

1  Hose  Rope. 

1  Set  Harness. 

1  Ax. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

1  Oiler. 

1  Squegee. 

1  Alarm  Bell  and  Rope. 

1  Set  Block  and  Tackle. 

50  feet  |-inch  Hose. 

1  Flag. 

1  Jackscrew. 

1  Tin  Boiler. 

1  Stove. 

1  Table. 

1  Set  Halliards. 

1  Hoisting  Rope. 

6  Chairs. 

1  Ladder. 

1  Horse  Blanket. 

1  Coal  Scuttle. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

1  Chamois  Skin. 

COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


221 


HOSE   COMPANY  NO.    6. 

LOCATION — M'ALLISTEK  STBEET,  BETWEEN  WEBSTER,  AND  BUCHANAN. 
Hose  reel,  four- wheeled;  carries  900  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

41 

26 
36 
28 
38 
41 
36 

40 
35 

POSITION. 

NO. 
BADGE 

OCCUPATION. 

P  H  Jones                                         

Foreman,  at  call  .  . 
Ass't     " 
Hoseman, 

Driver,  Permanent 
Steward,         " 

223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 

230 
231 

Caulker  . 
Painter. 
Engineer. 
Gasfitter. 
Bootmaker. 
Teamster. 
Painter. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Teamster. 
Caulker. 

J    D    Welch 

Geo    D   Flvn               

T   Minton 

Michael  Byron  
T  C    Johnson                                     .        

EMPLOYEES. 

J    W  Rice  

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOSE  COMPANY  No.  6. 


1  Sieve. 

1  Feed  Measure. 

1  Flag. 

2  Spittoons. 

1  Garden  Rake. 

2  Ladders. 

1  Hose  Clamp . 

1  Hose  Washer. 

1  Set  of  Old  Harness. 

1  Hammer. 

2  Hame  Straps,  spare. 
50  feet  of  Hose  Rope. 
4  Spare  Line  Snaps. 

3  Spare  Cheek  Snaps. 

100  feet  2finch  Carbolized 

Hose,  spare. 
3  Spare  Check  Straps. 


1  Four-wheeled  Hose  Car- 

2  Horse  Brushes. 

riage. 

3  Sponges. 

2  Horses. 

2  Buckets. 

1  Set  of  Double  Harness. 

1  Oil  Feeder. 

950  feet  2^-inch  Carbolized 

1  Tin  Ash  Barrel. 

Hose. 

1  Copper  Boiler. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

1  Clock. 

4  Hose  Spanners. 

1  Squegee. 

2  Lanterns. 

2  One-Gallon  Oil  Cans. 

1  Ax. 

1  Gas  Lighter. 

1  Jackscrew. 

2  Horse  Blankets. 

50  feet  f-inch  Hose. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

1  Screw  Wrench  . 

1  Gong. 

1  Set  of  Blocks  and  Tackles. 

1  Table. 

1  Hay  Fork. 

12  Chairs,  4  broken. 

2  Shovels. 

1  Stove  and  Fixtures. 

2  Brooms. 

2  Chamois. 

1  Carry  Comb.                            '    1  Coal  Scuttle. 

222 


CHIEF  ENGINEER  S  REPORT. 


HOSE   COMPANY  NO.   7. 

LOCATION — TENNESSEE   STREET,    BETWEEN    SIERRA   AND   NAPA. 

Hose  reel,  four-wheeled;  carries  900  feet  hose. 


MEMBKRS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

b 

M 

259 
260 
261 
2«2 
263 
264 
265 

266 
267 

OCCUPATION. 

J  V  Fulton                                 

23 
36 
42 
45 
51 
43 
26 

36 
43 

Foreman,  at  call.. 

Ass't     " 
Hoseman, 

Driver,  Permanent 
Steward,         " 

Clerk. 
Grocer. 
Caulker. 
Holder. 
Roller. 
Glassblower. 
Butcher. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Teamster. 
Seaman. 

P  McCormick  

M    McCoy 

J   McCabe  

H  McCrea                                       

j)  Toomy 

EMPLOYEES. 

M  .  Van  Bergen  

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOSE  COMPANY  No.  T. 


1  Bell  and  Rope. 
1  Platform  Scale. 
1  Gong. 

1  Triumph  Fire  Extinguisher 
1  Stove  and  Fixtures. 
1  Coal  Scuttle. 
1  Shovel. 

1  Dust-pan  and  Brush . 
1  Copper  Boiler. 
I  Stove  Brush. 
1  Table. 
1  Clock. 
6  Chairs. 
1  Locker. 

100    feet  Garden    Hose    and 
Pipe. 


1  Four-wheeled  Hose   Car- 

1 Set  Block  and  Tackles. 

riage. 

2  Axes. 

1,150  feet  of  2^-inch  Carbol- 

2  Sponges. 

izcd  Hose. 

1  Curry  Comb  . 

2  Horses. 

1  Horse  Brush  . 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

1  Corn  Brush. 

2  Blunderbusses. 

I  Pitchfork. 

4  Hose  Spanners. 

1  Hammer. 

2  Reel  Cranks. 

1  Hatchet. 

1  Hose  Strap. 

1  Saw. 

1  Hose  Clamp 

1  Mop. 

2  Horse  Blankets. 

1  Monkey  Wrench. 

1  Wheel  Wrench. 

1  Step-ladder. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

1  Chamois. 

1  Oil  Feeder. 

1  Feed  Measure. 

1  Jackscrew. 

1  Grain  Tester. 

4  Hitching  Straps. 

2  Gallons  Coal  Oil. 

1  Unhitching  Apparatus. 

2  ^-gallon  Oil  Cans. 

2  Lanterns. 

1  1-gallon  Oil  Can. 

2  Buckets. 

1  Time  Board. 
1  Stable  Shovel. 


COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


HOSE   COMPANY  NO.   8. 

LOCATION — SOUTH    SIDE   FILBEKT   STEEET,    BETWEEN   WEBSTER   AND   FILLMOBE* 

Hose  reel,  four-wheeled;  carries  900  feet  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

t 

268 
269 
270 
271 
•27-2 
278 
274 

275 
276 

OCCUPATION. 

J    Casebolt 

37 
30 
30 
30 
44 
39 
32 

24 
31 

Foreman,  at  call  .  . 
Ass't    " 
Hoseman 

it 

Driver,  Permanent 
Steward,         " 

Blacksmith. 
Porter. 
Plumber. 
Butcher. 
Hack-driver. 
Laundry  man. 
Lamplighter. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Jeweler. 
Carpenter. 

S.  S.  Balk  

Jno  Couo'hlin 

H.  Schmidt  

Jno   Devlin 

L.  H.  Perry  
Pat  Canty 

EMPLOYEES. 

A   Hauser 

Thomas  Murphy  

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOSE  COMPANY  No.  8. 


1  Four-wheeled    Hose  Car- 

1 Squirt  Can. 

1  Hay  Fork. 

riage. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

2  Brooms. 

2  Horses. 

1  Clock. 

1  Babcock  Extinguisher, 

2  Blunderbusses. 

1  Table. 

1  Stove. 

3  Lanterns. 

1  Feed  Measure. 

1  Hose  Clamp. 

1  Jackscrew. 

6  Spittoons. 

2  Sponges. 

1  Screw  Wrench. 

1  Hose  Washer. 

4  Oil  Cans. 

1  Set  Block  and  Tackles. 

1,100  feet  of  2£-inch  Carbol- 

2  Horse  Blankets. 

1  Shovel. 

ized  Hose. 

1  Gong. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

6  Chairs. 

2  Horse  Brushes. 

4  Spanners. 

1  CoalScuttle. 

1  Time  Board. 

2  Axes. 

1  Chamois. 

3  Hose  Suspenders. 

50  feet  Garden  Hose. 

1  Alarm  Bell. 

3  Buckets. 

1  Hammer. 

224 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S    REPORT. 


HOSE     COMPANY     NO.   9. 

(Fireboat  Governor  Irwin.) 


LOCATION — BROADWAY   WHAKF,    FOOT    OF    BROADWAY. 

This  boat  was  built  in  this  city  in  1878  for  the  Board  of  Harbor  Commis- 
sioners. It  was  tendered  to  the  Board  of  Fire  Commissioners  for  the  use  of 
the  Fire  Department  in  case  of  fires  on  the  city  front  or  in  the  bay.  The 
boat  is  tug  built,  is  eighty-six  (86)  feet  in  length  over  all;  breadth  of  beam, 
nineteen  (19)  feet  six  (6)  inches;  depth  of  hold,  ten  (10)  feet  six  (6)  inches, 
and  eighty  (80)  tons  measurement.  Is  fitted  with  two  (2)  non-condensing 
engines,  with  cylinder  eighteen  (18)  inches  in  diameter  and  eighteen  (18) 
inch  stroke;  diameter  of  propeller,  nine  (9)  feet.  Has  two  (2)  Hooker 
pumps  attached,  with  a  capacity  of  sixty-five  thousand  (65,000)  gallons  of 
water  per  hour  at  fair  working  speed,  and  is  supplied  with  twelve  hundred 
(1,200)  feet  of  2%-inch  carbolized  hose. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

1  NO. 
|  BADGE 

OCCUPATION. 

33 
28 
21 
29 
23 
33 
32 

50 
46 

Foreman,  at  call  .  . 
Ass't    " 
Hoseman 

Driver,  Permanent 
Steward,         " 

259 

260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 

266 
267 

Porter. 
Printer. 
Boatman  . 
Butcher. 
Harness-maker. 
Mariner. 
Boatman  . 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Shipwright. 
Fireman  . 

llichard  Sheppard  

Wm.  Barry  
Jno    H    Gillin 

James  Wilson              

Geo    Webb                          

EMPLOYEES. 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOSE  COMPANY  No.  9. 


1  Alarm  Gong. 

1  Cooking  Stove  and  Furni- 
ture . 

1  Dozen  Chairs. 

800  feet  2^-inch  Carbolized 
Hose. 


1  dock. 

2  Carbolized  Blunderbusses. 
50  feet  of  Garden  Hose. 

1  Twin  Nozzle. 

2  Brooms. 

1  Scrub  Brush. 


1  Window  Brush. 

1  Wood  Ax. 

2  Buckets. 
2  Sponges. 
1  Ladder. 


COMPANY  STATISTICS. 


225 


HOOK   AND   LADDER   COMPANY  NO.    1. 

LOCATION — NOBTH   SIDE    o'FAKKELL,  STKEET,    WEST    OF    DUPONT. 

This  Truck  was  built  by  the  Kirnball  Manufacturing  Company  of  this  city. 
It  is  a  first-class  Hayes  Patent  Fire-Escape  Truck.  The  number  of  ladders 
carried  is  nine,  and  also  the  usual  equipments  attached  to  Truck  Companies. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

1  NO. 
BADGE 

OCCUPATION. 

A.  Rissland  

39 
36 

Foreman,  at  call.  . 

Ass't      " 

166 

167 

Grocer. 

R  S   Wray                                    

49 

Truckman 

168 

J    Dolan 

27 

169 

Thos  Allen                               

SS 

170 

Plumber 

45 

171 

SO 

172 

Jno   McLoughlin  

88 

17S 

Teamster 

Richard  Otto  

27 

28 

174 
175 

Machinist  . 

Michael  McLoughlin  
Thos    McCraith            

43 
^3 

176 
177 

Stevedore. 
Clerk 

Wiiliam  Doyle 

SS 

178 

Boiler  Maker 

EMPLOYEES. 

Hugh  McCue 

SQ 

Driver  Permanent 

179 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

William  Cunningham  

30 

Tillerman,      " 

180 

Wire  Worker. 

Accidents:  R.  S.  Ray,  Tillerman,  run  over  by  Engine  Company  No.  4, 
while  going  to  an  alarm  from  Box  154,  on  the  morning  of  January  13,  1880. 
Death:  James  Feeney,  died  January,  1880. 


INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOOK  AND  LADDER  COMPANY  No.  1. 

1  First-class  Hayes  Truck. 

2  Horses. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

1  Battering  Ram. 

2  Crotch  Poles. 

3  Hooks. 
1  Rake. 

1  Crowbar. 
1  Top  Maul. 

1  Stable  Broom. 
100  feet  Guide  Rope. 
150  feet  Large  Rope. 
6  Rubber  Buckets. 

2  Johnson  Pumps. 
75  feet  |-inch  Hose. 

4  Lengths  Large  Hose. 
6  Lanterns. 


2  Babcock  Extinguishers. 

1  Clock. 

3  Shovels. 

1  Jackscrew. 

6  Axes. 

1  Screw  Wrench. 

6  Pitchforks. 

2  One-Gallon  Oil  Cans. 

1  Oil  Squirt  Can. 

150  feet  Police  Rope. 

3  Spittoons. 

4  Squegees. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

1  Set  Signal  Halliards. 

2  Wheels. 

1  Pitchfork. 

50  feet  Garden  Hose. 

1  Curry  Comb  . 

4  Brooms. 

1  Horse  Brush. 

2  Tables. 

2  Shovels. 

18  Chairs. 

2  Horse  Blankets. 

1  Coal  Scuttle. 

5  Hay  Hooks. 

1  Coal  Shovel. 

1  Life  Saving  Bag  and  Tackle. 

1  Stove. 

2  Patent  Nozzles. 

1  Sponge. 

2  Dander  Brushes. 

1  Flag. 

2  Hitching  Straps. 

15 


226 


CHIEF    ENGINEERS    REPORT 


HOOK   AND   LADDEE   COMPANY   NO.   2. 

LOCATION — SOUTH    SIDE    BROADWAY,    BETWEEN   DUPONT   AND    STOCKTON. 

This  Truck  was  built  in  1877  by  H.  M.  Black  &  Co.  It  is  a  first-class 
Hayes  Patent  Fire-Escape  Truck.  The  number  of  ladders  carried  is  nine, 
and  the  usual  equipments  attached  to  Truck  Companies. 


MEMBERS. 

AOE. 

POSITION. 

1  = 

OCCUPATION. 

Jno.  O'Brien  
Thomas  McCann   ....             

44 

40 

Foreman,  at  call.  . 

Ass't    " 

181 

182 

Baker  . 

Clerk. 

Stephen  McGrath 

28 

183 

Porter 

William  Vaughn  

?9 

184 

Bag-sewer  . 

27 

185 

Brass-finisher 

Jno.  Durham  
Peter  Louideck 

31 

51 

186 

187 

Clerk. 
Florist 

Edward  Mason  
Denis  Sullivan 

26 
?8 

188 
IRQ 

Teamster  . 

Clerk 

42 

190 

Storekeeper 

Andrew  Meagher    

26 

101 

Tinsmith  . 

Martin  Handley  

23 

IP? 

News-dealer. 

40 

1QS 

Laborer. 

EMPLOYEES. 

25 

Driver  Permanent 

194 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Teamster 

Peter  Fleming  

27 

Tillerman,      " 

195 

Gasfitter. 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOOK  AND  LADDER  COMPANY  No.  2. 


1  First-class    Hayes     Patent 

1  Life  Bag. 

1  Whip. 

Fire-Escape  Truck  . 

175  feet  Rope. 

50  feet  Garden  Hose. 

9  Ladders,  including  the  Pat- 

3 Snatch  Blocks. 

2  Guy  Ropes. 

ent  Escape  Ladder. 

1  Clock. 

2  Horses. 

1  Battering  Ram. 

11  Hay  Hooks  and  2  Straps. 

1  set  of  Double  Harness. 

4  Crotch  Poles. 

1  Spray  Nozzle  . 

2  Blankets  for  Horses. 

6  Hooks. 

1  Spare  Singletree. 

1  Stable  Shovel. 

1  Rake. 

1  Extra  Pole  for  Truck. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

1  Crowbar. 

4  Hitching  Straps. 

1  Horse  Brush. 

1  Top  Maul  . 

1  Step  Ladder  for  Hay  Loft. 

1  Dander  Brush. 

8  Axes. 

1  House  Mop. 

2  Stable  Forks. 

9  Pitchforks. 

1  Grain  Tester. 

2  Stable  Sponges. 

6  Truck  Buckets. 

1  Feed  Measure. 

2  Stable  Buckets. 

6  Lanterns. 

4  Truck  Brooms. 

2  Oil  Cans. 

2  Johnson  Pumps. 

2  Squegees. 

2  Spittoons. 

75  feet  %-inch  Hose. 

1  Double  Headed  Nozzle. 

1  Stove. 

2  Babcocks. 

1  Oil  Feeder. 

1  Coalscuttle  and  Shovel. 

3  Shovels. 

2  Dray  Ropes. 

1  Stable  Broom. 

1  Fairbanks'  Platform  Scales  . 

1  Police  Rope. 

1  House  Broom. 

10  feet  Stove  Pipe. 

1  Screw  Wrench. 

26  Chairs. 

]  Chamois. 

1  Jack  Screw. 

%  ton  Coal. 

1  Wire  Broom. 

}<  cord  Fire  Wood. 

1  Flag  (in  bad  condition). 

COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


227 


HOOK  AND   LADDER   COMPANY  NO.    3. 

LOCATION— SOUTH   SIDE    MAEKET   STKEET,    BETWEEN   TENTH   AND   ELEVENTH. 

This  Truck  was  built  by  Daniel  D.  Hayes,  of  this  city.  It  is  a  third-class 
Hayes  Patent  Fire-Escape  Truck.  The  number  of-  ladders  carried  is  nine, 
including  one  extension  ladder,  and  also  the  usual  equipments  attached  to  a 
Truck  Company. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

NO. 
BADGE 

OCCUPATION. 

E  T   McKittrick  

31 

Foreman,  at  call  .  . 

<>08 

Butcher 

Geo    Silvey 

32 

Ass't     " 

209 

Sam'l  Appell  

46 

Truckman 

^10 

William  Carew 

32 

211 

Frank  Haskell                   

29 

212 

Plumber 

W  V  Carroll 

34 

213 

P    Sullivan                                   

30 

214 

48 

215 

J  Jones                                         

28 

216 

William  Mulchaey 

34 

217 

William  Waters                                   

30 

218 

Painter 

Mark  Brown       

37 

9-|0 

Caulker 

M    J    Frawley 

30 

220 

EMPLOYEES. 

29 

221 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Jas  Fernandez       

26 

222 

Gasfitter 

At  White's  Laundry,  December  22,  1879,  Jerry  Jones,  P.  Curran  and  M. 
J.  Frawley  were  injured  by  the  falling  of  a  roof. 


INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOOK  AND  LADDER  COMPANY  No.  3. 


1  Hayes  Patent  Fire   Escape 

3  Oil  Cans. 

5  Lanterns. 

Truck. 

2  House  Brooms. 

1  Extension  Ladder. 

2  Horses. 

2  Horse  Blankets. 

8  Ladders. 

11  Hay  Hooks. 

1  Horse  Bucket., 

2  Crotchet  Poles.j 

7  Pitch  Forks. 

1  Horse  Brush. 

1  Oil  Feeder. 

1  Crowbar. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

1  Jackscrew. 

2  Picks. 

1  Box  Babcock  Charges. 

1  Chamois. 

7  Truck  Hooks. 

1  Set  Double  Harness! 

2  Squegees. 

5  Buckets. 

2  Johnson  Pumps. 

6  Chairs. 

7  Babcock  Extinguishers. 

75  feet^-inch  Hose. 

2  Hitching  Straps. 

5  Axes. 

2  Hay  Rakes. 

2  Stable  Brooms. 

4  Braoms. 

1  Gong. 

1  Stable  Fork. 

4  Shovels. 

1  Battering  Ram. 

1  Snatch  Block  and  Sling. 

100  feet  Police  Rope. 

29  Straps. 

feet  Hose  Rope. 

3  Cranks. 

2  Drag  Ropes. 

1  Extra  Pole. 

2  Monkey  Wrenches. 

1  Bar. 

Trace  Chains. 

228 


CHIEF   ENGINEERS  REPORT. 


HOOK  AND   LADDER   COMPANY  NO.   4. 

LOCATION — NORTH   SIDE    PACIFIC   STEEET,    BETWEEN    JONES    AND    LEAVEN  WOKTH. 

The  Truck  in  use  by  this  Company  was  built  by  the  Kimball  Manufactur- 
ing Company,  of  this  city. 


MEMBERS. 

AGE. 

POSITION. 

NO.  | 
BADGE 

OCCUPATION. 

James  W   Kentzel 

36 

Foreman  at  call 

•?39, 

Gasfitter 

G.  E.  Robinson  
W   F   Porter 

34 
32 

Ass't    " 
Truckman 

233 
?34 

Clerk. 
Machinist 

J.  Horrigan  
P  Galligan 

25 
23 

235 
?3fi 

Plumber. 
Butcher 

W.  Horrigan  

99 

•737 

Plumber. 

L  Kenney 

9q 

?,38 

J.  McCaull  

98 

239 

Carpenter. 

C.  Matthews 

97 

240 

Box-maker 

M   Fitzgerald 

36 

•741 

Machinist 

A.  Kaskell                               

9q 

949: 

Salesman 

Jos.  Fox  

?,5 

243 

Coppersmith. 

C.  Wolff  

EMPLOYEES. 

Washington  Donohue  

94 

Driver,  Permanent 

244 
945 

Clerk. 

FORMER  OCCUPATION. 

Teamster. 

B    F.  Jones                         

98 

Tillerman,     " 

•^fi 

Tinsmith. 

INVENTORY  OF  ARTICLES  IN  CHARGE  OF  HOOK  AND  LADDER  COMPANY  No.  4. 


1  Truck. 

1  Block  and  Tackle. 

1  Set  Double  Harness. 

2  Extinguishers. 

2  Horses. 

2  Police  Ropes,  100  feet. 

2  Small  Bells. 

2  Side  Ropes,  25  feet. 

6  Shingle  Hooks. 

5  Crotch  Poles. 

5  Hay  Hooks. 

1  Wrecking  Hook. 

8  Axes. 

5  Hooks. 

2  Johnson  Pumps. 

8  Ladders. 

6  Rubber  Buckets. 

2  Shovels 

7  Pitchforks. 

2  Rake  Hooks. 

6  Brooms  (on  Truck). 

1  Jackscrew. 

4  Lanterns. 

1  Hammer. 

2  House  Brooms. 

1  Monkey  Wrench. 

1  Stable  Fork. 

1  Shovel. 

1  Stable  Broom. 

1  Horse  Brush. 

1  Chamois  Skin. 

1  Curry  Comb. 

3  Sponges. 

2  Horse  Blankets. 

2  Corn  Brushes. 

1  Clock. 

2  Half-Gallon  Oil  Cans. 

1  'Whip. 

1  Flag. 

50  feet  %-inch  Hose  (bad). 

3  One-gallon  Oil  Cans. 

1  Blunderbuss. 

1  Unhitching  Apparatus. 

200  feet  of  2£-inch  Hose. 

1  Copper  Boiler. 

1  Spare  Pole. 

1  Stove  and  Fixtures. 

1  Platform  Scale. 

If  Set    of    Pompier    Equip- 

1 Spare  Tiller  Pole. 

1  Table. 

ments,  Ladders,  Belts,  etc. 

.  1  Set  Head  Bars. 

23  Chairs. 

COMPANY    STATISTICS. 


229 


TABULAE   STATEMENT 

OF  THE  DUTY  PERFORMED  BY  EACH  COMPANY  DURING  THE  YEAR  ENDING 
JUNE  30,  1880. 


NUMBER  OF  COMPANY. 

No.  TIMES 
IN  SERVICE. 

TIME 
AT  WORK.. 

No.  ALARMS 
RESPONDED  TO. 

35 
63 
16 
43 
53 
49 
21 
5 
32 
45 
6 
10 
48 
15 
32 
21 
31 
14 
8 
3 
5 
80 
49 
76 
19 

HS.  MINS. 

&6    45 
65    25 
16     .. 
54     .. 
61    15 
42    45 
22     .. 
9    30 
49    25 
48    55 
3    45 
29    10 
45     45 
6    15 
31    30 
39    25 
32    35 
11    15 
10    30 
3    40 
1     .. 
95     20 
74     40 
70     .. 
30    30 

246 
257 
254 
260 
255 
254 
252 
245 
257 
•    256 
52 
180 
251 
249 
247 
246 
249 
247 
40 
245 
5 
251 
251 
249 
250 

Engine  Company  No  .  3  

Engine  Company  No    5       

Engine  Company  No    7  ....                

Engine  Company  No    9                               

Engine  Company  No  .12  

Hose  Company  No    2  

Hose  Company  No    4  

Hose  Company  No    6                   

Hose  Company  No    8                                               

Truck  Company  No    1                                      

Truck  Company  No    2  

Truck  Company  No    3 

Truck  Company  No  .4  

This  statement  includes  Hall  bell  and  Still  alarms. 


TABLE 

SHOWING  THE   LOSSES   BY  FIRE   DURING  THE   FISCAL  YEAR,  AMOUNT  OF 
INSURANCE  AND  AMOUNT  OF  INSURANCE  PAID. 


ESTIMATED  Loss. 

INSURANCE. 

INSURANCE  PAID. 

1879—  July  

$3-?  010  07 

$534  710  50 

$20  211  64 

August                                .    .  . 

25  94(j  19 

928  447  18 

29  004  69 

September  
October  

7,438  12 
5  633  06 

139,530  00 
25,865  00 

5,936  12 
3,698  06 

November  
December  

27,329  52 
32  717  -80 

212,848  00 
414,500  00 

13,136  52 

28,546  80 

1S80  —  January  

19  007  00 

71  455  00 

12  194  50 

February 

10  157  30 

389  375  00 

5  700  30 

March  ... 

110  877  85 

2-79  475  00 

20557  83 

April  

97  224  53 

131  850  00 

11,869  53 

May  

22  300  08 

151,366  66| 

18,072  23 

June  

65,179  85 

151,870  00 

50,245  05 

Totals 

$385  821  37 

$2  681  292  34§ 

$212  173  27 

230 


CHIEF  ENGINEER'S  REPORT. 


CISTERNS. 

NUMBER    AND    LOCATION. 


LOCATION. 


CAPACITY. 


Dupont  and  Bush  streets,  crossings 29,000  gallons. 

Dupont  and  California  streets,  crossings 30,000 

Dupont  and  Washington  streets,  crossings 25,000 

Dupont  and  Pacific  streets,  crossings 28,275 

Dupont  and  Broadway  streets,  crossings 35,000 

Dupont  and  Vallejo  streets,  crossings 30,000 

Dupont  and  Green  streets,  crossings 32,000 

Dupont  and  Union  streets,  crossings 20,000 

Dupont  and  Greenwich  streets,  crossings 32,000 

Kearny  and  Post  streets,  crossings 

Kearny  and  Bush  streets,  crossings 27,000 

Kearny  and  California  streets,  crossings 

Kearny  and  Sacramento  streets,  crossings 

Kearny  and  Merchant  streets,  crossings 

Montgomery  and  Bush  streets,  crossings 21,538 

Montjjomery  and  California  streets,  crossings 

Montgomery  and  Commercial  streets,  crossings 32,000 

Montgomery  and  Washington  streets,  crossings 30,000 

Montgomery  and  Pacific  streets,  crossings 30,000 

Sansome  and  Bush  streets,  crossings 25,000 

Sansome  and  Pacific  streets,  crossings 30,000 

Battery  and  Bush  streets,  crossings 30,000 

Davis  and  California  streets,  crossings 40,000 

Stockton  and  Pacific  streets,  crossings 25,000 

Stockton  and  Broadway  streets,  crossings 20,000 

Stockton  and  Vallejo  streets 20,000 

Stockton  and  Green  streets,  crossings 21,000 

Stockton  and  Union  streets,  crossings 30,000 

Powell  and  Ellis  streets,  crossings 

Powell  and  Washington  streets,  crossings 30,000 

Powell  and  Jackson  streets 30,000 

Powell  and  Pacific  streets,  crossings 30,000 

Powell  and  Broadway  streets,  crossings 14,728 

Powell  and  Green  streets,  crossings 16,315 

owell  and  Filbert  streets,  crossings 20,000 

Taylor  and  Clay  streets,  crossings 45,000 

Jones  and  Jackson  streets,  crossings 100,000 

Broadway  and  Ohio  streets,  crossings 40,000 

irst  and  Folsom  streets,  crossings 29,000 

First  and  Harrison  streets,  crossings 100,000 

Second  and  Folsom  streets,  crossings 51,000 

Stevenson  and  Ecker  streets,  crossings 27,000 

Sixteenth  and  Folsom  streets ,  crossings 100,000 

Sixteenth  and  Mission  streets,  crossings , 27,000 

Sixteenth  and  Dolores  streets,  crossings. 42,000 

Nineteenth  and  Folsom  streets,  crossings 100,000 

Nineteenth  and  Howard  streets,  crossings 100,000 

Nineteenth  and  Guerrero  streets,  crossings 100,000 

Twenty-second  and  Shotwell  streets,  crossings 100,000 

Kearny  and  Pacific  streets,  crossings 20,000 

Union  and  Leavenworth  streets,  crossings 

Sacramento  and  Sansome  streets,  crossings 

Fremont  and  Mission  streets,  crossings 20,000 

Mason  and  California  street,  crossings 20,000 

Filbert  and  Polk  streets,  crossings,  private 

RECAPITULATION. 

Total  Capacity  of  Cisterns 2,011,856  gallons 

Total  Number  of  Cisterns •. 55 

All  the  Cisterns,  fifty-five  (55)  in  number,  are  in  good  condition,  with  one  exception,  that 
being  located  at  the  crossing  of  Sacramento  and  Sansome  streets;  it  is  not  water-tight  r.ni.!  can 
not  be  relied  upon  for  a  supply  of  water  in  case  of  a  fire  in  that  neighborhood. 


LOCATION    OF    HYDRANTS. 


231 


HYDRANTS   AND    LOCATION. 


N  side  Alta,  290  feet  E  of  Montgomery. 
E  side  Annie,  S  of  Market. 
E  side  Annie,  S  of  Market. 

S  side  Broadway,  75  feet  W  of;Davis. 

N  side  Broadway,  between  Front  and  Davis. 

NW  corner  Broadway  and  Front. 

SE  corner  Broadway  and  Battery. 

SW  corner  Broadway  and  Sansome. 

NE  corner  Broadway  and  Kearny. 

NE  corner  Broadway  and  Mason. 

S  side  Broadway,  250  feet  W  of  Stockton. 

SE  corner  Broadway  and  Van  Ness  avenue. 

SW  corner  Broadway  and  Franklin. 

SW  corner  Broadway  and  Gougli. 

SW  corner  Broadway  and  Octavia. 

SE  corner  Broadway  and  Fillmore. 

SW  corner  Broadway  and  Webster. 

SE  corner  Broadway  and  Buchanan. 

SE  corner  Broadway  and  Laguna. 

NE  corner  Bush  and  Battery. 

NE  corner  Bush  and  Montgomery. 

N  side  Bush,  120  feet  W  of  Kearny,  at  Engine 

House  No.  2. 

NW  corner  Bush  and  Dupont. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Powell. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Powell. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Mason. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Taylor. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Jones. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Leavenworth. 
SE  corner  Bush  and  Leavenworth. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Hyde. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Polk. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Van  Ness  avenue. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Franklin. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Gough. 
NW  corner  Busli  and  Octavia. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Laguna. 
NW  corner  Bush  and  Buchanan. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Webster. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Fillmore. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Steiner. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Pierce. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Scott. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Devisadero. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Broderick. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Baker. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Lyon. 
NE  corner  Bush  and  Central  avenue. 

NW  corner  Bay  and  Leavenworth. 
SW  corner  Battery  and  Filbert. 


NW  corner  Battery  and  Pacific. 
NW  corner  Battery  and  Union. 
SW  corner  Battery  and  Green. 
SW  corner  Battery  and  Vallejo. 
NW  corner  Battery  and  Jackson. 
SE  corner  Battery  and  Washington. 
NE  corner  Battery  and  Clay. 
SE  corner  Battery  and  Commercial. 
NE  corner  Battery  and  Sacramento. 
SE  corner  Battery  and  Richmond. 
SE  corner  Battery  and  California. 
SE  corner  Battery  and  Pine. 

SE  corner  Buchanan  and  Jackson. 
SE  corner  Buchanan  and  Sacramento. 
W  side  Buchanan,  between  Geary  and  Post. 
SE  corner  Buchanan  and  Geary. 
SE  comer  Buchanan  and  Eddy. 
NE  corner  Buchanan  and  Grove. 
NE  corner  Buchanan  and  Page. 
SW  corner  Buchanan  and  Haight. 
NW  corner  Buchanan  and  Waller. 
W  side  Buchanan,  50  feet  N  of  Herrman    or 
Kate  street. 

SE  corner  Broderick  and  Post. 

SE  corner  Broderick  and  Sacramento. 

SE  qorner  Broderick  and  Clay. 

NW  corner  Baker  and  Geary. 
SE  corner  Baker  and  Sutter. 

NE  corner  Bourbon  and  Eddy. 

SW  corner  Brenham  place  and  Washington. 

N  corner  Beal  and  Harrison. 
E  corner  Beal  and  Folsom. 
E  corner  Beal  and  Howard. 
N  corner  Beal  and  Mission. 
E  corner  Beal  and  Market. 

N  side  Bryant,  200  feet  W  of  Third. 
N  side  Bryant,  between  Second  and  Thirl. 
W  corner  Bryant  and  Rincon. 
N  side  Bryant,  between  Third  and  Fourth,  oppo- 
site Zoe. 

N  side  Bryant,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 
N  corner  Bryant  and  Fourth. 
N  side  Bryant,  228  feet  W  of  Fourth. 
N  corner  Bryant  and  Oak  Grove  avenue. 
W  corner  Bryant  and  Sixth. 
W  corner  Bryant  and  Langton. 
N  side  Bryant,  between  Seventh  and  Eighth. 
N  corner  Bryant  and  Ninth. 
NW  corner  Bryant  and  Twenty-fifth. 


232 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S   REPORT. 


N  corner  Brannan    and   Central    place,   south 

into  South  Park. 

N  side  Brannan,  between  First  and  Second. 
W  corner  Brannan  and  First. 
N  corner  Brannan  and  Zoe. 
S  side  Brannan,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 
N  corner  Brannan  and  Fourth. 
N  corner  Brannan  and  Fifth. 
S  side  Brannan,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
N  corner  Brannan  and  Sixth. 
W  corner  Brannan  and  Boardman. 
N  side  Brannan,  between  Seventh  and  Eighth. 
W  corner  Brannan  and  Eighth. 
NE  corner  Brannan  and  Dore. 
E  side  Brannan,  between  Eighth  and  Ninth. 

S  side  Berry,  300  feet  W  of  Third. 
S  side  Berry,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
S  side  Berry,  between  Fifth  and  Sixth. 
E  corner  Berry  andSixth. 

N  corner  Bluxome  and  Fifth. 

NW  corner  Bermnice  and  Thirteenth. 

S  side  Beach,  E  of  Van  Ness  avenue. 
N  side  Beach,  E  of  Van  Ness  avenue. 

NW  corner  Bartlett  and  Twenty-sixth. 
SE  corner  Bartlett  and  Twenty-fifth. 
SW  corner  Bartlett  and  Twenty-third. 
SW  corner  Bartlett  and  Twenty-second. 

NW  corner  Chestnut  and  Kearny. 

NW  corner  Chestnut  and  Dupont. 

N  side  Chestnut,  250  feet  W  of  Powell. 

NE  corner  Chestnut  and  Taylor. 

NW  corner  Chestnut  and  Leavenworth. 

SW  corner  Commercial  and  Montgomery. 
SW  corner  Commercial  and  Sansome. 
SE  corner  Commercial  and  Kearny. 
SW  corner  Commercial  and  East. 

N  side  Clay,  100  feet  W  of  East. 
NW  corner  Clay  and  Davis. 
NE  corner  Clay  and  Fro  t. 
S  side  Clay,  75  feet  E  of  Montgomery. 
NE  corner  Clay  and  Kearny. 
SW  corner  Clay  and  Dupout. 
SW  corner  Clay  and  Stockton. 
SW  corner  Clay  and  Powell 
SE  corner  Clay  and  Mason. 
NE  corner  Clay  and  Jones. 
SE  corner  Clay  and  Taylor. 
NW  corner  Clay  and  Hyde. 
NE  corner  Clay  and  Polk. 
NE  corner  Clay  and  Van  Ness  avenue. 
NE  corner  Clay  and  Franklin. 
NE  corner  Clay  and  Fillmore. 
NW  corner  Clay  and  Scott 


NE  corner  Clay  and  Devisadero. 
NE  corner  Clay  and  Baker. 

NE  corner  Central  avenue  and  Geary. 
SE  corner  Central  avenue  and  Pine. 

N  side  California,  100  feet  E  of  Davis. 

SW  corner  California  and  Drumm. 

NE  corner  California  and  Front. 

NE  corner  California  and  Kearny. 

NW  corner  California  and  Kearny. 

NW  corner  California  and  Dupont. 

NW  corner  California  and  Stockton. 

NE  corner  California  and  Powell. 

NW  corner  California  and  Jones. 

S  side  California,  W  of  Leavenworth,  Engine 

House  3. 
NW  corner  California  and  Hyde. 
NE  corner  California  and  Van  Ness  avenue. 
NE  corner  California  and  Franklin. 
NW  corner  California  and  Octavia. 
NW  corner  California  and  Fillmore. 
NW  corner  California  and  Buchanan. 
NW  corner  California  and  Steiner. 
NE  corner  California  and  Pierce. 
NE  corner  California  and  Devisadero. 
NE  corner  California  and  Broderick. 
NW  corner  California  and  Laguna. 
NW  corner  California  and  Central  avenue. 

N  side  Clementina,  between  First  and  Second. 

S  side  Clementina,  between  First  and  Second. 

N  side  Clementina,  between  Second  and  Third. 

N  side  Clementina,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 

W  corner  Clementina  and  Fifth. 

N  side  Clementina,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 

N  side  Clementina,  between  Fifth  and  Sixth. 

N  corner  Clementina  and  Sixth. 

N  side  Clementina,  between  Eighth  and  Ninth. 

W  side  Clinton,  between  Bryant  and  Brannan. 

E  side  Columbia,  between  Folsom  and  Harrison. 
NE  corner  Columbia  and  Dolores. 

N  side  Cleary,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
N  side  Cleary,  between  Fifth  and  Sixth. 

N  corner  Coulton  and  Brady. 

N  side  Clinton  Park,  345  feet  W  of  Guerrero. 

NW  corner  Capp  and  Twenty-sixth. 
NW  corner  Capp  and  Twenty-fourth. 
NW  corner  Capp  and  Twenty-third. 
NW  corner  Capp  and  Twenty-first. 
NW  corner  Capp  and  Nineteenth. 
NW  corner  Capp  and  Eighteenth. 
NW  corner  Capp  and  Seventeenth. 

W  side  Chatanooga,  between  Twenty-second  and 
Twenty-third. 


LOCATION    OF    HYDRANT; 


233 


NW  corner  Chatanooga  and  Twenty-fourth. 

NW  corner  Center,   or  Sixteenth,  and  Potrero 
avenue. 

N  side  Church,  between  Seventeenth  and  Eigh- 
teenth. 
NE  corner  Church  and  Borland. 

SW  corner  Dupont  and  Bay. 

NW  corner  Dupont  and  Francisco. 

SW  corner  Dupont  and  Greenwich. 

SW  corner  Dupont  and  Filbert. 

SW  corner  Dupont  and  Union. 

SW  corner  Dupont  and  Vallejo. 

NW  corner  Dupont  and  Broadway. 

NW  corner  Dupont  and  Pacific. 

SE  corner  Dupont  and  Jackson. 

E  side  Dupont,  between  Jackson  and  Pacific. 

NW  corner  Dupont  and  Washington. 

NE  corner  Dupont  and  Commercial. 

SE  corner  Dupont  and  Pine. 

NE  corner  Dupont  and  Bush. 

NE  corner  Dupont  and  Sutter. 

NE  corner  Dupont  and  Post. 

NE  comer  Dupont  and  Geary. 

NE  corner  Dupont  and  Morton. 

NE  corner  Dupont  and  Market. 

NW  corner  Davis  and  Oregon. 
SW  corner  Drumm  and  Clay. 

E    side    Dolores,    between   Fifteenth   and   Six 

teenth. 
NE  corner  Dolores  and  Clinton  Park. 

NE  corner  Devisadero  and  McAllister. 
SE  corner  Devisadero  and  Fulton. 
NE  corner  Devisadero  and  Grove. 
NE  corner  Devisadero  and  Hayes. 
NE  corner  Devisadero  and  Tyler. 
SE  corner  Devisadero  and  Washington. 
SE  corner  Devisadero  and  Pine. 
NE  corner  Devisadero  and  Sutter. 
NE  corner  Devisadero  and  Post. 
SE  corner  Devisadero  and  Geary. 
SE  corner  Devisadero  and  O'Farrell. 
SE  corner  Devisadero  and  Ellis. 
SE  corner  Devisadero  and  Eddy. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and  Powell. 

N  side  Ellis,  between  Powell  and  Stockton. 

S  side  Ellis,  between  Powell  and  Mason. 

NW  corner  Ellis  and  Mason. 

NW  corner  Ellis  and  Taylor. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and  Taylor. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and  Jones. 

NW  corner  Ellis  and  Leavenworth. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and  Larkin. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and  Polk. 


NE  corner  Ellis  and  Van  Ness  avenue. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and  Franklin. 

NW  corner  Ellis  and  Octavia. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and^Laguna. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and  Buchanan. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and  Webster. 

NE  comer  Ellis  and  Fillmore. 

NE  corner  Ellis  and  Steiner. 

NE  corner  Ellis  anl  Scott. 

NW  comer  Ellis  and  Broderick. 

SW  corner  Eddy  and  PowelL 

SW  corner  Eddy  and  Mason. 

SW  corner  Eddy  and  Taylor. 

SW  comer  Eddy  and  Jones. 

SW  corner  Eddy  and  Leavenworth. 

SW  corner  Eddy  and  Larkin. 

SW  corner  Eddy  and  Polk. 

SE  corner  Eddy  and  Van  Ness  avenue. 

SE  corner  Eddy  and  Franklin. 

SE  corner  Eddy  and  Gough. 

SW  corner  Eddy  and  Octavia. 

SE  corner  Eddy  and  Laguna. 

SW  corner  Eddy  and  Fillmore. 

SE  corner  Eddy  and  Broderick. 

E  side  East,  at  Ferry  Landing,  opposite  Market. 
E  side  East,  at  Ferry  Landing,  S  of  Market. 
E  side  East,  at  San  Rafael  Ferry,  opposite  Mar- 
ket. 

N  corner  Essex  and  Harrison. 
W  corner  Ecker  and  Frederick. 
N  side  Elliot  Park,  W  of  Steiner. 

W  corner  Everett  and  Third. 
E  corner  Everett  and  Fourth. 

SW  corner  Elgin  Park  and  Herman. 

E  corner  Eighth  and  Bryant. 

E  side  Eighth,  between  Bryant  and  Harrison. 

E  corner  Eighth  and  Harrison. 

E  corner  Eighth  and  Howard. 

E  side  Eighth,  between  Harrison  and  Folsom. 

E  side  Eighth,  between  Howard  and  Folsom. 

N  comer  Eighth  and  Minna. 

S  side  Eighth,  between  Mission  and  Market. 

E  corner  Eighth  and  Market. 

E  corner  Eleventh  and  Market. 

N  corner  Eleventh  and  Mission. 

E  side  Eleventh,  between  Mission  and  Howard. 

E  side  Eleventh,  between  Folsom  and  Howard. 

N  corner  Eleventh  and  Harrison. 

N  corner  Eleventh  and  Bryant. 

NE  corner  Eighteenth  and  Castro. 
NE  corner  Eighteenth  and  Noe. 


234 


CHIEF    ENGINEERS    REPORT. 


NW  corner  Eighteenth  and  Sanchez. 
NE  corner  Eighteenth  and  Dolores. 
NE  corner  Eighteenth  and  Valencia. 
NE  corner  Eighteenth  and  Hartford. 

NW  corner  Front  and  Jackson. 
SW  corner  Front  and  Pacific. 
SW  corner  Front  and  Commercial. 
SW  corner  Front  and  Pine. 

SE  corner  Francisco  and  Taylor. 

NW  corner  Filbert  and  Kearny. 

NE  corner  Filbert  and  Stockton. 

NE  corner  Filbert  and  Powell. 

NE  corner  Filbert  and  Jones. 

SE  corner  Filbert  and  Fillmore. 

SE  corner  Filbert  and  Webster. 

SW  corner  Filbert  and  Buchanan. 

S  side  Filbert,  between  Buchanan  and  Laguna. 

W  corner  First  and  Folsom. 

S  corner  First  and  Clementina. 

S  corner  First  and  Howard. 

W  corner  First  and  Tehama. 

S  corner  First  and  Natoma. 

E  side  First,  near  Natoma,  at  S.  F.  Gaslight  Co. 

S  corner  First  and  Mission. 

S  corner  First  and  Jessie. 

W  corner  First  and  Mission. 

S  corner  First  and  Market. 

S  corner  First  and  Stevenson. 

W  corner  First  and  Minna. 

N  corner  Fremont  and  Harrison. 

N  corner  Fremont  and  Folsom. 

N  corner  Fremont  and  Howard. 

N  corner  Fremont  and  Mission. 

E  corner  Fremont  and  Market. 

E  side  Fremont,  400  feet  SE  of  Market. 

E  corner  Fremont  and  Mission. 

E  corner  Fremont  and  Howard. 

NW  corner  Fulton  and  Larkin. 
NE  corner  Fulton  and  Polk. 
NW  corner  Fulton  and  Van  Ness. 
NE  corner  Fulton  and  Gough. 
NE  corner  Fulton  and  Octavia. 
NE  corner  Fulton  and  Laguna. 
NE  corner  Fulton  and  Fillmore. 
NE  corner  Fulton  and  Buchanan. 

W  corner  Folsom  and  Stuart. 
W  corner  Folsom  and  Spear. 
E  corner  Folsom  and  Main. 
N  corner  Folsom  and  First. 

N  side  Folsom,  between  First  and  Second,   oppo- 
site Essex. 

N  corner  Folsom  and  Third. 
N  side  Folsom,  between  Second  and  Third. 
N  side  Folsom,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 
N  corner  Folsom  and  Fifth. 


W  corner  Folsom  and  Sixth. 

N  corner  Folsom  and  Seventh. 

W  corner  Folsom  and  Russ. 

N  side  Folsom,  between  Fifth  and  Sixth. 

N  side  Folsom,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 

N  corner  Folsom  and  Langton. 

W  corner  Folsom  and  Rausch. 

N  side  Folsom,  between  Rausch  and  Eighth. 

W  corner  Folsom  and  Eighth. 

W  corner  Folsom  and  Tenth. 

W  corner  Folsom  and  Eleventh. 

SW  corner  Folsom  and  Thirteenth. 

SW  corner  Folsom  and  Fourteenth. 

SW  corner  Folsom  and  Fifteenth. 

NW  corner  Folsom  and  Sixteenth. 

W  side  Folsom,  between  Fifteenth  and  Six- 
teenth. 

W  side  Folsom,  between  Sixteenth  and  Seven- 
teenth. 

W  side  Folsom,  between  Seventeenth  and  Eigh- 
teenth. 

NW  corner  Folsom  and  Seventeenth. 

NW  corner  Folsom  and  Eighteenth. 

W  side  Folsom,  between  Eighteenth  and  Nine- 
teenth. 

SW  corner  Folsom  and  Nineteenth. 

NW  corner  Folsom  and  Twentieth. 

E  side  Folsom,  between  Twentieth  and  Twenty- 
first. 

NW  corner  Folsom  and  Twenty-first. 

E  side  Folsom,  between  Twenty-first  and  Twenty- 
second. 

SW  corner  Folsom  and  Twenty-second. 

NW  corner  Folsom  and  Twenty-third. 

W  side  Folsom,  between  Twenty-fifth  and 
Twenty-sixth. 

NW  corner  Folsom  and  Twenty-sixth. 

N  side  Freelon,  350  feet  W  of  Fourth. 
E  corner  Fifth  avenue  and  Harrison. 

W  corner  Fourth  and  Berry. 

S  comer  Fourth  and  King. 

W  6omer  Fourth  and  Townsend. 

W  corner  Fourth  and  Bluxome. 

S  corner  Fourth  and  Freelon. 

W  comer  Fourth  and  Welch. 

N  side  Fourth,  150  feet  N  of  Bryant. 

S  corner  Fourth  and  Harrison. 

S  corner  Fourth  and  Folsom. 

W  corner  Fourth  and  Folsom. 

W  corner  Fourth  and  Shipley. 

W  corner  Fourth  and  Cleary. 

W  corner  Fourth  and  Tehama. 

W  corner  Fourth  and  Howard. 

S  corner  Fourth  and  Market. 

N  corner  Fifth  and  Berry 

E  corner  Fifth  and  King. 


LOCATION    OF    HYDRANTS. 


235 


N  corner  Fifth  and  Townsend. 
N  corner  Fifth  and  Bryant. 
N  corner  Fifth  and  Cleary. 
N  corner  Fifth  and  Clementina. 
N  corner  Fifth  and  Minna. 
E  corner  Fifth  and  Mission. 
E  corner  Fifth  and  Jessie. 
E  corner  Fifth  and  Market. 

NE  corner  Fourteenth  and  Valencia. 

NW  corner  Fifteenth  and  Mission. 

NE  corner  Fifteenth  and  Valencia. 

SE  corner  Fifteenth  and  Dolores. 

N  side  Fifteenth,  between  Folsom  and  Howard. 

NW  corner  Fell  and  Polk. 
NW  corner  Fell  and  Van  Ness. 
NE  corner  Fell  and  Gough. 
NE  corner  Fell  and  Octavia. 
NE  corner  Fell  and  Laguna. 
NE  corner  Fell  and  Webster. 
NE  corner  Fell  and  Fillmore. 
NE  corner  Fell  and  Steiner. 
NE  corner  Fell  and  Pierce. 

NE  corner  Fillmore  and  Green. 
NE  corner  Fillmore  and  Pacific. 

NE  corner  Franklin  and  Pine. 
SE  corner  Franklin  an  O'Farrell. 
NE  corner  Franklin  and  Tyler. 
SE  corner  Franklin  and  Fulton. 
SE  corner  Franklin  and  Grove. 
NE  corner  Franklin  and  Fell. 
NE  corner  Franklin  and  Oak. 

NE  corner  Farren  avenue  and  Eddy. 

SW  corner  Florida  and  Mariposa. 

NW  corner  First  avenue  and  Sixteenth. 

NW  corner  Fourteenth  avenue  and  N  street, 

South  San  Francisco.      * 
N  side  Fourteenth  avenue,  between  N  street  and 

Railroad  avenue,  South  San  Francisco. 

NW  corner  Fifteenth  avenue  and  P,  South  San 

Francisco. 
N   side   Fifteenth   avenue,  between  P  and  Q, 

South  San  Francisco. 

NW  corner  Green  and  Calhoun. 

SE  corner  Green  and  Dupont. 

NE  corner  Green  and  La  Fayette. 

SE  corner  Green  and  Montgomery  avenue  and 

Stockton. 

S  side  Green,  200  feet  E  of  Hyde. 
SE  corner  Green  and  Polk. 

S  side  Guy  place,  300  feet  SW  of  First. 

SE  corner  Greenwich  and  Stockton. 
NEorner  Green wi  ch  and  Powell. 


N  side  Greenwich,  150  feet  E  of  Mason. 
NE  corner  Greenwich  and  Steiner. 
NE  corner  Greenwich  and  Pierce. 
NE  corner  Greenwich  and  Scott. 
NW  corner  Greenwich  and  Fillmore. 
NW  corner  Greenwich  and  Octavia. 

NW  corner  Geary  and  Mason. 

S  side  Geary,  75  feet  E  of  Mason. 

NW  corner  Geary  and  Taylor. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Jones. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Larkiii. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Polk. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Franklin. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Gough. 

NW  corner  Geary  and  Octavia. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Laguna. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Webster. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Fillmore. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Steiner. 

N  side  Geary,  between  Steiner  and  Scott. 

NE  corner  Geary  and  Broderick. 

N  side  Geary,  between  Laguna  and  Buchanan. 

NW  corner  Grove  and  Larkin. 
NW  corner  Grove  and  Polk. 
NW  corner  Grove  and  Van  Ness. 
NE  corner  Grove  and  Laguna. 
NW  corner  Grove  and  Webster. 
NE  corner  Grove  and  Fillmore. 
NE  corner  Grove  and  Steiner. 

N  corner  Garden  and  Bryant. 
S  corner  Garden  and  Harrison. 

E  side  Geneva,  300  feet  S  of  Brannan. 
W  corner  Gilbert  and  Brannan. 
NW  comer  Glenn  avenue  and  Bond. 

NE  corner  Gough  and  Haight. 
NE  corner  Gough  and  Grove. 
SE  corner  Gough  and  Sutter. 
SE  corner  Gough  and  California. 
SE  corner  Gough  and  Clay. 

NE  corner  Guerrero  and  Quinn. 

SE  corner  Guerrero  and  Fifteenth. 

NE  corner  Guerrero  and  Eighteenth. 

E  side  Guerrero,  between  Nineteenth  and  Twen- 
tieth. 

NE  corner  Guerrero  and  Twenty-first. 

NE  corner  Guerrero  and  Twenty-fourth. 

E  side  Guerrero,  between  Twenty-fifth  and  Twen- 
ty-sixth. 

NE  corner  Guerrero  and  Twenty-sixth. 

SE  corner  Hyde  and  Bay. 
SE  corner  Hyde  and  Chestnut. 
NE  corner  Hyde  and  Lombard. 
SW  corner  Hyde  and  Filbert. 


236 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S   REPORT. 


NW  corner  Hyde  and  Union. 
NW  corner  Hyde  and  Green. 
SW  corner  Hyde  and  Broadway. 
NW  corner  Hyde  and  Vallejo. 
SE  corner  Hyde  and  Sacramento. 
NE  corner  Hyde  and  Sacramento. 
NE  corner  Hyde  and  Sutter. 
NE  corner  Hyde  and  Post. 
SE  corner  Hyde  and  Geary. 
NE  corner  Hyde  and  Ellis. 
NE  corner  Hyde  and  Eddy. 
NE  corner  Hyde  and  Turk. 
NE  corner  Hyde  and  McAllister. 

NE  corner  Haight  and  Octavia. 
NE  corner  Haight  and  Laguna. 
NE  corner  Haight  and  Buchanan. 
NE  corner  Haight  and  FiUmore. 

SW  corner  Hampshire  and  Twenty-second. 
NW  corner  Hampshire  and  Twenty-third. 
NW  corner  Hampshire  and  Twenty-fourth. 

N  side  Hayes,  between  Larkin  and  Polk. 
NW  corner  Hayes  and  Polk. 
NW  corner  Hayes  and  Van  Ness. 
NW  corner  Hayes  and  Franklin. 
NW  corner  Hayes  and  Gough. 
NW  corner  Hayes  and  Octavia. 
NE  corner  Hayes  and  Buchanan. 
NE  corner  Hayes  and  Webster. 
NE  corner  Hayes  and  Fillmore. 

S  corner  Harrison  and  First. 
S  corner  Harrison  and  Second. 
W  corner  Harrison  and  Third. 
N  side  Harrison,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
N  corner  Harrison  and  Fifth.  % 

N  side  Harrison,  between  Fifth  and  Sixth,  op- 
posite Oak  Grove  avenue. 
W  corner  Harrison  and  Seventh. 
N  side  Harrison,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 
SE  corner  Harrison  and  Twenty-third. 

W  side  Hoff  avenue,  between  Sixteenth  and 
Seventeenth. 

NE  corner  Hill  and  Guerrero. 
NW  corner  Hill  and  Valencia. 

E  corner  Harriet  and  Howard. 

NW  corner  Herman  and  West  Mission. 

W  corner  Howard  and  Stuart. 

N  corner  Howard  and  Spear. 

W  corner  Howard  and  Beal. 

N  side  Howard,  between  Beal  and  Fremont. 

W  corner  Howard  and  First. 

N  side  Howard,  400  feet  N  of  Second. 

N  corner  Howard  and  New  Montgomery. 

W  corner  Howard  and  Third. 


N  side  Howard,  between  Third  and  Fourth, 

opposite  Union  Hall. 
S  side  Howard,  between  Third  and  Fourth,  in 

front  of  Union  Hall. 

S  side  Howard,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
S  corner  Howard  and  Hubbard. 
W  corner  Howard  and  Fifth. 
N  side  Howard,  between  Fifth  and  Sixth. 
E  corner  Howard  and  Moss. 
W  corner  Howard  and  Fremont. 
N  corner  Howard  and  Tenth. 
W  corner  Howard  and  Eleventh. 
NW  corner  Howard  and  Thirteenth. 
SW  corner  Howard  and  Fourteenth. 
SW  corner  Howard  and  Fifteenth. 
NW  corner  Howard  and  Seventeenth. 
SW  corner  Howard  and  Eighteenth. 
SW  corner  Howard  and  Twentieth. 
SW  corner  Howard  and  Twenty-first. 
NW  corner  Howard  and  Nineteenth. 
NW  corner  Howard  and  Twenty-second. 
SW  corner  Howard  and  Twenty-third. 
SW  corner  Howard  and  Twenty-fourth. 
NW  corner  Howard  and  Twenty-fifth. 

S  side  Humboldt,  E  of  Massachusetts. 
S  side  Humboldt,  E  of  Delaware. 
N  side  Humboldt,  E  of  Maryland. 
S  side  Humboldt,,  E  of  Louisiana. 
S  side  Humboldt,  E  of  Sierra. 

NW  corner  Iris  and  Thirteenth. 
NE  corner  Indiana  and  Sierra. 

NE  corner  Illinois  and  Napa. 
NE  corner  Illinois  and  Shasta, 

NW  corner  Jackson  and  Drumm. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Davis. 

SE  corner  Jackson  and  Front. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Sansome. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Montgomery. 

SE  corner  Jackson  and  Montgomery  avenue. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Hyde. 

NW  corner  Jackson  and  Jones. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Taylor. 

NW  comer  Jackson  and  Mason. 

NW  corner  Jackson  and  Virginia. 

NW  corner  Jackson  and  Dupont. 

N  side  Jackson,  100  feet  W  of  Kearny. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Van  Ness. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Franklin. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Gough. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Webster. 

NE  corner  Jackson  and  Laguna. 

NE  corner  Jones  and  Leavenworth. 
NE  corner  Jones  and  Broadway. 
NE  corner  Jones  and  Bush. 
SE  corner  Jones  and  Post. 


LOCATION    OF    HYDRANTS. 


237  ' 


NE  corner  Jones  and  O'Farrell. 
NE  corner  Jansen  and  Greenwich. 

S  side  Juniper,  400  feet  S  of  Folsom,  between 
Tenth  and  Eleventh. 

W  corner  Jessie  and  Ecker,  between  First  and 

Second. 

N  side  Jessie,  between  Ecker  and  Anthony. 
S  corner  Jessie  and  Annie. 
W  corner  Jessie  and  Fourth. 
N  side  Jessie,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
N  side  Jessie,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 
N  side  Jessie,  between  Mint  and  Sixth. 
W  corner  Jessie  and  Seventh. 
N  side  Jessie,  between  Seventh  and  Eighth. 
SW  corner  Jessie  and  Eighteenth. 
SW  corner  Jessie  and  Willow  avenue. 
NW  corner  Jessie  and  Twentieth. 
N  side  Jessie,  W  New  Montgomery. 
N  side  Jessie,  W  New  Montgomery. 
N  side  Jessie,  W  New  Montgomery. 
N  side  Jessie,  W  New  Montgomery. 

W  corner  King  and  Hitch. 

S  corner  King  and  Third. 

S  side  King,  between  Second  and  Third. 

S  side  King,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 

NW  corner  Kissling,  or  Treat  avenue,  and  Four- 
teenth. 

NW  corner  Kearny  and  Union. 
NW  corner  Kearny  and  Green. 
SW  corner  Kearny  and  Jackson. 
W  side  Kearny,  between  California  and  Sacra- 
mento. 

W  corner  Kearn  y  and  Bush. 
SW  corner  Kearny  and  Pine. 
NE  corner  Kearny  and  Geary. 

W  side  Kentucky,  between  Butte  and  Napa. 
SW  corner  Kentucky  and  Ilumboldt. 
NW  corner  Kentucky  and  First  avenue,  Butcher- 
town. 

W  side  Kentucky,  100  feet  S  of  Nevada. 
NW  corner  Kentucky  and  Shasta. 

NW  corner  Lombard  and  Dupont. 
NW  corner  Lombard  and  Kearny. 
NE  corner  Lombard  and  Taylor. 
NE  comer  Lombard  and  Jones. 
NE  corner  Lombard  and  Larkin. 
N  side  Lombard,  400  feet  W  of  Jones. 
NE  corner  Lombard  and  Polk. 

NE  corner  Leavenworth  and  Green. 
NE  -corner  Leavenworth  and  Union.     %  • 
NE  corner  Leavenworth  and  Filbert. 
SE  corner  Leavenworth  and  Greenwich. 


SE  corner  Leavenworth  and  Broadway. 
NE  corner  Leavenworth  and  Jackson. 
NE  corner  Leavenworth  and  Washington. 
NE  comer  Leavenworth  and  Clay. 
SE  corner  Leavenworth  and  California. 
SE  corner  Leavenworth  and  Pine. 
NE  corner  Leavenworth  and  Geary. 
SE  comer  Leavenworth  and  Sacramento. 
SE  corner  Leavenworth  and  Sutter. 

NE  corner  Larkin  and  Green. 
NE  corner  Larkin  and  Vallejo. 
NE  corner  Larkin  and  Broadway. 
NE  corner  Larkin  and  Pacific. 
NE  corner  Larkin  and  Jackson. 
SE  comer  Larkin  and  Washington. 
SE  corner  Larkin  and  Clay. 
SE  corner  Larkin  and  Sacramento. 
NE  corner  Larkiu  and  California. 
SE  corner  Larkin  and  Pine. 
SE  corner  Larkin  and  Turk. 
SE  corner  Larkin  and  Post. 
SE  corner  Larkin  and  Bush. 

NW  corner  Liberty  and  Valencia. 
NW  corner  Liberty  and  Guerrero. 
N  side  Liberty,  140  feet  E  of  Dolores. 

NE  corner  Laguna  and  Kate. 
NE  corner  Laguna  and  Hayes. 
NE  corner  Laguna  and  Filbert. 

SE  corner  Montgomery  and  Green. 
SW  comer  Montgomery  and  Jackson. 
SW  corner  Montgomery  and  Pacific. 
NE  corner  Montgomery  and  Broadway. 
SE  corner  Montgomery  and  Vallejo. 
SW  corner  Montgomery  and  Merchant. 
SW  corner  Montgomery  and  Bush. 
SW  corner  Montgomery  and  Sutter. 
SW  corner  Montgomery  and  California. 

NW  comer  Montgomery  avenue  and  Washing 

ton. 

NW  corner  Montgomery  avenue  and  Jackson. 
NW  corner  Montgomery  avenue  and  Vallejo. 
SW  corner  Montgomery  avenue  and  Broadway. 

SE  comer  Mason  and  Francisco. 
SE  corner  Mason  and  Chestnut. 
SE  corner  Mason  and  Lombard. 
SE  corner  Mason  and  Greenwich. 
NE  cornei  Mason  and  Filbert. 
SW  corner  Mason  and  Filbert. 
SW  corner  Mason  and  Union. 
NW  corner  Mason  and  Green. 
NE  corner  Mason  and  Washington. 
SE  corner  Mason  and  Washington. 
NE  corner  Mason  and  Jackson. 


238 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S   REPORT. 


NE  corner  Mason  and  Broadway. 
SE  comer  Mason  and  Vallejo. 
NE  corner  Mason  and  Clay. 
NW  corner  Mason  and  Turk. 
NW  corner  Mason  and  Geary. 
NW  corner  Mason  and  Sutter. 

NE  corner  Main  and  Harrison. 

S  side  Main,  between    Harrison   and  Folsom, 

Engine  No.  9  House. 
E  corner  Main  and  Howard. 
N  corner  Main  and  Howard. 
E  corner  Main  and  Market. 

SW  corner  Merchant  and  East. 

N  corner  Market  and  Sacramento. 

NE  corner  Market  and  Davis. 

NE  corner  Market  and  Front. 

N  side  Market,  between  Sansome  and  Battery. 

S  side  Market,  between  First  and  Second,  in 

front  of  No.  547. 

N  side  Market,  150  feet  E  of  Montgomery. 
N  side  Market,  175  feet  W  of  Montgomery. 
S  side  Market,  in  front  of  Palace  Hotel. 
S  side  Market,  in  front  of  Palace  Hotel. 
S  side  Market,  in  front  of  Palace  Hotel. 
S  side  Market,  in  front  of  Palace  Hotel. 
N  side  Market,  150  feet  E  of  Kearny. 
NE  corner  Market  and  Brooks. 
S  side  Market,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
S  side  of  Market,  between  Third  and  Fourth, 

opposite  Dupoiit. 
NE  corner  Market  and  Powell. 
N  side  Market,  between  Stockton  and  Powell. 
N  side  Market,  between  Taylor  and  Mason. 
NW  corner  Market  and  Taylor. 
NW  corner  Market  and  Jones. 
N  side  Market,  between  Jones  and  Larkin. 
N  side  Market,  opposite  Pavilion,  E  of  Eighth. 
NW  corner  Market  and  Larkin. 
NW  corner  Market  and  Van  Ness. 
SW  corner  Market  and  Brady. 
S  side  Market,  between  Tenth  and  Eleventh, 

Hose  No.  10. 

N  side  Minna,  between  First  and  Second. 

E  corner  Minna  and  Second. 

W  corner  Minna  and  Third. 

S  corner  Minna  and  Fourth. 

S  side  Minna,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 

N  side  Minna,  between  Fifth  and  Sixth. 

W  corner  Minna  and  Seventh. 

NW  corner  Minna  and  Fifteenth. 

N  corner  Mission  and  Stuart. 
W  corner  Mission  and  Stuart. 
N  corner  Mission  and  Spear. 
W  corner  Mission  and  Spear. 


N  corner  Mission  and  Main. 

W  corner  Mission  and  Main. 

W  corner  Mission  and  Beal. 

W  corner  Mission  and  Fremont. 

W  corner  Mission  and  Ecker. 

N  corner  Mission  and  New  Anthony. 

N  corner  Mission  and  Second. 

N  corner  Mission  and  New  Montgomery. 

N  side  Mission,  between  New  Montgomery  and 

Annie. 

W  corner  Mission  and  Third. 
N  corner  Mission  and  Fourth. 
N  side  Mission,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
N  side  Mission,  between  Fifth  and  Sixth. 
W  corner  Mission  and  Seventh. 
N  side  Mission,  between  Seventh  and  Eighth, 
N  side  Mission,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 
N  side  Mission,  between  Sixth  and  Seventh. 
W  corner  Mission  and  Eighth. 
W  corner  Mission  and  Ninth. 
N  side  Mission,  between  Eighth  and  Ninth. 
W  corner  Mission  and  Potter. 
S  corner  Mission  and  West  Mission,  opposite 

Thirteenth. 
E  side  Mission,  between   Twelfth   and   Thir 

teenth. 

SW  corner  Mission  and  Fourteenth. 
SW  corner  Mission  and  Eighteenth. 
NW  corner  Mission  and  Twentieth. 
NW  corner  Mission  and  Twenty-first. 
NW  corner  Mission  and  Twenty-third. 
W   side   Mission,    between   Twenty-third   and 

Twenty-fourth. 
W  side   Mission,  between  Twenty-fourth  and 

Twenty-fifth. 

NW  corner  Mission  and  Twenty-fifth. 
W    side    Mission,    between     Twenty-fifth    and 

Twenty-sixth. 

NW  corner  Mission  and  Twenty-sixth. 
NW  corner  Mission  and  Twenty-seventh. 
SW  corner  Mission  and  Serpentine  avenue. 
NW  corner  Mission  and  Twenty-eighth. 

NE  corner  McAllister  and  Leavenworth. 

NE  corner  McAllister  and  Larkin. 

NE  corner  McAllister  and  Polk. 

NE  corner  McAllister  and  Van  Ness  avenue. 

NW  corner  McAllister  and  Franklin. 

NE  corner  McAllister  and  Gough. 

NE  corner  McAllister  and  Octavia* 

NW  corner  McAllister  and  Laguna. 

NW  corner  McAllister  and  Buchanan. 

NW  corner  McAllister  and  Fillmore. 

NE  (ferner  McAllister  and  Steiner. 

NW  corner  McAllister  and  Pierce. 

NE  corner  McAllister  and  Scott. 


LOCATION    OF    HYDRANTS. 


239 


NW  corner  Mississippi  and  Solano. 
SW  corner  Mississippi  and  Mariposa. 

NW  corner  Minnesota  and  Solano 

N  side  Mariposa,  between  Indiana  and  Minne- 
sota. 

NW  corner  M  and  Fifth  avenue. 

N  side  Natoma,  between  First  and  Second. 
N  corner  Natoma  and  New  Montgomery. 
N  side  Natoma,  between  Third  and  New  Mont- 
gomery. 

N  corner  Natoma  and  Fifth. 
N  side  Natoma,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
N  corner  Natoma  and  Sixth. 
N  corner  Natoma  and  Russ. 
N  side  Natoma,  between  Sixth  and  Seventh. 
N  side  Natoma,  between  Seventh  and  Eighth. 
N  corner  Natoma  and  Ninth. 
N  corner  Natoma  and  Eighth. 
N  corner  Natoma  and  Tenth. 

E  corner  New  Montgomery  and  Market. 

W  side  New  Montgomery,  between  Market  and 

Jessie. 
W  side  New  Montgomery,  between  Market  and 


E  corner  New  Montgomery  and  Mission. 
E  corner  New  Montgomery  and  Jessie. 

E  corner  Ninth  and  Howard. 
N  corner  Ninth  and  Folsom. 
E  side  Ninth,  between  Folsom  and  Harrison, 

corner  Shipley. 

E  corner  Ninth,  between  Bryant  and  Har,  ison. 
E  corner  Ninth  and  Bryant. 
N  corner  Ninth  and  Brannan. 

NW  corner  Nineteenth  and  Mission. 
NE  corner  Nineteenth  and  Valencia. 
NE  corner  Nineteenth  and  Guerrero. 
NE  corner  Nineteenth  and  Dolores. 

SE  corner  Octavia  and  Pine. 
SE  corner  Octavia  and  Grove. 
SE  corner  Octavia  and  Jackson. 
SE  corner  Octavia  and  Vallejo. 
NE  corner  Octavia  and  Green. 

NW  corner  O'Farrell  and  Mason. 
NE  corner  O'Farrell  and  Stockton. 
NW  corner  O'Farrell  and  Taylor. 
NE  corner  O'Farrell  and  Leavenworth. 
NE  corner  O'Farrell  and  Hyde. 
NE  corner  O'Farrell  and  Larkin. 
NE  corner  O'Farrell  and  Polk. 
NW  corner  O'Farrell  and  Octavia. 
NW  corner  O'Farrell  and  Laguna. 
NE  corner  O'Farrell  and  Buchanan. 


NW  corner  O'Farrell  and  Fillmore. 
N  side  O'Farrell,  between  Steiner  and  Scott,  op- 
posite Pierce. 
NE  corner  O'Farrell  and  Broderick. 

NW  corner  Oak  and  Van  Ness. 
NE  corner  Oak  and  Gough. 
NE  corner  Oak  and  Octavia. 
NE  corner  Oak  and  Laguna. 
NW  corner  Oak  and  Buchanan. 
NE  corner  Oak  and  Webster. 

SW  corner  Pearl  and  Market. 
NW  corner  Pearl  and  Ridley. 

NE  corner  Pacific  and  Kearny. 

NE  corner  Pacific  and  Montgomery- 

NW  corner  Pacific  and  Battery. 

SW  corner  Pacific  and  Davis. 

NW  corner  Pacific  and  Hyde. 

NW  corner  Pacific  and  Leavenworth. 

NW  corner  Pacific  and  Jones. 

SW  corner  Pacific  and  Jones. 

NE  corner  Pacific  and  Taylor. 

NE  corner  Pacific  and  Salmon. 

NE  corner  Pacific  and  Mason. 

S  side  Pacific,  300  feet  W  of  Stockton,  opposite 

Virginia. 

N  side  Pacific,  300  feet  W  of  Dupont. 
S  side  Pacific,  between  Sansome  and  Montgom 

ery,  Engine  No.  1. 
NE  corner  Pacific  and  Steiner. 
NE  corner  Pacific  and  Pierce. 
NE  corner  Pacific  and  Scott. 
NE  corner  Pacific  and  Polk. 
N  side  Pacific,  between  Van  Ness  avenue  and 

Polk,  Engine  No.  8. 
NE  corner  Pacific  and  Van  Ness. 
NE  corner  Pacific  and  Franklin. 
NW  corner  Pacific  and  Gough. 
NW  corner  Pacific  and  Octavia. 
NW  corner  Pacific  and  Laguna. 
NE  corner  Pacific  and  Buchanan. 
NE  corner  Pacific  and  Webster. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Green. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Lombard. 
NW  corner  Powell  and  Francisco. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Vallejo. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Broadway. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Pacific. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  John. 
NW  corner  Powell  and  Jackson. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Jackson. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Washington. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Clay. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Sacramento. 
NW  corner  Powell  and  California. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Pine. 
SW  corner  Powell  and  Sutter. 


240 


CHIEF  ENGINEER'S  REPORT. 


SW  corner  Powell  and  Geary. 

SW  corner  Powell  and  O'Farrell. 

W  side  Powell,  between  Ellis  and  Eddy. 

N  side  Perry,  between  Second  and  Third. 
S  side  Perry,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 
E  corner  Perry  and  Fourth. 
S  side  Perry,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
E  corner  Perry  and  Fifth. 

SW  corner  Post  and  Montgomery. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Kearny. 

NW  corner  Post  and  Montgomery. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Powell. 

NW  corner  Post  and  Mason. 

SW  corner  Post  and  Taylor. 

SE  corner  Post  and  William. 

SW  corner  Post  and  Leaven  worth. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Van  Ness. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Franklin. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Gough. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Octavia. 

SW  corner  Post  and  Laguna. 

SW  corner  Post  and  Webster. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Lyon. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Baker. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Buchanan. 

SE  corner  Post  and  Fillmore. 

S  side  Post,  between  Central  avenue  and  Lyon. 

S  side  Post,  E  of  Fillmore,  Hose  No.  2. 

S  side  Pine,  300  feet  E  of  Montgomery. 

SE  corner  Pine  and  Montgomery. 

S  side  Pine,  300  feet  E  of  Kearuy. 

SE  corner  Pine  and  Dupont. 

S  side  Pine,  between  Stockton  and  Powell. 

NW  corner  Pine  and  Mason. 

NW  corner  Pine  and  Taylor. 

NW  corner  Pine  and  Jones. 

NW  corner  Pine  and  Hyde. 

NE  corner  Pine  and  Polk. 

NE  corner  Pine  and  Van  Ness. 

NE  corner  Pine  and  Gough. 

NW  corner  Pine  and  Laguna. 

NW  corner  Pine  and  Buchanan. 

NW  corner  Potrero  avenue  and  Santa  Clara. 

NE  corner  Pine  and  Fillmore. 

NE  corner  Pine  and  Steiner. 

N  corner  Park  avenue  and  Bryant. 
E  side  Park  avenue,  S  of  Bryant. 

SE  corner  Polk  and  Vallejo. 
SE  corner  Polk  and  Broadway. 
NE  corner  Polk  and  Jackson. 
SE  corner  Polk  and  California. 
NE  corner  Polk  and  Sutter. 
SE  corner  Polk  and  Post. 

SW  corner  Pennsylvania  and  Solano. 
SW  corner  Pennsylvania  and  Mariposa. 


NW  corner  Pennsylvania  and  JButte. 

NW  corner  Page  and  Franklin. 
NE  corner  Page  and  Gough. 
NE  corner  Page  and  Octavia. 
NE  corner  Page  and  Laguna. 

SE  corner  Pierce  and  Clay. 
NE  corner  Pierce  and  Pine. 
SE  corner  Pierce  and  Ellis. 
SE  corner  Pierce  and  Eddy. 
NE  corner  Pierce  and  Fulton. 

<• 

NE  corner  Potrero  avenue  and  Sonoma. 
SW  corner  Potrero  avenue  and  Twentieth. 
NW  corner  Potrero  avenue  and  Twenty-first. 
SW  corner  Potrero  avenue  and  El  Dorado. 
SW  comer  Potrero  avenue  and  Alameda. 
NW  corner  Pine  and  Webster. 
NW  corner  Potrero  avenue  and  Mariposa. 
NW  corner  Potrero  avenue  and  Solano. 
SW  corner  Potrero  avenue  and  Butte. 
W  side  Potrero  avenue,  between  Twenty-first 
and  Twenty-second. 

SW  corner  P  street  and  Fourteenth  avenue, 
South  San  Francisco. 

E  side  Quincy,  between  California  and  Pine. 
NE  corner  Quinn  and  Guerrero. 

W  side  Hitch,  between  Brannan  and  Townsend. 
E  side  Ritch,  between  Folsom  and  Harrison. 

E  corner  Russ  and  Howard. 

E  side  Rincon  place,  at  St.  Mary's  Hospital. 

E  corner  Rausch  and  Howard. 

NE  corner  Ridley  and  Valencia. 

W  side  Railroad  avenue,  between  Seventh  and 

Eighth  avenues,  South  San  Francisco. 
SW  corner  Railroad   and   Eleventh   avenues, 

South  San  Francisco. 
SW  corner  Railroad   and   Fifteenth   avenues, 

South  San  Francisco. 
SW   comer   Railroad  and  Sixteenth  avenues, 

South  San  Francisco. 
NW  corner  Railroad  and  Seventeenth  avenues, 

South  San  Francisco. 
SW   corner   Railroad   and    Twelfth    avenues, 

South  San  Francisco. 
SW  corner  Railroad  and  First  avenues,  South 

San  Francisco. 
W  side  Railroad  avenue,  between  Fourth  and 

Fifth  avenues,  South  San  Francisco. 

SW  corner  Sansome  and  Greenwich. 
SW  corner  Sansome  and  Pacific. 
SW  corner  Sansome  and  Clay. 


LOCATION    OF    HYDRANTS. 


241 


SW  corner  Sansome  and  California. 
SW  corner  Sansome  and  Bush. 
SW  corner  Sansome  and  Pine. 

NW  corner  Sumner  and  Clementina. 

NW  corner  Sierra  and  Tennessee. 
NE  corner  Sierra  and  Minnesota. 
NW  corner  Sierra  and  Delaware. 

8  corner  Silver  and  Third. 

S  side  Silver,  between  Second  and  Third. 

S  side  Silver,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 

SW  corner  Stockton  and  Francisco. 

SW  corner  Stockton  and  Chestnut. 

SW  corner  Stockton  and  Lombard. 

NW  corner  Stockton  and  Greenwich. 

SW  corner  Stockton  and  Washington. 

NW  corner  Stockton  and  Jackson. 

W  side  Stockton,  250  feet  N  of  Pacific,  Engine 

No.  5. 

SW  corner  Stockton  and  Broadway. 
SW  corner  Stockton  and  Vallejo. 
NE  corner  Stockton  and  Pine. 
NE  corner  Stockton  and  Sacramento. 
NW  corner  Stockton  and  Bush. 
NW  corner  Stockton  and  Sutter. 
SW  corner  Stockton  and  Sutter. 
NW  corner  Stockton  and  Post. 
NW  corner  Stockton  and  Geary. 
NW  corner  Stockton  and  Ellis. 

NE  corner  Sacramento  and  Sansome. 

NE  corner  Saoramento  and  Leidesdorff. 

NW  corner  Sacramento  and  Front. 

SE  corner  Sacramento  and  Front. 

SE  corner  Sacramento  and  Davis. 

SW  comer  Sacramento  and  Drumm. 

N  side  Sacramento,  between  Drumm  and  East, 

at  Corporation  Yard. 
SE  corner  Sacramento  and  Kearny. 
SW  corner  Sacramento  and  Dupont. 
SW  corner  Sacramento  and  Mason. 
SW  corner  Sacramento  and  Jones. 
S  side  Sacramento  opposite  Waverly  Place. 
NE  corner  Sacramento  and  Devisadero. 
NE  corner  Sacramento  and  Steiner. 
NE  corner  Sacramento  and  Pierce. 
NE  corner  Sacramento  and  Polk. 
NE  corner  Sacramento  and  Van  Ness. 
NE  corner  Sacramento  and  Franklin. 
NE  corner  Sacramento  and  Gough. 
NW  corner  Sacramento  and  Octavia. 
NE  corner  Sacramento  and  Fillmore. 

SW  corner  Shotwell  and  Fifteenth. 
NW  corner  Shotwell  and  Seventeenth. 
NW  corner  Shotwell  and  Eighteenth. 
SW  corner  Shotwell  and  Nineteenth. 


NW  corner  Shotwell  and  Twentieth. 
NW  corner  Shotwell  and  Twenty-first. 

NE  corner  Sutter  and  Kearny. 
NW  corner  Sutter  and  Montgomery. 
NW  corner  Sutter  and  Sansome. 
N  side  Sutter  150  feet  E  of  Dupont. 
S  side  Sutter  75  feet  W  of  Jones. 
SE  corner  Sutler  and  Larkin. 
SE  corner  Sutter  and  Van  Ness. 
SW  corner  Sutter  and  Franklin. 
SW  corner  Sutter  and  Octavia. 
SW  corner  Sutter  and  Laguna. 
SE  corner  Sutter  and  Buchanan. 
SE  corner  Sutter  and  Fillmore. 
SW  corner  Sutter  and  Scott. 
SE  corner  Sutter  and  Lyon. 
SW  corner  Sutter  and  Webster. 
SE  corner  Sutter  and  Pierce. 
SE  corner  Sutter  and  Central  avenue. 

W  corner  Second  and  Folsom. 
S  comer  Second  and  Tehama. 
S  corner  Second  and  Howard. 
W  side  Second,  between  Howard  and  Mission 

Engine  No.  4. 

S  corner  Second  and  Mission. 
W  corner  Second  and  Towusend. 
S  corner  Second  and  Brannan. 
W  corner  Second  and  Bryant. 

SE  corner  Spear  and  Market. 

E  corner  South  Park  and  Third. 

S  side  South  Park,  between  Second  and  Third. 

N  corner  Stanley  place  and  Bryant. 

E  corner  Shipley  and  Fifth. 
S  side  Shipley,  between  Fifth  and  Sixth. 
S  side  Shipley,  between  Fourth  and  Fifth. 
E  corner  Shipley  and  Sixth. 

N  corner  Stevenson  and  Second. 
W  corner  Stevenson  and  Third. 
W  corner  Stevenson  and  Annie. 
N  corner  Stevenson  and  Fourth. 
N  side  Stevenson,  between  Sixth  and  Seventh. 
N  side  Stevenson,  between  Seventh  and  Eighth 
N  side  Stevenson,  between  Eighth  and  Ninth. 
S  corner  Stevenson  and  Crocker. 
NW  corner  Stevenson  and  Eighteenth. 
NW  corner  Stevenson  and  Twentieth. 
W   side   Stevenson,    between   Twentieth   and 
Twenty-first. 

NE  corner  Sixth  and  Cleary. 
E  corner  Sixth  and  Folsom. 
E  corner  Sixth  and  Hairison. 
E  corner  Sixth  and  Bluxome. 
N  corner  Sixth  and  Townsend. 


16 


242 


CHIEF    ENGINEER  S   REPORT. 


E  comer  Sixth  and  Maiket. 
E  corner  Sixth  and  Stevenson. 
E  corner  Sixth  and  Mission. 
N  corner  Sixth  and  Minna. 
E  corner  Sixth  and  Howard. 

N  corner  Seventh  and  Townsend. 
E  side  Seventh,  between  Townsend  and  Bran- 
nan. 

N  corner  Seventh  and  Brannan. 
E  side  Seventh,  between  Brannan  and  Bryant. 
N  corner  Seventh  and  Cleavland. 
E  side  Seventh,  between  Folsom  and  Howard. 
E  corner  Seventh  and  Howard. 
E  corner  Seventh  and  Natoma. 
E  corner  Seventh  and  Market. 
N  corner  Seventh  and  Bryant. 

NW  corner  Santa  Clara  and  Hampshire. 
NW  corner  Santa  Clara  and  Bryant. 
N  side  Santa  Clara,  between  Bryant  and  Har- 
rison. 

NE  corner  Santa  Clara  and  Columbia. 
NW  corner  Santa  Clara  and  York. 

NE  corner  Sixteenth  and  Dolores. 

N  side  Sixteenth,  between  Dolores  and  Guer- 
rero. 

NW  corner  Sixteenth  and  Guerrero. 

N  side  Sixteenth,  between  Guerrero  and  Val- 
encia, Engine  No.  7. 

NW  corner  Sixteenth  and  Valencia. 

NW  corner  Sixteenth  and  Mission. 

NE  corner  Sixteenth  and  Howard. 

NE  corner  Sixteenth  and  Shotwell. 

NE  corner  Sixteenth  and  Harrison. 

E  side  Sixteenth,  at  Mission  Woolen  Mills,  3 
hydrants. 

NE  corner  Sonoma  and  Nebraska. 

NE  corner  Sonoma  and  Utah. 

NE  corner  Steiner  and  Eddy. 
NE  corner  Steiuer  and  O'Farrell. 
NE  corner  Steiner  and  Sutter. 
SE  corner  Steiner  and  Clay. 

NW  corner  Seventeenth  and  Mission. 
NE  corner  Seventeenth  and  Valencia. 
NW  corner  Seventeenth  and  First  avenue. 
NE  corner  Seventeenth  and  Guerrero. 
NE  corner  Seventeenth  and  Dolores. 
NE  corner  Seventeenth  and  Church. 
NE  corner  Seventeenth  and  Sanchez. 

NE  corner  Scott  and  Post. 
8E  corner  Scott  and  O'Farrell. 
NE  corner  Scott  and  Tyler. 
SE  corner  Scott  and  Haight. 
SE  corner  Scott  and  Waller. 
SE  corner  Scott  and  Eddy. 


SE  corner  Scott  and  Pierce. 
SE  corner  Scott  and  California. 

NW  corner  San  Jose  avenue  and  Twenty-sixth. 
NW  corner  San  Jose  avenue  and  Twenty-fifth. 
SW  corner  San  Jose  avenue  and  Twenty-third. 
SW  corner  San  Jose  avenue  and  Twenty-second. 

SW  comer  Shasta  and  Michigan. 

W  side  San  Bruno  road,  30  feet  S  of  Golden 

Acre  Nursery. 

W  side  San  Bruno  road,  170  feet  N  of  Tannery. 
W  side  San  Bruno  road,  137  feet  S  of  Eve. 

NE  corner  Seymour  and  Tyler. 

NW  corner  Taylor  and  Green. 
SW  corner  Taylor  and  Union. 
SW  corner  Taylor  and  Filbert. 
W  side  Taylor  100  feet  N  of  Filbert,  corner 

Valparaiso. 

SW  corner  Taylor  and  Greenwich. 
SW  corner  Taylor  and  Broadway. 
SW  corner  Taylor  and  Pacific. 
SW  corner  Taylor  and  Jackson. 
NW  comer  Taylor  and  Washington. 
N  W  corner  Taylor  and  Clay. 
NW  corner  Taylor  and  Sacramento. 
SE  corner  Taylor  and  California. 
NE  comer  Taylor  and  Market. 
SE  corner  Taylor  and  Sutter. 
NW  corner  Taylor  and  Sutter. 
NW  corner  Taylor  and  Bush. 

SE  coiner  Turk  and  Taylor. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Jcnes. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Leavenworth. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Pclk. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Van  Ness. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Franklin. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Gough. 
SW  corner  Turk  and  Buchanan. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Webster. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Fillmore. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Steiner. 
SW  corner  Turk  and  Pierce. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Broderick. 
SE  corner  Turk  and  Devisadero. 
SW  corner  Turk  and  Scott. 

S  side  Tehama,  between  First  and  Second. 

S  side  Tehama,  250  feet  W  of  Second. 

N  side  Tehama,  between  First  and  Second. 

N  side  Tehama,  250  feet  E  of  Third. 

W  side  Tehama,  between  Third  and  Fourth. 

W  corner  Tehama  and  Fifth. 

N  corner  Tehama  and  Sixth. 

N  side  Tehama,  between  Eighth  and  Ninth. 


LOCATION    OF    HYDRANTS. 


243 


SW  corner  Thirteenth  and  Harrison. 

N  side  Townsend,  between  Second  and  Third. 
N  corner  Townsend  and  Hitch. 
W  corner  Townsend  and  Crook. 

E  corner  Third  and  Harrison. 

E  corner  Third  and  Perry. 

E  corner  Third  and  Bryant. 

N  corner  Third  and  Brannan. 

E  side  Third,  between  Brannan  and  Townsend. 

E  corner  Third  and  Townsend. 

S  corner  Third  and  Market. 

E  corner  Third  and  Verona. 

N  corner  Third  and  Clementina. 

N  corner  Tenth  and  Bryant. 

N  corner  Tenth  and  Harrison. 

E  side  Tenth,  between  Howard  and  Folsom. 

E  corner  Tenth  and  Mission. 

E  corner  Tenth  and  Market. 

N  corner  Twelfth  and  Harrison. 

N  side  Twelfth,  between  Harrison  and  Folsom. 

W  corner  Twelfth  and  Folsom. 

W  corner  Twelfth  and  Howard. 

E  corner  Twelfth  and  Mission. 

NE  corner  Tyler,  or  Golden  Gate  avenue,  and 

Jones. 

NW  corner  Tyler  and  Leavenworth. 
NE  corner  Tyler  and  Hyde. 
NE  corner  Tyler  and  Larkin. 
NE  corner  Tyler  and  Polk. 
NE  corner  Tyler  and  Gough. 
NE  corner  Tyler  and  Octavia. 
NE  corner  Tyler  and  Laguna. 
NW  corner  Tyler  and  Buchanan. 
NW  corner  Tyler  and  Fillmore. 
NW  corner  Tyler  and  Steiner. 
NW  corner  Tyler  and  Webster. 
NW  corner  Tyler  and  Pierce. 

NE  corner  Twentieth  and  Dolores. 

NE  corner  Twentieth  and  Guerrero. 

NE  corner  Twentieth  and  Valencia. 

NW  corner  Twenty-first  and  Jessie. 

NE  corner  Twenty-first  and  Valencia. 

NE  corner  Twenty-first  and  Fair  Oaks. 

N  side  Twenty-first,  between    Fair  Oaks  and 

Dolores. 

NW  corner  Twenty-first  and  Chattanooga. 
NW  corner  Twenty  second  and  Potrero  avenue. 
SW  corner  Twenty-second  and  Bryant. 
NW  corner  Twenty-second  and  Dolores. 
NE  corner  Twenty-second  and  Fair  Oaks. 
NE  corner  Twenty-second  and  Guerrero. 
NE  corner  Twenty-second  and  Valencia. 
NE  corner  Twenty-second  and  Mission. 
NE  corner  Twenty-second  and  Shotwell. 


NW  corner  Twenty-second  and  Treat  avenue. 
N  side  Twenty-second,  between  Treat  avenue 
and  Folsom. 

NW  corner  Twenty-third  and  Bryant. 
NE  corner  Twenty-third  and  Columbia. 
NE  corner  Twenty-third  and  Alabama. 
NE  corner  Twenty-third  and  Valencia. 
NE  corner  Twenty-third  and  Guerrero. 
NE  corner  Twenty-third  and  Fair  Oaks. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  San  Jose  avenue 

NW  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Mission. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Columbia. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Bryant. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Alabama. 

NW  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Harrison. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Treat  avenue. 

NW  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Folsom. 

NW  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Shotwell. 

NW  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Potrero  avenue. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Nebraska. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Kansas. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Bartlett. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Valencia. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Church. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Vicksburg. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Sanchez. 

N  aide  Twenty-fourth,   between  Sanchez   and 

Noa. 

NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Noe. 
N  side  Twenty-fourth,  between  Noe  and  Church. 
NE  corner  Twenty-fourth  and  Castro. 

NW  corner  Twenty-fifth  and  Capp. 
NW  corner  Twenty-fifth  and  Shotwell. 

NW  corner  Twenty-sixth  and  Mission. 
NW  corner  Twenty-ninth  and  Mission. 
NW  corner  Thirtieth  and  Mission. 

NW  corner  Treat  avenue  and  Twentieth. 
SW  corner  Treat  avenue  and  Twenty-first. 
SW  corner  Treat  avenue  and  Twenty-third. 
W  side  Treat  avenue,  between  Twenty-third  and 
Twenty-fourth. 

SW  comer  Union  and  Montgomery. 
NE  corner  Union  and  Dupont. 
SE  corner  Union  and  Stockton. 
SW  corner  Union  and  Stockton. 
SE  corner  Union  and  Powell. 
SE  corner  Union  and  Jones. 
SE  corner  Union  and  Larkiu. 
SW  corner  Union  and  Fillmore. 
SW  corner  Union  and  Octavia. 
SW  corner  Union  and  Laguna. 
SW  corner  Union  and  Buchanan. 
SE  corner  Union  and  Webster. 


244 


CHIEF   ENGINEER  S  REPORT. 


NW  corner  Vallejo  and  Kearny. 

SW  corner  Vallejo  and  Front. 

NW  corner  Vallejo  and  Jones. 

NE  corner  Vallejo  and  Leavenworth. 

N  side  Vallejo,  200  feet  W  of  Leavenworth. 

S  comer  Vallejo  and  Sansome. 

NE  corner  Vermont  and  Twenty-third. 
NE  corner  Vermont  and  Humboldt. 
E  side  Vermont,  N  of  Humboldt. 
NE  corner  Vermont  and  Colusa. 

SE  corner  Van  Ness  and  Franklin. 
SE  corner  Van  Ness  and  O'Farrell. 
NE  corner  Van  Ness  and  Geary. 
SE  corner  Van  Ness  and  Vallejo. 

SW  corner  Valencia  and  Market. 

SE  corner  Washington  and  Sansome. 
NW  corner  Washington  and  Sansome. 
NE  corner  Washington  and  Front. 
NW  corner  Washington  and  Davis. 
NW  corner  Washington  and  Druinm. 
N  side  Washington,  50  feet  W  from  East. 
SW  corner  Washington  and  Keainy. 
SW  corner  Washington  and  Hyde. 


SW  corner  Washington  and  Jones. 
NW  corner  Washington  and  Ross.  • 
SE  corner  Washington  and  Montgomery. 
NE  corner  Washington  and  Steiner. 
NE  corner  Washington  and  Polk. 
NE  comer  Washington  and  Van  Ness. 
NE  corner  Washington  and  Frankh'n. 
NE  corner  Washington  and  Gough. 
NW  corner  Washington  and  Buchanan. 
NE  corner  Washington  and  Fillmore. 

NW  corner  Waller  and  Octavia. 
NE  corner  Waller  and  Laguna. 

SE  corner  Webster  and  Fulton. 
SE  corner  Webster  and  McAllister. 
SE  corner  Webster  and  Eddy. 
SE  corner  Webster  and  O'Farrell. 
NE  corner  Webster  and  Washington. 
NE  corner  Webster  and  Sacramento 
NE  corner  Webster  and  California. 

SW  corner  York  and  Twenty-fourth. 
NW  corne  r  York  and  Twenty-fifth. 
SW  corner  York  and  Twenty-second. 
NW  corner  York  and  Twenty-third. 


FIRE  >LARM  AND  POLICE  TELEGRAPH 

REPORT. 


OFFICE  OF  THE  FIRE  ALARM  AND  POLICE  TELEGRAPH,    j 
San  Francisco,  July  1,  1880.  j 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — In  compliance  with  Resolution  No.  14,765  (New 
Series),  I  have  the  honor  herewith  to  submit  this,  the  Fifteenth 
Annual  Report  of  the  Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph  Depart- 
ment for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880. 


The  Signal  Boxes  in  use  consist  of — 

Crank  Boxes 82 

Automatic  Boxes 74 

Total 156 

Located  throughout  the  City  as  follows : 


246 


FIRE    ALARM    TELEGRAPH. 


SIGNAL   BOXES. 


Box. 

2— S.  W.  corner  Mason  and  Lombard. 

3— S.  E.  corner  Stockton  and  Greenwich. 

4—N.  W.  corner  Sansome  and  Greenwich. 

5 — N.  E.  corner  Battery  and  Union. 

6—  S.  E.  corner  Montgomery  and  Green. 

7 — S.  E.  corner  Kearny  and  Union. 

8— S.  W.  corner  Powell  and  Union. 

9— N.  E.  corner  Dupont  and  Vallejo. 
12 — N.  W.  corner  California  and  Kearny. 
13— S.  W.  corner  Front  and  Broadway. 
14 — s.  W.  corner  Stockton  and  Broadway. 
15 — S.  W.  corner  Clay  and  East. 
16 — N.  W.  corner  Mason  and  Pacific. 
17 — N.  E.  corner  Pacific  and  Kearny. 
18 — S.  W.  corner  Sansome  and  Jackson. 
19— N.  E.  corner  Davis  and  Washington. 
21 — Kearny  and  Merchant. 
23— S.  E.  corner  Clay  and  Taylor. 
24— S.  E.  corner  Clay  and  Powell. 
25 — N.  W.  corner  Washington  and  Dupont. 
26— N.  E.  corner  Clay  and  Battery. 
27 — N.  W.  corner  Montgomery  and  Commer'l 
28— S.  W.  corner  Pine  and  Dupont. 
29 — N.  W.  corner  Stockton  and  California. 
31 — S.  W.  corner  Sansome  and  Halleck. 
32— S.  W.  corner  California  and  Drumm. 
34— S.  W.  corner  Mission  and  Steuart. 
35 — S.  E.  corner  Montgomery  and  Pine. 
36 — N.  W.  corner  Folsom  and  Steuart. 
37_N.  W.  corner  Battery  and  Bush. 
38— S.  W.  corner  Market  and  Second. 
39— N.  W.  corner  Howard  and  Spear. 
41 — N.  W.  corner  Sutter  and  Jones. 
42 — S.  E.  corner  Geary  and  Mason. 
43— O'Farrell,  near  Dupont. 
45— N.  W.  corner  O'Farrell  and  Jones. 
46— N.  W.  corner  Sutter  and  Kearny. 
47 — S.  W.  corner  Market  and  Powell. 
48 — S.  W.  corner  Geary  and  Kearny. 
49— N.  W.  corner  Stockton  and  Sutter. 
51 — N.  W.  corner  Folsom  and  Beale. 
52— S.  W.  corner  Mission  and  Fremont. 
53— King,  East  of  Third. 
54 — Engine  No.  4,  Second,  near  Howard. 
56— North  side  Bryant,  west  of  First. 
57 — N.  W.  corner  Brannan  and  Second. 
58— N.  W.  corner  Folsom  and  First. 
59— P.  M.  S.  S.  Company's  wharf , foot  of  First. 
61— S.  W.  corner  Howard  and  Third. 
62— S.  W.  corner  Mission  and  Fourth. 


Box. 

63 — N.  E.  corner  Harrison  and  Fourth. 

64— S.  W.  corner  Howard  and  Fifth. 

65— S.  W.  corner  Mission  and  Sixth. 

67 — N.  E.  corner  Harrison  and  Hawthorne. 

68— N.  E.  corner  Brannan  and  Fourth. 

69— S.  W.  corner  Bryant  and  Third. 

71-  S.  W.  corner  Mission  and  Eleventh. 

72 — S.  E.  corner  Mission  and  Thirteenth. 

73— S.  E.  corner  Howard  and  Eighth. 

74— Engine  No.  7,  Sixteenth  street. 

75 — N.  W.  corner  Jones  and  McAllister. 

76 — S.  W.  corner  Market  and  Hayes. 

78— N.  E.  corner  Folsom  and  Ninth. 

79_N.  \y.  corner  Folsom  and  Twelfth. 

81 — S.  E .  corner  Franklin  and  Hayes. 

82 — N.  E.  corner  Fulton  and  Gough. 

83 — N.  E.  corner  Octavia  and  Oak. 

84— Valencia  and  Market. 

85 — N.  E.  corner  Laguna  and  Hayes. 

86 — N.  W.  corner  Broadway  and  Montgomery. 

87— S.  E.  cor.  Haight  and  Webster. 

91— N.  E.  corner  Hyde  and  Turk. 

92— N.  E.  corner  Franklin  and  Turk. 

93— N.  E.  corner  Jones  and  Turk. 

94— S.  E.  corner  Polk  and  Ellis. 

95— N.  E.  corner  Market  and  Taylor. 
123— S.  W.  corner  Hyde  and  Union. 
124— Pioneer  Woolen  Mills,  Black  Point. 
125— N.  W.  corner  Filbert  and  Jones. 
126— S.  E.  corner  Hyde  and  Washington. 
127— S.  E.  corner  Broadway  and  Polk. 
128— S.  E.  corner  Clay  and  Leavenworth. 
129— N.  W.  corner  Pacific  and  Leavenworth. 
132— S.  W.  corner  Pine  and  Mason. 
134— S.  E.  corner  Bush  and  Hyde. 
135— S.  E.  corner  Bush  and  Polk. 
136— N.  E.  corner  Post  and  Van  Ness  avenue. 
137— N.  W.  corner  Post  and  Larkin. 
138— S.  W.  corner  California  and  Larkin. 
139— S.  E.  corner  O'Farrell  and  Hyde. 
142— N.  E.  corner  Valencia  and  Twentieth. 
143 — N.  E.  corner  Mission  and  Twenty-second. 
145 — N.  W.  corner  Folsom  and  Twenty-second. 
146 — S.  W.  corner  Folsom  and  Sixteenth. 
147 — N.  E.  corner  Howard  and  Twentieth.      ,t 
148 — N.  E.  corner  Mission  and  Sixteenth. 
149— S.  W.  corner  Folsom  and  Eighteenth. 
152 — N.  W.  corner  Brannan  and  Eighth. 
153 — N.  W.  corner  Harrison  and  Seventh. 
154— N.  W.  corner  Bryant  and  Sixth. 


SIGNAL    BOXES. 


247 


Box. 

156— N.  E.  corner  Fourth  and  Berry. 
157 — South  side  Folsom,  east  of  Fourth. 
158— South  side  Folsom,  east  of  Fifth. 
159— S.  W.  corner  Folsom  and  Sixth. 
162— S.  E.  corner  Pacific  and  Franklin. 
163 — S.  E.  corner  Sacramento  and  Franklin. 
164— S.  E.  corner  Clay  and  Polk. 
172— S.  E.  corner  McAllister  and  Buchanan. 
173— N.  W.  corner  Ellis  and  Buchanan. 
174— N.  E.  corner  Turk  and  FiJlmore. 
175 — S.  W.  corner  Webster  and  Grove. 
176-N.  W.  cor.  Post  and  Octavia. 
178 — N.  VV.  corner  Buchanan  and  Geary. 
182— N.  E.  corner  Sixth  and  Townsend. 
183— S.  E.  corner  Mission  and  Eighth. 
192— N.  W.  corner  California  and  Front. 
193— S.  W.  corner  Hyde  and  Chestnut. 
194-  N.  W.  corner  Stockton  and  Francisco. 
213-  S.  W.  corner  Bush  and  Buchanan. 
214— S.  E.  corner  Bush  and  Steiner. 
215— S.  W.  corner  Washington  and  Webster. 
216 — S.  E.  corner  Sacramento  and  Fillmore. 
217 — S.  E.  corner  Bush  and  Devisadero. 
218— N.  E.  corner  Post  and  Fillmore. 
219— S.  E.  corner  Filbert  and  Fillmore. 
231— N.W.  corner  Howard  and  Twenty-fourth 


Box. 

234— N.W.  co  ner  Harrison  and  Twenty-fcmrth 
235— City  and  County  Hospital. 
236— N.  E.  corner  Mission  and  Twenty -sixth 
237 — S.W.  corner  Dolores  and  Twenty-second. 
238 — N.  E.  corner  Santa  Clara  and  Potreroav. 
241 — S.  E.  corner  Gough  and  Bush. 
243— N.  W.  corner  Clay  and  Scott. 
245— S.  W.  corner  Geary  and  Steiner. 
246—  S.  E.  corner  Geary  and  Devisadero. 
247— N.  W.  corner  Turk  and  Scott. 
248 — N.  E.  corner  Devisadero  and  Fulton. 
251 — N.  E.  corner  Broadway  and  Octavia. 
253 — N.  E.  corner  Union  and  Laguna. 
254 — N.  E.  corner  Union  and  Pierce. 
261 — S.  W.  corner  Stevenson  and  Ecker. 
271 — S.  W.  corner  Seventeenth  and  Church. 
273 — Eighteenth,  east  of  Castro. 
274 — N.W.  cor.  Twenty  fourth  and  Guerrero. 
281 — San  Bruno  Road  and  Twenty- Eighth. 
291 — S.  W.  corner  Jones  an'l  Vallejo. 
312— N.  E.  corner  Jackson  and  Laguna. 
314 — S.  E.  corner  California  and  Laguna. 
321 — S.  E.  corner  Pierce  and  California. 
324 — S  E.  corner  Sacramento  and  Broderick. 
395 — S.  E.  corner  California  and  Central  ave 
326— S.  E.  corner  Sutter  and  Baker. 


SOUTH  SAN  FRANCISCO  BRANCH. 


3— N.  E.  cor.  First  avenue  and  Kentucky . 
4— S.  W.  cor.  Fifteenth  avenue  and  Post. 


5— East  side  Kentucky,  bet.  Sierra  and  Nev'a. 
6 — S.  W.  cor.  Butte  and  Kentucky. 


Seventy- nine  J9)  Gongs  and  Tower  Bells  are  operated  in  connection  with  this  office,  as  follows; 

Gongs  (large) 39 

Gongs  (small) 32 


BELLS. 


Of  4,500  pounds  weight. 

Of  2,000 

Of     800        " 

Of     300        " 


Total . 


The  Battery  power  consists  of  248  jars,  divided  as  follows: 


Gravity 

Electropoion . . 


Total. 


As  compared  with  last  year's  report,  this  shows  a  considerable  de: 
rhich  will  be  explained  further  on. 


157 

91 

-24S 

of  gravity  jars, 


248  FIRE    ALARM    TELEGRAPH. 

We  are  now  operating  one  hundred  and  twenty  miles  of  wire.  One  hun- 
dred miles  of  this  is  run  on  poles,  the  balance  on  houses. 

During  the  past  year  the  following  extensions  and  improvements  have 
been  made: 

We  have  put  up  twelve  miles  of  No.  9  galvanized  wire.  Six  miles  of 
this  was  used  in  the  construction  of  a  new  signal  circuit,  the  balance  in  gen- 
eral repairs.  The  new  signal  circuit  was  run  through  the  Western  addition 
and  enabled  me  to  not  only  locate  new  boxes  but  also  to  provide  that  section 
of  the  City  with  two  signal  circuits,  and  to  divide  up  the  boxes  so  as  to  give 
it  the  greatest  protection  possible  at  present. 

Twelve  Automatic  Boxes  were  placed  in  circuit,  two  replacing  Crank 
Boxes  removed  from  service  and  the  balance  being  new  boxes,  as  follows,  and 
located  as  per  official  list:  178,  251,  253,  291,  312,  314,  321,  324,  325,  226  =  10. 

A  line  was  run  from  this  office  to  that  of  Chief  Engineer  Scannell  and  the 
Fire  Commissioners,  and  connected  with  a  small  gong  there  and  so  arranged 
that  immediately  upon  the  first  tap  of  an  alarm  being  received  at  this  office, 
a  switch  is  turned  by  the  operator,  which  connects  this  line  with  the  line  on 
which  the  alarm  is  coming  and  enables  the  Chief  Engineer  to  receive  the 
alarm  a  few  seconds  before  the  regular  alarm  is  struck.  This  is  designated 
as  a  Tapper  line  and  has  given  satisfaction. 

As  a  number  of  companies  rendezvous  at  the  corner  of  Kearny  and  Mar- 
ket streets,  at  every  alarm,  where  they  wait  for  a  second  alarm,  and  it 
often  being  difficult  to  hear  a  bell  on  account  of  noise,  it  was  deemed  advis- 
able to  place  a  gong  in  the  neighborhood  upon  which  the  companies  could 
always  depend;  arrangements  were  therefore  made  and  a  fifteen-inch  Engine 
House  Gong  was  placed  in  the  establishment  of  Messrs.  Adam  and  Kibbe  on 
the  corner  of  these  streets,  which  is  accessible  to  the  Department  at  all  hours 
of  the  day  or  night. 

The  working  of  our  lines  is  frequently  interrupted  by  telephone  and  private 
wires,  and  to  protect  them  from  such  interruption  as  much  as  possible  I  have 
concluded  to  use  in  the  most  exposed  places  through  the  business  part  of  the 
city  (where  most  of  the  interruptions  occur),  No.  10  galvanized  line  wire, 
insulated  in  such  a  manner  as  to  prevent  interference  by  outside  lines  and 
this  in  connection  with  the  use  of  cornice  brackets,  i.e.,  iron  brackets  with  an 
insulator  on  the  upright  portion  and  attached  to  the  corners  of  the  cornices, 
will  place  our  lines  in  as  safe  a  position  as  is  possible  where  they  are  run 
over  houses. 

We  have  also  had  some  trouble  caused  by  the  wooden  pins  breaking  and 
letting  our  wires  down  in  the  streets  where  the  lines  turn  corners  and  pass 
from  one  street  to  another  at  right  angles,  and  to  obviate  this  I  have  devised 
an  iron  pin  8  inches  long  by  %  diameter;  one  end  of  this  is  placed  in  a 
mould  and  a  lead  head  with  screw  attached  to  fit  insulator  glass  is  moulded 
on  to  it;  this  I  found  to  be  a  success  and  since  commencing  to  use  them  have 
never  found  one  to  give  way. 


SUPERINTENDENT'S  REPORT.  249 

No  additions  were  made  to  the  local  line  at  South  San  Francisco,  but  the 
line  was  re-run  with  new  wire,  the  necessity  for  which  became  apparent  upon 
taking  down  the  old  wire,  some  portions  of  which  were'  found  to  be  in  very 
bad  condition,  caused  by  the  action  of  the  salt  water  on  the  marshes  over 
which  the  line  ran. 

The  gong  of  Engine  No.  11  which  is  on  this  line  was  overhauled,  cleaned, 
and  the  magnets  rewound,  which  removed  considerable  resistance  and  causes 
the  line  to  work  better. 

In  my  last  report  I  spoke  of  some  improvements  which  I  contemplated 
placing  in  the  Automatic  Boxes;  these  improvements  I  have  placed  in  most 
of  these  boxes  and  it  has  enabled  me  to  make  a  great  reduction  in  the  bat- 
tery on  these  lines ;  in  some  cases  it  amounts  to  a  reduction  of  fifty  and 
sixty  per  cent. 

Among  the  additions  to  the  instruments  in  the  office  has  been  a  combined 
Test  Switch  Board,  to  which  all  the  wires  are  brought,  where  they  are  so  ar- 
ranged that  a  number  of  necessary  tests  can  be  made  rapidly  and  with  accur- 
acy. 

To  provide  for  additional  signal  circuits  a  black  walnut  table  has  been 
placed  across  the  front  of  the  office,  and  on  this  are  placed  improved  regis- 
ters. The  old  registers  are  five  pen,  and  they  and  the  relays  used  in  connec- 
tion with  them  possess  a  number  of  serious  defects  which  I  have  overcome 
with  the  new  ones;  these  have  a  single  pen  and  each  has  two  main  line  relays 
and  two  local  alarm  bells,  together  with  necessary  switches  and  other  safe- 
guards, which  render  it  impossible  for  them  to  get  out  of  order. 

Among  other  improvements  contemplated  is  that  of  removing  the  wires 
on  Kearny,  Market  and  Third  streets,  which  are  run  over  houses,  and 
placing  them  on  a  line  of  30  and  -iO-foot  poles,  to  be  set  on  Dupout,  Mar- 
ket and  Third.  At  present  they  are  greatly  troubled  by  outside  wires,  and  are 
inaccessible  at  night;  to  place  them  on  these  poles  will  put  them  where  we 
can  always  get  at  them  and  they  will  be  less  likely  to  be  interfered  with. 

The  employees  of  this  Department  are: 

Superintendent JOHN  CURRAN 

Operator ALFRED  CLARKE,  Jr 

Operator , *. ROBT.  W .    SILVEY 

Operator WM.  MORTON 

Repairer W.  E .  ACKERSON 

Assistant  Repairer DANIEL  SHAY 

Assistant  Repairer J.  M.  KLBIN 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries  of  Employees — 

Superintendent $2,400  00 

Operators  (3)  at  $1,500  each 4,500  00 

Repairer 1,200  00 

$8,100  00 
Extensions  and  Repairs 9,975  35 


$18,075  35 


250  FIRE    ALARM   TELEGRAPH. 


During  the  year  245  alarms  were  given  through  the  Fire  Alarm  Telegraph, 
as  follows : 

Fires .• 207 

Second  Alarms 2 

Duplicate  Alarms 11 

False  Alarms 6 

Chimneys 18 

Bonfire 1 

Total ' 245 

In  addition  to  the  above,  an  alarm  was  struck  September  20,  1879,  an- 
nouncing the  arrival  of  General  Grant,  and  on  May  31,  1880,  the  bells  and 
gongs  were  tolled  in  honor  of  Decoration  Day. 

During  the  year  6,978  blows  were  struck  on  each  bell  and  gong,  making  a 
total  for  the  79  bells  and  gongs  of  551,262  blows. 


FIRE    ALARMS. 


251 


p 

o 

W 


-    5 


Totals 

t-         O         (N         00         C5         O                             Ot^ClOtNO 

3 

3 

CO             •         rH         <M             •         CO                             <M             •         CO                          •         rH 

!_S 

0 

r-<             'i-H^Hr-l(N                             (MTH(M(MrH 

T*« 

05 

JTH^rHTt«(MJ                                              ^iHJC^CO 

!  S 

00 

i-H                                        •    '      <N         iH                                                        CO             •         (M 

O5 

t^ 

•         CO             •         O             •         r-(                                              •         (M         i-l 

a 

S 

to 

I  IH       M        9*       »4       04                                     i-HCO(Ni-l(M(N 

Ob 

PH 

U3 

1^^:^^^             *  .   1     I           j      1 

t 

-* 

!         W         M         l-l             •             j                                50          rH          r-l                         iH 

rH 

co 

(MtN^l'rH-                                              I^^Hr-lrH 

0 

<N 

iH             •         <>5                                                                                   i-(         (M                       (M         i-l 

os 

H 

IMrHrH                                    r-l                             i-l'r-(                       rHfM 

0 

|>1 

i-H             •'         I-H         (N                       rH                                 •         i-H         rH                          •             ' 

t- 

O5 

3 

U  1  J  1  1   3  ^?  i     M 

i  a  4  j  i  §      1  1  i  i  ^ 
^^is^a      !  !  a  1  1  ! 

^S 

Totals. 

^JWCOIN^),^                             OSC503000SCO 

o 

rH 

rH                                     •        ^H                                       r-l        (N            •        r-l 

•0 

o 

i-<         CO                                                 (N                                 •         r-l                                        •         i-H 

00 

O5 

^      :    ^      :    ^      :               :    ^      :      :      :      : 

« 

oo 

rH                       rH         rH         rH 

^ 

^ 

rH.H.H::^            ^1:^^: 

o: 

3 

CO 

•         rH                                        '         rH                             i-H         (M         (N 

t^ 

< 

lO 

(N                                        •         rH         TH                             rH             '•         -*         (M             •         rH 

rH 

^ 

:      :      :    ^             «"      :      :      :      :      : 

Ttl 

CO 

(N                                                                                        rH        <N            •        rH        (M         (M 

0 

(N 

CO(M(NrH-rH                                              'rHrHrHi-H 

CO 

i-H-^rH-'i-l                                              'rHOqiM-^rH 

t^ 

(M 

i-H                       i-i             •'         r-H         (M                             r-1                                        •         i-H 

t~. 

1 

«  j  sUl   .ii"M  i.J 

^    I    1     I      §     1                 S     S     •§     =J       -     d 

Illlll        1  1  1  III 

J 

g 

252 


FIRE    ALARM    TELEGRAPH. 


TABLE    No.     2. 

SHOWING  THE  NUMBER  OF  ALARMS  EACH  DAY  OF  THE  WEEK 
AND  MONTH  OF  THE  YEAR. 


18 

A 

18 

30. 

| 

DAY  OF    WEEK. 

CH 

1 

1 

g 
I 

| 

! 

1 

1 

f 

t 

I 

: 

1 

P 

1 

1 

1 

5 

: 

Sunday 

t 

7 

9 

9 

1 

2 

3 

1 

7 

9 

3 

36 

Monday  

4 

2 

2 

5 

2 

2 

4 

2 

1 

7 

3 

34 

Tuesday  . 

3 

5 

2 

1 

2 

4 

3 

9 

1 

1 

2 

?, 

918 

Wednesday  

4 

3 

4 

3 

2 

2 

4 

33 

Thursday  

3 

1 

2 

4 

3 

5 

1 

4 

3 

4 

1 

5 

36 

Friday  

8 

5 

4 

2 

1 

4 

2 

1 

4 

2 

3 

1 

37 

Saturday  

3 

4 

2 

4 

3 

2 

4 

1 

9 

1 

5 

3 

41 

Totals  

31 

27 

18 

20 

15 

21 

19 

16 

28 

13 

21 

16 

245 

TABLE  No.  3. 

SHOWING  THE  NUMBER  OF  ALARMS  FROM  EACH  BOX 
DURING  THE  YEAR. 


w 

> 

a 

> 

W 

> 

to 

!> 

" 

> 

u 

~~^ 

W 

!> 

$ 

> 

cd 

> 

0 

x 

p 

0 

M 

s 

§ 

X 

P* 

o 

X 

§* 

o 
X 

| 

g 

gf 

8 

g 

3 

g 

9 

3 

p 

• 

H 

3 

3 

3 

: 

X 

i 

r 

00 

: 

; 

» 

CO 

2 

2 

23 



43 

2 

64 

3 

85 

2 

135 

3 

158 

2 

214 



248 



3 

24 

i 

45 

1 

65 

5 

86 

2 

136 

159 

2 

2151.... 

•251 

4 

25 

8 

46 

5 

67 

87 

1 

137 

"2" 

162 

216  .... 

253 

5 

4 

26 

3 

47 

2 

68 

3 

91 

5 

138 

163 

217 

l 

254 

6 

1 

27 

4 

48 

1 

69 

92 

1 

139 

"2" 

164 

218 

261 

'«" 

7 

28 

1 

49 

3 

71 

"i" 

!!:! 

142 

3 

172 

219 

l 

271 

l 

8 

•s" 

29 

51 

1 

72 

4 

94 

"i" 

143 

•2 

173 

231 

1 

273 

2 

9 

3 

31 

"i" 

52 

8 

73 

1 

95 

i 

145 

174 

i 

234 

3 

274 

1 

12 

2 

32 

i 

53 

74 

1 

123 

2 

146 

'»" 

175 

235 

2 

281 

1 

13 

2 

34 

i 

54 

i 

75 

2 

124 

147 

2 

176 

236 

4 

291 

14 

2 

35 

2 

56 

4 

76 

125 

"2" 

148  3 

178 

237 

312 

15 

3 

36 

57 

1 

78 

"2" 

126 

1 

149  1  1 

182 

•i" 

238  3 

314 

.... 

16 

37 

58 

4 

79 

.... 

127 

152 

183 

i 

241  .... 

321 

17 

2 

38 

"2" 

59 

2 

81 

'3 

128 

"i" 

153 

2 

192 

248  .... 

324 

18 

1 

39 

1 

61 

7 

82 

1 

129 

154 

4 

193 

245!.... 

325 

19 

9 

41 

4 

62 

7 

83 

1 

132 

2 

166 

1 

194 

246 

1 

326 

"3" 

O1 

.40 

ftO 

1 

84 

K 

134 

157 

^ 

213 

^ 

247 

1 

Zl 

vZ 

Do 

1 

REMARKS.  253 


The  attention  of  your  Honorable  Body  is  again  respectfully  called  to  the 
urgent  necessity  of  discarding  the  old  Crank  Box,  and  substituting  the  Auto- 
matic. Improper  turning  at  boxes  from  which  the  signal  is  given  by  the 
crank  is  still  the  rule,  and  a  perfect  signal  the  exception.  Although  the  at- 
tention of  key-holders  has  been  called  to  this  defect  repeatedly,  both  by 
printed  and  personal  explanation,  it  is  noticeable  to  as  great  an  extent  as 
ever,  and  there  is  but  little  hope  of  any  improvement  in  this  respect  until 
the  signaling  apparatus  of  the  boxes  is  changed.  Nothing  but  long  experi- 
ence and  a  thorough  familiarity  with  the  instruments  and  boxes,  which  have 
taught  the  operators  the  various  shapes  into  which  a  signal  can  be  tortured, 
has  in  many  instances  prevented  the  giving  of  a  wrong  alarm  and  a  conse- 
quent sending  of  the  Fire  Department  to  a  different  locality  from  where  the 
fire  was  located.  Something  is  needed  that  shall  place  it  beyond  the  power 
of  an  over-excited  or  over-cautious  party  to  give  an  imperfect  signal.  Our 
own  experience,  and  that  of  every  city  that  has  used  crank  boxes,  shows  con- 
clusively that  they  are  unreliable  and  should  be  discarded .  The  Automatic 
Fire  Alarm  Box  needs  only  to  be  seen  to  convince  any  one  of  their  great  su- 
periority over  the  cranks.  One  pull  at  a  hook  sets  in  motion  train  work  that 
gives  the  signal  with  unerring  accuracy,  and  it  seems  to  me  a  necessity  that 
all  our  old  crank  boxes  should  be  replaced  by  them,  for  where  so  much  is  at 
stake  no  argument  is  needed  in  favor  of  employing  the  very  best  means  that 
can  be  obtained  to  accomplish  the  desired  end,  viz.,  an  instantaneous  and 
definite  fire  signal.  If  the  Fire  Alarm  Telegraph  is  worth  anything  to  the 
Fire  Department,  it  should  be  pushed  to  its  utmost  efficiency^  We  have  in 
use  at  present  82  Crank  Boxes,  and  I  cannot  too  strongly  urge  their  retire- 
ment from  service  and  the  substitution  of  the  Automatic  Box  at  as  early  a 
date  as  possible. 

During  the  past  year  frequent  and  serious  interruptions  have  been  caused 
by  the  numerous  telephone  and  private  wires  throughout  the  city.  Boxes 
have  been  cut  out,  and  in  some  instances  our  wires  have  been  cut  and  their 
usefulness  destroyed  for  the  time  being,  as  during  such  period  no  alarm  could 
be  received  or  transmitted  to  the  Fire  Department,  and  unless  some  law  is 
passed  which  will  be  so  severe  as  to  dett-r  the  perpetrators  of  these  acts,  it 
will  some  day  result  in  a  serious  conflagration. 

It  sometimes  happens  that  persons  desiring  to  use  a  Fire  Alarm  Box  at 
night  are  unable  to  immediately  find  one,  owing  to  their  ignorance  of  the  lo- 
cation of  the  boxes.  For  this  reason  I  would  suggest  that  the  upper  part  of 
the  street  lamp  on  each  corner  that  has  a  box  be  fitted  with  red  glass,  which 
will  be  visible  for  several  blocks  in  every  direction,  and  will  always  be  a 
prominent  indication  of  the  location  of  a  box. 

In  conclusion,  I  wish  to  tender  my  thanks  to  his  Honor  the  Mayor,  the 
Board  of  Supervisors,  Fire  Department  Committee  of  the  Board  of  Super- 


254  FIRE    ALARM    TELEGRAPH. 

visors,  the  Board  of  Fire  Commissioners,  Chief  Engineer  Scannell  and  his 
assistants,  the  Board  of  Underwriters,  and  Captain  White,  of  the  Fire  Pa- 
trol, for  their  kindness  and  courtesy  to  this  Department;  and  I  also  take 
pleasure  in  returning  my  thanks  to  the  employees  of  this  office  for  their 
cheerful  co-operation  and  valuable  assistance  in  promoting  the  efficiency  and 
reliability  of  this  Department. 

All  of  which  is  respectfully  submitted. 

JOHN  CURRAN, 
Superintendent  Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph. 


REPORT 


OF  THK 


SUPERINTENDED  OF  PUBLIC  STREETS 
HIGHWAYS  AND  SQUARES. 


OFFICE  OF  THE  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  ) 

PUBLIC  STREETS  AND  HIGHWAYS,  j 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  19,  1880. 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — Herewith  I  have  the  honor  of  transmitting  my 
annual  report  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880. 

This  Department  during  my  administration  has  not  deviated 
from  a  strict  adherence  to  the  law  limiting  its  expenditures,  bet- 
ter known  as  the  "  McCoppin  one-twelfth  Act." 

No  work  has  been  done  on  unaccepted  streets,  which  Section 
19  of  Article  4  of  the  Constittionn  effectually  estops,  the  Supreme 
Court,  in  the  case  of  McDonald  vs.  Patterson,  having  decided 
said  section  to  be  mandatory,  requiring  no  legislation  to  put  it 
in  force. 

There  are  twenty-seven  miles  of  county  roads,  including  many 
bridges  and  culverts,  to  be  kept  in  repair,  necessitating  the  con- 
tinual employment  of  a  considerable  force  under  the  constant 


256  REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  STREETS. 

supervision  of  a  deputy;  they  are  now  in  good  condition,  but  the 
limited  amount  of  five  hundred  dollars  per  month,  set  apart  for 
that  purpose,  is  scarcely  adequate  to  keep  them  so,  especially  in 
inclement  seasons  of  the  year. 

Your  attention  is  respectfully  called  to  the  condition  of  the 
sewer  on  Eighteenth  street;  the  old  sewer,  composed  of  wood, 
having  almost  entirely  rotted  out,  it  is  impossible  to  maintain  the 
street  in  proper  repair;  in  many  places  the  surface  is  only  held 
by  the  arch  of  the  macadam.  I  would  therefore  earnestly  recom- 
mend that  a  new  sewer  be  constructed  before  the  rainy  season 
sets  in. 

I  would  also  call  attention  to  the  dilapidated  condition  of  the 
city  front,  there  being  no  authority  or  funds  under  my  control 
to  enable  me  to  remedy  the  evil. 

I  would  respectfully  recommend  to  your  Honorable  Board  the 
purchase  of  a  steam  roller.  No  pavement  of  any  description  will 
endure  for  any  length  of  time  without  a  solid  foundation,  and  I 
deem  it  to  be  true  economy  for  the  city  to  own  a  machine  so 
constantly  necessary. 

Eespectfully,  your  obedient  servant, 

WM.  PATTERSON, 
Superintendent  of  Public  Streets,  Highways  and  Squares. 


COST  OF  WORK  DONE  IN  FISCAL  YEAR  1879-80,  AS  PER 
ASSESSMENT  RECORDS. 

Grading $  98,949  44 

Macadamizing 56,629  27 

Planking 5,703  36 

Paving 45,770  02 

Sidewalks I 17,984  41 

Crosswalks  and  Curbs 29,738  54 

Gutterways 6,742  99 

Brick  Sewers 49,552  39 

Cement  Pipe  Sewers 4,690  98 

Ironstone  Pipe  Sewers , 20,462  35 

Redwood  Sewers ..  3,09765 


$339,321  40 


REMARKS.  257 


AMOUNT    DRAWN    FROM   STREET  DEPARTMENT  FUND,   FISCAL 
YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,   1880. 

Wages  for  labor  on  accepted  streets  from  July  1  to  November  30, 

1879 , $  36,016  94 

Wages  for  labor  on  accepted  streets  from  December  1,  1879,  to 

June  30,  1880 54,443  91 

Wages  for  labor  in  cleaning  sewers  from  July  1  to  November  30, 

1879 16,487  75 

Wages  for  labor  in  cleaning  sewers  from  December  1,  1879,  to 

June  30,  1880 21,983  50 

Street  sweeping — Laborers  employed  by  this  department 1,148  00 

Street  sweeping,  by  contract,  from  July  1  to  November  30,  1879.     26,001  00 
Street  sweeping,  by  contract,  from  December  1  to  June  30,  1880.     20,646  00. 

Material  account,  from  July  1  to  November  30,  1879 41,842  86 

Material  account,  from  December  1,  1879,  to  June  30,  1880 31,779  90 

Drawn  out  of  fund  for  use  of  county  roads,  from  July  1  to  No- 
vember 30,  1879 4,552  00 

Drawn  out  of  fund  for  Pioneer  Park  by  Board  of  Supervisors  . . .          545  00 
Assessments  against  city  and  government  property  from  July  1 

to  November  30,  1879 23,174  71 

Assessments  against  city  and  government  property  from  Decem- 
ber 1,  1879,  to  June  30,  1880 6,91560 


Total $285,537  17 


Amount  expended  on  county  roads  from  July  1  to  November  30, 

1879 $  8,240  00 

Amount  expended  on  county  roads  from  December  1,  1879,  to 

June  30,  1880 5,066  50 


Total $  13,306  50 


Expended  for  stationery  and  printing  from  July  1,  1879,  to  June 

30,1880 $     1,18778 


258 


REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  STREETS. 


ft 

H 

S3 

M 

a 

«4 
ft 
^ 
0 
«1 

a 

as 

M 


88S§£§! 

t-  t-  t~  t~  M  1C  < 


o  . 

§1111111 


:11^  :§ 

;  c«  rt  cS     •  o 


"  >r: 

-H    5    O! 


&J& 


':ss°« 

iii« 

2££, 


111 


SIDEWALKS. 


259 


8rHCO^<M 
S»t-^ 


0          oo  oo  IQIO  in 

ift  i-H  <M  <£  lO  t-  C-l  t- 

(Nom-*csooo-*o5Oinooo6<>JOioioooi« 
1—  *-t  >>]  f>i  <>i  o  *M  ic  c:  o  -^  o  o  'M  Ci  cc  -^  T— (  c<i  I-H  CM  t-» 

It^-^         OtMOrHO         ClO-^rH(XlG5-*OlOir5lOOOIM 


gfomery.. 

Ti    •    • 

.......          .  G     •     •     • 

Webster  
d  to  Twenty-four 
ti  to  Hvde  
o  Rrorlorick 

.  f=i 

ill 

111 
1-SiS 

•      :  :  '•  :  :£  :  : 

•                 .     "     .     .  t~l 

'.    >3      ' 

'.~a   '. 

i  il 

*|y 

lijijlfi 

llsjllli 

i  to  Lark 

ids.  .  . 

js  i 

S-Orfi 

o  a  •§ 

iili 

Itl^ 

kl 

1 

L 

Mil 

s  : 
S^= 


11  ; 


as  il 


260 


REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  STREETS. 


i  00  O  00  C<l  CO  CO  O 


O  CO  t--  O  O  C-l 


-  t^-  1>-  1--  < 


CQ 


EH 
H 

p 


'^^o 


•PH 

|3 

O          •  cS 

-u  bebc'S 


:| 

•  >i 

il . 

ISJ 


:18 

•  sO 
:  o 


•-e   .  •  o 

I  ;i| 

II;  is 

£3  :  --3 


•  SJ3     •     • 
ill    :    j 

•EH  >>  :  . 

:  S  c   :  a 

Illil 


IPS  ; 


:S  : 


«S 


illll 

:      :o0     OH  '«••«•      :§0^°- 

bO  bK  he ^ --=  be-*3  0-12  b£  be  g  bo  bxi  be  "  iO  ?  b£  be  be 

E5c^iaclm*:'^!=cSccc-S^0cccc 
S  g'u  c  o  '53  g^j  o  '5  'S  £'cc'33'35  «  c  -^  y'7.'~'7. 

s  s  a  §^  ••a*>sLl  s«sssf««Ss( 


ifl<SiS  i 
:•§•§•§  i 

•  cS  c$  c«     • 

:222  i 


c^  :  ^fl  ': 
£&  :  illl  ! 


;il 


••e  •£  o  *, 

:§  :Jo^  :  :  i  :  j 

:  2  -oQfe  .  .  .  .  : 


JJ     .-OT3T3 

Iflgi 


:»a=>S§SS 
Hi  Illl 

;T3  J3g   ^5  OT  » 


«  o- 


•2-2-2-S-SaSbl3  S 

Sj3acSC3«333 


GUTTERWAYS PLANKING. 


261 


<M  t-  O  O  lO  I 


.S  5»C  be  bo 

fill 


:22  : 
.  ill? 

I  SSI 

SS   :i§§ 


£ *% 

EH  EH  H  f 


O 

^ 

PH 


:^?§8S^25i8 

><-3«^<^-*P!*P 


fc£       •« 

yip: 


bbv 


l-Nl 


<U  •<  a 


262 


REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  STREETS. 


& 
ft 

M 
> 

«i 

PH 


£ 

:  i-2 


>  ,'  • 


Illll  ;< 

§  3 .2  o  2  g=  |  g3  |,c  ^  ?f  fc«  be  be  b:_o  ^3^  i/  tc  ^5  .«  "V^ 


•>o*ijy>i*ii^itUfiftfiftf* 
jOOJOOOOOOOO&HO 


SO^ 


;1|  :*  ;9lilli  •  : 

:^d  :gl:^s5^S^S  :  ' 

:?j  io-^S'SS'ol-c  :§• 

!i||lll!lli 
Hi  jlNl^lil 

ix  S  :  g«is>^^-^^^  :  c 
i^r^^Sccccse^-r;. 


^OO  COXOOOOrHr-l      ^  jGiGO         (MCO  ^     ^^^-^^  -^Ti— I  <N  ^  ^ 


BRICK  SEWERS. 


263 


CO  O      •  -*  SO  • 


t-  •Ovn-*l 
M  •  r-i  t--  to 
?H  -(MM  J 


o  co          c>  co  ce  to  so  -<*i  ~  jo  --D  & 


COOC5CO  Oi 


M 


PQ 


£  :  :  :  :c-^^§  : 
2  :  :  :    |sl|  : 
^  •  •  •  J'S  a-5^1  • 
v  :  :  :ifc>jfSS  : 
s  :  :  :w  0^S  es  : 

Valencia  

3ro  and  Scott  

'age  
k  to  Waller  

o  Page  
k  to  Devisadero.  .  .  . 
to  Eighth  

o  Hermann  

>  Broderick  
to  Fillmore  

<  js  y,  o>  c 


i 


:  «>T3  »••;•• 

.02^  ca  :  •  •• 

•  -3  -5  rf  -3  •  :  j 


^^^&i§»l»ltiijl| 

r±'^r^'--C-.F-r-*p-»^MM^    £--*•?      ^      ^ 


264 


REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  STREETS. 


2S|222§  ' 

s|iii|iiii||j||.illilili|ll|il|f 


SEWERS. 


265 


H 

O 

O 

ft 
PH 


J 

1 

1 

LINEAL 

1-1 

STREETS  BETWEEN. 

to  Brannan  
o  Diamond  
westerly  from  Fourth  

III 

1 

1 

s  : 

a)"n_o 

H 

Ei 

o  oo 
oo  ri 

M    S    3 

"3  cs  » 

H 


02 

W 
f^ 

M 

£H 

H 

£5 

a 

O 


' 

1181  i 

BAL  FEET. 

(M        10                       OS 
O  O  1O  00  (N  00                  00 

N" 

K 

3 

i      :      '-  i 

'.         '.         '.    '. 

.    . 

:      :      :  : 

§ 

^      :      :  : 

I 

•a     :     :  : 

STREETS  E 

1  i 

yjii 

i 

if 

i  « 

1 

•"S 

s 

nsli 

>.^>>tJoS)g 

"3  3  3_=  j=  § 

266 


REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  STREETS. 


N 


i»-i^jiOoe<JtHgo^i-t3ooQia3M!-iio«5wi 

M  ^i-l  IT.  t-  CO  -O  O  -O  -*  W  C<l  rH         CO  CO  (M^t-  t-  i 

rjTpH1         T^T  r-T  o'^jTirT 


rH  O  T— I  10  C^  O  X  '^  >~  -*-  »* 
O  Ci  1C  CO  •*  7-1  ffi  OO  M  10  1'- 

~'"rrH  cC^eif wfg^ 


' 


ill 


:£ 


;t 


:1' 


111 


llfl 

ill 


MACADAMIZING. 


267 


§<M  '. 
!--< 

^>«5: 


oowcsso-^c 
c-  oo  co  rn  r-i  » 


oooo 
o  o  m  t-  C 


M  IO  OS  O  r-i  iH  3  t-  CO  C:  r^  rH  -TI  -T'!  '•  i  r5 
X'  r-l  S  S  «C  W  OT  OS  IO  W  IN  N  CQ  t-  OO  iH  i 


.ssas^s 

"*  I-H  ^H  j5  " 

Itlll    i    i    ::::: 

^:'! ","  ^i 

ii : 

•*  S  2  I  fi  R  2  8  8  £  2  £ 

>a^ooooociac>oooi/2i>O:e£-i 

.  -  .  .      .  .      :  :  £  '3  c   :  :  :  :  2  §   :  : 

>O a>«so        ...-SS.. 

;l:    ;;  i  fjlliil] 

J?  :         :  :SS  :o§-g-S  :?  :^  :g 

:^aosil^§:;j§;b 

:|-|-aS|ll-g|3l|f  3  = 

ft  ill  jJHIUHIj  IttHitii 

:  p  o>  O!  ci    -    •    '•    •    •    •    • 
C5'cTci"~lt-"o"o'o''^  ^^^r-^^00oo 

^^^^t-i^J-itj^cO  >        ^^0  OOGOOO 

•2'£2'QX:^3X!X!^35'^i3^?^<;<1     "    -    -    '  «*5 'jfe-f  <N"rvf  (N"r<r 

SSSSgSggsrf§§p3£(N03a)CJ'~l=<">"^'>'tN<>l 


268 


REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  STREETS. 


ft 
^ 
P3 


0?        r^r-T^Tr-T       t  ^""^^T 


r-ToT     coo'^ 


. 


:  > 

•  r^ 


GRADING. 


269 


CO  I~  1C  O 
OfNt-CO 


firft-T     ,-T     i-T     CN"-*"     c£     i-Tio't'rrfai'i-i'.jgfaC 

<N         r-l         rH         (N  ,H  t-         <N 


ill* 

s^§ 


W 


•a ; 


:§  ;°^  i 

:  rf   .  o>  -  ^  -^> 

rs  oj  3  2  >;  M 

i«8fl|l| 

:o^>^&-?: 


I    SM^O^.O    ^-     o         iafig^fig 

5  a>^  •SgglS^s'-S-s  tie  *• » tigs  8-^33 

31 III 111 §1 |il iiiili^lsl 


;  a 

>^  3  £\£i  5 


« 

00  00  CO  00  00  CO  £ 


270 


REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  STREETS. 


>t~-<coGicc<Mir:c'5C>c 

oo  !-<  i-  J.  ~.  '  -  7-  i  -  ~. 

CM  1C  C>1         ^J<I>»T}iC<l-^ 


02 

PQ 
& 
P 
O 

ft 
jz; 

<J 

00 

M 

Hi 

<! 
^ 

02 
02 
O 

P5 
Q 


•  in    •    •          oo    •ost^^-^co    •         •  co  co  GJ  •**  Si 


^g|^  ;;;*.;::     ^ 
§3^  :  :  :£  :::::« 


S^^ 


Sp.pt 
Slil|5 


o  «  o  ""  tr  bi)  i>c  i  si  be  be  he  fce'T  bo*?  *5  -^  bio  ti,  tJo5  t/D 
*  .-S  S  S  .c  .5  .=  c  .c  3 .5  .=  .c  £c  33  "  .=  .=  .gt!  | 


"  ' 


Oa 
Fel 
ave 


£  2  g  2 

o  o  o  o 

|ssa-B^ 

S  S  S  S  o  -3 

EmfcfeiS^. 


:J!&1 


• 

c3  S  -g  3  JS  >>  ^     '•     '.  >> 


ggSSSSSS'- 

r-Tr-rrH~r-r-«  lo'in'oo"  3 


I  CO  ^  iN  ^  < 


^H  O 

ftS1S 


< —  • — •  •— ^  *~  --'-^rs^j^ora 

Illlplllll 


CROSSWALKS  AND  CURBS. 


271 


rri^i^gir^ii-Pio.^ 

IllSlt,SlJ*il*IlS«l*I-S 


',    « 

IIIIIII1II44I111I1IIIIIIIIMII 


272 


REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  STREETS. 


EECAPITULATION  OF  WOEK  DONE  ON  THE  STEEETS  OF  SAN  FEANCISCO  FOE  THE 
FISCAL  YEAE  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880.  (As  shown  by  Assessment  Eecords.) 

4! 

s 
3 
O 

s 

«! 

^^^S^SSS;  :§    &^^SS§    ^ 

JlIISSSS  il  lllilS  S 

toxic    r£-<fi-*cD  '.  c<r   o^oro"^"^^   ® 
^                      :                          SI 

Flushing   Holes 
and  Covers. 

6 
ft 

:::::::::         '^^^  :  : 

Manholes  and 
Covers. 

o 
K 

:      :  :      :  :  : 

"  :"  :  f  :  :  :          *            : 

Corners. 

£ 

%  :-*  :*  :  :§  :^    ^i^^  :  : 

Gutterways. 

4 

::::::::::::::::§ 

o 

i 

1 

Redwood. 

Cement 
Pipe. 

|l 

al 

;•;;;;  ;  ;  ;  .  r-T 
;  '      ;;;;;.*'      *      '  °J 

c4" 

I.  S.  Pipe. 

c  ~S 

a| 

'.  '.     '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.:    S 

:  :      ::::::::::§ 

•    •    -of 

Sick. 

.^5 

'^'- 

I'..'.'.'.'.'.'....  to 
oT 

CJ 
!<5 

•<! 
ft 

Basalt. 

4 

;  i  :  ;  ;  :  ;  ;  :  :  :| 

Cobble. 

#1 

Composite. 

d-1 

OQ(^ 

..'.::  :a 

SIDEWALKS. 

Asphalt. 

*l 

Plank. 

II 

:  :      :      :    S 

•:  ;   ;   :  g 

.  :     .     .    "* 

•      10" 

<N 

Macadam. 

*S 

:  :      j      :! 

00      . 

II 

|g 

§* 

Stone  Curbs. 

c-S 

3£ 

.      .            .         (M 

i  ;   !  S 

-        o" 

Crosswalks. 

3£ 

.    .        .  <?a 
I    .        .  t-T 

Redwood 
Curbs. 

p-g 

ag 

I    I      so1 

Planking. 

la 
fa« 

ii 

Grading. 

« 
"C 

>H 

3 
O 

•  •* 

'•& 

Macadam  and 
Foundation. 

^5 

1 

S 

I 

oT 

H 

O 

a  a    a 


o 
m 

S 
3 

PXn   IH 

^^ 

O     53 
O  "a 

3 


Is 
!<s 

1* 
2£ 
f* 

(9 

00    OS 

-SES 
^ 

"&£ 

!•? 

|o 

H£ 


^   3 


SHERIFFS  REPORT. 


OFFICE  OF  THE  SHERIFF  ) 

Of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  j 

To  the  Honorable  tJie  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — In  accordance  with  Resolution  No.  14,765  (New 
Series)  of  your  Honorable  Body  I  herewith  respectfully  submit 
the  folio  wing  report: 

Having  assumed  the  duties  of  Sheriff  on  the  3d  day  of  Decem- 
ber, 1879,  I  can  only  present  a  statement  of  the  operations  of 
this  office  for  the  last  seven  months,  except  as  relates  to  jail  sta- 
tistics, which  I  am  able  to  lay  before  you  for  the  last  fiscal  year. 

Respectfully, 

THOS.  DESMOND, 

Sheriff, 


18 


274  SHERIFF'S  REPORT, 

FEES  RECEIVED  AND  PAID  TEEASUEER, 

SFPERIOK  COUHT  DEPARTMENT. 

1879— December $495  991 

1880— January 2,975  63 

February, 4,494  03 

March, Ir280  48 

April 2,162  45 

May .  4,076  89 

June 3,954  91 

$19,420  38 
JUSTICES'   COUBT  DEPARTMENT. 

1879— December $531  79- 

1880— January 717  64 

February 861  95- 

March. 667  80 

April 802  65- 

May 570  16 

June 808  09 

4,960  08 


Total < ., ., $24,380  46 


STATISTICS    OF    COUNTY    JAIL. 


275 


Larceny,  Petty  

OOW£;S$5H;g3**-«M« 

rH 

Larceny,  Grand  

(M<N-*QOrH«5rH(MCOOOi-H-H 

5 

Felony 

!          i-H          i-H          <M          00          0,          l-H          !N              .          <N          ,-1 

0 

Forgery  

rH         i-H                      l-H         i-H             •         rH         <N         <N 

05 

Embezzlement  

<NW(NM<0«rH<?l(N<N                          : 

0 

J 

Desertion,  U.  S  

LO                                                                             •           rH 

CD 

3 

Disch  arging  Fire 
Arms  

rH                         •         <N                                                                •         i-H 

* 

9 

Disturbing  the  Peace 

- 

3 

Drunkenness  

ft  fe  »  ft  '.  .  ?-.  ar:  '  ?l  :.  ':  *'  .  Va  .  "»  '  *  ^ 

o 

| 

Detained    Witnesses 

OOrHrHW^I^^O            jrH^rH 

§ 

§ 

Carrying    Burglars' 
Tools  

::::::::    ^      :    -      : 

* 

B 

Cruelty  to  Animals  .  . 

rHrH            I         04         «N            jrHrH            IrHCO            j 

S 

£ 

w 

Carrying    Concealed 
Weapons  

^0,^0,00,000,0,00^ 

S 

o 

Contempt  of  Court  .  . 

(NpHrHrH              l|Hl-H                        <N              -rH 

0      . 

EH 

Counterfeiting,  U.  S. 

rH:jrHrH,fl;^rH;:: 

2 

02 

fc 

Barratry,  U.  S  

•         i-H         rH 

•M 

o 

Begging 

rHrH(M50            :0<M(MrH(MC<IrH 

§5 

H 
O 

Bigamy  

;;;;;,       ;           ;      !      ; 

^ 

ffl 

Burglary,  Attempt  to 

•    <M    I-H            :      '.      '.      '. 

0, 

^ 

Burglary  

or-ooooooTtiC-JNo 

05 

rH 

Batter}'  .  .  . 

Tt(QOh~t--.O(MCO(M(MeOOr-l 

C5 

C§ 

Arson  

i   i   ;   ;   ;       :   ;   :  ^       : 

^ 

Assault    to    Commit 
Rape  

i  H   j   j   ;      :   ;   ;   ;      ; 

rH 

Assault  with  Deadly 
Weapon  

»            j            j        W            j                      rHrHrHO,^rH 

CO 

Assault  

^0,           ioiOSIM                    (NWtNrHO, 

1O 

ooooooonooooGOoooooooooo 

0 

1  1 
8   s 

H 
\ 

;    i  I  j  |  |  ^  b   i    :       ! 

ttflllllSlii 

1 

276 


STATISTICS    OF    COUNTY    JAIL. 


1 

1  S  §  S  S  8  1  i  8  I  1  2 

5-5 

S" 

Assault  on  High  Seas 

:::::::::    ^ 

^ 

Violating  Saloon  Or- 
dinance    

•         (M                         •         r-l 

CO 

Violating  E  1  e  e  ti  o  n 
Law,  U.  S  

CO 

CO 

H 
p 

SE 

Violating     Revenue 
Law,  U.  S  

22SSS23SSSS2 

i 

Vulgar  Language  .  .  . 

3 

1 

Smuggling,  US  

rH                '       (M                        rH 

^ 

g 

Safe-keeping  

rH                                                                                    •          r-i 

C^l 

Robbery,  Attempt  to 

| 

Commit  

:           :::::; 

Robbery  

-HOOCOCOOOCO«O^OOCO<N 

do 

W 

1-1 

|Q 

g 

Receiving  Stolen 
Goods  

*     :     ::    -,  7            :-:::: 

N 

£ 
W 

53 

Resisting  U.S.  Offi- 
cer   

:      i      :      :      :                  :      :      ':    *      : 

* 

Rape  

:      :      :      :      :                  :      :      :    "> 

* 

w 
% 

Prisoners  en  Route.  . 

!£>                         •         CO         •*                      rH            •         i-l            •         rH 

S 

o 

02 

Perjury  

rH         rH            j         „         rH         rH                      CO            j            j         rH 

O 

s 

Personating  an  Oni- 
cer,  r.  s  

,H            .         <N            .            .         rH            ;            ;            .            .         rH 

0 

§ 

Obtaining    Goods 
Falsely  

tN                                      <N          rH              •          rH 

•J5 

^ 

Malicious  Mischief.. 

C^ 

CHARGES 

Misdemeanor,        Va- 
grancy, Visiting 
and  Keeping  Hous- 
es of  111  Fame  and 
Opium  

-*OOi-JC!-r-ICO005MCCt^ 

5 

Murder,  Attempt   to 

rH^^^CO<NCO<N05<NCl(N 

>r. 

Murder  

CO         T-I         CO       -<M         CO         SO         -H                         -(NCMCM 

51 

:    rH      '-      :      :      :      :                 :      : 

rH 

Lib.-l      ... 

:      :           ,      :      :      :      :    rn      :      . 

rH 

. 

S5     op     oc      00-    -«o     2    " 

0 

1  j 
s. 

M  1  j  I  i  1  &  i   i 

^:  1   i  1   1  1    I   1  1  d 

lilll  I  i  i  i  III 

i 

SHERIFF  S    REPORT. 


277 


H      - 

co<NOOrHcNrHmt~«j-icoo 

<N 

a 

il 

On  Bail  

:     :    -     :                :                     :     : 

rH 

II 

Serving  Sentence..  . 

:      :      :      :                ^                     «    e> 

00 

22  02 

Legally  Discharged  . 

ssss^sssssa- 

1 

Transported  to  State 
Prison  .   .         

so^oooo^c,^.,^^^        i 

s 

Taken  to  Insane  Asy- 

!            I             I                                      rH              ' 

lum  

Sent  to  City  Prison 
to  work  as  Trusties 

•         i-H         <N                                      •         rH                          •         rH            •'         <M 

^ 

Serving  Sentence... 

'.'.'.                                                                        rH         O         t-         SO 

O5 

Sent    to    House    of. 
Correction  

a      <M      e<s      53      oo      eo        -*M        -IM        •.- 

lO 

02 

Paid  Fines  or  Part  of 
Fines  

«'.;*".'  i.  .  *  .'  a  ';«'.'  ^."i  .'.».  *  -  « 

0 

Prisoners    Awaiting 
Trial  

-      !""S2§333SS 

(M 

b 

Pardoned  by  the  Gov- 

^     :      :::::::::: 

,_, 

ernor  

O 
H 

On  Bail  

SSSSSS^^S^1"      : 

OS 

1 

Legally      Discharged 
at     Expiration    of 

rH         Ci         1--         O5         '-O         ---I         •*         O         CO         CO         1^         JO 

CO         <3i         0         :0         0         0         ^         tO         CO         05         CO         10 

1 

s 

Sentence  or  by  Or- 
der of  Court  

••* 

Discharged    on    Ha- 

beas   Corpus  

::::::           :            : 

. 

Dismissed  Cases.  .  .  . 

Discharged    on     His 
Own  Recognizance 

:      :    ^      :    ^    rn    rn      :      :      : 

CO 

Delivered  to  Sheriffs 
of  Other  Counties. 

;;;;;;;;-- 

(M 

Bills  Ignored  

rH         rH         „         „             j            j            j            j            . 

CO 

l^-        1--         1^         I—        i-^        T-         00         00         OO         CO         00         O 

k, 

0 

1       1 

3     H 

0        33 

I 

J!  yli  IH  \\ 

i  !  !  !  I  !  !  !  I  !  i  I 

1 

278  SHERIFF'S  REPORT. 

Male  prisoners  during  the  year 2,075 

Female  prisoners  during  the  year 177 


Total 2,252 

Male  prisoners  in  jail,  July  1st,  1880 220 

Female  prisoners  in  jail,  July  1,  1880 12 


Total..  232 


NUMBEE  OF  PEISONERS 

IN  JAIL  JULY  1,  1880,  AWAITING  TRIAL  ON  THE  FOLLOWING  CHARGES. 

For  Murder...  15 


For  Assault  to  Murder 

For  Assault  with  Deadly  Weapon . 

For  Burglary 

For  Forgery 

For  Grand  Larcen y 

For  Robbery 

For  Embezzlement 

For  Rape 


For  Violation  of  United  States  Revenue  Laws 

Serving  Terms  of  Sentence  for  Minor  Offenses,  City  and  County. 


Total 

Yours,  respectfully, 


70 


For  Felony 

For  Perjury 

For  Mayhem I         1 

IS 
41 


THOS.    DESMOND, 

Sheriff. 


OF  THE  CHIEF  OF  POLICE. 


OFFICE  OF    THE    CHIEF    OF    POLICE,          ^ 
San  Francisco,  July  1,   1880.  j 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco  : 

GENTLEMEN — In  compliance  with  Kesolution  No .  14,765  (new 
series),  of  your  Honorable  Board,  I  submit  herewith  the  annual 
report  of  the  Police  Department  for  the  year  ending  June  30, 
1880. 

Schedule  "A"  exhibits  the  number  and  tabulated  statements 
of  the  arrests  made  by  the  police  during  the  year. 

Schedule  "B"  shows  the  number  of  arrests  by,  and  strength 
of  the  police  force  for  eighteen  years  preceding  June  30,  1880. 

Schedule  "C" — cash  received  during  the  year  from  Sheriffs  of 
other  counties,  masters  of  vessels  and  others  for  keeping  of  pris- 
oners in  the  city  prison. 

Schedule  "D"  exhibits  the  value  of  property  reported  as  lost 
or  stolen  during  the  year,  and  amount  recovered  by  the  police. 

Schedule  "E"  exhibits  the  number  of  witnesses  subpoenaed 
for  the  several  Courts  of  Criminal  jurisdiction  for  the  year  end- 
ing June  30,  1880. 

Schedule  "F" — Unclaimed  property  or  money  in  possession  of 
the  Chief  of  Police  to  June  30,  1880. 

Schedule  "G-"  exhibits  the  number  of  police  stations  and 
their  location. 

Schedule  "H" — Comparative  statement  of  population,  police 
force,  number  of  arrests,  average  number  of  arrests  to  each  officer, 
and  ratio  of  population  to  police  force. 

Schedule  "I" — Summary  of  action  taken  by  the  Board  of 
Police  Commissioners  in  the  supervision  of  retail  liquor  dealers' 
licenses  from  January  1,  1880,  to  June  30,  1880. 


280  CHIEF  OF  POLICE'S  REPORT. 

POLICE  STATIONS. 

The  growth  of  the  city  and  increase  of  population  has  required 
the  establishment  of  branch  police  stations  in  several  locations, 
as  will  appear  by  schedule  "  G." 

These  stations  are  connected  by  telephone  with  the  central 
office,  and,  if  necessary,  the  officers  there  detailed  can  be  con- 
centrated more  speedily  than  under  the  former  system. 

Some  of  these  stations  are  inconveniently  situated,  and  are  not 
well  adapted  to  the  requirements  of  the  service,  and,  in  view  of 
the  fact  that  the  want  of  these  facilities  will  be  continuous  until 
supplied,  I  would  urge  that  it  would  be  a  useful  and  economic 
measure  for  the  city  to  purchase  suitable  lots,  and  thereon  build 
police  stations  fully  adapted  to  our  wants. 

The  experience  of  other  cities  shows  the  utility  of  having  per- 
manent branch  police  stations  owned  by  the  city. 

LIQUOR   LICENSES. 

The  act  to  equalize  and  facilitate  the  collection  of  licenses  in 
the  city  and  county  of  San  Francisco,  approved  March  23,  1878, 
which  gives  the  Police  Commissioners  power  to  supervise  (to  a 
limited  extent)  the  issue  of  retail  liquor  dealers'  licenses,  has  pro- 
duced satisfactory  results. 

Under  it  a  considerable  sum  of  delinquent  license  has  been 
collected,  and  many  places  have  been  closed  which  should  not 
have  been  allowed  to  continue  business  if  there  had  previously 
been  any  law  to  reach  them . 

In  proportion  as  the  Police  Commissioners  have  laid  on  their 
restraining  hand,  resistance  has  developed  to  the  enforcement  of 
the  law,  and  suits  have  been  brought  to  overthrow  their  au- 
thor ii,y. 

These  suits  have  been  decided  adversely  to  the  plaintiff,  and 
thereis.no  reason  to  believe  that  any  other  conclusion  can  be 
reached  in  the  proceedings  which  are  still  pending. 

The  action  of  the  Board  on  this  subject  is  shown  in  schedule 

K   T      » 

All  of  which  is  respectfully  submitted. 

P.  CEOWLEY, 

Chief  of  Police, 


STATEMENT    OF    ARRESTS. 


SCHEDULE    "A." 

TABULATED  STATEMENT  OF  ARRESTS   MADE  BY   THE    POLICE    DEPARTMENT    OF 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  DURING  THE  YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


CRIMES. 

1879. 

1880. 

H 

GO 

tn 
£ 

<<T 

> 

f 

i 

$ 

J^ 

* 

o 
•3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

*ri 

cr1 

5 

1 

fe. 

a 
| 

1 

CH 

Alms  House  (persons  for) 

1 

1 

5 

1 

9 

1 

2 

3 
1 

i 

3 
1 

1 

2£ 
I 

loi 

< 
218' 
14* 

4« 
15' 
] 
23* 
4( 
3 
10' 
5 

i 

i 
Iff 

26, 
1 
33 
865 
47 
1 
13 
3< 

i 

4 

6 
2 

7, 
7 
1 
6 

37 

Arson  

Assault  . 

13 
1 
204 
17 

2 

12 
3 
157 
17 

12 
1 
196 
9 

13 

10 
1 

6 

9 

9 

8 

6 

2 

8 
1 

7 

Assault  (indecent).   .   . 

Assault  and  Battery  
Assault  with  a  Deadly  Weapon. 
Assault  to  commit  Bodily  In- 
jury      

228 
11 

178 
12 

166 
10 

1 

176 
12 

261 

17 

161 
13 

157 

7 

1 

152 
9 

153 
14 

3 
2 
9 

Beggars  (healthy)  

5 

4 

18 

5        3 

7       8 

9 
25 
1 

3 

27 

iS 

2 
9 

2 
10 

3 
3 

Bench  Warrant 

15 

13 

Bigamy  

Burglary 

35 

14 
3 

"s 

is 

6 
3 
10 

11 

4 
4 
12 

18 
4 
2 
11 

19 
7 
5 
11 

22 
2 
1 
13 
3 

25 

8 
8 
14 

22 
6 
2 
3 
3 

26 
3 
4 
2 
1 

20 

"*€ 

7 

2 

13 
3 
2 
10 
1 

Burglary  ('attempted)  .   . 

Burglar's  tools  (carrying)  
Burglary  (second  degree)  
Conspiracy  

""& 

Cruelty  to  Children 

Contempt  of  Court  

1 

1 

1 

3 
23 
8 

1 

"*2 

14 

'"i 
11 

24 
1 

1 



15 

Counterfeiting  

2 
7 
23 
1 
40 
625 
34 
4 

1 

5 
24 
1 
9 
561 
44 

1 
11 
20 
8 

3 
18 
23 

Cruelty  to  Animals  .  . 

7 
23 
2 
17 
706 
39 
g 

12 

25 

28 
618 
34 

15 
21 

1 
47 
920 
33 

19 

28 

Concealed  Weapon  (carrying)  .  . 
Deserters 

Disturbing  the  Peace  
Drunk 

23 

805 
30 

29 
694 
34 

45 
688 
64 

10 

727 
46 

19 

678 
31 

40 
917 
51 

24 
716 
32 

Drunkard  (common)  

Election  Law  (violating^ 

Embezzlement  
Escape  from  Industrial  School  . 
Escaped  from  Jail  

7 
1 

15 
1 

1 

6 

11 
4 

12 
4 

8 
2 
2 

12 
7 

1 

38 

9 
1 
1 

4 
11 

7 
5 

10 
3 

'"i 

Escaped  from  State  Insane  Asy- 
lum 

1 

Escaped  from  State  Prison  
Exhibiting  a  Deadly  Weapon.  . 
Exhibiting    Obscene     Publica- 
tion, etc  

'"i 

1 

'  "i 

i 

i 

4 
5 
2 
1 

1 

A 

3 

2 

11 
11 

1 

1 

4 

5 
1 

8 
6 

2 

1 
2 
1 
13 

9 
6 

1 
4 
1 
14 

7 

11 
4 
1 

1 

6 

6 
3 

3 

8 

"26 

'"l 
40 

1 

Felony  

4 

"  'o 
3 

4 
3 

3 

'"i 

6 

1 

2 

2 
6 

2 
6 
3 
19 
2 
1 
64 

1 

1 

'"i 

9 
3 

"-6 
1 

2 

'"2 

2 
16 

7 

0 
1 

10 
2 

6 
15 

'"9 

Fugitive  from  Justice  
Fire  Arms  (dischargitig)  
Forgery  
False  Pretences  (obtaining  mo- 
ney and  goods  by)  
Furious  Riding  or  Driving  
Gambling  (Faro)  

Gamblin""  (Lottery) 

A 

Gambling  (Dice)    

1 
2 

48 

1 
1 

78 

Gambling  (Tools  in  possession) 
Gambling  House  (visiting)  
Game  Laws  (violating)  
Hackmen(f  or  overcharging,  etc.  ) 

1 

2 

3 
6 

'"3 

'"2 

20 

44 

71 
1 

282 


CHIEF    OF    POLICES    REPORT. 


SCHEDULE     "  A  "—  CONTINUED. 

TABULATED    STATEMENT    OF  ARRESTS    MADE  BY  THE    POLICE  DEPARTMENT  OF 
SAX  FRANCISCO,    DURING  THE  YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


187 

9. 

188 

0. 

1 

CRIMES. 

«H 
C 
<<* 

> 

1 

October.. 

Novembei 

1 

«_i 

% 

f 

I 

? 

CH 
P 

. 

. 

1 

9 

3 

Ill  Fame  (soliciting  for  house  of) 
111  Fame  (visitor  to)  
Indecent  Exposure.  .  
Industrial  School  (children  for) 
Industrial  School  (en  route  for) 
Insane         .... 

25 

4 

1 
28 

"94 

43 

7 
5 
18 

VJ 

38 
2 
6 
11 

<>6 

3* 
8 
5 
29 

90 

42 
3 
1 
24 

'l8 

65 
14 

1 
25 

"91 

50 
20 
2 
29 

18 

30 
9 
4 

28 

15 

43 
4 
4 
19 
1 
20 

57 
5 
2 
18 
1 
8 

54 
1 
5 
17 
1 
16 

66 
12 

2 
16 

19 

547 
89 
38 
262 
3 
215 

1 

1 

2 

Language  (obscene)             

Q9 

65 

86 

no 

93 

79 

77 

94 

86 

79 

99 

84 

1037 

Libel 

3 

3 

1 

3 

s 

4 

3 

9 

22 

Larceny  ("Tand)            .  . 

10 

10 

15 

9,1 

90 

16 

11 

96 

IP 

as 

19 

8 

193 

Larceny  (petit) 

61 

43 

Sn 

77 

75 

8-' 

97 

109 

7t 

73 

84 

87 

895 

Larceny  (petit,  attempted)  

1 

4 

3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

21 

1 

License  (carrying  on  business 
without) 

1 

1 

License  (peddling  without)  

2 

1 

2 
11 

7 

7 

a 

10 

11 

6 
1 

9 

3 

2 

60 
14 

58 

58 

£9 

16 

12 

90 

28 

17 

15 

94 

9,6 

17 

10 

16 

218 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

8 

1 

1 

1 

9 

Misdemeanor  
Murder 

164 
3 

122 
2 

100 
^ 

134 

99 
4 

152 
3 

211 
1 

196 
1 

131 
3 

145 
2 

159 
5 

132 

0 

1745 
29 

Murder  (attempted)  
Nuisance  by  urinating  publicly 
Perjury  

8 
1 
1 
^ 

8 
1 
1 

9 

'"i 

1 

19 
2 

4 

12 
3 

10 

"i 

7 
1 
1 

9 

2 

22 
o 

1 

7 

"*2 

9 

9 

"i 

14 

4 

134 
11 
25 
4 

Prisoners  (en  route)  
Rape 

8 

13 

9 

7 

16 

18 
1 

13 

5 

10 

11 

19 
5 

6 
1 

135 

7 

4 

1 

1 

9 

1 

1 

10 

Receiving  Stolen  Goods  

1 

1 

2 

2 
3 

*8 

1 

1 

1 

'"a 

1 

8 
12 

3 

3 

4 

1 

2 

1 

f> 

B 

-> 

24 

Riot,  Rout  and   Unlawful  As- 

4 

4 

6 

8 

10 

14 

15 

(i 

6 

14 

18 

8 

f 

i 

116 

Robbery  (attempted)  
Revenue  Laws  of  United  States 

2 

5 

2 
1 

3 
4 

1 
1? 

q 

1 

4 

13 

7 
11 

9 

11 

3 
1(1 

26 
89 

Saloon  (violating  order  relating 
to) 

2 

21 

6 

37 

Sidewalk  (driving   and  riding 
on( 

8 

f 

J 

3 

? 

25 

State  Prisoners  (en  route)  

"2 

9 

7 

11 

12 

14 

2 

4 

7 

17 

IE 

le 

116 

STATEMENT    OF    ARRESTS. 


283 


SCHEDULE     "A"—  CONCLUDED. 

TABULATED    STATEMENT    OF  ARRESTS   MADE  BY  THE    POLICE    DEPARTMENT  OF 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  DURING  THE  YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


CRIMES. 

1879. 

1880. 

1  1  Totals  

C_| 
^ 

vT 

August  

September  .... 

October  

November  .... 

December  

Cj 

<< 

February  .  . 

g 
& 
3 

tr 

> 
V 
3. 

1 

«H 

d 

B 
P 

: 

Streets  (depositing  dirt,  etc.  in). 
Streets  (obstructing-)  
Sodomy 

"31 

"32 

57 

1 
46 

"26 

2 

2 
102 

4 
44 

7 
S3 

6 
35 

2 
24 

37 

"37 

22 
526 
2 
32 
29 
167 
6 

46 

Surrendered  by  Bondsmen  
Threat  against  Life  
Vagrancy  
Wearing  the  Attire  of  the  other 
Sex  ;  .  . 

4 
2 
14 

1 

4 

4 
2 
5 
1 

2 

4 
2 
23 

5 
5 
9 

1 
2 
9 

2 

"is 

I 

2 
2 
24 

5 
3 
19 

9 

I 
3 
12 

3 

4 
4 

7 

6 

"      4 
13 

"ii 

3 

4 

4 

8 

2 

5 

3 

2 

Witnesses  Detained  

Total 

1608 
110 

1353 
109 

1638 
125 

1698 
101 

1862 
253 

1982 
110 

1949 
456 

2034 

337 

1750 
160 

1602 
106 

1973 
96 

1614 
67 

21063 
2030 

Lodgers  

284 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE  S  REPORT. 


SCHEDULE    "B." 

COMPARATIVE   STATEMENT    OF    THE   NUMBER   OF    ARRESTS  BY,   AND  STRENGTH 
OF  THE  POLICE  FORCE,  FOR  THE  EIGHTEEN  YEARS  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


YEARS. 


1862-63., 
1863-64. . 
1864-65. . 
1865-66.. 
1866-67 . 
1867-68. . 

-69.. 

-70. . 
1870-71. . 
1871-72. . 
1872-73. 
1873-74. . 
1874-75. 
1875-76. . 
1876-77. . 
1877-78. . 
1878-79. . 
1879-80. . 


NUMBER 
OF   POLICE. 


54 
54 
66 
84 
84 
84 
104 
104 
104 
•104 
104 
121 
152 
150 
154 
172 
329 
"340 


NUMBER 
OF   ARRESTS. 


5,422 
6,887 
7,619 
9,240 
9,123 
9,588 
11,882 
13,644 
12,335. 
11,035 
12,810 
13,007 
16,820 
20,108 
21,789 
18,627 
22,120 
21,063 


Present  force  -400. 


CASH  RECEIVED  FROM  SHERIFFS. 


285 


SCHEDULE    »C." 

CASH  RECEIVED  FROM  SHERIFFS  OF  OTHER  COUNTIES,  MASTERS  OF  VESSELS, 
AND  OTHERS  FOR  KEEPING  OF  PRISONERS,  ETC.,  IN  THE  CITY  PRISON  FOR 
THE  YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


DATE. 

NAME. 

WHKRE   FROM. 

AMOUNT  . 

1879—  July     1 
6 
9 
19 
31 
Aug.    12 
13 
14 
24 
27 
Sept.     8 
13 
18 
25 
28 
Oct.       4 
7 
12 
12 
12 
13 
28 
31 
Nov.      5 

? 

11 

16 
24 
24 
25 

Dec.      7 
9 

12 
12 
15 
17 
19 
22 
23 
27 

Sheriff   Beckiner  

Sonoma  

$1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
3  00 
1  00 
2  00 
1  00 
2  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
2  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  CO 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
4  00 
1  Oo 
1  00 
5  00 
3  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 

Sprague  
Sprague 

Butte 

Butte 

Hirsch  
Orton 

San  Luis  Obispo 

Santa  Cruz  
Butter 

Harkey  

Beckiner 

Sonoma  
Amador 

Vogan  

Maxwell  

San  Luis  Obispo  
United  States  Army.  .  . 
Santa  Clara. 

Sergeant  Brown  .  .    . 

Sheriff   Harris,  
Oakes  . 

San  Luis  Obispo  
Merced 

Meanuy  
Arnold  
Hart  

Colusa  
Colusa 

Foster  

Napa  
Petaluma 

Marshal  Blume  

Sheriff   Plaisted  

San  Diego  
Santa  Barbara  

Monterey 

Young  ... 
Franks  
Young  
Riddle  
Fulkerth  
Mahan  
Riddle 

Tuoluiunc  
Ventura 

Stanislaus  
Contra  Costa  

Atchinson  

Butte  

Hunt  
Meaney  
Maxwell  
Sprague 

Santa  Cruz 

Merced  
San  Luis  Obispo  
Butte  
Nevada  
Colusa                     , 

Montgomery  
Grover  
Sergeant  Hyde  

(Soldier)  
Monterey  

Sheriff   Franks  
Oakes  
Larrimore  
Stanley. 

San  Luis  Obispo  
Tehama 

Mailhouse,  en  route  to  Bodie 

Sheriff  Hawes 

Vogan  

Seguin  

Sierra     .  .  . 

Mahan.... 

Contra  Costa  
Tehama... 

McCoy  

286 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE  S  REPORT. 


SCHEDULE    "C"— CONCLUDED. 


DATE. 

NAME. 

ft 

WHERE   FROM. 

AMOUNT. 

1880—  Jan.      6 
13 
15 
23 
Feb.     3 
17 
19 
19 
Mar.     5 
5 
11 
16 
IS 
20 
22 
April    1 
4 
5 
5 
9 
17 
21 
25 
May      4 
(5 
9 
16 
18 
23 
25 
31 
June     2 
4 
6 
8 
10 
10 
12 
14 
18 
24 
28 

Vallejo 

§1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
2  00 
2  00 
1  00 
18  00 
16  00 
1  00 
2  00 
3  00 
2  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
2  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
5  00 
1  00 
2  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
1  00 
2  00 
1  00 
1  00 
4  00 
1  00 
9  00 
5  00 
2  00 

§160  00 

Sheriff  Leeson  

Merced  
San  Luis  Obispo 

Cakes                      

Constable  Parker  

Santa  Clara  

Calaveras  

Frank  

Monterey  

San   Difio-o 

E.  Hall  Fresno  
Harper                      ISan  Diego      

Officer  Hall                                                          ISan  Jose 

Constable  Forest                       Marin     

San  Francisco  
San  Luis  Obispo  
Ventura  

Sheriff  Stanford      

Detroy                                        .    . 

j    \\r    Smith 

Shasta  
MerCed 

Harkey                                    

Sutter  

C.  Sherman  
Calderwood                        

Santa  Barbara 

Sonoma  
Sutter  .   .                

Monterey  

Wells 

Tulare        ... 

Pitts 

Contra  Costa  

Mendocino  
Mendocino  

Hu(vhes    ...                                 

Walla  Walla  
Mendocino  

Sturdivant                             

Butte      

Troy                                      . 

Ventura  

Burtnett                                          .... 

Lake  

Spear 

Butte 

Amador  
Ventura 

Votran 

Amador  

Burnham                   .         

El  Dorado  

Maxwell                                               .   . 

San  Luis  Obispo  
Calaveras      

Thorne 

Weed  man 

DeWitt  Co.,  Ill  

Donohue  

Mendocino  
Sacramento  

Hulbron 

Total  .  .  . 

PROPERTY  STOLEN  AND  RECOVERED. 


'287 


SCHEDULE    "D." 

AMOUNT  OF  PROPERTY  REPORTED  STOLEN  AND  LOST,  AND  AMOUNT  RECOVERED 
BY  THE  POLICE  FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


MONTHS. 

STOLEN7   OR    LOST. 

RECOVERED. 

1879    July                                           

$12,711  00 

$4,154  50 

6  408  00 

1  930  25 

10,547  50 

2,077  00 

7  331  00 

4  4-^9  15 

8,355  00 

i,803  55 

December                        

12,852  00 

6,079  20 

9  092  00 

5,571  25 

8,275  00 

5,716  00 

March           .            

13,847  00 

5,301  55 

3,895  50 

2,569  00 

May                                     

5,924  80 

1,535  95 

5,064  00 

2,538  lf> 

§104,302  80 

§43,708  55 

SCHEDULE    <«E." 

N  UMBER  OF  WITNESSES   SUBPCENAED  FOR  THE   SEVERAL   COURTS   OF   CRIMINAL 
JURISDICTION    FOR    THE    YEAR    ENDING    JUNE    30,    1880. 


MONTHS. 


1879    July 

780 

August          ...           .              .    . 

560 

September  

741 

October 

938 

November  
December  

567 
493 

1880  —  January  

673 

February  
March 

668 
611 

April  

577 

May 

551 

June  

533 

Total 

7  692 

288 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE  S  REPORT. 


SCHEDULE     "  F." 

UNCLAIMED   MONEY  AND   OTHER  PROPERTY  IN  THE  HANDS  OF  THE  CHIEF  OF 
POLICE  TO   JUNE   30,  1880. 


NO. 

DATE. 

NAME. 

DESCRIPTION. 

1 

Chin  Heoncr 

2 

Dec  13   1879... 

Ah  Loy  

One  dollar. 

3 

Tan  9    1880    .... 

Suey  Wong  

One  65-100  dollars. 

4 

Jan  13    1880 

Ben  Pan 

One  60-100  dollars 

5 

March  9  1880 

Fin  Ting 

6 

May  11  1889    .  .   . 

Ah  Sain  

<  )ne  65-100  dollars,  purse  and  papers. 

7 

Jan  5    1879 

J    Aurella 

Three  dollars. 

g 

Dec  13    1879 

A  Bates 

Two  studs 

•  9 

Dec  14*  1879  ..   . 

John  Brown  

One  dollar. 

1Q 

Jan  15    1880     .   . 

One  40-100  dollars. 

11 

12 

Feb.  14,  1880  
March  7  1880.... 

G.  Beda  
John  Brady  

Letters. 
Spectacles  and  picture. 

13 

March  16  1880 

Geo  Belfrice      

Seventy  cents. 

14 

April  10  1880 

One  25-100  dollars. 

15 
16 
17 
18 

April  11,  1880  .... 
April  16,  1880  .... 
April  28,  1880  .... 
April  29,  1880  .  .  . 

Wm.  Burris  
Win.  Burns  
F.  Surges  
Louis  Brown  

Twenty-five  cents. 
Forty  cents. 
Thirty-five  cents. 
Ninety  cents. 

19 
20 

May  4,  1880  
May  11    1880 

Michael  Biady  

Two  50-100  dollars. 
Sleeve  button. 

20  l 

Dec  26    1879 

Twenty-five  cents. 

21 
22 

May  2,  1880  
August  1  1879 

Harry  Brown  

E    Bawett                         .     .   .. 

Ninety  cents. 
One  10-100  dollars  and  corkscrew. 

23 

Jan  10    1880 

Jas  Clark 

Fifty-five  cents. 

24 

Jan  17    1880  

Jas   Casey  

Two  dollars. 

25 

Jan  31    1880 

B  W  Connolly 

Mem  book  and  papers. 

26 

March  9  1880 

Ellen  Collins 

Piece  of  lace. 

27 

March  12,  1880... 

W.  Colton  .  .  . 

Ten  cents. 

28 

March  22  1880  . 

W  Colwell  

Sixty-five  cents. 

29 

March  26  1880 

N  Cadasso 

Twenty-five  cents. 

30 

April  9  1880 

j  Campbell 

One  60-100  dollars. 

31 

April  12   18SO  

F  Cummings  

Thirty  cents. 

32 

April  17  1880 

Eighty  cents. 

33 

April  20  1830 

C  Carmody 

Sixty-live  cents. 

34 

April  24',  1880.... 

M  Carr  

Forty-five  cents  and  pipe. 

35 
36 

April  25,  1880  .... 
April  28  1880 

P.  Cauber  

Thos    Cook 

One  dollar. 
One  5-100  dollars  and  glasses. 

37 

April  28  1880 

Seventy-five  cents. 

38 

May  15  '  1880  

P  Carlin  

Seventy  cents. 

39 

May  16  1880 

Five  45-100  dollars  and  purse. 

40 
41 

May  22,  1880  
Jan   27  1830  

M.  Connor  
E.  Duboise  

One  45-100  dollars. 
One  crystal  necklace. 

42 

March  4  1880 

J  Durbin  

One  55-100  dollars. 

43 

March  6  1880 

R  Dupee 

Forty-five  cents. 

44 

March  14  1830 

Thos  Davis 

Fifty  cents. 

45 

March  23'  1880  . 

P  Donohue  

Fifty  cents. 

46 

May  15  1880 

J  Donohue  

One  60-100  dollars. 

47 
48 
49 

May  12,  1880  
May  18,  1880  
May  22  1880 

A.  Davis  
Georgie  Danzler  
Jim  Davis  

Seventy  cents  and  purse. 
Letters. 
One  50-100  dollars. 

50 
51 
52 

Jan.  4,  1880  
Feb.  8,  1880  
March  8  1830 

Jas.  Dillon  
John  Evens  

Fifty-five  cents  and  mem.  book. 
One  55-100  dollars. 
Fifty-five  cents  and  three  studs. 

53 

May  25  1880 

Mary  Ewell  

Papers. 

54 

May  25'  1880 

F  E  Emerson  

Twenty  cents  and  papers. 

55 

Dec  is'  1879 

R  Ferran 

Sixty-five  cents,  specs  and  mem.  book. 

56 

Dec  10    1879 

P    Fellerson 

Forty  cents 

57 

Jan  15    1880 

Annie  Frank  

Pawn  ticket. 

58 

Feb  20    1880 

Jahn  Farrell       

Sixty  cents. 

n 

March  3.  1830... 

Peter  Finn  .  .  . 

One  20-100  dollars. 

UNCLAIMED    PROPERTY. 


289 


SCHEDULE     <  <  F  "—CONTINUED. 


NO. 

DATE. 

NAME. 

DESCRIPTION. 

60 
61 

April  18,  1880  .  .  . 
April  24  1880 

F.  Farley  

Book. 
One  95-100  dollars  cigar-holder  and  book 

62 

May  15,  1830  

Fred.  Fox  

Nine  60-100  dollars. 

63 
64 

Nov.  17,  1876  
Dec  15    1879 

L.  Getz  
M  Galfrie 

Ten  cents. 
Thirty-five  cents 

£5 
66 

67 

Dec.  2r>,  1879  
Jan.  17,  1880  

March  2,  1830..., 

J.  Gallagher  
J.  H.  Goodwin  

Jas.  H.  Goodwin..  . 

Fifty  cents. 
1,200  shares  of  Sixty-three  G.  and  S.  M. 
Co.,  No.  372. 
Sixty-five  cents. 

68 

March  21,  1880... 

B  G  Gray  

One  10-100  dollars. 

69 

March  24  1880 

One  5-100  dollars 

70 

April  6  1830 

J  Gilbert 

71 

May  8  1880  

J  M  Geary  .... 

Sixty  cents 

fa 

May  28,  1880  

F.  Granger  

Eighty  cents. 

73 

74 

Dec.  10,  1879  
Dec   21  1878  

H.  S.  Higgonbottom  
J  Haah  ... 

Seventy-five  cents. 
Thirty-five  cents  and  purse 

75 

Dec   24  1379 

W  T  Holland 

76 

77 

Jan.  24,  1880  
Jau   24  1830  .... 

J.  Hayes  

C  Heiu 

One  70-103  dollars. 
Razor  ci^ar-holder  and  case 

78 

March  29,  1880... 

J.  Hamilton  

Bank-book  on  S.  F.  Savings  Union,  No 

79 

April  24  1880  .... 

J   Hansen 

7,860. 
One  50-100  dollars 

80 

May  14,  1830  

J.  Finn... 

Forty-five  cents  and  purse 

81 

82 

May  14,  1880  
Oct  3  1873  

M.  Hill  
J  G  Jeffreys 

Fifty  cents,  glasses  and  ivory  ring. 
Thirty  25-100  dollars  and  papers  evidence 

83 
84 

Dec.  3,  1879  
Dec   23,  1879  

Harry  Jones  

Twenty-five  cents. 
Fifty  cents 

85 

Dec.  25,  1879  

H.  Israel  

One  80-100  dollars.   Evidence 

86 
87 

Dec.  15,1879  
Jan.  10,  1880  

S.  H.  Jeimer  
B.  James  

Bank-book  on  the  Pioneer  Land  and  Loan 

Association,  No.  2,081. 
One  80-100  dollars. 

88 
89 

Jan.  31,  1880  
Jari   31   1880  

J.  Jacks  

Seventy-five  cents. 

90 

Feb    14  1880  ..   . 

One  60-100  dollars 

91 
92 

Feb.  18,  1880  
March  5  1880.... 

Thos.  Jones  
Dr  Jack-knife 

One  pipe. 

93 
94 

March  1,  1880.... 
May  22,  1880  

Frank  Jean  
E   Johnson  

Sixty  cents. 
Two  studs 

95 

May  21,  1880  

John  Doe  Jones  

Thirty-five  cents  and  match-box 

96 

97 

May  19,  1880  
Dec    14  1879  

Win.  Johnson  
J  Kittridge 

Thirty-five  cents. 

98 
99 
100 

Jan.  17,  1880  
Jan.  26,  1880  
March  7  1880  ... 

Geo.  Keyser  
Jas.  Keef  

Wm  Kenncy 

One  55-100  dollars. 
One  60-100  dollars. 
Fifty  cents 

101 
102 

April  17,  1880  .... 
March  21,  1880... 

Tom  Kelly  
P  Kenney  

Sixty-five  cents. 

103 

March  29  1880 

103 
104 
105 

Dec.  26,  18SO  .  . 
April  6,  1880  
March  16,  1830... 

Mary  Kelly  
Jane  Kane  
J.  Kittridge  

One  ring. 
Ninety  cents  and  purse. 
Eye-glasses 

106 

107 

Dec.  6,  1879  
Dec.  20,  1879     . 

R.  A.  Looney  
John  II  Lee 

One  75-100  dollars. 
Thirty-five  cents 

108 

Dec.  21,  1879  

John  Lick  

300  shares  Silver  Prize  G  and  S  M  Co 

109 

Feb.  21,  1880  .  .  , 

Timothy  Lane 

Nos.  1,966  and  1,967. 

110 
111 
112 

March  23,  1S80... 
April  28,  1880 
May  23,  1880 

F.  P.  Lord  
J.  Lampsher  

Eliza  Laville 

Masonic  Lodge  certificate. 
Forty-five  cents. 

113 
114 

May  15,  1880  
June  28,  1879  .  .  . 

A.  Lopes  
J.  Mogan  

One  80-100  dollars. 

115 

Oct  27,  1879 

A   Morrell 

One  25-100  dollars  and  pawn-ticket 

116 
117 

Dec.  7,  1879  
Dec.  17,  1879  

C.  Mondivly  
Jas.  Murphy  

Fifty  cents. 
Three  30-100  dollars,  H  case  silver  watch 
No.  12,990,  chain  and  mem.  book. 

19 


290 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE  S  REPORT. 


SCHEDULE     "  Y  "— CONTINUED. 


KO. 

DATE. 

j 
NAME.                                                              DESCRIPTION. 

118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 

146 

147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160' 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165    I 
166    j 
167     i 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173    < 
174 

175 
176 

Dec.  31,  1879... 
Jan.  1,  1880  
Jan.  2,  1880  
Jan.  5,  1880  
Jan    3  1880 

Jas  McCloud 

Thirty-five  cents. 
Thirty-five  cents. 
One  dollar. 
Fifty  -five  cents. 
Sleeve  buttons  and  pin. 
One  dollar. 
One  5-100  dollars. 
Three  25-100  dollars. 
Pair  ear  rings. 
Thirty  cents. 
One  15-100  dollars  and  sleeve-buttons. 
One  dollar. 
Fifteen  cents  and  neck-tie. 
One  dollar. 
Seventy  cents. 
Scarf-pin. 
Thirty  cents  and  purse. 
Fifty  cents. 
Sixty  cents. 
Thirty-rive  cent?. 
Twenty  cents. 
Seventy-five  cents. 
Twenty  cents. 
Thirty  cents. 
One  50-100  dollars. 
Twenty  cents. 
Thirty-five  cents. 
H  case  silver  watch,  No.  52,509,  steel  chain 
and  mem.  book. 
Fifteen  cents. 
Fifteen  tea-spoons. 
Two  dollars. 
Twenty-five  cents. 
Seventy-five  cents. 
Sixty  cents  and  pin. 
Thirty  cents. 
One  55-100  dollars. 
Two  30-100  dollars  and  purse. 
Fifteen  cents. 
Mem.  book  and  papers. 
Forty  cents. 
Chinese  ticket. 
Eighty  cents. 
Eye-glasses. 
Vest  chain  and  letters. 
Vest  chain  and  scarf-ring. 
H  case  silver  watch,  No.  32,017. 
One  35-100  dollars. 
Fifty  cents. 
One  10-100  dollars. 
One  35-100  dollars 
Fifty  cents. 
Fifty  cents. 
One  15-100  dollars. 
Vest  chain. 
Twenty  cents. 
Two  20-1CO  dollars,  purse  and  handkerchiefs 
Two  hundred  shares  of  the  Mount  Wash- 
ington Silver  Mining  Company,  certifi- 
cates Nos.  31  and  32,  memorandum  book 
and  papers. 
Open-faced  nickel  watch,   No.  18,140,  and 
steel  chain. 
Harmonica  and  sleeve  buttons. 

N.  McNeil.... 

J.  Mullen  
M.  C.  Miller  

Jan.  1,  1880  
Jan.  16,1880  
Jan    16  1880 

M.  Molloy  
Maria  Murtha  

Jan.  26,1880  
Feb.  23,1880  
Feb.  25,  1880'.... 
March  5,  1880.... 
March  5,  1880.  .  .  . 
March  11,1880... 
March  21,  1880... 
March  28,  1880... 
April  7,  1880  
April  8,  1880  
April  9,  1880  
May  8,  1880  
May  9,  1880  
May  13,  1880  
May  21,  1880  
May  26,  1880  
May  29,  1880  
Dec.  6,1879  
Jan.  12,  1880  
Feb.  24,  1880  

March  11,1880... 
May  11,  1880  
May  12,  1880  
May  24,  1880  .  .  . 
Jan.  8,  1880  
March  17,  1880... 
May  8,  1880  
March  28,  1880... 
July  17,  1879  
Dec.  5,  1879  
Dec.  14,1879  
Jan.  3,  1880  
Nov.  10,  1878  
Dec.  9,  1879  
Dec.  23,1879  
Nov.  21,  1879  
Nov.  19,  1879  
Nov.  26,  1859  
Dec.  2,  1880  
Dec.  15,  1879  
Dec.  24,  1879  
Jan.  24,  1880  
Feb.  6,  1880  
March  5,  1880.... 
April  13,  1880  .  .  . 
May  18,  1880  
May  18,  1880  
May  24  1880 

Nellie  McGinn  
Jane  Martin  
C.  Maricado  »  .  . 

P.  Morgan  
J.  McCarthy  
J.  McMaster  
J.  McDonald  
A.  Mareugo  
Lizzie  McFeehan 

S.  Moran  

Wm.  Moore  
W.  D.  Madigan  
J.  McCloud  

M.  Madden  
H.  McGardel  
E    Monahan 

J.  Neville... 
A.  Nelson.  

M.  Noonan..  
Mary  Newton  
J.  Nevin  
J.  Nevins  
Jas.  O'Bierne  
Miss  O'Rilee  
Jas.  O'Toole  

M  O'Leary  

F  Peterson 

J.  Powers  

A.  Pickett  
J.  Polopola  
P.  Quinn  -.  
Patrick  Quinn  

E.  Quinlan  
W  Ryan 

F  Russell 

W.  Rolston  
J.  Ragueto  
T  Roberts 

J.  Reddy  

G.  W.  Raymond  
R  Riley.   . 

P  Rogers 

Mary  Rasavich  
Jas.  Ryan  
C.  Robinson  
H   Rowley 

Oct.  30,  1879  

Nov.  9,  1879  
N"  ov.  15  1&79  

Walter  Shear  

M.  Serunte  
Geo.  Sansome  

UNCLAIMED    PROPERTY. 


291 


SCHEDULE     "  F  "—CONTINUED. 


NO. 

DATE. 

NAME. 

DESCRIPTION. 

177 
178 

Dec.  11,  1879... 
Dec   18  1879 

Chas.  Sherman  
Jas  Smith                            .    ... 

One  dollar  and  memorandum  book. 
Two  10-100  dollars    glasses  memorandum 

179 

Dec   27  1879 

Frank  Smith  

book  and  pictures. 
Twenty-five  cents  and  purse 

180 

Jan    1  1380 

John  Schultz                 

181 

Jan..  20  1880     .. 

D  Sheehan  

Twenty  cents  and  purse 

182 

Feb   8  1880 

F  C  Sitire      

Seventy  cents 

183 

Feb    15  1880 

Benj   Smith 

184 

March  20  1880 

John  Smith  

Fifty  cents. 

185 

April  13  1880 

Thos  Swauton               

Fifty  cents 

186 

April  18  1880 

187 
188 
189 

May  10,  1880  
May  15,  1880  .  .  . 
May  16  1880 

L.  Sheridan  
B.  Sullivan  

Fifty  cents  and  purse. 
Three  90-100  dollars. 

Fifty  cents 

190 
191 

May  16,  1880  
May  19  1880 

Fritz  Sparks  
Dan  Sullivan 

Twenty-five  80-100  dollars. 

192 

May  23  1880 

Win    Sherwood  

Forty  cents. 

193 
184 

Dec.  20,  1879  
Jan   15  1880 

Geo.  Thomas  
Bridget  Tolan 

Forty  cents  and  purse. 

195 
196 

March  5,  1880.... 
April  21   1880 

Jas.  Teague  
F  B  Tailor 

Twenty-five  cents. 
Fifty  cents 

197 

May  1  1880  

A  H  Taylor  

Pocket-book  and  papers  ' 

198 
199 

May  16,  1880  
May  30  1880 

M.  D.  Townsend  
J  Vouclair 

One  15-100  dollars  and  purse. 
Fifty-five  cents 

200 
201 

July  29,  1878  
Nov  23  1879 

Sam'l  Wilson  
F  S  Wilson 

Twenty  shares  Amazon  Consolidated  Min- 
ing Company,  No.  1,526,  and  one  hundred 
shares  Poomian  Gold  and  Silver  Mining 
Company,  No.  1,422. 

202 
203 

Dec.  7,  1879  
Dec   11  1879 

Harry  Wilson  

One  25-100  dollars. 
One  dollar  and  purse 

204 

Dec   12  1879 

Mr*  Williams 

205 
206 

Dec.  22,  1879... 
Dec   2°>  1879 

Thos.  Wilson  

Fred  Williams 

Silk  handkerchief. 
Riii"  chain  and  locket 

207 
208 
209 

Jan.  22,1880  
March  6,  1880..., 
March  8  1880 

Jas.  Williams  
Michael  Welsh  
Albert  Winters 

One  35-100  dollars  and  purse. 
Two  50-100  dollars. 
Two  15-100  dollars 

210 
211 

April  5,  1880  .... 
April  17  1880 

Geo.  Whitney  
Thos  Williams 

One  75-100  dollars. 
Ninety-five  cents  and  purse 

9,1?, 

May  2  1880 

Jack  Williams  

Eighty  cents. 

213 

May  15  1880 

Joseph  Ward 

Eighty-cents  and  purse 

214 

May  17  1880 

M  Welsh 

Sixty-five  cents 

215 
216 

June  10,  1879  .  .  . 
May  18  1877 

Fred.  Wait  

Gold  scarf-pin. 
Sleeve-buttons,  studs  and  purse  found  by 

217 

218 

Nov.  28,1879  
Nov  28  1879 

Officer  Bunner. 
Eleven  shawl-pins,  one  comb  and  ten  sleeve- 
buttons,  found  by  Officer  J.  H.  Cahill  on 
Turk  street. 
Hand  satchel,  found  by  F  Weatherbee  on 

219 

Dec   7  1879.  . 

California  street. 
H  case  silver  watch,  No.  13,055,  and  steel 

220 

Dec    23  1879 

chain,  found  by  D.  Dunnigan. 
Gold  ring  left  by  Peter  Bradley 

221 

July  1,  1879  

Fourteen    certificates    of     mining     stock, 
found  on  Sixteenth  street;  brought  in 
by    Officer   Falls.      One  certificate  of 
Bradshaw  G.  and  S.  M.  Co.,  No.  84,  for 
one  thousand  shares;    one  certificate 
Gray  Ledge  G.  and  S.  M.  Co.,  No.  107,  • 
for  five  shares;   two  certificates  Belle 
G.  and  S.  M.  Co.,  Nos.  19  and  65,  for 
ten  shares;   one  certificate  Sierra  Pa- 
cific G.  and  S.  M.  Co.,  No.  7,  for  ten 
shares;  one  certificate  Lord  Byron  G. 

292 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE  S  REPORT. 


SCHEDULE     ' '  F  "—CONTINUED. 


DESCRIPTION. 


221..  Continued., 


Feb.  3, 


Feb.  17,  1880.... 

April  29,  1880  . . . 
May  20,  1830  . . . . 


May  8,  1880  . . 
Jan.  23,  1877. 
Dec.  4,  1879.. 
Dec.  10,  1879. 
Dec.  16,  1879. 
Dec.  17,  1879. 
Feb.  10,  1880. 
Feb.  19,  1880. 
Feb.  26,  1880. 
March  14,  188 
Apvil  1:2,  1880 
May  9,  1880  . . 
May  13,  1880  . 
Nov.  21,  1878. 
Nov.  1,  1879.. 
Feb.  2,  1880.. 

April  6,  1880  . 
March  12,  iSS 
May  21,  1880  . 
Ian.  31,  1830. 
Dec.  24,  1879. 

April  7,  1879  . 
Nov.  8,  1878.. 


i  Michael  Kane.... 
I  D.  Bowen........ 

i  G.  W.  Irving 

|  YeeAh  Yek 

i  Chas.  House 

Chas.  Robinson . . . 

J.  Desmond 

Hong  Long 

i  J.  McDonald 

|  Ah  Hong 

i  Fong  Ping 


Ah  Jim 

M.  Sullivan 

J.  Sullivan,  alias  Desmond. 


Jas.  Doyle 

John  Randolph 

:  M.  Madden 

|  John  McCarthy 

!  MissWoodthorpe.... 


and  S.  M.  Co.,  No.  66,  for  ten  shares; 
one  certificate  California  Wharf  Co., 
No.  5,981,  for  seventy  shares;  one  cer- 
tificate Annie  Laurie  G.  and  S.  M.  Co., 
No.  106,  for  fifteen  shares;  one  certifi- 
cate Nevada  Con.  G.  and  S.  M.  Co., 
No.  25,  for  five  shares;  two  certificates 
Silver  Crescent  G.  and  S.  M.  Co.,  NOB. 
40  and  12,  for  sixteen  shares;  three  cer 
titicates  Russell  G.  and  S.  M.  Co.,  Nos. 
5,  6  and  7,  for  seventy-five  shares. 

One  gold  seal  and  quartz  locket,  found  ly 
Officer  Thos.  Stanton,  in  the  Board  of 
Supervisors'  rooms. 

Purse  and  twenty  cents,  found  by  W.  O. 
Southwick,  watchman  old  City  Hall. 

Box  watch  keys,  found  by  It.  Henry. 

.Sixty-live  cents,  found  by  Officer  Barn- 
stead. 

Fifty  cents,  from  822  Washington  street. 

One  gold  vest  chain.     Evidence. 

Fifty  cents.     Evidence. 

Fifty  cents.    Evidence. 

Forty-five  cents.     Evidence. 

Sixty-five  cents.     Evidence. 

Ten  cents.     Evidence. 

Fifteen  cents.     Evidence. 

Eighty  cents.     Evidence. 

Gold  ring.     Evidence. 

Fifty  cents.     Evidence. 

Thirty  cents.     Evidence. 

Twenty  cents.     Evidence. 

One  overcoat. 

Shirt.     Evidence. 

Coat  found  on  Brannan  street,  by  Officer 
Murray. 

One  coat.     Evidence. 

Coat  and  two  vests. 

Pair  of  shoes. 

Pair  blankets.     Evidence. 

Lady's  sacque  and  hat,  left  by  Officer 
Gano. 

Pair  boots  and  hat,  left  by  burglars  at  store 
of  M.  C.  Hawloy  &  Co. 

Three  pair  pants,  left  for  identification  by 
Officer  Hensley. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 

One  dozen  pocket-knives. 


UNCLAIMED    PROPERTY. 


293 


SCHEDULE     "  F  "—CONTINUED. 


DESCRIPTION. 


May  22,  1879 !  Andrew  Spohr 

August  16,  1379  . . !  Andrew  Jackson. . , 


April  26,  1879  . 
Sept.  30,  1879  . 
Oct.  10,  1879 
Oct.  27,  1879 
Nov.  4,  1879. 
Nov.  7,  1879. 
Nov.  27,  1878 
Dec.  8,  1879. 
Dec.  18,  1879. 
Dec.  24,  1879. 
Jan.  6,  1880.. 
Feb.  1,  1880... 
March  10,  1880 


Wm.  Brun,  or  Bullion 

C'has.  Fisher 

Low  Ah  Poy 

i  A.  McShay 

NickPoggi 

Fred.  Short 

J.  Mahoney 

j  M.  Kiley 

A.  Duckworth 

!  Philip  Miller 

I  UnDuUn 

J.  Gresmner 

!  Catherine  Kallaher... 


March  28,  1880. . . ;  John  Baker. 


One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
Ono  do/ren  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket  knives. 
On  3  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket  knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives, 
/en  pocket  knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
One  dozen  pocket-knives. 
Seven-shot  pistol.  Evidence. 
Five-shot  pistol  and  bowie  knife. 


Evi- 


Five-shot  pistol.    Evidence. 
Five  shot  pistol.     Evidence. 
Five-shot  pistol.     Evidence. 
Seven-shot  pistol.     Evidence. 
Seven-shot  pistol,  No.  1,136.    Evidence. 
Five-shot  XL  pistol. 

Seven-shot  pistol,  No.  107,975.    Evidence. 
Five-shot  S.  &  W.  pistol,  No.  86,881. 
Seven-shot  pistol.    Evidence. 
Seven-shot  pistol.    Evidence. 
Five-shot  XL  pistol.    Evidence. 
Five-shot  pistol.     Evidence. 
Seven-shot  S.  &  W.  pistol,  No.  24,050.    Evi- 
dence 
Single-shot  pistol.     Evidence. 


294 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE  S  REPORT. 


SCHEDULE     "  F  "—CONCLUDED. 


NO. 

DATE. 

NAME. 

DESCRIPTION. 

328 

May  23,  1880  .  .  . 

Jas  Dillon  

Single-shot  pistol     Evidence 

329 
330 

Sept.  10,1879...   . 
Dec   24  1879 

Chin  Heong  

Cheese-knife.    Evidence. 

331 

Dec.  30,  1879...   . 

Chas.  Williams  

Knife.    Evidence 

332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 

Dec.  30,  1879...   . 
Jan.  3,  1880..  \.   . 
Jan.  9,1880  
Jan.  15,  1880.  .  .    . 
Feb.  3,  1880.... 
Feb    17  1880 

Ah  Goon  
Thos.  Nunan  
O.  McDonald  
Sing  Hone  
AhWy  
G  Garrity 

Chinese  knife.     Evidence. 
Knife.     Evidence. 
Clasp-knife.     Evidence. 
Chinese  knife.     Evidence. 
Knife.    Evidence. 

338 

Feb    20,  1880  

Ho  Quon  

Bowie-knife.     Evidence 

339 
340 

March  12,  1880... 
April  4  1880 

W.  McGreger  

Bowie-knife.     Evidence. 
Knife     Evidence 

341 

April  28,  1880  .... 

Thos.  Cook  

Knife.    Evidence 

342 
343 

August  8,  1878  .  .  . 
Jan    26  1879 

Ah  Yin  
P  McGuire 

Clasp-knife.    Evidence. 
Knife     Evidence 

344 

March  28,  1879... 

Louis  Hansen  

Knife.     Evidence 

345 
346 

April  5,  1879  
May  10  1879 

Jas.  Sullivan  
M  Hill  ..     . 

Knife.     Evidence. 
Knife     Evidence 

347 

June  16  1879 

348 
349 
350 

June  26,  1879  
August  31,  1879  .  . 
Sept  5  1879 

Monahan  and  Foley  
Wm.  Smith..  

Knife.     Evidence. 
Knife.    Evidence. 
Knife     Evidence 

351 

Oct.  5,  1879  .  .  . 

Chas.  Feline  

Knife.     Evidence. 

352 
353 

Oct.  29,  1878  
Oct  31  1879 

L.  Sorano  

Knife.    Evidence. 
Knife     Evidence 

354 

Nov.  1,  1879.... 

P.  Gonzales  

Knife.     Evidence. 

355 
356 

Dec.  6,1879  
Dec   8  1879 

Wm.  Adams  
M  Murtha.. 

Knife.    Evidence. 
Knife     Evidence 

357 

Dec.  14,  1879... 

Teung  Ah  Chung  

Knife.    Evidence. 

358 
359 
360 

Dec.  25,  1879  
Feb.  2,  1880  
April  3  1880 

H.  Israel  
T.  Shillaber  
Jas  Griffin 

Knife.    Evidence. 
Knife.    Evidence. 
Knife     Evidence 

361 
362 

Jan.  21,  1878  
March  14,  1878 

J.  Lambert  
Ong  Gee  

Sheath-knife.     Evidence. 
Cheese-knife.    Evidence. 

363 

Nov  21  1879 

M  Welsh 

Table-knife     Evidence 

364 

Sept  9  1879 

Jas  McGill 

Sheath-knife     Evidence 

365 
366 

Dec.  24,1879  
Dec   25  1879 

Thos.  Murphy  
E  Girard 

Bowie-knife.     Evidence. 
Bowie-knife.     Evidence. 

367 

March  15  1880 

M  A    Mulcahy 

Knife     Evidence 

368 

August  10,  1879  .  . 

J.  Bacon  

Razor.     Evidence. 

369 

Feb.  '1,  1878. 

J  P  Varnes  

One  six-shot  Remington  pistol,  No.  50,284. 

370 

May  10,  1877  

J.  Gavin  

Evidence. 
Six-shot  self  -cocking  pistol,  No.  2,283.   Evi- 

371 

Sept  2  1878  . 

M  Flaherty  

Five-shot  Colt's  pistol,  No.   11,872.     Evi- 

372 
373 

Jan.  17,1879  
April  27,  1879  .... 

M.  J.  Kent  
Sing  Yow  

dence. 
Two  single-shot  pistols.    Evidence. 
Five-shot  XL  pistol.     Evidence. 

374 

June  13  1879 

J  P  Moran 

Five-shot  pistol.     Evidence. 

375 

Dec    13  1879 

Ah  Loy 

Five-shot  pistol     Evidence. 

376 

377 
378 

379 

Jan.  18,  1880  
Jan.  20,  1880  
March  23,  1880.  .  . 

March  26,  1879... 

C.  Angelo  
Horn  Ah  Hop  
G.  Sprague  

Joel  Agee,  alias  Goose  

Five-shot  pistol.    Evidence. 
Five-shot  pistol.     Evidence. 
Seven-shot  S.  &  W.  pistol,  No.  117,754.  Evi- 
dence. 
Wagon  wrench.    Evidence. 

380 
381 

August  19,  1879  .  . 
July  18  1879 

G.  Nicholas  
Geo  Baffey 

Hammer.    Evidence. 
Iron  bar     Evidence. 

382 

One  trunk,  containing  articles  from   No. 

239  to  382,  inclusive. 

UNCLAIMED    PROPERTY. 


295 


SCHEDULE     "G." 

POLICE  STATIONS   AND    THEIR  LOCATION. 


NAME  OF   STATION. 


Central  Station 

Folsom  Street  Station 

North  Harbor  Station 

South  Harbor  Station 

New  City  Hall  Station 

17th  and  Howard  Station 

North  End  Station 

Potrero  Station 

Telegraph  Station 

Telegraph  Statun 

Telegraph  Station 


Did  City  Hall. 
29  Folsom  Street 
r>22  Davis  Street. 
247  Steuart  Street. 
McAllister  Street. 
207  Seventeenth  Street. 
Corner  Polk  and  Jackson  Streets 
Potrero. 

833  Sutter  Street. 

Corner  California  and  Fillmore  Streets 
961  Mission  Street. 


SCHEDULE    «H." 

COMPARATIVE  STATEMENT]  OF  POPULATION,  POLICE  FORCE,'  NUMBER  OF 
ARRESTS,  AVERAGE  NUMBER  OF  ARRESTS  TO  E\CH  OFFICER,  AND  RATIO 
OF  POPULATION  TO  POLICE  FORCE. 


Population  

. 

Numerical  Strength 
of  Police  Force.  .  . 

Number  of  Arrests 
for  the  Year  

Average  Arrests  for 
Each  Officer  

Ratio  of  Population 
to  Each  Officer.  .  . 

New  York 

1  207  915 

9  548  (76) 

87  297  (76) 

34 

435  (76) 

Philadelphia 

843  000 

1  ?40  (78) 

44  600 

35 

872 

Brooklyn  

550  000 

635  (79) 

25  706 

41 

866 

Chicago    .  .  . 

474  000 

443  (78) 

27  208 

67 

1  071 

Boston  
Baltimore 

365,000 
350  000 

692  (79) 
594  (79) 

24,963 

20  787 

37 
35 

527 
589 

Cincinnati  .... 

250  OOC 

338  (79) 

14  908 

42 

74.0 

San  Francisco  

233,066 

340  (79) 

21  063 

62 

685 

Buffalo  

165  000 

204  (79) 

8  858 

44 

809 

Cleveland  

157,000 

161  (79) 

6  594 

41 

981 

Detroit 

119  000 

150  (79) 

3  922 

24 

753 

Providence  
Albany 

104,500 
87  584 

176  (79) 
132  (79) 

5,328 
4  916 

30 

37 

593 
664 

Lowell  

61  000 

53  (78) 

2  708 

51 

1  154 

Minneapolis 

45  000 

25  (19) 

1  774 

71 

1  800 

Hartford  
Dayton  

42,000 
38,751 

73  (77) 
36  (79) 

4,184 
3  183 

57 
89 

575 
1  077 

296 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE  S  REPORT. 


SCHEDULE    "I." 

SUMMARY  OF  ACTION  TAKEN  BY  THE  BOARD  OF  POLICE  COMMISSIONERS  IN 
THE  SUPERVISION  OF  RETAIL  LIQUOR  DEALERS'  LICENSES  FROM  JAN.  IST 
1880,  TO  JUNE  30TH,  1880. 


Total  number  of  applicants  for  permits  for  license 511 

Granted 455 

Granted  by  obtaining  signatures  of  property  owners 24 

Refused.., 32 

511 

Number  arrested  for  violation  of  License  Law 103 

Number  closed  permanently,    no  permit  being  granted  by  the   Board— the 

character  of  the  place  being  bad 49 

RECEIPTS   FROM   PROSKCUTIONS.  AMOUNT. 

Amount  paid  for  delinquent  licenses  by  persons  under  prosecution $1,260 

Amount  paid  as  fines  to  Police  Court. 

Total $2,1 1G 


REPORT 

OF    THE 

SUPERINTENDENT  OF  THE  HOUSE  OF 


HOUSE  OF   CORRECTION, 
San  Francisco,  July  1,  1880, 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — I  herewith  submit  my  report  of  the  management 
of  this  institution  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880,  as 
per  following  exhibits : 

"A." — Number  of  prisoners  committed,  discharged,  etc. 

"  B." — Name  of  the  offense  for  which  they  were  committed. 

"  C.", — By  whom  committed. 

"  D." — Terms  of  sentence  of  prisoners  committed. 

"  E." — Ages  of  prisoners  committed. 

"  F." — Nationality  of  prisoners  committed. 

"  Gr." — Occupations  of  prisoners  committed. 

"  H." — Religion  professed  by  prisoners  committed. 

"  I." — Number  of  prisoners  committed  more  than  once. 

"  J." — Number  of  days'  work  done  by  prisoners,  and  where. 

"  K." — Number  of  prisoners  punished  and  offenses  committed. 

"  L." — Expenses  of  the  institution  for  the  fiscal  year, 

"  M."— Prisoners'  diet  table. 

"N." — General  remarks  and  recommendations. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be, 

Very  respectfully,  yours, 

A.  W.  PBEVOST, 

Superintendent. 


298 


REPORT    OF    THE 


EXHIBIT      "A." 

NUMBER     OF    PRISONERS     COMMITTED,     DISCHARGED,     ETC., 
DURING   THE    FISCAL   YEAK   ENDING    JUNE  30,  1880. 

Number  of  prisoners  on  hand  June  30,  1879 400 

Males  committed  during  the  year 762 

Females  committed  during  the  year 177 

939 


1,339 


NUMBER     OF     PRISONERS   RELEASED    DURING    THE    YEAR 
ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


MALES. 

FEMALES. 

Discharged  by  expiration  of  sentence. 

888 

183 

Died  
Pardoned  by  Governor  William  Irwin 

3 

2 

Pardoned  by  Governor  George  C.  Perkins  
Released  on  bail                                 .    .  . 

3 
2 

Sent  to  the  Chief  of  Police  

32 

Sent  to  the  City  and  County  Hospital  

'3 

4 
1 

Escaped                            

1 

Prisoners  on  hand  June  30  1880 

934 

188 

1122 
217 

1339 

HOUSE    OF  CORRECTION. 


299 


EXHIBIT     "B." 

OFFENSES  FOR  WHICH  PRISONERS  HAVE  BEEN   COMMITTED   DURING   THE   YEAR 
ENDING    JUNE    30,    1880. 


FEMALES. 


Assault 7 

Assault  to  murder 1 

Assault  to  rob 1 

Assault  and  disturbing1  peace 

Assault  with  deadly  weapon 1 

Attempt  at  burglary 

Attempt  at  petty  larceny 

Burglar}' — first  degree 6 

Burglary — second  degree 

Burglars'  tools „• 10 

Battery 01 

Battery  and  disturbing  peace 1 

Battery  and  vulgar  language 

Battery  and  malicious  mischief 

Conspiracy 

Disturbing  pea'ce  and  vulg-ar  language 

Embezzlement 4 

Forgery 2 

False  Pretenses 

Grand  Larceny 3 

Indecent  exposure 9 

Misdemeanor 32 

Misdemeanor  and  battery 2 

Misdemeanor  and  misdemeanor  drunk 1 

Misdemeanor  drunk 178 

Misdemeanor  and  vulgar  language 1 

Misdemeanor  drunk  and  battery 2 

Misdemeanor  drunk  and  disturbing  peace 

Malicious  mischief 5 

Malicious  mischief  and  disturbing  peace 

Misdemeanor  drunk,  battery  and  vulgar  language 1 

Petty  larceny 381 

Petty  larceny  and  misdemeanor  drunk •     3 

Petty  larceny  and  battery 5 

Petty  larceny  and  embezzlement 1 

Riot 2 

Vagrancy 9 

762 

Males 762 

Females 177 

Total...  ..  939 


148 

1 


177 


300 


REPORT    OF    THE 


EXHIBIT    "C." 

•PRISONERS    WERE    COMMITTED    FROM    THE    FOLLOWING    COURTS    DURING    THE 
YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


POLICE  COURT. 
Hon .  Davis  Louderback 

POLICE  COURT. 


363 


Hon.  Hale  Rix : 329 

POLICE  COURT. 
Acting  Judge,  H.  L.  Joachimson 14 

CITY  CRIMINAL  COURT. 
Hon.  Robert  Ferrall v 30 

MUNICIPAL  CRIMINAL  COURT. 
Hon.    M.    C.   Blake 20 

SUPERIOR  COURT— DEPT.  11. 
Hon.  Thomas  W.  Freelon 2 

SUPERIOR  COURT— DEPT.  12. 
Hon.  Robert  Ferrall 4 

762 

Prisoners  from  Police  Court 883 

From  Superior  and  Criminal  Courts 56 


75 


Total . 


HOUSE   OF    CORRECTION. 


301 


EXHIBIT     "D." 

TERMS  OF  SENTENCE  OF    PRISONERS    COMMITTED    DURING    THE    YEAR    ENDING 

JUNE  30,  1880. 


YEARS. 

MONTHS. 

DAY'S. 

MALES. 

FEMALES 

TOTAL  . 

100 

57 

39 

110 

1 

120 

22 

10 

125 

36 

8 

130 

1 

1 

140 

1 

150 

20 

1 

155 

2 

180 

1 

3 

267 

101 

3 

10 

8 

1 

3 

20 

17 

(j 

3 

80 

2 

3 

40 

1 

3 

50 

1 

| 

3 

CO 

1 

3 

90 

1 

4 

58 

2 

4 

10 

3 

4 

20 

3 

4 

30 

1 

5 

21 

3 

5 

20 

1 

6 

171             3 

(5 

10 

1 

6 

20 

!"'                  1 

6 

30 

2 

6  mos.  and  $1000 

•2 

7 

8 

7 

10 

1 

7 

CO 

1 

8 

2 

9 

5 

9 

20 

1 

9 

SO 

1 

10 

4 

1 

1 

11 

1 

5 

1 

I 

1 

3 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

G 

8 

. 

2 

5 

•2 

0 

5 

3 

1 

- 

762 

177 

939 

302 


REPORT    OF    THE 


EXHIBIT     "E" 


AGES    OF    PRISONERS    COMMITTED    DURING    THE    YEAR    ENDING   JUNE  30,  1880. 


AGES. 

MALES. 

FEMALES. 

AGES. 

MALES. 

FEMALES. 

Fourteen  
Fifteen  
Sixteen  

1 
3 
24 

•• 

Brought  up  
Forty-five  
Forty-six  

603 
19 
11 

135 
6 
2 

Seventeen  

32 

1 

Forty-seven  

12 

1 

Eighteen 

43 

6 

Forty-eight 

14 

6 

Nineteen 

43 

Forty-nine 

6 

3 

Twenty 

29 

3 

Fifty. 

16 

8 

34 

2 

Fifty-one 

7 

36 

1 

Fifty-two 

2 

5 

Twenty-three  

27 
29 

5 

4 

Fifty-three  
Fiftv-four 

10 
9 

2 

26 

2 

Fifty-five     . 

8 

21 

9 

Fifty-six 

3 

1 

Twenty-seven  , 

14 
19 

2 
5 

Fifty-seven  
Fifty-  eight 

2 
1 

1 

Twenty-nine  
Thirty 

16 
32 

3 
9 

Fifty-nine  
Sixty        

1 
10 

4 

Thirty-one  

8 

1 

Sixty-one  

2 

Thirty-two  
Thirty-  three  
Thirty-four 

11 
15 
10 

1 
10 
2 

Sixty-two  
Sixty-three  
Sixty-four  

1 
4 
1 

1 

1 

Thirty-five  

16 

13 

Sixty-five  

6 

1 

Thirty-six  
Thirty-seven     

15 
14 

6 
2 

Sixty-six  
Sixty-seven  

1 

1 

Thirty-eight  
Thirty-nine  
Forty  
Forty-one  
Fortv-two  .... 

12 

14 
22 
13 

5 

8 
13 
6 

Sixty-eight  
Seventy  
Seventy-two  
Seventy-three  
Seventy  -four  

1 
'  1 

1 
1 
:2 

::: 

Forty-three  

11 

6 
3 

Seventy  -seven  
Unknown 

1 

5 

* 

4 

7 

Carried  fomoard 

603 

135 

762 

177 

Females . . . 


762 

..  177 


939 


HOUSE    OF    CORRECTION. 


303 


EXHIBIT     "F." 

NATIONALITY      OF      PRISONERS      COMMITTED      DURING      THE      YEAR      ENDING 

JUNE    30,    1880. 


NATIVE  BORN. 

MALES. 

FEMALES. 

NATIVE  BORN. 

MALES. 

FEMALES. 

Connecticut     

3 

6 

Brought  up  

144 

22 

Calif  ornia(exc  of  S.F. 

25 
3 

3 

New  York  
New  Jersey  

119 
2 

14 
1 

3 

Nebraska 

1 

1 

Nevada 

\ 

Illinois 

7 

Oregon  

2 

4 

Ohio  ,.. 

6 

1 

2 

Pennsylvania  

26 

1 

Kentucky  

2 

7 

1 

4 

Rhode  Island  
San  Francisco  

2 
90 

2 
5 

Michigan  
Missouri  

2 
11 
3 

1 

South  Carolina  
Tennessee  
Texas  

1 
2 
1 

62 

8 

Virginia  

7 

3 

6 

2 

West  Virginia 

^ 

3 

Wisconsin 

Carried  forward 

144 

22 

407 

49 

Native  Males 

Native  Females. . . 


407 
49 


456 


304 


REPORT    OF    THE 


EXHIBIT     «F"— CONCLUDED. 

JSTATIONALITY      OF      PRISONERS      COMMITTED      DURING      THE      YEAR      ENDING 

JUNE  30,  1880. 


FOREIGN    BORN. 

MALES. 

FEMALES  . 

FOREIGN   BORN. 

MALES  . 

FEMALES. 

Austria  

1 

Brough  t  up  

326 

127 

2 

Italy 

4 

7  .  ,  r  Y  '  '.'  'p' 

21 

10 

Mexico 

2 

Central  America  

2  ' 
100 

Norway  
Poland 

1 
1 

Denmark  
England 

1 
30 

11 

Prussia  
Sardinia  

4 
1 

France 

8 

1 

Sweden  

4 

Greece 

1 

Switzerland  

1 

Germany 

26 

14 

Saxony  

1 

Hawaiian  Islands.... 
Ireland 

1 
133 

91 

Scotland  
Western  Islands  .... 

10 
1 

Carried  forward 

326 

127 

355 

128 

Foreign  Born  Males 
Foreign  Born  Females 


355 
128 


Native  Born  Males  .......  ..................  407 

Native  Born  Females..  .  .     49 


483 


456 


Total 


HOUSE    OF    CORRECTION. 


305 


EXHIBIT     "G." 


OCCUPATIONS    OF    PRISONERS    COMMITTED    DURING    THE    YEAR   ENDING 
JUNE  30,   1880. 


OCCUPATIONS. 

MALES. 

OCCUPATIONS. 

MALES. 

Actors  

1 
1 
1 
2 
12 
6 
2 
2 
4 
8 
13 
1 
1 
6 
12 
1 
15 
6 
3 
18 
56 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
9 
3 
1 
3 
2 
8 
4 
1 
4 
12 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
11 
4 
2 
3 

Brought  forward  
Lace-makers  
Laundry  men 

254 
1 
12 
6 
10 
1 
2 
4 
5 
1 
1 
4 
24 
4 
4 
7 
3 
14 
1 
1 
1 
1 
7 
20 
1 
1 
17 
1 
1 
2 
4 
11 
6 
1 
9 
1 
2 
1 
16 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 

472 

Accountants                 .      ... 

Assayers 

Laborers  

Barbers  

Machinists  

Bakers 

Mattress-  makers 

Bag  Sewers  

Marble-cutters  

Masons  

Boatmen  

Miners  

Millwrights 

Bookkeepers  

Merchants  

Molders 

Bookbinders       .... 

Painters  

Peddlers 

Blacksmiths 

Plasterers  

Plumbers 

Carpenters                       

Physicians  

Printers 

Caulkers 

Prestidigitators 

Cigar-makers  

Ragpickers  

Cooks 

Rectifiers 

Confectioners     

Saloon-keepers.  .  .  . 

Compositors 

Sailmakers 

Coopers  ....              

Seamen  

Canvassers 

Scullions 

Cotton  Weavers  

Shoefitters 

Clerks 

Curriers 

School-teachers 

Dish-washers  
Engineers 

Storekeepers  

Stevedores 

Expressmen  

Tanners  

Farmers 

Tailors 

Firemen  

Teamsters     .  .    . 

Florists 

Telegraph  Operators 

(Jasfltters 

Tinsmiths 

Gardeners  
Gilders 

Type-setters  

Upholstsrers 

Hatters  

Varnishers  

Harness-makers 

Waiters 

Horse-shoers  ....        .... 

Wagon-makers 

Horse-clippers  '.  

Watchmen  

Hostlers  ... 

Whitewashers 

House-servants  
Jewelers.  .  .  . 

Wood-workers 

Wood  -polishers 

Janitors  

Wood-carriers 

Carried  forward  

TOTAL 

254 

Number  of  prisoners  committed  having  oscupati 
Number  of  prisoners  committed  having  no  occu 
Women  .  .  . 

ons  

.     472 
9QO 

pation                                                 . 

.     177 

20 


306 


REPORT   OF    THE 


EXHIBIT     "H." 

RELIGION   PROFESSED  BY  PRISONERS   COMMITTED   DURING   THE   YEAR        DI     G 

JUNE   30,  1880. 


CREEDS. 

MALES. 

FEMALES. 

Roman  Catholic 

418 

134 

Protestant  
Heathen                                  .                  ... 

222 
100 

38 

Hebrew  
Greek  Church                                      .... 

10 
1 

3 

Mormon  
Freethinker 

2 

5 

2 

No  religion                   

4 

762 

177 

Males                                         

762 

Females  .  .  . 

..   177 

939 


EXHIBIT     "I." 


SHOWING  THE  NUMBER  OF  PRISONERS  RECEIVED  WHO  HAVE  BEEN   COMMITTED 

TO  THE  INSTITUTION  MORE  THAN  ONCE,  FOR  THE   YEAR 

ENDING   JUNE   30,  1880. 


MALES. 

FEMALES. 

Set'ond  time  committed 

148 

60 

Third  time  committed  
Fourth  time  committed  

104 
30 

47 
22 

Fifth  time  committed  

9 

6 

Sixth  time  committed 

2 

2 

On  first  commitment  

293 

469 

137 
40 

762 

177 

939 

HOUSE    OF    CORRECTION. 


307 


Grand  Total  

g 
& 

i  s 

«•  8 

Yard  Improve- 

I           .                      •*&         Ol         »O         t~»        Ci 

.      ,H      m      C2      <N      1-1 

§ 

ments  

Avenue  

o      co        •              o 
.      B      •*         •         •      <M         ;         ;         ;         ; 

3 

In  and  about  Buil- 

OOirj<M^HO<MO<N5OCO<MO 
CO-*tlCOl-—         •'fOOOOCOOSOi—  1 

s 

CO 

i-H         rH         iH         i-l 

oo" 

Laundry  

cSS^joooooooooooooooo-* 

3 

co" 

Women  

S-oo^^oosocooosoost^ 
,H    8    *-    <                >    8    £    £    Si    S 

(M 
8; 

<N" 

Brick  and  Manure 
Hauling 

«•    :-*                   :           »     •*            !      i    S 

s 

Barn  

r-4          CO                                                                      :          T»t          IM 

s 

Whitewashing  .  .  . 

t^      c>                      so      ca      o      o                         -co 

<>4         ,-1                                   r-(                      •*         IM                                                CO 

t~ 

'C 

£ 

^ 

Park 

o 

^5 

n 

San  Jose  Road..  .. 

05CiC005C3r-lt-.            'JS^             '         i2 
(Mi—  (                      |H<N-"*                          •         O         T—  t             •         CO 

i 

soners 

Quarries  

Oi         (M         00         Cl         t--         'M         T—  *         C3         IO         »J^         »O 

(N         rl         >O         (71         TJI         C  3         <M         i-l         O         CO         i-H 

CO 

& 

c 

<N~ 

Industrial  School. 

G^ICSOO             •             -^tlrHOO»O             -OOO 
5^1         00         <M            •            •         50         r-1         Ca         0             •         ^H         1- 

o      ^<      c^t                                co      I-H                 •               >n 

<§ 
O) 

oC 

a 

0 

03 

:      :            :            : 

3 

San  Bruno  Road  . 

o      ••*      »o      o                  •                           ;                  ; 

of 

w 

i 

Yard  and  Garden. 

oooKcSSSoooocnSS^ 

(M 

s 

of 

ork  done 

MONTH. 

ilil  1  f  Nd      = 

^?ciS>§§^ll^c 
?  5  !  .  i  £.  •  -  1  I  fi  3.  .  $  fl  1 

Totals  

Number  of  days'  w 

308 


REPORT    OF    THE 


EXHIBIT     "K." 

NUMBER  OF  PRISONERS  PUNISHED  DURING  THE  FISCAL  YEAR 
ENDING  JUNE   30,  1880. 

SHOWING  THE  NATURE  OF  THE  OFFENSES  AND  PUNISHMENTS. 


OFFENSES. 

COMMITTED 
BY  MALES. 

COMMITTED 

BY  FEMALES. 

Insolence  to  officers 

35 

6 

Insolence  to  visitors  

1 

1 

Refusing  to  work                                                        

45 

Fighting  

28 

3 

Disturbing  the  peace  of  the  prison                                

10 

Breaking  cell  rules  willfully  .     
Smokin""  opium 

58 
47 



104 

Vulgar,  profane  and  abusive  language 

10 

8 

18 

Abusing  trusties                                                             

28 

8 

Destroying  prison  property                                               

5 

1 

12 

410 

18 

428 

Punished  by  a  loss  of  from  5  to  30  days'  credits — 

Males 

Females 


Punished  by  confinement  in  dark  cells  from  24  to  72  hours — 

Males 

Females ' 


Punished  by  confinement  in  "tank"  from  24  to  72  hours — 

Males 

Females 


Total  punished . 


253 


70 

3 


263 


73 

.   428 


HOUSE    OF    CORRECTION. 


309 


EXHIBIT     "L." 

SHOWING   THE   EXPENSES   OF   THE    INSTITUTION   FOR    THE  FISCAL  YEAR 
ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


Rations  

24,183  56 

Salaries  .                

22,965  98 

Gasoline  

886  40 

Range  for  kitchen 

525  00 

Paints  and  oils  (kerosene)  

615  35 

Drugs  and  medicines  

518  72 

Hose  for  house  and  garden 

93  13 

Prison  cloth  . 

1,032  87 

Stationery  

145  36 

Printing            .... 

25  00 

Telephone  account 

54  15 

Hardware 

636  62 

Lumber    ....              ... 

154  74 

Blacksmithing  

255  30 

Dry  goods,  etc  

144  72 

Crockery  

113  15 

Horse  feed  

584  69 

. 

Harness  account  

43  50 

Transportation  of  prisoners  

42  00 

Garden  shrubs,  seeds,  etc  

33  00 

Repairing  rifles,  cartridges,  etc     

25  50 

Horse  and  cow  

?60  00 

Sui)dries  

335  03 

*Less  

$53,673  77 
2  844  64 

Total  

§50  829  13 

See  Note  in  general  remarks. 


310 


REPORT    OF    THE 


EXHIBIT     "M." 

PRISONERS'    DIET    TABLE. 


BREAKFAST. 

DINNER. 

Beef  stew  

...J  Ib 

Tuesday  

Bread  

...£  lb 

Boiled  beef 

Coffee  
Bread 

1  pint 
i  flj 

Bread  
Potatoes  

!!(> 
It) 

Bean  soup 

...Ipint 

,v». 

I  lb 

Wednesday  
Thursday  

Beef  stew 

5  lb 

Boiled  beef  

Coffee 

Bread  .  . 

Beef  stew  

£tt> 

Potatoes  

Rice  soup  
Boiled  beef 

..  .4  to 

...i,,^ 

Bread 

i  tt. 

Coffee  

Beef  stew  
Bread  . 

1  pint 

..;*» 

i  tt> 

Bread  
Potatoes 

il 

Barlev  soup  
Boiled  beef  

...  1  pint 
£  tb 

Friday  
Saturday  

Coffee  

1  pint 

Bread  
Potatoes  

ift 

',  ll, 

Cracked  wheat  mush  

...iff, 
1  oz 

1  pint 

Boiled  beef 

Bread         e 

...ilb 
1  pint 

JT    It) 

Bread 

i  tb 

Coffee  ... 

Potatoes  

^  tl) 

.  .  .1  pint 
!lb 

Beef  stew 

Rice  soup  
Boiled  beef  

Sunday  

Bread 

...*«> 

1  pint 
i  ft, 

Coffee  
Beef  stew 

Bread 

11. 
lb 

Potatoes 

Pea  soup  
Boiled  beef          

..  .1  pint 
J  ft 
ifb 
^  lb 

Bread 

'  n 

Coffee 

1  pint 

Bread  
Potatoes             

Prisoners  who  are  confined  in  cells  are  allowed  two  meals  per  day,  as  above. 
Prisoners  who  are  placed  at  work  receive  three  meals  per  day. 


HOUSE    OF    CORRECTION.  311 


EXHIBIT     "N." 

In  the  preceding  pages  I  have  given  tables  showing  more  fully  the  details 
•of  our  prison  matters  than  is  required  by  law  or  would  be  of  interest  to  the 
ordinary  reader;  but,  as  at  the  present  day  the  subject  of  the  investigation 
of  the  causes  of  criminal  life,  and  the  treatment  of  the  criminal,  and  the 
criminally  inclined  classes  is  absorbing  the  attention  of  many  of  the  most 
intelligent  minds  of  our  country,  especially  such  as  are  given  to  the  study  of 
social  science,  and  to  those  whose  labors  are  given  to  works  of  humanity,  I 
have  tabulated  for  their  examination  and  use  such  facts  as  I  deemed  useful 
to  them  and  accessible  to  me. 

An  examination  of  the  books  of  the  preceding  administration,  and  a  com- 
parison, shows  about  the  same  statistical  facts  in  one  year  as  in  another,  so 
it  may  be  accepted  that  our  prisoners  come  from  the  same  sources,  are 
from  the  same  class  of  people,  and  have  been  guilty  of  about  the  same 
offenses,  numerically,  in  one  year  as  another. 

Our  numbers  may  be  greater  or  less,  as  influenced  by  many  causes. 

City  prisons  are  best  filled  (if  numbers  are  an  indication)  when  times  are 
good,  when  money  is  easy  to  get,  and  when  the  lower  classes  do  not  have  to 
work  hard  to  make  a  living,  when  from  the  ease  with  which  they  make 
money  they  indulge  in  unreasonable  excesses  and  get  into  trouble. 

Laxity  of  police  vigilance  tends  largely  to  a  reduction  of  the  number  com- 
mitted, and,  if  the  past  is  any  criterion,  our  prisons  are  crowded  in  the  win- 
ter months  and  empty,  or  nearly  so,  in  the  summer. 

I  would  call  the  attention  of  your  Honorable  Board  to  the  class  of  prison- 
ers sent  to  us  known  as  "repeaters."  I  think  it  is  simply  nonsensical  to 
send  that  class  of  familiar  faces  to-  the  police  and  frequenters  to  courts  of 
justice,  for  such  a  short  period  as  three  months.  They  should  be  treated 
as  chronic  cases,  and  receive  a  longer  term  of  imprisonment.  It  takes  the 
time  of  the  police  officer,  of  the  courts,  and  of  your  prison  officials,  which 
should  be  given  to  better  work,  and  it  costs  the  tax-payers  too  much  to  be  a 
matter  of  indifference.  Another  class  to  which  I  wonld  call  your  attention — 
those  who  properly  belong  to  alms-houses  and  asylums.  It  is  a  pity  they  are 
sent  to  us.  No  matter  through  what  cause  they  may  have  lost  their  health 
or  reason,  the  prison  is  not  the  place  for  them,  and  surely  it  is  not  the  place 
for  idiots.  It  is  much  easier,  however,  to  write  of  the  faults  of  any  system 
than  to  suggest  remedies  for  their  ills;  but  the  time  to  cure  disease,  moral  or 
physical,  is  in  its  inception  or  in  its  earliest  stages,  and  not  after  its  having 
taken  deep  root. 

The  present  congregate  prison  system,  at  best,  is  extremely  faulty,  whether 
for  juyeuiles  or  adults;  and  if  they  must  be  associated  together,  the  less  inter- 
course the  better,  and  the  more  rigid  the  discipline  the  better,  also. 


312  REPORT    OF    THE 

In  this  connection,  the  jails  of  our  city  are  demoralizing  to  an  alarming 
extent,  and  our  state  prisons  are  EO  better.  In  many  of  them  prisoners  are 
herded  like  "cattle,"  the  good  and  the  bad  indiscriminately  placed  together, 
and  all  the  vileness  of  the  worst  is,  or  may  be,  communicated  to  the  others. 

Prisoners  should  be  held  in  such  restraint  that  neither  their  actions  nor 
language  could  shock  the  moral  sensibilities  of  their  more  decent  fellows. 

During  the  past  year  we  have  made  valuable  improvements  in  and  about 
the  building. 

The  lawns  are  much  improved,  and  the  vegetable  garden  is  producing  an 
abundance  of  fine,  fresh  vegetables  to  supply  the  officers'  tables. 

We  have  also  made  many  improvements  inside  the  prison,  such  as  putting 
new  floors  in  the  lower  cells,  plumbing,  painting,  etc.,  etc.,  all  of  which  has 
been  done  by  prison  labor,  and  would  have  cost  the  city  hundreds  of  dollars 
to  have  hired  it  done. 

The  discipline,  order  and  cleanliness  of  the  institution  have  been  such  as 
to  merit  the  approval  of  your  Honorable  Board. 

The  sanitary  condition  has  been  faultless,  the  sick  have  been  carefully 
cared  for,  and  but  few  complaints  have  been  made  to  me  by  any  prisoner  of 
any  supposed  grievance  during  my  administration  as  Superintendent.  And 
I  believe  that  the  expense  of  management  has  been  economical,  and  the  re- 
sults, so  far  as  pecuniary  interest  is  concerned,  have  been  all  that  could  be 
reasonably  desired,  as  the  following  comparison  with  the  preceding  year  will 
clearly  show. 

The  total  expense  of  running  the  institution  last  year  (1878-79)  was,  as 
per  Auditor's  books,  sixty-two  thousand  one  hundred  and  sixteen  dollars 
and  seventy-five  cents.  Add  debts  contracted  (paid  this  year) ,  two  thousand 
eight  hundred  and  forty-four  dollars  and  sixty-four  cents,  and  it  makes  a 
total  of  sixty-four  thousand  nine  hundred  and  fifty-eight  dollars  and  thirty- 
nine  cents, 

The  total  expenses  this  year,  deducting  the  amount  of  two  thousand  eight 
hundred  and  forty-four  dollars  and  sixty-four  cents,  paid  for  bills  contracted 
and  not  audited  last  year,  is  fifty  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty-nine 
dollars  and  thirteen  cents.  Deducting  the  amount  of  thirty-six  hundred  ddl- 
lars  from  the  expenses  last  year,  for  the  amount  of  the  decrease  in  the  salar- 
ies of  officers,  leaves  a  net  expense  of  sixty-one  thousand  three  hundred  and 
fifty-eight  dollars  and  thirty-nine  cents,  while  the  net  amount  of  expense  for 
the  fiscal  year  1879-80  is  fifty  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty-nine  dol- 
lars and  thirteen  cents,  making  a  clear  saving  this  year  over  the  last  of  ten 
thousand  five  hundred  and  twenty-nine  dollars  and  twenty-six  cents .  And 
the  records  will  show  more  prisoners  received  this  year  than  last. 

The  per  capita  this  year,  including  all  expenses,  has  been  thirty-six  and 
one-fourth  cents.  The  per  capita  for  1878-79  was,  after  deducting  thirty-six 
hundred  dollars  (difference  in  salaries),  forty-eight  and  one-half  cents,  and 
you  will  readily  perceive  that  the  per  capita  will  be  larger  as  the  prisoners 
decrease,  as  the  salaries  do  not  decrease  with  the  prisoners. 


HOUSE  OF  CORRECTION.  313 

Therefore  I  claim  that  the  present  Board  has  made  a  good  showing  in  this 
institution,  and  I  would  here  take  the  opportunity  to  thank  the  members  of 
your  Honorable  Board  for  many  valuable  suggestions  and  their  hearty 
co-operation  in  the  management  of  this  institution. 

I  would  also  thank  Supervisor  Schottler  for  the  many  visits  he  has  paid 
the  prison,  and  for  the  uniform  kindness  he  has  manifested  toward  me,  and 
for  the  zealous  interest  he  has  shown  in  aiding  me  to  conduct  the  prison  in 
a  creditable  manner,  reflecting  great  credit  upon  himself  as  chairman  of  the 
House  of  Correction  Committee,  as  well  as  to  the  balance  of  the  Board  and 
Committee. 

I  wish  also  to  thank  Dr.  Charles  Blach,  City  and  County  Physician,  for 
promptness  at  all  hours  of  the  day  or  night,  when  called  to  this  place,  and 
congratulate  him  upon  his  success  in  treating  the  inmates  of  this  institution, 
having  only  two  deaths  within  the  past  year,  and  both  cases  being  men  over 
sixty-four  years  of  age,  and  who  died  from  the  effects  of  chronic  alcoholism. 

I  would  also  thank  the  Directors  of  the  Odd  Fellows'  and  Mercantile- 
Library  Associations  for  the  donation  of  valuable  miscellaneous  reading 
matter,  and  other  friends  who  have  assisted  in  establishing  a  library  at  the 
House  of  Correction,  now  consisting  of  five  hundred  and  seventy-one  volumes. 

I  deem  a  well-selected  library  among  the  most  important  additions  to  any 
public  institution  that  could  be  made,  and  ours  is  highly  appreciated  by  both, 
officers  and  prisoners. 

My  thanks  are  also  due  to  my  subordinate  officers  for  the  faithful  manner 
in  which  they  have  performed  their  duties,  and  I  am  happy  to  report  no- 
escapes  during  my  administration,  owing  to  the  efficiency  of  my  officers,  and,, 
with  but  few  exceptions  (which  I  trust  will  soon  be  overcome),  the  discipline 
of  the  institution  is  highly  satisfactory  to  me. 

Eeligious  services  have  been  held  at  this  place  every  Sabbath,  with  but 
one  or  two  exceptions,  the  Protestants  holding  service  one  Sabbath  and  the 
Catholics  the  other,  thus  alternating  with  each  other. 

Mr.  Woodworth,  Secretary  of  the  Prison  Commission,  has  my  sincere 
thanks  for  the  good  work  he  has  done  in  bringing  reading  matter  and  preach- 
ing to  the  inmates. 

In  fact,  he  is  to  be  thanked  for  starting  the  services  at  this  place,  and  he- 
has  them. 

To  your  Honorable  Body  I  am  indebted  for  your  continued  confidence  in 
my  administration,  as  evidenced  by  your  kindness  at  all  times  to  me,  and  by 
your  ready  adoption  of  such  suggestions  as  from  time  to  time  I  have  made. 

Thanking  you,  gentlemen,  I  hope  I  shall  be  deemed  worthy  of  your  future 
confidence-  Very  respectfully, 

A.  W.  PEEVOST, 

Superintendent. 


INDUSTRIAL  SCHOOL  REPORT. 


SAN  FKANCISCO,  JULY  1,  1880. 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — In  accordance  with  resolution  No.  14,765  (New 
Series),  I  herewith  present  my  annual  report  as  Superintendent 
of  the  City  and  County  Industrial  School,  for  the  fiscal  year 
ending  June  30,  1880. 

Of  the  inmates  I  can  speak  very  favorably.  Their  conduct  and 
morals  have  been  as  good  as  could  be  expected  from  the  class 
we  have  to  deal  with,  a  majority  of  whom  have  been  taken  from 
the  lowest  class  of  society.  Brought  up  in  ignorance  and  vice, 
and  allowed  to  have  their  own  way  in  everything,  it  is  but  natural 
that  they  should  eventually  find  their  way  "out  to  the  school." 

I  am  satisfied  from  my  investigation  that  in  four-fifths  of  the 
oases  the  parents  are  to  blame  for  their  children  being  in  this  in- 
stitution. "While  there  are  some  of  the  boys  that  can  be  re- 
formed, there  are  others  who  will  eventually  bring  up  in  the 
State  Prison. 

This  report  will  show  a  smaller  number  present  in  the  institu- 
tion than  last  year.  I  can  only  account  for  the  falling  off  in 
numbers  by  the  granting  of  indefinite  leave  of  absence  to  inmates 
who  have  only  been  in  the  institution  a  short  time .  It  is  almost 
always  the  case  that  a  boy  who  leaves  on  probation  is  returned  to 
the  school  in  a  short  time,  011  a  new  charge.  I  would  recom- 
mend that  no  boy  be  released  until  he  has  served  at  least  six 
months  in  the  institution,  and  then  only  on  the  recommendation 


INDUSTRIAL    SCHOOL.  315 

of  the  Superintendent,  as  he,  having  constant  watch  over  him,  is 
able  to  see  any  reform  that  may  have  taken  place  during  his  stay 
in  the  institution,  and  would  be  able  to  judge  whether  the  public 
would  be  benefited  by  the  release. 

Schedule  "A"  will  show  the  number  of  boys  committed,  cause 
of  commitment,  by  whom  committed,  term,  age,  etc. 

Schedule  "B"  will  show  the  number. of  girls  committed,  cause 
of  commitment,  by  whom  committed,  term,  age,  etc. 

Schedule  "C"  will  show  how  the  inmates  have  been  received 
and  discharged. 

Following  is  the  amount  of  work  performed  in  the  different 
departments  and  amount  of  material  on  hand  : 

SHOE  SHOP. 

There  has  been  employed  in  the  Shoe  Shop  during  the  year  an  average  of 

ten  boys  five  days  in  each  week.  The  amount  of  work  done  by  them  has 
been  as  follows  : 

Number  of  pairs  of  shoes  made 486 

Number  of  pairs  of  shoes  repaired 976 

Number  of  pairs  of  shoes  distributed 434 

Number  of  pairs  of  shoes  on  hand  .  , .  < 57 

Number  of  pairs  of  women's  slippers  on  hand 173 

Number  of  pairs  of  balmorals 22 

TAILOR  SHOP. 

The  tailor  shop  has  been  kept  busy  all  the  year  making  and  repairing 
clothes.  An  average  of  ten  boys  have  been  kept  in  this  department  five  days 
in  each  week.  The  work  performed  by  them,  and  the  articles  on  hand,  are  as 
follows': 

Number  of  jackets  made 121 

Number  of  pants  made     267 

Number  of  caps  made 202 

Number  of  jackets  repaired . . . 1,752 

Number  of  pants  repaired 1,113 

Number  of  caps  repaired 560 

Number  of  overalls  made 15 

Number  of  jumpers  made 24 

Number  of  jackets  on  hand 57 

Number  of  pants  on  hand 118 

Number  of  caps  on  hand . .          42 

Number  of  overalls  on  hand 3 

Number  of  jumpers  on  hand 9 

Number  of  yards  of  cloth  on  hand 818 


316 


REPORT    OF    THE 


LAUNDRY. 


There  has  been  employed  in  the  Laundry  an  average  of  seven  boys,  six 
days  in  the  week,  who  have  done  all  the  washing  and  ironing  of  the  institu- 
tion. The  amount  of  work  performed  in  this  department  has  been  as  fol- 
lows : 

Number  of  pieces  washed 52,356 

Number  of  pieces  ironed % 24,032 

Average  number  of  pieces  washed  per  mouth 4,363 

Average  number  of  pieces  ironed  per  month 2,003% 

SEWING  ROOM. 

In  the  Sewing  Room  live  boys  have  bean  employed  five  days  of  each  week. 
In  this  department  all  the  shirts,  sheets,  spreads,  etc.,  are  made  and  mended. 
The  work  done  in  this  department  has  been  as  follows  : 

Number  of  shirts  made 200 

Number  of  shirts  examined  and  repaired 5,722 

Number  of  sheets  examined  and  repaired 140 

Number  of  spreads  examined  and  repaired 126 

Number  of  miscellaneous  pieces  repaired 330 

GARDEN. 

Our  garden  is  in  a  nourishing  condition.  We  are  now  able  to  furnish  all 
our  own  vegetables  and  garden  produce.  There  has  been  an  average  of  seven 
boys  employed  six  days  in  the  week. 

FARM. 

Outside  of  the  garden,  there  are  six  boys  employed  on  the  farm,  who  do 
all  the  work  outside  under  the  stipervision  of  the  farmer.  The  farm  will 
produce  about  one  hundred  tons  of  excellent  hay.  We  have  also  five  acres  of 
potatoes  which  will  turn  out  very  well.  The  farm  land  is  divided  as  follows: 

Industrial  School  and  gixninds • 5  acres 

House  of  Correction  and  grounds 5  acres 

Barn,  stable,  shed  and  grounds 3  acres 

Cultivated  for  hay 53  acres 

Cultivated  for  vegetables 9  acres 

Pasturage 35  acres 

Total 110  acres 

STOCK  AND  IMPLEMENTS. 

Horses 7 

Cows 5 

Yearlings 2 


INDUSTRIAL    SCHOOL.  317 

Calves 2 

Pigs 52 

Four-horse  wagon   1 

Farm  wagon 1 

Hock  wagon 1 

Double-seated  light  wagon 1 

Light  wagon 1 

Dump  cart -. 1 

Mower  (old) 1 

Seed  sower  (old) , 1 

Horse  rake 1 

Cultivator 1 

Plough 1 

Harness.  .    1 

Harrow 1 

In  the  kitchen  there  are  eight  boys  employed  all  day.  The 
balance  of  the  inmates  are  distributed  around  in  the  halls,  dor- 
mitories, officers'  rooms,  school  rooms,  hospitals,  etc.  Every 
boy  in  the  institution  is  detailed  to  some  kind  of  work,  none  are 
idle. 

The  institution,  being  nearly  twenty-one  years  old,  necessitated 
a  great  many  repairs  to  keep  it  in  good  condition.  There  are  a 
great  many  repairs  that  are  required  to  be  done,  and  will  cost  a 
considerable  amount  of  money,  and  are  likely  to  increase  every 
year.  We  have  made  some  necessary  improvements  in  the  build- 
ing during  the  year.  New  water  closets  have  been  put  in  the 
dormitories,  replacing  the  old  ones,  which  have  been  a  continual 
source  of  expense  keeping  them  in  repair.  The  old  range,  being 
all  burnt  out,  necessitated  a  new  one,  which  was  put  in  last  Feb- 
ruary and  at  the  present  time  is  working  well.  There  have  been 
new  pipes  put  in  different  parts  of  the  building,  thus  giving  a 
better  water  supply.  A  new  fence  has  been  built  at  the  barn, 
making  a  large  yard  for  pigs  to  run  in.  A  new  fence  has  also 
been  built  at  the  south  end  of  the  building,  replacing  the  old 
one,  which  was  blown  down.  This  fence  acts  as  a  wind-break  to 
protect  the  yard  from  the  heavy  westerly  winds  that  blow  during 
the  afternoon. 

The  fence  enclosing  the  building  is  in  a  very  bad  condition. 
The  braces  on  that  portion  of  the  fence  facing  east  being  very 
unsafe,  in  case  of  a  very  heavy  wind  I  could  not  answer  for 


318  REPORT    OF    THE 

the  damage  that  would  be  done.  The  bottom  of  the  fence  is  rot- 
ten from  the  top  of  the  ground  down,  and  will  necessitate  the 
putting  of  new  fencing  from  the  depth  of  three  feet  to  about  the 
same  distance  above  ground.  This,  with  new  braces  on  the  out- 
side, will  make  it  quite  secure. 

PAINTING,  ETC. 

The  walls  of  the  main  'building,  school  rooms  and  small  dor- 
mitory have  all  been  whitened  and  some  of  them  painted.  The 
office,  sitting  room  and  hall  ways  have  all  been  painted  in  imita- 
tion of  wainscoting.  Other  parts  of  the  building  have  been 
painted  when  required. 

GRADING. 

A  number  of  convicts  have  been  sent  over  from  the  House  of 
Correction  to  work,  grading  the  rear  bank.  The  dirt  taken  from 
the  bank  is  used  to  make  a  road  leading  from  the  rear  gate  to  the 
barn,  thereby  avoiding  the  heavy  grade  we  have  to  use  now.  The 
road  is  nearly  finished,  and  it  is  my  intention  to  continue  it  along 
the  south  and  east  sides  of  the  fence  to  connect  with  the  main 
road,  and  thereby  improve  the  entrance  to  the  yard.  When  the 
bank  is  graded  it  will  make  a  great  improvement  to  the  rear 
yard. 

I  am  pained  to  report  the  death  of  two  boys  in  the  institution 
during  the  year.  Frank  Faskell,  aged  eighteen  years,  died  March 
10,  1880,  after  a  lingering  sickness  of  many  months.  William 
Beinhardt,  aged  sixteen  years,  died  May  8,  1880;  he  was  'also 
sick  a  long  time.  They  were  both  buried  from  the  institution 
with  appropriate  services.  I  will  liere  return  my  thanks  to  Dr. 
B.  D.  Dean,  our  visiting  physician,  for  the  care  and  attention  he 
has  always  shown  those  who  have  been  unfortunate  enough  to 
come  under  his  care. 

Schedule  "D"  will  show  the  manner  in  which  the  appropria- 
tion has  been  expended.  Under  the  head  of  repairs  and  improve- 
ments there  should  be  added  $232  50  paid  for  the  new  range, 
also  $154  40  paid  for  a  new  copper  kettle  put  in  the  laundry; 
these  amounts  were  put  in  the  miscellaneous  account  and  should 
be  deducted  from  that  account. 

During  the  year  I  have  visited  the  Magdalen  Asylum  weekly. 


INDUSTRIAL    SCHOOL.  319 

I  have  always  found  the  inmates  in  good  spirits,  cleanly,  and 
well  taken  care  of.  There  have  been  no  complaints  made  to  me 
of  any  kind,  and  all  the  inmates  appear  to  be  as  contented  as 
could  be  expected  under  the  circumstances. 

There  was  paid  to  the  Magdalen  Asylum  last  year,  for  the 
maintenance  of  841  girls,  being  an  average  of  70J  girls  per  month, 
$12,863  50;  while  the  provisions,  clothing  and  shoes,  to  maintain 
1,685  inmates  in  the  Industrial  School  amount  to  $11,593  63;  the 
average  cost  of  maintaining  the  girls  per  month  was  $15  40.4; 
for  maintaining  an  average  of  141  1-12  inmates  in  the  Industrial 
School,  per  month,  was  $7  41.9.  This,  to  me,  seems  to  be  more 
than  should  be  paid.  The  girls  can  be  taken  care  of  in  this  in- 
stitution at  a  cost  of  one-half  the  amount  paid  at  present.  I 
would  recommend  that  some  action  be  taken  by  your  Honorable 
Board  toward  lessening  the  expense  of  keeping  the  girls,  either 
by  reducing  the  amount  paid  for  their  maintenance  at  the  asylum, 
or  having  them  transferred  to  this  institution. 

Appended  are  schedules  showing  the  commitments,  discharges, 
disbursements,  average  cost  of  maintenance,  etc. 

To  your  Honorable  Body  I  desire  to  express  my  warmest  thanks 
for  courtesies  extended,  and  to  the  Industrial  School  and  House 
of  Correction  Committees  for  material  assistance  in  expediting 
work  done  during  the  year. 

To  the  officers  and  employees  I  am  indebted,  their  labors  being 
arduous,  and  at  times  showing  no  satisfactory  results.  I  tender 
them  my  sincere  thanks,  hoping  to  receive  their  earnest  co-oper- 
ation in  the  future  as  I  have  in  the  past. 

Trusting  that  our  labors  will  receive  the  approbation  of  your 
Honorable  Board,  this  report  is  respectfully  submitted. 

j.  F.  MCLAUGHLIN, 

Superintendent. 


320 


REPORT    OF    THE 


KEPOET    OF    THE    PRINCIPAL. 


INDUSTRIAL  SCHOOL, 
San  Francisco,   July  1,   1880. 
To  -John  F.  McMaughlin, 

Superintendent  of  the  Industrial  School  : 

SIR — The  following  is  the  annual  report  of  the  School  Department  of  this 
institution  for  the  year  ending  June  30,  1880  : 

The  number  of  boys  in  the  school  at  the  beginning  of  the  year  was 128 

The  number  at  the  end  of  the  year 105 

The  average  number  was 119 

The  \>oys  are  divided  into  two  divisions  : 

First  division  (lowest),  two  classes,  taught  by  Mr.  M.  A.  Jones,  Assist- 
ant Teacher,  average  number 49 

Second  division   (highest),  two  classes,  taught  by  John   C.  Robinson, 

Principal,  average  number 70 

The  band,  composed  of  boys  from  the  two  divisions,  taught  by  Mr.  Jas. 

C.  Kemp,  Leader,  average  number 18 

The  following  tables  will  show  the  standing  of  the  boys  now  in  the  school 
and  their  scholarship  when  admitted. 

BEADING. 


WHEN*  ADMITTED. 

AT  PRESENT. 

12 

1 

18 

Can  read  in  First  Reader  

.  11 

Could  read  in  the  First  Reader.  . 
Could  read  in  the  Second  Reader  

....  19 
....  21 
2D 

Can  read  in  Second  Reader  
Can  read  in  Third  Reader  
Can  read  in  Fourth  Reader 

35 
33 
25 

Could  read  in  the  Fourth  Reader.  .  .  . 

15 

Total 

.    .   105 

Total 

105 

•  WRITING. 


WHEN  ADMITTED. 


AT  PRESENT. 


Could  m 

Could  not  write  words 

Could  not  write  their  letters . . . 
Could  not  write  well 


Total 105 


Cannot  write  words 

Can  write  words , 

Can  write  their  own  letters . . . 
Write  very  well 


Total. 


.  19 
.105 


INDUSTRIAL    SCHOOL. 


321 


ARITHMETIC. 


WHEN  ADMITTED. 


Knew  nothing  of  Arithmetic 13 

Could  count 27 

Studied  Rudiments  of  Arithmetic 65 

Total ...  ...  105 


AT  PRESENT. 


Study  Primary  Arithmetic 47 

Study  Rudiments  of  Arithmetic 32 

Study  Practical  Arithmetic 26 

Total 10S 

N.  B.— 58  study  Mental  Arithmetic. 


GEOGRAPHY. 


WHEN  ADMITTED. 

AT  PRESENT. 

Knew  nothing  of  Geography  
Had  studied  Primary  Geography  
Had  studied  Intermediate  Geography  .  . 

..  44 
..  43 
..   18 

Do  not  study  Geography  
Receive    oral     instruction    from 
maps  
Stiuty  Monteith's  Manual     

32 
outline 
35 
38 

Total  

105 

Total                                 

106 

GRAMMAR. 


WHEN  ADMITTED. 


Knew  nothing  of  Grammar 

Had  received  oral  instruction 


Total. 


.105 


AT  PRESENT. 


Do  not  receive  instruction 42 

Receive  oral  instruction 38 

Study  Primary  Grammar 26 

Total...  ...105 


Whole  number  of  School  Days  in  Year. . 

Average  per  month 

Days'  Attendance  in  School 

Days'  Absence  from  School 

Average  Daily  Attendance 

Per  cent  of  attendance . . 


19.5 


84 
71 


234 

19,713 
8,010 


AGE  OF  BOYS  IN  SCHOOL  AT  END  OF  YEAR. 


Years     

20 

19 

18 

17 

16 

15 

14 

13 

12 

n 

10 

9 

g 

AVERAQR 

First  Division  

6 

4 

10 

5 

10 

1 

1 

13 

Second  Division  

1 

2 

5 

9 

10 

8 

15 

10 

3 

15 

Total  

1 

2 

5 

9 

15 

12 

25 

15 

13 

6 

1 

1 

14.33 

21 


322  REPORT    OF    THE 


RELIGION    OF   PARENTS. 

Protestants 17 

Jews 6 

Chinese 5 

—      28 
Catholics 77 

Total 105 

School  exercises  are  as  follows: 

Monday — Spelling,  Reading,  Arithmetic,  Writing,  and  Lessons  on  Morals 
and  Manners. 

Tuesday — Spelling,  Beading,  Intellectual  and  Written  Arithmetic,  Gram- 
mar, Geography,  Writing  and  Singing. 

Wednesday — As  on  Monday. 

Thursday — As  on  Tuesday. 

Friday — Spelling,  Reading,  Dictation,  Composition,  Arithmetic,  and  Les- 
sons on  Morals  and  Manners. 

Saturday  is  taken  up  with  house  cleaning,  bathing,  inspection  of  clothing, 
etc. 

*  Sunday — Religious  exercises  from  9%  to  10%  A.  M.,  and  Sunday  School 
from  two  to  three  o'clock  p.  M. 

*  Band  Exercises — On  school  days  from  10  to  10%  A.  M.  and  from  6%  to 
7%  P.  M. 

The  band  is  composed  at  the  present  time  of  young  boys  who  have  been 
but  a  frhort  time  under  instruction,  and  are  doing  very  well,  considering  this 
fact  and  that  they  have  old  instruments,  worn-out  and  almost  unfit  for  use. 
But  steps  are  being  taken  to  obtain  new  instruments,  and  then,  under  their 
able  and  attentive  leader,  they  will  regain  their  old  standing  as  one  of  the 
leading  bands  of  the  city. 

During  the  past  year  we  have  received  many  favors  in  the  way  of  presents 
of  pictorials,  magazines  and  papers,  which  are  ^agerly  sought  for  by  the  boys 
and  read  and  re-read.  Our  best  friend  has  been  the  Society  of  California 
Pioneers,  and  then  Messrs.  Badger,  Grant  and  Rev.  Father  Harrington. 

It  will  be  seen  from  the  tables  given  that  the  boys  have  made  considerable 
progress  during  the  past  year,  and  that  in  the  face  of  many  obstacles.  A 
number  of  the  boys  have  at  times  to  be  absent  from  school  attending  to  work 
in  the  shops,  on  the  farm  and  garden.  But  this  is  not  a  loss,  for  I  consider 
it  more  desirable  to  teach  the  class  of  boys  we  have  to  deal  with  habits  of 
industry  and  obedience  to  law  than  mere  book  learning. 

Most  of  the  boys  in  this  institution  have  been  brought  here  through  the 
fault  of  parents,  who  have  allowed  them  to  be  truants  from  school,  idlers 
about  the  streets  day  and  night—and  so  descending  until  graduating  from 


INDUSTRIAL    SCHOOL.  323 

the  dives  and  "dumps"  to  the  station-house,  "Ref,"    House    of   Correction 
and  then—  ? 

As  has  been  said  to  me,  "Those  words,  sir,  are  the  first  words  of  kindness, 
of  hope,  ever  spoken  to  me.  I  will  try  to  be  good."  And  they  have  tried, 
and  while  with  us  have  given  no  trouble,  but  too  often,  when  discharged, 
they  find  no  home  as  it  should  be,  and  are  thrown  back  among  their  old  chums 
of  the  streets,  and  then  again  return  to  us,  worse,  more  hardened  in  crime 
than  before. 

On  Sundays  service  is  held  in  the  morning  for  the  Catholic  boys  by  a 
priest,  who  comes  from  the  city.  Rev.  Father  Kelly,  S.  J.,  has  been  con- 
stant in  attendance  during  the  past  year.  In  the  afternoon  Sisters  of  Mercy 
from  St.  Mary's  Hospital  attend  and  take  charge  of  the  Sunday  School,  and 
to  view  the  boys  while  under  their  care,  so  quiet  and  respectful  and  atten- 
tive, it  would  be  almost  impossible  to  believe  that  they  were  the  hoodlums 
who  had  been  the  terror  of  so  many  parts  of  the  city. 

The  Protestant  boys  and  all  who  are  not  Catholics  attend  a  service  in  the 
morning  conducted  by  one  of  the  teachers,  and  in  the  afternoon  Sunday 
School.  Formerly,  some  interest  was  taken  to  send  ministers  and  teachers 
but  of  late  we  have  been  wholly  neglected,  as  during  the  past  year  but  one 
Protestant  minister  has  visited  us,  and  that  was  specially  by  request  to  attend 
the  funeral  of  one  of  our  boys. 

This  is  much  to  be  regretted,  for  without  religious  instruction  there  will  be 
no  reformation.  Where  there  is  no  sense  of  God  there  will  be  small  sense  of 
guilt,  and  without  sense  of  guilt  there  will  be  no  repentance  or  better  life. 

The  teacher  cannot  have  the  power  to  interest  and  instruct  the  boys  as  readily 
as  one  who  is  not  brought  so  much  in  contact  with  them,  as  he  is  daily.  So 
I  hope  that  during  the  coming  year  we  will  not  have  to  say  so  often  on  Sun- 
days: "  No  one  is  coming  to-day." 

Allow  me  to  say  one  word  more.  I  believe,  and  my  experience  of  twenty 
years  with  boys  (two  years  in  this  institution)  makes  me  believe,  that  these 
boys  can  be  reformed.  During  the  past  the  average  for  conduct  in  school 
(4%  hours  daily)  is  ninety  per  cent.  What  school  can  show  better  ? 

Boys  who  can  so  control  themselves  can  be  brought  to  so  conduct  them- 
selves that  they  will  become  good  men  and  good  citizens. 

We  want  more  accommodation,  that  we  may  separate  the  boys  into  smaller 
classes,  according  to  character,  etc.,  and  long  terms  of  sentence,  that  when  a 
boy  has  turned  into  the  right  path  we  may  help  him  until  he  can  travel  alone. 
Give  us  these,  and  we  ask  no  more  to  insure  the  reformation  of  the  unfortu- 
nates sent  to  this  institution. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

JNO.  C.  ROBINSON, 

Principal  Teacher. 


324 


REPORT    OF    THE 


PH 

S3  ^ 

8s- 

!t 


W 
A 

P    £* 


g  a 
%« 


r/T  H" 

i 


w 
o 

s 

:::::::::  i"1  :  I  •"• 

1- 

rH      •      •  rH  <N      •  rH      •      •  O>1      -rHIOO 

sc 

CO  <M  rH  -*  <M      •  rH  rH  rH      •  <N  CO     |    O 

a 

•^  CO  u-5  rH  0  -*  CO  -*  CO  rH         CO     j    l_  - 

rH 

JOCOWrHW      -(NrHMW         <M         >= 

--. 

CO  <N  CO  rH  CC  rH      •  CO  CO  CO        <N    IT* 

i 

<N  <N  rH  <N  rH  CO  rH      .      'COrH      '     1    »>• 

rH 

i-H  rH     •  (N     •  (N      •  rH  —  <                 -|OO 

o 

I      ;rH-lrH      ;rH      •      .      .            •     j    rj. 

05 
00 

•rHrH      j(N 

NO.  OF  TIMES 
COMMITTED. 

0 

......     .r*     -.           ;    jrH 

IO 

-  :  ^  :  -1  :  :  :  :  -«    «  |  ••  . 

*< 

(N<M      •      .<NrH<NrH      -r-l           •     j   rH 

CO 

(MIO      -rHrHIM      -iCCO(Mi-HCO     ICO 

fM 

CDC-1«51-(Nr-lrHrHCOTt<      ;  rH     Irh 

rH 

r~t-r-o£iO«"*ot-eour.    |  ^ 

T.KRM  FOR 
WHICH  COMMITTED. 

Until  Legally  Discharged 

ia--OOlTj«OOrHSO;:HCirHCOO     IO 

5  years  

::::::  :"•  :  :^  :  |  ^ 

8  months  

::::  --1  :::::::  1  " 

b  months  

rH  1C  CO  t~  1-  >O  r-i      •'>]'*      •      ;     |    JO 

3  months  

•  CO  rH  (N  (N  ^  •*     •     •     ;     ;     ;    |   ® 

'2  months  ... 

rH      1    rH 

1  month  

^  :::::::::::  1  ^ 

110  days  

:  :  :  :  :  :*  :  :  :  :  :  I  M 

100  days  

rH-rH      |    ^ 

ki 

Surrendered  by  Guardian 

:  :  :  -<  ::::::::]  ^ 

City  Criminal  Court  

::  -"-1  :::::::;  i  N 

Police  Court            

SSr^SSS^SSS          rH     |S 

CAUSE  OP  COMMITMENT. 

Surrendered  

::::::::::::!    : 

Vagrancy  

:  :  :  :•-"-<  :w  ^  :  :  I  <° 

Attempt  at  Petit  Larceny 

:  :  :  :«  :-:::::  |w 

CO     rH     I    -* 

Unmanageable  

rH  rH      1    W 

Malicious  Mischief  

Idle  and  Dissolute  Life.    . 

•  rHi-H       -(M       -<NrH      •       •  rH      -IOO 

Misdemeanor  

CDWWW^^rHlN     ;     ;rH^    |   g 

Petit  Larceny  

0005rHOOOi^O<00^<NCO     |    g 

No.  of  boj 

00  rji  ^J<  CO  00  C  05  CM  rH  1C  "*  rH     IOS 

I    ^ 

§ 

MONTHS. 

:      :  :  :      :::::: 

flllllllllll 

INDUSTRIAL    SCHOOL. 


325 


n  xt 

W       H     ' 
fi 

hH 


» 

O 

O 


Q  % 

<l 

.,-  W 


O     „ 
B  M 


P 

P 

5  ^ 

O     w    ., 


^  8 

01"  W" 


3  fc 

M 

el 

,8 


Parents  unknow  n  

:^  :-"  :::::::  /,'  - 

o 

Parents  dead  

p 

Father  and  stepmother  

r-t       •       •  rH  <N       •       •  rH  rH      •       •      -ISO 

o 

Mother  and  stepfather  

rH  rH  rH  S-J  (N  00  rH  rH      •      •      •  CO     1    in 

J 

Mother  living-  

rHrH      •  >O  IN  (N  rH  SC  tH  SO      •  rH     (O 

B 

Father  living  

I 

Parents  living  

OOi<N<NO"*>nCDOOOCOO     1    •gj 
T-H         rH         T-H                            rH                      00 

British  Columbia  

::::::::::  M  :  |  rt 

Prince  Edward's  Island  

:  :  :  :  :  :^  :  :  :  :  :  |  ^ 

Germany  

r-t      •             •      •  i-H     1    <N 

New  Granada  ,  

•      •      '      -rH      |    rH 

ca 

England  

::  i1-1  ::::::::    * 

China  

:  :  :*-*  :::::::.!  ^ 

® 

France  

•      .  rH      .      .      -      •  (N      •      •      •      •         ;o 

Canada  

:.  ^  :::::::::  |  rH 

£ 

Ireland  

rH  rH  rH      •      •  rH      •      •      •  (N      •      •     j    CO 

Scotland  

:**:.::::::::  j  ^ 

Mexico  

*  *  ::::•:::::  |  N 

Australia  

1-1  i  !  ^  ;  ;  '.  '.  '.  '.  '.  *"*  |  ^ 

Georgia  
Minnesota  

::::::  -1  :  :  :  :  :  |  H 

Illinois?    

••••rH'-H      |(N 

Oregon  

•      '      •-      |    rH 

Nevada  

•  r-l     •      •  <N      •     •     I   SO 

Michigan  

;  ;  "^  ;  '.  '.  '.  '.  ;  '.  '.  '.  \  *~* 

pj 

Kentucky  

.rHrH      •      ;      ;      •      •  r-l      •  r-l      •     j    TJ. 

Massachusetts  

•00     -i-HrH     •      .(NrH      •      •     -Ijb- 

S3 

Iowa  

;  rn     ••;;;;;;••    j   rH 

Indiana  

.V-w  York  

rH  (N      •  rH  (N  •*      •  rH  rH      •      -SO         m 

Kansas  

... 

Caiii'oniia  

rH                      rM                                    '                  00 

0 

Chinese  

Indian   

:  :  :  "  ::::::::  |  ^ 

g 

Black  

;            •      •  rH  rH  rH  rH      •  rH      •      •    j    in 

White  

t-SO"*?Jl-OXrH—  «*-*rH     1    rH 

1   rH 

00 

MONTHS. 

326 


REPORT    OF    THE 


H     s 

s? 

I 


SOCIAL  CONDI- 
TION. 

Mother  &  stepfath.  living 
Parents  dead  
Mother  living  

-^rr-rs-i  :  pn5rhrfj*r 

:  :  r-"N   :  :  ^  :  :  :  rt  :  |  »° 

Father  living  

CO  i-H  i-l  CO  <N  i-H      •  rH  ,-H      •      •      -ICO 

Parents  living  

i-H-*,-Hr-iCO--*eM<NrHrH<NrH     ICO 

jz; 

CS    y 
£    A 

c>  o 

France  

:-:  t  :•:::::  :rt  :  .|  •H 

Germany  

:   :  :  :™  :•:::::  |  M 

England  

.r-l.r-(--H       ICO 

NATIVE  BORN. 

Kentucky  

::::::::  ^  :      :  |  - 

Maine  

:::::::  ^  ::      :  |  ^ 

Kansas  

:  :  :  :  :  ^  :  :  :  :      :  |  .- 

Nc-w  York  

:  :   i1"1   ::::::::  |  ""* 

Nevada  

:  -  ::::::::::  |  ^ 

Massachusetts  

""  :"  ;r~   :  :  :  :"  :  '^ 

Color  .  .  . 

Indian  

White  ««^.OOOWW*^CN«^      |    CN 

w 
o 

£3 

CMfNi-H'NrH      •      -i-Hi-H      •  r-(      •     li-H 

CO 

^HrHrHrHCSlrHCM      •      •      --Hi-H     IrH 

10 

i-H^H         CO  —  4  -^<         (MCMrHCO      -100 

rH 

rHrH    ^  :^  :  i1"""1  :  :  |  ° 

CO 

.    .      ^,_    ;r_«N    .    .    .    .  |  « 

s 

.      .  5SI      1    CM 

S§|ri 

CO 

:*  :~  .:::::::    M 

CM 

rH 

eo^JOvO^^oMTt.^CN'^r-1      .a 

TERM  OF  COM 
MITMENT. 

5  years  

CO     •      •      •      •        CO 

6  months  

rH      •      •  CO  CM  0            •      •  r-t      •      •         CM 

o  months  

••rH-t-H      CM 

3  months  

.^r-t.-.rH      CO 

Indefinite  

TH*«N.n<NpH.N«NTf.^«5pH         CO 

I 

BY  WHOM  COM-  | 
MITTEU. 

By  committee  and  guard'n 

tM  i-l      •  CM      10 

By  committee  and  parents 

•  !M      pH      .      .      .         CO 

By  committee  and  mother 

•  rH      •  i-l  !TJ      •      •  r-l      •      •      •      •         lO 

Surr.  by  com.  and  father. 

CM      •  CM  CM      •  i-H      t^ 

City  Criminal  Court     .... 

:   :-  :::::::::     ^ 

Police  COUrt  j        «Hr-<rHMca«M.*M<NWr-.         g 

QC   0   S 
£>  0  H 

Idle  and  dissolute  life  .    .  . 

CM  JO      •      •  rH      •         CO 

Vairrancy  

.      ;lH      .      ;      .      ;      --(      -CMrH         0 

AiisUt  -mean  or  

i-lrHi-ICOCOlCi-lr-l(MiMCM      •         J>1 

L  innanageahie  

^^CM^CNrH.rH^;.;         C 

Number  received  

1  m 

GIRLS. 

| 

c 

JittWJij 

^5«Sllifl3^5 

INDUSTRIAL    SCHOOL. 


32T 


w 


o 

g  ||  CAUSE  OF  COMMITMENT.  ||  CAUSE  OF  RELEASE. 

Transferred  to   C.  and  C. 
Hospital  

rH  rH      •                                •      •  rH      •         CO 

Died  

•         rH      '•      '•                                      •         rH 

Escaped  

*  :     :::::.:     :  -:    ^ 

Granted  indefinite  leave  of 
absence  

•      •        OO 

<N  CO  i-H      •  rH      •  <M  00      •  rH      •      •         (N 

Discharged,  term  expired 
etc  

00  CO  <N      --^t-rH      !  CO  SO  0>1  1C         O 

Surrendered  

•^irjrHlOrHrH-rHrH                   •         O5 

Returned  from  C.  and  C. 
Hospital  

•••.-.            .      . 

:            :  :  :  :         :  :    M 

Leave  of  absence  revoked  . 

.::::,_,::       _<  :    <N 

Committed  by  City  Crim- 
inal Court.  .  .  . 

:  •"*  T  :  :  :  :      :  :  :    ^ 

Committed  by  the   Police 
Court  
=r 
)tr  received  

rH^^CO^OCO^O^OrH         g 

—  —  —  — 

£ 

o 

PH 

CAUSE  OF  RELEASE. 

Died  

•      •  rH      •  rH      •         <N 

Escaped  .  .  . 

rH     "  "                    <M       !                 00 

Granted  indefinite  leave  of 
absence  

«*.««M««««^M          S 

Discharged  (term  expired)  '      oooi-o^«ooMTt.i-T).5o«o     <* 

CAUSE  OF  COMMITMENT. 

Surrendered  

[jJ^JJJJJU!  M 

Escapes  captured  • 

"*  (N  <N  l-~  «5  t-  It-     ;  t^  CO  t-  CO        tg 

Returned  voluntarily  

:  :  :  :^  :  :  :  :,H  :  :    « 

Leave  of  absence  revoked  . 

::::,_,:::::::    ,_, 

Escapes    returned    under 
new  commitment  

:::::::::::'*    "* 

Committed  by  City  Crim- 
inal Court  

:  :^~  ::::::::    « 

Committed  by  the  Police 
Court  

%3Z22Z°>SZS«*-    51 

Numb 

8sss»ssgsass 

03 

s 

H 

o 

:;::::      :      j      [ 

>^  •<  a8  O  JS5  ft  ^  fc  S  <«S  *^ 

00                                   00 

328 


REPORT    OF    THE 


SCHEDULE"    C".— CONCLUDED. 


RECAPITULATION. 


Boys  in  institution  July  1,  1879 

128 

Bo3's  committed  bv  Police  Court            

142 

Boys  committed  by  City  Criminal  Court  

2 

Boys  leave  of  absence  revoked         .  .         .           

1 

Bo3'S  returned  voluntarily.                                   ...           

2 

Boys  escaped  captured  
Boys  surrendered  

65 
1 

Boys  discharged  .  . 

345 
102 

Boys  granted  indefinite  leave  of  absence  ,  

54 

Boys  escaped  .... 

89 

Boys  died  

0 

Boys  remaining  in  school  June  30,  1880  .. 

240 
105 

Girls  in  Magdalen  Asvlum  July  1,  1879  

71 

Girls  committed  by  City  Criminal  Court  1  and  Police  Court  34.. 
Girls  leave  of  absence  revoked 

35 

9 

Girls  returned  from  City  and  County  Hospital  
Girls  surrendered  

3 

18 

Girls  discharged  

129 
36 

Girls  granted  indefinite  leave  of  absence  
Girls  escaped  

28 
j 

Girls  died  

1 

Girls  transferred  to  City  and  Countv  Hospital 

3 

Girls  remaining  in  Magdalen  Asylum  June  30,  1880  

69 
60 

Total  number  boys  and  girls  in  institution  June  30,  1880  

165 

INDUSTRIAL    SCHOOL. 


329 


g 


w 


p    fc    P 


W 

o 


:o  :      :  :            :    o  oo  :  : 

§ 

a 

Flannel 

.  *N      .             .                                t         O  t*»      •      • 

i|j_jj       \  ^  \  '• 

i 

£  0 

|9 

i£  :  .  :  •          i     i  !SS 

g 

o 

Woolen  Cloth  

'     ['HI     M;is 

1 

Miscellaneous    Gro- 
ceries,   Spices, 
Fruit,  Vinegar,  etc 

(M  -<f  CO  rH  O  Ol                        rHO^OOOlO 

c? 

OOO^IOOCO<M                      COiHC:00'MCO 
COlOOOrJIJOCO                        00-*CO^>OiO 

8 

Flour  and  Meals  

OlOCSlHOI^                        CCrHr-IOOOO-^ 
i-iOOOCiOI                    OOCOOOOOOO 

I 

Potatoes  and  Vege- 
tables   

EOOO^GO^                    Ci"*COl>-COCO 
rH  (M  (M  rH  CO                        iH  rH  CO  <>a  <N  0-1 

s 

O5 

c 

0 

Sugar  and  Syrup.  .  . 

SSg3!£S          S§5^Sr3§ 

Ci  1—  *M  CO  O  1  -                      CO  l:~  CO  •*  Oi  O 

oo 
S3 

uo 

K 

E 

s 

Tea  and  Coffee  

oooooo             ocoooo 

»OOOiCiCO                      O»OOOUiiO 
COH^lOOC-11^                      COCi»OCOt~lO 

s 

O5 

Butter,  Eggs,  Lard  .  . 

i^t^-*<MTj<oo               cocor^cocoos 

OOGOTOrHO                      inrHCOCO(NO 
OOr<i'X)l-'HCO                   Tfu-5COiO"*i(M 

s 

Meat,  fresh  and  salt 
Fish,  fresh  and  salt 

OOr-i-*!>5COcb                      Cir-i'cOOOOCi 

.$2,88750 

55 

Number  of  Inmates 

ZZ3ZZZ                          ^gg^H-CO 

53 

*" 

fl 

and  Employees.  .  . 

i 

i 

H 
^ 

fe      i  i            :    i                 : 

o 

as 

UlJll        J       i 

.»s^ag           is  g  -  :  : 

3 

^atS^l        i||s  >>§ 

H 

^•<^O^Q        3  2  a  •§*»  1 

330 


REPORT    OF    THE 


1 

I     I 

5     pq 

II 

J      H 


80*48  •              •  :8  '    ? 

0 

Lime,  Brick,  etc.  .  . 

c;  co  35  10    •                    •    •  ao    ;    .  t- 

1 

Paints,  Oils,  Glass, 

8g§S  :             £    8  :8  : 

§ 

etc  

g^rnjN    :                             -H    ;<M     ; 

I 

Plumbing  and  Gas- 
fltting  

:S  :§§  :          ^    §  :S  : 

:  °  ;  >H  ;          r-<    »-  :  -*  ; 

10 

X 

M 

:g  :  :  :            :      :      :  : 

s 

2 

Asphaltum  Work  .  . 

r_ 

M 

':&  :      :            :      :      |J 

8 

cc 

Harness  and  Repairs 

:  :8      :          8      :8  :  ; 

8 

i 

M 

8 

9 

H 

rno  :  :                 :      :<=>  :  : 

M 

§ 

Iron  Stone  Pipe  

a°  :.  ;          :   ;M  i  i 

i 

jjj 

Blacksmithing  and 
Shoeing  

lip  iiiisi 

I 

rtrH  :.n?oo          ovom  :ojo 

r-i 

Hardware  

' 

o  f^-      oo  <>j                   ic  ic  rH    ;  I-H 

I 

SiS    §  ':  ;          8££S  i 

S 

g5    &  |  |          %$£%  : 

I 

Miscellaneous    for 

:  :jg  :  ;  :          §  :  :S  : 

§5 

I 

Shoe  Shop  

::§:::          «  :  :^  : 

8 

S3 

Q 

::-*:::          cs  :  :<a  : 

oo 

« 

Leather  

•    -03    ;    ;    ;              i-    •    ;  o>    ; 

i 

•  -S  i  •  :         w  •  i0"  : 

S 

B3 
o 

Trimmings  for  Tai- 
lor Shop  

1  1-  eo  -H    'jo               to  t-  gj  ^  oo 

<M 

H 

0 

:  -^  :  ®  o>             >>     :  :  • 

f?<J^O^Q                          ^^S<Sr-s 

I 

INDUSTRIAL    SCHOOL. 


331 


Total  Monthly  Expenditures 

S8E8SS          SSSSSS 

(N  50  0  CO  C:  iC                    ^  £  0  0  0  M 

$50,942  20 

i+***4 

MISCKLLANEOI'S. 

Magdalen  Asylum  .  . 

g  g  g  ?  g  g          g  g  8  3  8  g 

§ 

<N~ 
•» 

Salaries   of    Officers 
and  Employees.  .  . 

888882          §88888 

oo  »o  c  *c  o  ^>               r^  o  ic  o  o  o 

$18,072  03 

Crockery  

'  t^  io    '  o    '               o  o  o  ic  o    ' 

:  oo  o?  :  S             c  <M  o  ^i  S  : 

;o>i«;t^                  5oi~-*c5o; 

$237  32 

Miscellaneous,  Tele- 
phone, etc  

CO^JiCifligO                   OjC^J^OO 

§O»  in  CO  5O  I-                      i.C  •*  SI  5O  itt  3»3 
^"SS                            »^?1«'rH« 

S3 
5 

Labor 

pii  i    i.n.i! 

•* 

Til 
C-J 

I 

Drugs  

SSS:5            ig2SSS 
SSSi1  |2             gSSS^S 

i 

Gaso  ine,    Coal    Oil 
and  Candles  

8OOOOO                   OOOOO     ! 
•^•^•^••^rH                      C5OOOO      . 

5 

i 

Wood  and  Coal  

pip 

2 
I 

Garden    Seed    and 
Tools 

m    .'    !  o        '              o  <N  i~  o  o 

<M      .      :  CO             :                      00  IM  CO  0  0 

CO       '       '  -^1                                      Ci  'TJ  rH  5O  Cvl 

S    ;     ;  M          ;                 i-  vi  ^       r-i 

I 

Feed  for  Stock  

M  f-4  O  >O       K9                  10  I-H  ec  •X)     !  i  ~ 

|S§S    S                 --^  i§ 

So 

I 

Soap,  Sal  Soda  and 
Starch  

Hills    sin 

CM 
10 

1 

Books,  Paper,  Pens, 
Ink,  etc 

8SS2  :•*         ^'^    § 

S 

I 

I 

1 

1 

s  ii  g  lii, 

332 


REPORT    OF    THE 


SCHEDULE     "E." 

CLASSIFICATION   OF  EXPENDITURES,   COST  OF  MAINTENANCE  PER  CAPITA,  ETC. 


Amount  Expended  for  Provisions ^.027   00 

Clothing  and  £hoes 3,560  63 

Repairs  and  Improvements 3,838  02 

Books  and  Stationery ,  219  50 

Soap,  Starch,  etc 317  52 

Feed  for  Stock,  and  Seed 923  81 

Fuel 1,19818 

Light 914  (in 

Labor 542  44 

Crockery 237  32 

Salary 18,072  03 

Magdalen  Asylum 12,863  50 

Total  Amount  Expended $50,942   20 

Average  Monthly  Expense  Industrial  School  and  Magdalen  Asylum §4,245   18  3 

Average  Monthly  Expense  per  Individual 20  16  7 

Average  Daily  Expense  per  Individual 67  5 

Average  Monthly  Expense  for  Provision $668  90  5 

Average  Monthly  Expense  for  Provision  per  Inmate ...    4  76  4 

Average  Daily  Expense  for  Provision  per  Inmate |  15  9 

Average  Monthly  Expense  for  Clothing  and  Shoes §290  72  0 

Average  Monthly  Expense  for  Clothing  and  Shoes  per  Inmate 2  65  5 

Average  Daily  Expanse  for  Clothing  and  Shoes  per  Inmate 09  0 


CORONER'S    REPORT. 


CORONER'S  OFFICE, 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  31,  1880. 

To  the  Hon.  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

In  compliance  with  Kesolution  No.  14,765  (New  Series),  passed 
by  your  honorable  body,  July  6, 1880,  requesting  a  report  of  the 
condition  of  this  Department  of  the  City  Government  during 
fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880,  I  have  the  honor  to  submit  the 
following  tables  and  remarks  thereon: 

Table  No.  1. — The  number  of  deaths  reported,  autopsies  made 
and  inquests  held  during  each  month  of  the  year.  It  shows  that 
the  total  number  of  deaths  reported  for  investigation  was  four 
hundred  and  thirty-two  (432),  an  average  of  thirty-six  (36),  per 
month  and  in  number  forty-six  (46),  more  than  last  year.  Au- 
topsies were  made  in  one  hundred  and  sixty-nine  cases,  an 
average  of  about  fourteen  (14),  per  month  and  a  decrease  of  eight 
(8),  cases  from  last  year.  Of  inquests  there  have  been  held  two 
hundred  and  twenty-three  (223),  about  one-half  of  the  cases  re- 
ported for  investigation.  This  gives  an  average  of  over  eighteen 
(18),  per  month  and  an  increase  of  seventeen  (17),  from  last  year. 

Table  No.  2. — The  cause  of  death  in  each  case  and  the  nature 
of  crime  charged,  if  any.  Comparing  this  table  (mortuary  table) 
with  that  of  last  year,  we  find  that  there  has  been  but  little 
change  in  the  number  of  sudden  and  unexpected  deaths  from 
natural  causes.  We  would  have  a  definite  number  of  such  deaths 
in  a  given  population  and  it  is  probable  that  there  has  been  but 
little  change  in  the  number  of  inhabitants  during  the  last  year. 


334  CORONER'S  REPOKT. 

In  Table  No.  3  there  will  be  found  an  analysis  of  these  sud- 
den and  unexpected  deaths  from  natural  causes,  and  it  is  inter- 
esting from  the  fact  that  sufficient  disease  existed  to  cause  death, 
yet  but  little  if  any  signs  were  given  or  known  to  the  friends  or 
usual  medical  attendant.     A  number  of  these  were  from  brain 
lesions  difficult  to  diagnosticate  or  anticipate.     The  number  of 
the   forms   of  pneumonia,  the    so-called  "walking  pneumonia/1 
where  the  patient  is  able  to  be  about  until  near  death,  were  nu- 
merous but  about  the  same  as   other  years.     There  were   other 
diseases  of  the  lungs — apoplexy  and  congestion — but  a  few,  of 
course,   where  consumption  was  found  to  have  killed,   and  in 
these  cases  as  in  many  others  of  death  from  a  disease  which  may 
have  been  chronic,  if  the  friends  or  medical  attendant  had  been 
known  and  found,  they  would  not  have  been  considered  sudden 
or  surprising.     Disease  of  heart  claims  about  the  usual  number, 
while  aneurism  was  somewhat  less  than  usual.     The  only  other 
cause  of  death  in  the  list  worthy  of  remark  is  two   deaths  from 
exposure   to  cold,  which,  in  this  climate,  may   be   astonishing. 
These  were  Chinese  fishermen  whose  boat  became  unmanageable 
and  filled  with  water  in  the  bay,  during  one  of  our  cold  storms 
last  winter,  and  they  were  compelled  to  remain  in  the  boat  until 
they  died.     In  the  ages  of  the  cases  the  extremes  are  found,  but 
the  average  (41),  may"  be  considered  about  the  average  age  at 
death  from  all  causes  and  circumstances  in  life.     The  greater 
number  are  found  between  45  and  55.     In  occupation  there  are 
few  having  trades  wnere  the  powers  of  endurance  for  continuous 
and  prolonged  work  are  tested,  the  most  being  of  the  callings 
where  but  little  exertion  is  required.     "Housewives"  and  "La- 
borers" are   of   course   positions    where    strength   is    somewhat 
tested,  but  as  there  is  no  established  price  for  a  day's  work  in 
such   positions  it  is  probable  the  sum  paid  governed  the  work 
performed  to  a  considerable  extent.     As  regards  the  nativity  of 
these  cases  the  most  are  found  to  be  natives  of  California,  Ger- 
many and  Ireland.     The  former  are  all  under  five  years  of  age. 
In  color  the  negroes  are  undoubtedly  in  large  proportion  to  the 
number  with  us.     The  males  are  largely  in  excess,  and  the  single 
are  considerably  so.     The   proportions   to   the  number   in  our 
midst  cannot  be  stated  without  consulting  the   census  returns, 
now  incomplete. 


CONTENTS    OF  TABLES.  335 

The  number  of  accidental  deaths  has  increased,  but  not  from 
the  processes  of  building  and  the  carrying  on  of  general  business, 
as  there  has  been  a  decrease  in  deaths  from  "falls"  and  "run 
over  by  vehicles,"  but  from  a  large  number  of  deaths  caused  by 
burning  and  drowning.  Three-fifths  of  the  deaths  from  burning 
were  Chinese  laundry  men,  and  in  the  circumstances  surrounding- 
them  it  was  demonstrated  that  great  carelessness  existed  in  their 
use  of  fires  and  coal  oil,  while  many  deaths  were  the  direct  re- 
sult of  the  habits  of  these  tradesmen  to  work  nearly  all  night, 
then  obtain  a  few  hours  rest  and  sleep  by  stupefying  themselves 
with  opium,  when  the  flames  and  death  found  them  easy  victims. 
The  whole  city  and  the  lives  of  its  inhabitants  are  no  doubt  en- 
dangered by  allowing  these  laundries  to  be  located  in  nearly 
every  block.  The  establishing  of  a  Chinese  quarter  as  a  guard 
against  the  spread  of  fires  to  a  people  comparatively  law  abiding* 
and  careful,  is  something  to  hope  for.  Twenty-one  persons  were 
killed  outright  during  the  year  by  being  burned  or  suffocated  in 
fire,  and  one  person  died  from  burns  received  in  a  fire  a  few 
days  before  his  demise.  Of  this  number  eighteen  were  males 
and  four  females,  Chinese  fifteen,  white  seven,  adults  nineteen, 
and  children  three.  All  of  these  lives  were  lost  in  six  fires. 

There  is  no  explanation  to  make  for  the  remarkable  increase 
in  the  number  of  deaths  from  drowning,  as  there  has  been  no- 
calamity  where  more  than  one  death  occurred,  except  in  one  in- 
stance, when  three  men  lost  their  lives  by  the  capsizing  of  a 
boat.  It  is  perhaps  strange  we  do  not  have  more  deaths  from 
this  cause,  considering  our  large  water  frontage  and  the  amount 
of  business  that  requires  crossing  the  Bay.  All  cases  of  drown- 
ing are  not.  known,  and  many  known  to  be  drowned  are  not  reck- 
oned in  this  or  any  other  office,  as  the  bodies  were  not  recovered. 
So  our  number  is  probably  far  from  the  facts. 

In  Table  No.  4  will  be  found  an  analysis  of  these  accidental 
deaths.  As  regards  occupation,  it  will  be  seen  that  laborers, 
laundry  men  and  seamen  are  greatly  in  excess  of  other  callings. 
In  nativity,  as  might  be  expected  from  occupation,  those  born 
in  Ireland  are  much  the  most  numerous;  then  come  those  born 
in  this  State,  and  closely  following  them  those  of  China.  Three- 
fourths  of  those  born  in  California  were  under  fifteen  years  of 


336  CORONER'S  REPORT. 

age.  There  was  but  one  of  the  accidental  deaths  among  the 
negroes.  In  sex,  about  six-sevenths  were  males.  In  domestic 
condition  over  four-sevenths  were,  fortunately,  single,  while  in 
twelve  of  the  Chinese  it  was  unascertained.  In  age,  there  is 
a  large  number  between  the  ages  of  thirty-five  and  forty. 
It  is  very  gratifying  to  be  able  to  say  that  the  deaths  from  the 
careless  use  of  fire-arms  were  only  four — one  of  them  from  the 
premature  discharge  of  a  small  cannon  and  the  remaining  three 
from  pistol-shot  wounds.  Nine  accidental  deaths  resulted  in  the 
year  1878-79  from  the  use  of  fire-arms. 

Table  No.  5  is  of  the  victims  of  homicide.  Perhaps  a  more 
interesting  statement  could  be  made  of  the  perpetrators,  but  the 
points  for  such  a  report  are  not  furnished  by  the  records  of  this 
office.  Of  murders  there  were  twenty-one  (21),  four  more  than 
in  1878-79.  This  is  a  large  number,  but  not  as  large  as  two 
and  three  years  ago,  when  it  was  twenty- five  and  twenty-seven, 
respectively.  Comparing  the  number  this  year  with  New  York 
City  in  1879,  when  they  had  one  murder  to  every  25,000  of  the 
inhabitants,  we  find  we  had  one  murder  to  every  11,190  of  the 
population,  or  more  than  double  the  number  we  should  have 
had  as  compared  with  the  largest  city  in  the  United  States.  Ex- 
cluding the  Chinese  from  our  calculation — which,  perhaps,  is  a 
better  test — we  have  had  one  murder  for  every  17,755  inhabi- 
tants, still  indicating  a  number  much  too  large.  Nine  of  the 
murders  were  among  the  Chinese,  and,  saying  that  we  have  about 
20,000  Chinese  in  this  city,  it  would  be  one  for  every  2,222.  In 
all  cases  of  Chinese,  excepting  one,  the  murderer  was  of  the 
same  nationality.  The  system  of  professional  murderers  among 
this  peculiar  people  was  frequently  recognized,  and  during  the 
year  several  of  the  assassins  have  evaded  detection.  These  mur- 
ders are  of  the  most  cowardly  and  dastardly  kind,  not  one  hav- 
ing the  semblance  of  manslaughter  or  justifiable  homicide, 
generally  undertaken  for  purposes  of  revenge  in  money  difficul- 
ties. Of  the  victims  among  the  whites,  two  were  wives  mur- 
dered by  their  husbands  in  the  most  brutal  manner.  The 
remaining  nineteen  were  males,  and  fifteen  of  them  were  single 
The  pistol  and  knife  were  used  about  an  equal  number  of 
times.  Three  cases  of  manslaughter  occurred  daring  the  year — 


CONTENTS    OF    TABLES.  337 

a  decrease  of  two  from  the  preceding  year.  Of  justifiable  homi- 
cide, there  were  three  cases— an  increase  of  one  from  1878-9. 
Two  of  these  deaths  were*  caused  by  police  officers  in  the  lawful 
discharge  of  their  duty.  Negroes  are  conspicuous  by  being  ab- 
sent from  this  list. 

SUICIDES. — There  have  been  ninety  (90)  suicides  during  the  year, 
only  a  slight  gain  from  the  previous  year,  when  we  had  eighty- 
six  (86).  This  gives  us — reckoning,  as  shown  by  the  late  census, 
that  we  have  233,066  inhabitants,  one  suicide  to  every  2,589  of 
the  population.  The  calculation  last  year  of  one  for  every  3,488 
of  the  population  has  proven  to  be  markedly  erroneous,  we  not 
having  by  66,934  the  number  of  people  with  us  that  the  supposed 
most  reliable  estimates  gave.  As  a  definite  comparison,  New 
York  City  can  be  instanced.  In  1877,  that  city  had  one  suicide 
to  every  7,225  of  the  population,  while  Paris  in  1878  had  one 
suicide  to  every  2,676  of  the  population.  The  calculation  for 
New  York  is  taken  from  the  City  Record,  the  official  journal. 
That  for  Paris  is  taken  from  the  Bulletin  Eecapitulatif  de  Statis- 
tique  Municipale,  sent  to  this  office  a  few  months  ago.  Both  of 
these  sources  cannot  be  questioned,  and  are  the  only  grounds 
for  authoritative  calculations,  while  our  recent  census  is  sup- 
posed to  be  correct.  It  must  be  acknowledged,  then,  that  we 
have  more  than  two  and  one-half  times  as  many  suicides  as  New 
York  City,  and  a  number  excelling  Paris,  this  being  in  propor- 
tion to  the  number  of  inhabitants  in  each  of  those  cities.  Our 
number  of  ninety  for  the  year  does  not  include  one  in  Septem- 
ber, one  in  October  and  two  in  May,  all  males,  who  suicided  by 
drowning  themselves  in  the  Bay,  and  whose  bodies  were  not  re- 
covered. They  all  belonged  to  this  city,  and  should  be  em- 
braced in  our  numbers  and  appear  in  the  report.  A  record  of 
the  published  attempts  at  suicide  has  been  kept,  and  it  is  found 
they  number  fifty  (50),  fourteen  less  than  last  year.  Of  these, 
thirty-four  were  males  and  sixteen  females,  which,  as  might  be 
expected,  is  a  large  proportion  of  females  as  compared  with  the 
relative  numbers  of  those  who  succeed  in  suiciding.  In  four 
cases  this  was  the  second  attempt,  in  two  cases  the  third  attempt 
and  in  one  case  the  fourth  attempt;  in  the  remaining  forty-three 
cases  there  was  nothing  published  of  previous  attempts.  It 

22 


338  CORONER'S  REPORT. 

is  well  known  that  many  attempts  are  made  that  the  report  of 
never  reaches  the  public  or  press,  hidden  away,  an  ugly  skeleton 
in  many  a  family  closet.  No  doubt,  in 'some  instances,  perhaps 
not  a  few,  the  act  is  accomplished,  but  reported  otherwise.  A 
recent  writer  on  this  subject  makes  the  statement  that  in  Europe 
the  attempts  and  those  successes  concealed  from  the  officials 
and  public  would,  in  his  opinion,  equal  one-half  the  suicides 
officially  known.  His  estimate  is  not  near  enough  for  this  com- 
munity, where  we  have  published  more  than  that  proportion. 
It  is  not  unreasonable  to  expect  that  in  the  deaths  from  un- 
known causes  among  the  Chinese  and  others — of  which  there 
were  in  1877,  438  Chinese  and  55  of  all  others,  in  1878,  407  Chi- 
nese and  39  of  all  others,  and  in  1879,  346  Chinese  and  39  of  all 
others — that  not  a  few  are  concealed  cases  of  suicide,  particu- 
larly as  we  know  how  constantly  all  but  a  few  of  the  Chinese  use 
the  deadly  opium,  yet  it  is  not  known  to  have  killed  but  about 
one-half  of  the  known  suicides  of  Chinese  during  the  past  year. 
Death  from  unknown  causes  is  not  found  in  the  reports  of  other 
cities.  If  we  add  the  recorded  number  of  suicides  (90),  the 
drowned  in  the  Bay  and  not  recovered  (4),  to  the  published  at- 
tempts (50),  we  would  have  the  aggregate  of  144,  or  one  to  every 
1,618  of  the  population  of  our  young  city,  and  this,  it  must  be 
remembered,  is  not  counting  the  unpublished  attempts  and  con- 
cealed successes.  If  we  consider,  as  far  as  this  illustration  of 
the  state  of  society  is  concerned,  that  the  attempt  is  equal  to  the 
accomplishment,  in  what  a  deplorable  condition  we  must  find 
ourselves.  Reports  from  every  county  in  the  state  have  been  re- 
ceived of  the  number  of  suicides  during  the  year  1879,  and  we 
find  that  there  have  been  recorded  227  in  a  population  estimated 
from  nearly  completed  census  returns  of  862,780.  This  would 
be  one  suicide  to  every  3,800  of  the  inhabitants,  a  number  nearly 
doubling  that  of  New  York  City,  as  compared  with  the  number 
of  people.  When  we  examine  the  reports  of  the  different  coun- 
ties, and  compare  the  number  of  suicides  with  the  population, 
we  find  there  have  been  seven  counties  exceeding  San  Francisco 
in  its  frequency.  They  are  Alpine,  Colusa,  El  Dorado,  Lassen, 
Marin,  Mono  and  Sutter,  ranging  from  one  in  179  to  one  in  2,129 
of  the  population.  In  the  counties  where  they  have  a  population 


CONTENTS    OF    TABLES.  33!) 

next  to  this  one,  we  find  in  Alameda  one  in  3,684,  in  Sacramento 
one  in  3,016,  in  Santa  Clara  one  in  5,016,  in  Sonoma  one  in 
5,169,  and  in  Los  Angeles  one  in  11,130.  In  thirteen  counties 
there  were  no  suicides  in  1879.  In  Europe,  as  a  whole,  they 
have  an  annual  average  of  one  to  every  5,000.  In  Denmark, 
where  the  greatest  mortality  from  suicides  of  any  country  in 
Europe  exists,  they  have  276  for  every  million  of  the  population. 
In  Paris,  the  rate  is  six  times  that  of  the  French  country  people. 
In  this  city,  our  rate  is  a  little  less  than  double  that  of  the  coun- 
try (that  is,  all  outside  of  San  Francisco),  where  they  have  one 
suicide  for  every  4,664  of  the  inhabitants.  So  it  seems  that  our 
suicidal  mania  is  not  confined  altogether  to  San  Francisco,  but 
extends  to  the  entire  State.  While  we  say  that  the  frequency  of 
suicides  in  France  is  a  Parisian  eccentricity,  in  this  State  we  take 
in  a  wider  field,  and,  leaving  the  metropolis,  are  obliged  to  call 
it  a  California  monstrosity. 

Table  No.  6  contains  the  special  particulars  of  the  cases  of 
suicide  during  the  past  year.  In  nativity  nearly  two-thirds  of 
the  victims  were  born  out  of  the  United  States,  and  of  these 
there  were  13  each  born  in  Germany,  Ireland  and  China.  The 
number  of  Germans  has  decreased  more  than  one-half  as  com- 
pared with  the  number  of  the  previous  year.  In  color,  we  have 
no  negroes.  Of  sex,  one-sixth  of  the  whole  number  (the  usual 
proportion),  were  females.  Nearly  one-half  were  fortunately 
single  persons.  More  than  five-ninths  were  supposed  or  known 
to  have  been  educated  under  Protestant  influences,  while  over 
one-sixth  of  all  were  Catholics  and  three  of  the  cases  were  Jews. 
As  regards  intellect,  seven  were  weak  or  below  the  average, 
seventy-two  were  considered  only  average  and  nine  were  above 
it.  In  former  attempts,  one  had  made  one  attempt  and  four  had 
made  two  attempts  on  their  lives  before  the  successful  time.  In 
age,  the  youngest  was  15,  the  oldest  70,  giving  an  average  of 
39-J--  By  examining  the  table  it  will  be  seen  that  the  most  have 
occurred  between  the  ages  of  25  to  30  and  50  to  55.  If  it  was 
known  how  many  of  each  age  were  among  us,  it  would  probably 
be  found  that  there  are  more  old  persons  committing  suicide  in 
proportion  to  the  number  with  us,  it  being  the  case  in  other 
cities.  This  table  gives  the  nativities  by  ages,  also  the  means  by 


340  CORONER'S  REPORT. 

ages.  By  the  latter  it  is  observed  that  the  two  youngest,  from 
15  to  '20,  used  the  pistol  as  a  means,  while  the  oldest  used  a 
knife.  In  a  continuation  of  this  table  will  be  found  a  list  of  na- 
tivity by  means  used.  Nine -chose  death  by  drowning,  two  of 
whom  were  Chinese.  Eleven  by  hanging,  five  of  whom  were 
Chinese  and  two  were  Frenchmen.  Six  of  the  ninety  used 
the  knife,  four  of  the  number  selecting  the  throat  as  the 
point  of  attack.  The  pistol  was  used  in  about  one-third  of  the 
cases,  nearly  all  of  these  selecting  the  head  One  Chinaman 
shot  himself  in  the  abdomen,  and  this  is  the  only  one  on  record 
in  this  office  for  many  years,  if  ever,  who,  among  the  Chinese, 
has  used  the  pistol  for  such  a  purpose.  Thirty-four  of  all  de- 
cided on  poison  as  a  means,  twenty  of  them  using  preparations 
of  opium.  Five  took  strychnia.  In  the  table  of  occupation  we 
find,  as  we  would  expect,  that  housewives  and  laborers  have  the 
largest  numbers.  Then  follow  clerks  and  speculators.  The  un- 
known and  no  occupation  have  a  large  number.  At  this  time  it 
is  impossible  to  say  how  these  numbers  compare  to  the  numbers 
with  us.  Of  domestic  condition,  thirty-six,  or  somewhat  more 
than  a  third,  had  no  relatives  in  the  State,  as  far  as  known; 
twenty  left  wives  and  eleven  left  children  in  this  State,  to  strug- 
gle on  in  life  as  best  they  may,  or  to  receive  the  cold  charity  of 
the  multitude,  cowardly  deserting  them,  while  in  most  cases  of  a 
perfectly  sane  mind  and  in  the  moments  of  greatest  need,  when 
their  strong  arms  could  be  of  the  most  use  to  those  they  should 
love  best,  and  live  and  suffer  for,  if  necessary.  Nine  of  the  sui- 
cides left  husbands,  and  two  of  these  females  left  children. 

In  the  predisposing  causes,  30  were  for  pecuniary  difficulties. 
Of  these  6  were  from  gambling  in  mining  stocks  and  15  simply 
the  want  of  means  to  live  on.  In  6  cases  domestic  unhappiness 
was  the  cause.  After  having  committed  a  crime  claims  6.  The 
excessive  use  of  alcohol  is  given  in  13  cases.  Unsoundness  of 
mind  was  found  to  be  conducive  in  one  case,  and  positive  insan- 
ity in  two  instances.  Physical  suffering  was  claimed  as  the  cause 
in  4  subjects,  while  an  incurable  disease,  which  in  every  person 
was  the  truth,  was  the  ascribed  cause  in  13  cases. 

In  the  immediate  causes,  stock  gambling  has  but  one  victim, 
and  purely  want*  of  means  has  thirty-one.  Domestic  unhappi- 


CONTENTS    OF    TABLES.  341 

ness  has  five,  equally  divided  in  the  sex  of  the  persons  married. 
Homesickness  has  one  only.  Fears  of  various  results,  real  and 
imaginary,  caused  eleven  to  take  their  lives.  King  Alcohol  claims 
fifteen  victims.  An  unsound  mind  was  the  cause  in  five  cases 
and  insanity  in  two.  Physical  suffering  was  the  cause  in  seven 
cases,  and  in  six  instances  a  reasonable  cause  was  not  ascertained. 
In  looking  over  these  circumstances  supposed  and  known  to  ex- 
ist at  the  time  the  rash  act  was  perpetrated,  it  is  very  difficult  to 
consider  them  in  any  way  justifiable,  but  there  are  many  instan- 
ces, where,  in  the  opinion  of  many  thinking  people,  the  act  might 
be  considered  excusable  under  the  circumstances.  Granting 
that  those  suffering  from  the  acute  or  chronic  effects  of  alcohol, 
one  in  an  extreme  state  of  anger,  those  poorest  of  unfortunates 
who  are  called  on  to  endure  great  physical  suffering  and  those 
from  chronic  incurable  disease  might  be  added  to  the  number  of 
unsound  mind  and  insanity,  and  in  charity  including  the  six 
cases  where  no  known  cause  was  ascertained,  it  would  take 
thirty-six  cases  away  from  the  total  of  ninety,  -leaving  fifty-four 
cases  to  be  accounted  for.  The  various  fears,  remorse,  grief, 
homesickness  and  love  disappointments  might  be  said  by  some 
to  be  excusable  and  sufficient  reasons  for  taking  one's  life.  This 
would  take  off  twenty  more  and  leave  thirty-four  to  explain  away. 
The  only  causes  we  have  left  are  business  disappointments  and  a 
simple  want  of  means,  and  it  is  to  these  that  the  crime  of  moral 
cowardice  can  be  justly  attributed.  A  recent  English  writer  in 
Blackwood's  Magazine,  says,  in  relation  to  suicide:  "  We  of  to- 
"  day  have  learned  to  see  it  not  only  a  monstrous  self-indulgence 
"  but  also  an  atrocious  crime  and  an  idiotic  cowardice.  We  deny 
"  its  pretensions  to  be  a  grasp  at  peace  and  a  declaration  of  lib- 
"  erty;  we  proclaim  it  to  be  a  grasp  at  the  unknown  and  a  dec- 
"  laration  of  revolt." 

Illustrations  of  the  cowardice  of  suicides  are  frequently  seen 
in  this  office.  It  is  only  necessary  for  me  to  give  the  particulars 
of  one.  S,  a  healthy,  strong  able  bodied  man  had  risen  from  a 
day  laborer  to  a  contractor  and  had  considerable  success.  Times 
becoming  dull,  he,  anticipating  financial  ruin  in  the  future,  made 
the  remark  that  rather  than  return  to  work  as  a  laborer  he  would 
kill  himself.  He  did  so  early  one  morning,  leaving  his  feeble 


CORONERS  REPORT. 

wife  and  several  small  children  to  struggle  on  in  poverty.  Will 
anyone  -say  that  if  this  man  had  not  succeeded  he  should  not 
have  been  punished  ?  The  law  of  England  is  somewhat  incon- 
sistent. It  says  suicide  is  murder,  but  the  attempt  to  commit  it 
is  only  a  misdemeanor. 

The  English  author  whom  I  have  quoted  above  also  says,  that : 
"  The  revival  of  suicide  has  almost  exactly  coincided  in  time  with 
"  the  modern  extension  of  schooling,  and  is  found  most  abund- 
"  ant  in  the  regions  in  which  schooling  is  most  expanded."  He 
denies  that  climate  has  anything  to  do  with  causing  suicides,  yet 
he  states  that  in  Algeria,  where  many  French  soldiers  are  sta- 
tioned, and  kill  themselves  from  homesickness,  it  has  been  re- 
marked that  the  moment  ordinarily  chosen  \>j  them  for  the 
purpose  is  when  the  irritating  south  wind  blows.  It  will  be  re 
membered  that  there  are  more  suicides  in  this  city  during  the 
months  of  April,  May,  June  and  July,  when  our  irritating  winds 
blow  the  hardest. 

Table  No.  7. — Number  of  suicides  during  each  month  for 
eighteen  years.  The  addition  of  the  last  year  makes  no  relative 
change. 

Table  No.  8  consists  of  the  bodies  recovered  from  the  bay  of 
San  Francisco,  where  the  cause  of  death  was  not  known.  It 
embraces  ten  males,  all  white.  Decomposition  was  advanced  in 
these  cases. 

Table  No.  9. — Report  of  unknown  dead  and  those  of  doubtful 
identity.  During  the  past  year  the  bodies  of  seven  white  male 
adults,  one  white  female  infant  and  one  Chinese  female  infant 
were  unidentified. 

Table  No.  10. — Schedule  showing  property  found  with  or  upon 
deceased  persons  and  the  disposition  of  the  same.  It  shows  the 
receipt  of  $16,389  25  in  money,  besides  mining  stocks,  jewelry, 
papers  and  articles  of  value  received  and  disposed  of  as  the  law 
directs. 

Table  No.  11. — Expenses  incurred  in  the  prosecution  of  the 
duties  of  the  office. 


CONTENTS    OF    TABLES.  343 

In  suits  against  the  Sheriff,  fees  have  been  collected  and  paid 
over  to  the  City  and  County  Treasurer,  in  accordance  with  law, 
amounting  to  two  hundred  and  ten  dollars  and  forty  cents 
($210  40). 

In  conclusion,  I  beg  leave  to  tender  my  thanks  to  Deputy 
Coroners  Wheeler  and  Hamilton,  and  to  Messenger  Smith,  for 
faithful  performance  of  their  several  duties;  also,  to  ex-Police 
Surgeon  Stivers,  Police  Surgeon  Clarke  and  City  Physician 
Blach,  for  the  careful  manner  of  making  autopsies  during  the 
last  year.  I  am  under  obligations  to  ex-Chief  of  Police  Kirk- 
patrick,  Chief  of  Police  Crowley  and  the  police  force,  ex-Sheriff 
Nunan,  Sheriff  Desmond  and  Deputies,  for  timely  assistance  in 
the  discharge  of  my  official  duties,  and  to  the  public  press  for 
advertisement  of  the  description  of  unknown  dead  and  those  of 
questionable  identity.  I  am  also  under  obligations  to  your  Hon- 
orable Body  for  furnishing  all  means  and  facilities  requested  for 
properly  conducting  this  office. 

Very  respectfully, 

L.  L.  DOEE,  M.  D., 

Coroner. 


344 


CORONER  S  REPORT. 


TABLE     No.    1. 

NUMBER     OF    DEATHS      KEPOKTED,     AUTOPSIES    MADE    AND 
INQUESTS    HELD, 

DURING   EACH   MONTH   OF   FISCAL   YEAR  ENDING   JUNE   30,  1880. 


MONTH. 


DEATHS. 


AUTOPSIES. 


INQUESTS. 


1879— July 42 

August 36 

September 33 

(  ctober 36 

November 34 

December 46 

1880— January 45 

February 39 

j 

March 43 

April 25 

May I  28 

June |  25 

I 

Total 432 

Average j  36 

Increase  from  1878-79 46 

Decrease  from  1878-79 


1!) 
10 
12 
12 
15 
21 
22 
14 
£0 

6 
10 

7 


169 


14.08 


223 


18.58 


MORTUARY    TABLES. 


845 


TABLE     No.    2. 

M  0  R  T  U  A  E  Y      TABLE, 

FOR    THE    FISCAL    YEAR    ENDING    JUNE    30,     1880. 


CAUSES   OF   DEATH. 

Natural  Causes  

Accident  

Murder  

Manslaughter  

Justifiable  Homicide. 

Suicide  

W 

3 

3' 
• 

| 

I 

Unknown  or  Doubtful 

I 

Q 

1 

1 

8 

95 

25 

15 

1 

16 

Drowning  

31 

9 

A 

1 

41 

6 

6 

Fall 

95 

25 

Gunshot  Wounds  
Hanging     .  .' 

3 

10 

2 

29 
11 

44 
11 

Human  Remains    . 

2 

2 

Natural  Causes 

148 

148 

Poison                       .  . 

8 

34 

42 

Run  over   vehicle  or  train 

7 

1 

8 

Stabbing  or  Cutting 

9 

2 

1 

6 

18 

Still-born 

,, 

22 

Strangulation 

3 

1 

Suffocation 

1 

4 

Unknown 

1 

1 

Unknown  found  in  Bay 

10 

10 

Totals  

148 

131 

21 

3 

3 

90 

2 

22 

12 

432 

346 


CORONERS    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     3. 

SUDDEN  DEATHS  FROM  NATURAL  CAUSES 

SHOWING   COLOR,   SEX,   CONDITION   AND  AGE, 


NATIVITY. 

COLOR. 

5* 

SEX. 

SI 
f. 

1 

Chinese.. 

H3 

^=3 

JiT 

1 

1 

18 

'"l" 

2     • 
3 
3 
1 
1 

; 

: 

Trt 

1 

§• 

>3 
E 
X 

Jj> 

CM 

No 
Me 
Ch 
JM 

8 
g. 

c 

H 

« 

Ob 

Tn 

^Alabama  

I 

1 

18 
1 
1 
1 
5 
3 
5 
5 
1 
1 
1 

1 
9 
1 
1 

1 
3 
3 

4 
3 

1 

'"0 

"*a 

'"i 

2 

'"i 
i 

'"2 

1 

18 
1 
1 
1 
5 
3 
5 
5 
1 

1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
i 

2 
8 
1 
6 
17 
2 
40 
2 

i 

3 

3 

California                                                   

15 

i 

i 

5 

3 

1 

District  of  Columbia  
Illinois 

Iowa  

Maine  

Maryland  

3 
4 

r} 

Massachusetts  

1 

.... 

New  York 

New  Jersey..    .       .         ....                

1 

i 

.... 

North  Carolina  

Ohio      

1 

2 
2 
1 
1 

i 

3 
2 

3 

Vermont     ...          .                

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

"  i" 

"  i 

4 

2 
10 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

West  Virginia  

^United  States  

1 

lada  

va  Scotia 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
8 
1 
6 
17 
2 
40 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 

148 

'"l 
1 

1 
2 
7 
1 
6 
14 
2 
25 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 

108 

i 
i 

'"i 

'"a 

"is 

"i 

40 

•dco  
li  

naica,  W.  I  

i 

f  Austria  

2 

England  
Finland  

18 

-   6 

Germany 

17 

Holland  

2 
40 
2 
2 

Ireland                         



Italy  
Norway 

Portugal  

2 
2 
2 

.... 

Russia                             

na                                    

3 

known  

8 

Totals 

137 

8 

3 

148 

64 

DEATHS  FROM  NATURAL  CAUSES. 


347 


—Part     1. 

FOR  THE   YEAR   ENDING  JUNE"  30,  1880. 

ARRANGED   ACCORDING   TO   NATIVITY. 


CONDITION . 


AGE    BY    YEARS. 


Married  . 

Widow.. 

1 

Widower 

Unascert: 

H 

Under  5  y 

& 
g" 

M 
O 

o 
? 

tn 

Gn 

81 

8 

g 

$ 

g 

£ 

S" 
§ 

§ 

g- 
B 

s 

£ 

S 

*. 
o 

o 

y< 

S 
? 

S 

S 

S" 

g 

Cn 

Ul 

o 

§ 

S 
S- 
S 

8 

£ 
o 

S 

g- 

•<r 

O' 

$• 
§ 

g 
g 

S 

§ 

£ 

: 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

18 

IS 

18 

i 

1 

i 

1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

5 

1 

2 

T 

< 

fi 

3 

1 

1 

1 

S 

1 

1 

5 

i 

1 

0 

1 

F> 

3 

1 

5 

2 

i 

T 

1 

a 

1 

i 

i 

1 

1 

i 

1 

1 

i 

z 

3 

1 

1 

1 

s 

i 

2 

i 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

\ 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

T 

1 

T 

1 

1 

1 

I 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

t) 

3 

S 

8 

1 

2 

g 

1 

1 

8 

1 

1 

1 

1 

12 

1 

1 
1 

6 
17 

1 

1 
1 

1 

B 

2 

•> 

i 
g 

0 

o 

T 

i 

... 

6 
17 

2 

1 

i 

2 

19 

4 

1 

fi 

40  ^ 

i 

7 

- 

w 

9 

•^ 

g 

1 

i 

1 

40 

•2 

1 

1 

9. 

^ 

•2 

] 

1 

2 

1 

2 

2 

2 

1 

*2! 

1 

1 

? 

1 

2] 

1 

1 

2 

9 

3 

1 

1 

1| 

3 

3 

3 

9 

1 

3 

48 

7 

i 

25 

148 

Is! 

0 

1 

i| 

0 

5 

To 

171 

17 

25 

24 

14 

5 

4 

4 

2 

1 

148 

348 


CORONERS   REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     3. -Part     2. 

SUDDEN    DEATHS    FKOM    NATURAL    CAUSES. 

Age— Oldest,  80  years;  Youngest,  1  hour.    Average,  41  years. 


OCCUPATION. 

xo. 

OCCUPATION. 

xo. 

Accountant  '.  

3 

Amount  brought  forward  

61 

Barber 

2 

Miller 

o 

Blacksmith  

1 

Miner 

9 

Boatman  :  

1 

Musician 

1 

Carpenter  

2 

Nurse 

1 

Clerk 

2 

Peddler 

•) 

Cooper  .  .  . 

1 

Porter 

0 

Cook 

1 

1 

Copyist  

1 

Roofer 

1 

Editor  

1 

Saloon  keeper 

1 

Farmer  

2 

Sawyer 

1 

Fisherman  

4 

Seaman                        

7 

Fringe  maker  

1 

Seamstress 

2 

Gardener  

1 

Shoemaker          ... 

1 

Grocer 

1 

I 

Hardware  dealer  

1 

Steward  

2 

Hostler 

3 

1 

Housewife  

10 

Tailor  

2 

Junk  dealer  

1 

Teacher  

2 

Laborer               .... 

14 

Tiler 

1 

Lawyer  

4 

1 

Librarian  

1 

Waiter 

Lodging-house  keeper  

1 

Watchman  

1 

Maltster  

1 

Wood  carver 

Master  Mariner  

1 

Unknown  and  no  occupation  

2 
49 

Amount  carried  forward  

61 

TOT\L 



148 

CAUSES    OF    DEATH. 


349 


TABLE     No.     3.— Part     3. 

SUDDEN     DEATHS     FKOM     NATURAL     CAUSES. 

CLASSIFIED  AS  TO  DISEASE  PRODUCING  THE  SAME,  AS  SHOWN  BY   AUTOPSY   OR 

INSPECTION. 


DISEASE. 

NO. 

DISEASE. 

NO. 

Brain,  Apoplexy  serous  

10 

-Amount  brought  forward 

105 

Brain,  Apoplexy  sanguineous  

6 

Liver,  Cirrhosis  of  

1 

Brain   Hemorrhage  of                 .... 

1 

Liver,  Congestion  of 

1 

Brain   Softening  of 

1 

Liver,  Cancer  of 

I 

Brain   Abscess  of 

] 

Hepatitis 

2 

Convulsions,  infantile  

4 

Kidneys,  Bright's  Disease  of  

2 

13 

Metro-peritonitis 

1 

16 

Hemorrhage  from  Childbirth 

I 

Pneumonia,  Alcoholic  

1 

Cancer  of  Right  Ovary.  .    . 

1 

Pneumonia,  Chronic  

4 

Inguinal  Hernia 

1 

Apoplexy,  Pulmonary  

10 

Cholera  Infantum 

2 

Hemorrhage,  Pulmonary  

2 

Typhoid  Fever  

1 

Lungs   Congestion  of 

Alcoholism 

13 

Phthisis 

1 

Septicemia 

1 

4 

•^ 

Hydro-thorax  

1 

Poison  by  Sewer.  Gas  

9 

Heart  disease  

11 

Result  of  Amputation 

1 

Endo-carditis. 

1 

Inanition 

4 

Aneurism      .   . 

10 

Premature  Birth 

2 

Aorta-arch  Rupture  of 

1 

General  Debility 

2 

Stomach,  Rupture  of  
Liver,  Hypertrophy  of  

1 
1 

Exposure  to  cold  
Unknown  

2 
1 

Amount  carried  forward 

105 

TOTAL  •                                ... 

148 

350 


CORONERS   REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     4. 

ACCIDENTAL   DEATHS   FOR  THE 

SHOWING   COLOR,    SEX,   CONDITION   AND  AGE 


NATIVITY. 

COLOR. 

BEX. 

White  

f 

Chinese  

f 

i 

Female  

| 

03 

I 

• 

•OS-  saxvxg  oaxwn  631  -QS—  saoaaa 

/'California 

21 

22 

1 

i 

5 

1 

22 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

21 

1 

'"i"' 
i 

Illinois  

Indiana. 

•^ 

1 
1 
1 
3 
4 
1 
11 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 

11 

Kentucky  

1 
1 

Louisiana            

3 

Massachusetts            

4 

3 

'"i 

4 
1 
11 
1 
1 

3 

1 
8 
1 

1 

New  York  

11 

1 

Ohio  

1 
2 

2 
1 

2 

^  Rhode  Island  
iada 

1 
2 

i 

2 
1 

1 

ver  California  
of  Jersey                                       .  .   . 

1 
1 

1 
3 
3 
2 
2 
4 
5 
25 
1 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
2 
21 

131 

i 

3 
i 

2 
3 
5 
21 

1 

4 

1 
2 
1 
2 
21 

114 

"i 

"4 
"i 

1 
3 
3 
2 
2 
4 
5 
25 
1 
1 
4 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
10 

^Austria  . 

3 
3 

Denmark 

England  

2 

Finland                               

2 

4 

Germany  

5 

25 

Italy          

1 

1 

Scotland  

4 
1 

2 

Sweden  

2 

1*1 

2 
1 
2 
21 

1 
1 
2 
9 

Switzerland                           ... 

1 

Wales 

2 

21 
21 

na                                    ...... 

Totals  '  

109 

1 

131 

76 

ACCIDENTAL    DEATHS. 


351 


—Part     1. 

YEAR  ENDING   JUNE   30,  1880. 

ARRANGED   ACCORDING   TO   NATIVITY. 


CONDITION. 

AGE    BY    YEARS. 

Married  

Widow  

Widower  .... 

Unascertained 

H 

Under  5  years 

01 

S 

o 

s 
r 

H 

w 

w 
ff 
V 

8 
s 
B 

t* 

Ql 
S" 
g 

8 

£ 
S 

g 

S" 
*. 
o 

§ 

8" 

>P*- 

Cn 

S- 

s 

S 
£ 

? 

S 

ff 

8 

8 

s- 

O5 
tn 

f 

: 

1 

i 

22 
1 
1 

1 

5 

5 

3 

i 

1 

22 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
4 
1 
11 
1 
I 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 
2 
4 
5 
25 
1 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
2 
21 

1 

i 

1 
1 

1 

1 
3 

i 

"i 
i 

"  i 

1 

1 

3 
4 
1 
11 

1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 

"i 

1 

1 

i 

"  i 

1 

1 

i 

1 

4 

i 

2 

1 

i 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

i 

'"i 

i 

i 

'"i 

i 

2 
1 

2 

3 
3 

2 

1 

"i 

i 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 
2 
4 
5 
25 
1 

'"i 

'  i 

1 
5 

3 
1 

i 

3 

8 

1 
1 

5 

'"i 
i 

i 
"2 

'"i 
i 

14 
1 

1 
2 

1 

i 

i 
'"i 

i 

1 
4 

1 
2 

'"2 
4 

'"i 
'i2 

1 
2 
1 
2 
21 

'"3 

'.'i 

i 
'9 

"-2 

i 

i 

34 

2 

2 

17 

131 

9 

6 

7 

10 

16 

14 

10 

24 

12 

9 

5 

6 

3 

131 

352 


CORONERS    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     4 

ACCIDENTAL  DEATHS   FOE  THE 

CAUSE  OF   DEATH   BY   NATIVITY. 


NATIVITY. 

CAUSE    OF    DEATH. 

s 

Burns  

Crushed  

Drowning... 

Explosion  .  .  . 

P 

PISTOL 
SHOT 
WOUND 

POISON  . 

Run  over  by  vehicle 

*/: 
1 

i 

c 

Suffocation  

1 

1 

Abdomen.  . 

Carbolic  acid 

Chloroform 

1 

C 

— 

I 

: 

: 

H 
I' 

1 
1J 

Cai 
Lo\ 

Isl< 

1" 
Chi 

^California 

5 

1 

4 

1 

5 

l 

"i 

"i 

i 

i 
i 

i 

i 
i 

'i 
'i 

1 

'-2 
1 

'i 

i 

i 

'i 

2 

'i 
i 

22 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
4 
1 
11 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 
2 
4 
5 
25 
1 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
2 
21 

131 

Indiana  ... 

1 

1 

Kentucky  

Louisiana  .    . 

1 

1 

Maine  

Massachusetts  
Missouri 

2 

i 

1 
'3 

'3 

'i 

New  York  
New  Jersey 

Ohio  

Pennsylvania            

v  Rhode  Island  

i 

iada 

i 

ver  California  

of  Jersey  W   I 

i 

-'Austria  
Denmark                                             

i 

3 

1 

i 

England  

Finland  
France  

i 

2 

2 

's 

1 
1 
1 

Germany  
Ireland 

8 

;f 

'3 

i 

3 
6 

'2 

Italy  
Russia                  

Scotland  

1 

i 

Spain  
Sweden  

Switzerland  

v  Wales 

1 

9 

na  
Totals  

15 

3 

6 

25 

31 

6 

25 

2 

1 

1 

2 

3 

2 

7 

i 

4 

ACCIDENTAL    DEATHS. 


353 


—Part    2. 

YEAK  ENDING  JUNE   30,  1880. 

AGE   BY  CAUSE  OF  DEATH. 


CAUSE  OF  DEATH. 

AGE    BY    YEARS. 

CJ 

3 

a 

Ct 

S 

0 

t 

£n 
S 

§ 

0 

S 
ff 

g 

s- 

8 

S 

S 

0 

& 
o" 

§ 

s- 

01 
W< 

? 

§ 

S" 

H 

tn 
«^ 

$ 

7. 

0 

P1 

P 

g 

8 

g 

s 

£ 

§ 

Ct 

CM 

8 

? 

f 

Blow 

^ 

3 
1 

2 

8 

3 

1 

3 
1 

' 
1 

2 
3 

9 

i 

2 
2 
2 
6 
o 

a 

3 

2 
3 

1 
•  •  -\- 

1 

2 

i 
i 

1 
1 

6 

25 
15 
31 
6 

Crushed 

2 
1 

2 

3 
1 
1 

Drowning1                     .   ... 

Explosion  

Fall  

1 

3 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

3 

5 

2 

1 

3 

25 

Pistol  Shot  Wounds  
Poison 

1 

2 

2 
1 

1 

4 

2 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

3 
8 

7 

Run_Over  by  Vehicle  

Strangulation  

1 

1 

Suffocation  
Totals  

1 
9 

1 
6 

7 

10 

16 

14 

10 

1 
24 

1 
12 

9 

5 

6 

3 

4 
131 

23 


354 


CORONER  S   REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     4— Part     3. 

ACCIDENTAL    DEATHS, 

Age— Oldest,  63  years;  youngest,  3  days.     Average,  30  years. 


OCCUPATION. 

xo. 

OCCUPATION. 

xo. 

Aeronaut                                   

1 

66 

Barber 

1 

Holder 

1 

1 

Oiler 

9 

Blacksmith                                

1 

Painter     . 

2 

1 

Plasterer 

1 

Carpenter                 .   ...            

8 

Porter 

1 

Cigarmaker           

2 

Poultry  dealer 

1 

City  car  conductor        .... 

2 

Prostitute 

3 

Clerk            

1 

Rope  maker 

1 

Cook  
Distiller     

2 
1 

Saloon  keeper  
Seaman           .                .                 

1 
1] 

Domestic  

2 

Ship  carpenter  

Foreman  

1 
2 

Shoemaker  
Soldier  (USA) 

1 

Hostlur 

1 

Stock  driver                                  .   . 

5 

Tanner 

2 

Laborer 

19 

4 

14 

Tinner               

1 

1 

Vaquero         

1 

1 

Veterinary  surgeon 

1 

Mason 

1 

1 

2 

Unknown  and  no  occupation  . 

26 

66 

TOT  \L                 ... 

131 

HOMICIDES. 


355 


TABLE   No.  5.— Part  1. 

HOMICIDES. 

Age— Oldest,  57  years;  youngest,  13  hours.     Average,  34  years. 


OCCUPATION. 

.NO. 

OCCUPATION. 

NO. 

1 

Amount  brought  forward.  .         .... 

16 

2 

Prostitute 

I 

1 

Real  estate  broker 

Cook                             '  

1 

Saloon  keeper  

1 

Editor                 

1 

Seaman  

1 

1 

Teacher  

1 

6 

Tobaconist  

2 

Unknown  and  no  occupation  

Manufacturer  

1 



A  mount  carried  forward  

16 

TOTAL  

27 

356 


CORONERS    REPORT. 


TABLE    No.  5 

HOMICIDES  FOK  THE  YEAK 

SHOWING  COLOR,  SEX,  CONDITION,  AGE  AND  CAUSE 


COLOR. 

BEX. 

CONDITION  . 

3j 

g 

H 

g 

0? 

§ 

OB 

3* 

| 

^ 

g 

NATIVITY. 

£-" 

5* 

P" 

*""* 

5 

P" 

ft 

a 

E 

O 

Cft 

P. 

r"* 

5™ 

Is 

. 

r 

& 

? 

I 

* 

1 

MURDER. 

^5  (  California  

i 

1 

1 

i 

i 

i 

Louisiana 

i 

1 

1 

i 

i 

i 

y-;  -i  Maine  

l 

1 

1 

i 

i 

i 

1  Massachusetts 

- 

1 

1 

i 

•1 

i 

*-*  ^New  York         '  

9 

2 

1 

1 

2 

i 

J 

2 

Costa  Rica 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

gjj    .  (  Germany  
"b  u?  \  Ireland  

1 

1 
3 

1 
3 

1 
3 

i 
i 

1 

1 

1 

W  1   (  Sweden 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

China  

9 

9 

9 

9 

7 

2 

9 

Totals  

12 

9 

21 

19 

2 

'21 

15 

5 

1 

IT 

MANSLAUGHTER. 

Georgia  

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Sweden 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Totals  

3 

.  

3 

3 



3 

2 

1 



3 

JUSTIFIABLE  HOMICIDE. 

New  York  

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Ireland 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

I 

Totals  

3 

3 

3 

3 

2 

1 

3 

•   Grand  Totals  

18 

9 

27 

25 

2 

27 

19 

7 

1 

27 

HOMICIDES. 


357 


—Part    2. 

ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 

OF  DEATH,   ARRANGED  ACCORDING  TO  NATIVITY. 


AGE   BY   YEARS. 

CAC.SK  OF  DEATH. 

Under  5  years.  . 

20  to  25  

25  to  30  

I 
o 

g! 

35  to  40.  ....... 

40  to  45  

50  to  55  

55  to  60  

i 

f 

Crushed  

PISTOL  SHOT  W'NDS. 

KNIFE   WOUNDS. 

g 

i 

1 

Q 

I 

I 

Abdomen.  . 

1 

Neck  and 
Abdomen 

f 

C6 

1 

f 

S 

1 

i 
i 

1 

l 
l 
l 
l 

9 
1 
1 

3 

1 

a 

21 

1 
1 
1 

1 

..    1 

i 

I 

i 

1 

i 

'i' 

1 
1 

1 

1 

i 

2 
1 

1 

i 

•i      l 

... 

I 
3 

1 

V 

1 

... 

i  ' 

l 

i 

1- 

9 

l 

I 

i 

2 

2 

1 
1 

2 
3 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

0 

1 

1 

2 

9 

1 

2      2 

0 

21 
1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

3 

2 

1    !..  .'       . 

1 

•'• 

1 

...     1 

1 



-  - 

1 

1 

"•V 

1 

1 

3 

1 
2 

l 

f 

1 

3 

1 
2 

3 

1 

1 

'L 

1 

2 

3 

...    1 

1 

I 

! 

1 

1 

3 

12 

4 

3 

2 

1 

27 

2 

1 

2 

3 

3 

1 

3 

2 

1 

3 

2 

1 

27 

358 


CORONERS    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     6 

SUICIDES   FOR  THE   YEAR 

SHOWING  COLOE,  SEX,  CONDITION,  EEL1GIOUS  BELIEF,  INTELLECT, 


NATIVITY. 

COLOR. 

SEX. 

CONDITION. 

S" 

Chinese  

1 

g 

5* 

Female  

1 

BE 

I 
9 

Married  

1 

Widower  

Unascertained  . 

1 

^' 

i 

(5 

Cai 
Me 

Cei 

l\ 

c 
W 
Phi 

Chi 
Un 

1 
4 

1 
4 

2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
4 
1 
4 
2 
2 
1 

1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
3 
2 

"2 

1 
"2 

i 

i 

1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
4 
9 

4 
1 
4 
2 
2 
1 
8 
2 
1 
1 
4 
3 
13 
13 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
13 
3 

3 
2 
1 

3' 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

"i" 
i 

"2 

"5" 

6 

1 

1 

1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
4 
1 
4 
2 

2 

1 

2 

1 
1 
4 
8 
13 
13 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
13 
3 

California 

Connecticut  
Illinois 

2 
1 

1 
4 
2 

Louisiana  

1 

"i" 

2 

3' 
2 
1 

1 
1 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts  . 

4 
1 

Missouri 

New  York  
Ohio 

4 

9 

Pennsylvania  
Vermont 

2 
1 

v  State  unascertained  
lada 

3 

3 
2 
1 
1 
4 
3 
13 
13 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

"4" 

3 
10 
11 
1 

1 

1 
1 

i 

i 

"3" 

2 
1 

2 
1 

1 

2 
2 
7 
5 
1 

1 

1 

dco  
tral  America  .  .  .-,  
r  England  
France 

1 
1 
4 
3 
13 

"l" 

2 

1 

Germany 

Ireland  
Poland 

13 
1 

Scotland  
Sweden 

1 
1 

1 

Wales  

1 
1 

1 
1 
11 

"i' 

1 
3 

lippine  Islands 

na  

8 

13 

13 
3 

13 
3 

<nown        

Totals  

11 

13 

90 

75 

15 

90 

43 

35 

3 

4 

5 

90 

SUICIDES. 


359 


—Part    1. 

ENDING  JUNE   30,  1880. 

AND    PREVIOUS    ATTEMPTS,    ARRANGED    ACCORDING    TO    NATIVITY. 


RELIGIOUS   BELIEF. 

INTELLECT. 

PREVIOto 
ATTEMPTS  . 

H 

g 

o' 

i 

0 

1 

o> 

Unascertained  . 

| 

£ 

1 

I 

Above  Average. 

a 

1 
I 

1 

First  Attempt  . 

Second  Attempt 

^ 

1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
3 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 

'"4" 
"ii" 

5 

i 

4 
2 

1 
1 
4 

'"i" 
'"i" 

'"2" 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
4 
2 

1 

1 



1 

1 

4 

.'..'.'.'. 



....... 

2 
4 

1 

1 
1 

9 

2 
4 
1 

1 

4 
1 
4 
2 

9 

1 

i 

3 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 

4 
2 
2 
1 
3 

9 

"i" 

'•••• 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

2 
1 
1 
4 
3 
13 
13 
1 
1 
1 

'"i" 



1 

i 
i 

'"i" 
'"i" 

1 
1 
3 
2 
13 
11 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 

4 
3 
13 
13 
1 
1 
1 
1 



i 
'"i" 

3 

2 

8 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
13 
3 

i 

i 

1 

"is" 

'"2" 

1 
13 

1 

1  • 

11 
1 

...!.. 

1 

52 

2 

3 

17 

3 

13 

5 

90 

7 

72 

9 

2 

90 

1 

4 

5 

360 


CORONERS    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     6 -Part     2. 


SUICIDES   FOR  THE  YEAK  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


AGE   BY  NATIVITY. 


NATIVITY, 

AGE    BY    YEARS. 

v\ 

5 

8 

§ 
S 

8 

& 

s 
g 

g 

s- 

g! 

g 

£ 

o 

o 

o^ 

S; 

w 

s- 
? 

§ 

s- 

8! 

S 

s- 

p 

S 
S" 

s 

g 
s 
s 

o 

s- 

u? 

f 

e!  g  g  EUROPE—  37.  £  &  $  UXITKD  STATES—  32. 

f  Alabama  

l 

1 

4 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
4 
1 
4 
2 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
4 
3 
13 
13 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
13 
3 

California 

i 

1 

2 

i 

Connecticut  

1 

Illinois  
Louisiana  

i 

i 

'i 

"i 

9 

Maine 

i 

i 

1 

1 

Maryland  

Massachusetts  
Missouri  
New  York        

i 

i 

i 

1 

1 

1 

i" 

2 

1 

2 

i 

i 
i 

i' 

i 

"2" 

i 
i 

2 
3 

1 

i 
i' 
"i: 

3 

2 
1 

1 

i' 

Ohio  

Pennsylvania  
Vermont  
vState  unascertained  

xico  
itral  America  
^England  
France  
German  y  
Ireland  
Poland  

1 
3 

1 

1 

4 
1 

i 

1 

1 

Scotland     .  . 

1 

i 

Sweden  

i 

^Wales 

ilippine  Islands 

'i' 

1 
5 

"2" 

i 

M  W  • 

"i" 
i 

1 

ma  
known  

Totals 

2 

3 

16 

15 

13 

5 

11 

16 

4 

2 

2 

1 

90 

SUICIDES. 


361 


TABLE     No.    6— Part  2. 

(CONTINUED.) 
SUICIDES  FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880 

AGE   BY   CAUSE   OF   DEATH. 


CAUSE  OF  DEATH. 

AGE     BY     YEAKS. 

£ 
S 
8 

:    I 

g 

s 

5* 

8 

s 
§ 

8 
8 

g? 

8 

S" 

P 

§ 
& 

fe 
w 

& 
S" 
g 

§ 

S" 

tfl 

C" 

s    § 
s-    s- 

OS            O5 
O           01 

8 
S 

P 

S 

s 

tn 

! 

Drowning  
Hanging  

1 

3 
2 

7 
3 

i 

2 
1 
6 
5 

2 
2 
1 
5 
3 

1 

2 

2 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 

1 

9 
11 
f> 
34 
29 
1 

1 

i 

Knife  Wounds 

Poison  ... 

3 

4 

5 

6 
5 
1 

1 

2 

Pistol-shot  Wounds  
Run  over  by  Train 

2 

1 

i 

Totals 

2 

3 

16 

15 

13 

5 

11 

16 

4 

2 

o 

1 

90 

362 


CORONER'S  REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     6. 

SUICIDES     FOB    THE    YEAR 

CAUSE  OF   DEATH   BY  NATIVITY 


NATIVITY. 

Drowning  

K 
p 

3 

3" 
OP? 

KNIFE   WOUNDS. 

PISTOL  SHOT  WOUNDS. 

Throat  

» 

3 

f 

1 

1 

! 

Abdomen  

H 

. 

. 

1 

1 
2 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
2 

|  California                  

'V 

1 

i 

tw     Illinois                         

1 

1 

>     Maine            .           

9 

1 

1 

vn  H  Massachusetts     

2 



g     New  York               

?     Ohio                             .   .                 .... 

i 

i 
'i 

2 

1 

"l" 

4 

4 

--}     Pennsylvania  

1 
1 

i 

2 

1 

Mexico 

1 

1 

"2" 

1 
1 

1 
4 

/England 

2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

5 

i 

o  1  Poland 

cs  |  Scotland 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

29 

^Wales 

Philippine  Islands 

1 

~ 

1 
6 

2 

i 

1 

2 

5 
1 

1 

1 

1 
25 

1 

Totals                                         

9 

11 

4 

SUICIDES. 


363 


-  -Part  3, 

ENDING  JUNE   30,  1830. 


POISON. 

3 

0 

2 
cr 

i 

!     =' 

0 

3 
p. 

2 

Arsenic  

1 

0 
pr 

Chloroform  

Corrosive  subli- 
mate   

Hydrocyanic  acid. 

OPIUM. 

Paris  green  

1 

HJ 

c 
I 

Laudanum  .  .  . 

Morphia  

O 
"2. 
c 

4 

2 

1 
4 
2 
4 
1 
4 
2 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
4 
3 
13 
13 
1 
1 
1 

i 

i 

13 
2 

1 

i 

2 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
4 
2 
1 

i 

1 

1 

::::::  "r 

"i 

i 

•••••• 

1 

2 
1 

1 

1 

1 

i 
i 

1 

1 

1 

•  i 

2 

2 

i 

6 

5 

i  " 

;;;*;; 

• 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

i' 

4 

1 

..  . 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

i 

6 

8 

6 

2 

5 

34 

1 

90 

364 


.  CORONER  S    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     6  — Part     4. 
SUICIDES. 


DOMESTIC   CONDITION. 

NO. 

DOMESTIC   CONDITION. 

NO. 

No  relative  in  State,  as  far  as  known  .  .  . 
Wife  here  

36 
9 

,,'.'.   Amount  brought  forward  

70 
•> 

Wife  and  children  here  

11 

Son  here 

g 

Husband  here 

6 

1 

Husband  and  children  here 

2 

0 

Husband,  father  and  brothers  here  
Mother  and  brothers  here  
Father  and  sister  here  
Father  here  
Parents  here        .         

1 

1 
1 
1 

Sister  here  
Uncle  and  aunt  here  
Niece  here  
Nephew  here  

1 
2 
•2 
1 

A  mount  carried  forward  

70 

TOT\L 

90 

TABLE     No.    6— Part  5. 

SUICIDES. 

Age— Oldest,  70  years;  Youngest,  15  years.     Average,  39.74  years. 


OCCUPATION. 

NO. 

OCCUPATION. 

NO. 

Accountant         .                    

1 

44 

Agent  

1 

Liquor  dealer  

1 

Baker  

1 

Machinist 

1 

Blacksmith  .                  ....           

1 

Manufacturer  (shoes) 

1 

Bootblack     

1 

1 

Boot  and  shoe  dealer  

1 

Molcler  

1 

Butcher  

1 

Oiler 

1 

Canvasser  

1 

Painter  • 

1 

Cigarmaker  

] 

Picture  frame  maker                     .   . 

1 

Clerk 

4 

1 

1 

Porter 

1 

Detective  (private)  

Domestic 

1 

9 

Prostitute  

1 

1 

Editor                

1 

Restaurateur  

1 

Farmer  
Fisherman  
Fish  monger    

2 
1 
1 

Seaman  
Shoemaker  
Speculator     

1 
2 

8 

Foreman     

1 

Teamster  

1 

Furrier  

1 

Tobacconist  

1 

Hack  man                     .                  

1 

Tinner  

1 

9 

Waiter 

2 

7 

1 

4> 

Well  sinker                              

1 

1 

1 

44 

Unknown  and  no  occupation  
TOT^L                                           

19 
90 

SUICIDES. 


365 


TABLE     No.     6— Part   6. 

PREDISPOSING     CAUSES     OF    SUICIDES    DURING    THE 
YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,    1880. 


FISCAL 


CAUSES. 


PECUNIARY — 30. 

/  Miner 1 

Business  )  Detective 1 

Disappointments — 4.  "i  Restaurateur , 1 

\  Occupation  not  known 1 

Loss  of  property 

Loss  of  money 

Gambiing-7.  { Shames: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : ::: ::: ::: : .:  ? 
•  — 

Want  of  work 

Want  of   means 

LOVE— 9. 

WsaPPointn,cn,--2.  {^l; ^J* ;.:;;;.;.;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;_; 

(  With  family 1 

Domestic  Unhappiness—  6.  <  With  wife.*. 1 

(  With  husband 4 

Grief— Loss  of  child 

Remorse — After  crime 

/'  Accessory  to  murder 1 

)  Bigamy. l 

After  Crime— 6.  -v  Embpzzlement 3 

(  Murder 1 

AI     i,  i     10   (  Delirium  Tremens. ..  1 

Alcohol-U  1  Intemperance 12 

Wan   of  self-confidence 

Effects  of  a  fall 

Indictment  for  violation  of  revenue  law 

Laziness ,    

Weak  intellect 

Weak  mind  from  disease 

Unsound  mind 

Insanity 

/Phthisis 1 

Physical  Suff ering-4 .  J  £a!n  |n  he*d l 

\  Pain  in  spine 1 

,,       (.  Neuralgia > . . . .    1 

^Deafness 1 

j  Epilepsy 2 

!  Heart  disease 1 

Supposed  Incurable  Disease— 13 .  -;  Leprosy 2 

j  Phthisis 5 

',  Rupture  in  "join 1 

I  Disease  not  known 1 

Not  known 

TOTAL  . . . 


NUMBER. 


366 


CORONER  S   REPORT. 


TABLE    No.    6— Part   7. 

IMMEDIATE   CAUSES   OF   SUICIDES   DUKING  THE  FISCAL  YEAR 
ENDING  JUNE   30,   1880. 


CAUSES. 


NUMBER. 


PECUNIARY— 34. 

Business  disappointment — Occupation  not  known 

Gambling— Stock 

Loss  of  money 

Want  of  means 

LOVE— 8. 
Disappointment— with  gentleman , 

( With  wife        

Domestic  Unhappiness— ">.  -  With  husband 

(With  niece 

Nostalgia , 

Grief  for  absent  child , 

Remorse  of  dissipation 

(  Of  arrest 1 

Of  exposure - 

Of  depraved  associates ] 

KVar    11      I  Of  loss  of  property 1 

*ear-ll.  ^        misfortVimr  . .  * 1 

I   Of  poverty '2 

I   Of  punishment 3 

V.  Of  results 1 

A  i     v,  i    -i -    f  Delirium  tremens 1 

Alooho1-15- -(Intemperance _14 

Fit  of  anger I 

Unsoxmd  mind ' 

Insanity 

(  Heart  disease 1 

|    Pain  in  head 1 

Physical  Suffering— 7.-',   Phthisis 3 

j   Rupture  in  jjroin 1 

^  Disease  not  known 1 

Not  known 

TOTAL  ...  


'JO 


SUICIDES. 


36T 


P*    W 

1 1 

H    S 

•™J       CsJ 

PQ 
^    g 

H  i 

p 
0 

m 
W 
Q 


: 

month  of.  . 

No.  of  times 

no  case  in 
month  of. 

Total  seasons. 

i—  i                    10                         o                         co                C; 

•^                                                                         rH                                      ?1                        00 

TOTALS  

s  .  fc  8  s  $  8  s  s  «  a  s  a 

1 

1879-80  

oo      <N      t—      oo      •*      oo      o      m      r-      to      o      >a 

i 

uO 

1878-9  

oooocooo^oocoo^ 

s 

S 

1877-8  

a  -  ••  -  •  a  :.*  j$  a  *  -  *  '  -a 

1 

s 

00 

1876-7  

«•«     *     t.     *.«.».•,.«•  w    .*'<•     co 

s 

od 

1875-6  , 

«       «       *       00       «       -»       CO       0       «       t-       0»       » 

s 

2 

1874-5  

o      «      CD      o      o      *      co      co      *,      3      x      <o 

g 

« 

1873-4  

t-      co      <*      <«      o      ia      »      rn      -o      «      o      o 

05 

1872-3  

M       «       «       H    (  ^       «       «       M       «.       «^  «       « 

SO 

0, 

1871-2  

N         „         0         ^         0  '7,         -0         «         ^         ^         «         * 

$ 

OQ 

1870  1 

,-tOM^^O^^.OMiOOO 

M< 

°. 

1869-70  

*      »      ^      «      ^      c,      «      »      «      -      ^      - 

5 

00 

1868-9  

u»     «     t.     ««*»*««     4.     ea 

CO 

JO 

1867-8 

•#       CO       O       r-t    '  OT       «-<       »)       04  •    O       M..      O       *1 

0 

*? 

™ 

co 

1866-7  

(M 

1865-3  

^    »    H    «    «    »  .  9    o    en    o    r<    -* 

§ 

CO 

1864-5  

0 

2 

1803-4  

i-HC-IOOI-Ji-HT-HCOiOIO'MO 

i 

*? 

1862-3  

00^«.-.^^.0CTrtO=, 

J5 

I-i 

: 

1 

N  1  ^  1  |  =?  H        ; 

_» 

Average  per  mont] 

368 


CORONER  S    REPORT. 


Table    No    8 


CAUSE  OF  DEATH  UNKNOWN. 


(FOUND  IN  THE  BAY  ) 


COLOR. 

SEX. 

CONDITION. 

AGE. 

—  * 

sf 

OCCUPATION. 

NATIVITY. 

§ 
$ 

1 

GO 

I 

o* 

Unknow 

10  to  15. 

35  to  40. 

40  to  45. 

45  to  50. 

50  to  55. 

a  3 
ll 
11 

c 
B 

f 

B 

* 

Laborer 

re 
§ 
2 
p 

3 

Unknow 

: 

CD  g- 

: 

s 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1  . 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Switzerland       .   . 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Hawaiian  Islands 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Unknown  

4 

4 

4 

1 

1 

2 

3 

1 

*4 

Total  

10 

10 

5 

5 

1 

3 

1 

j 

1 

i 

8 

1 

1 

3 

1 

5 

1 

UNKNOWN    DEAD. 


369 


TABLE     No.    9. 
KEPOKT    OF    UNKNOWN    DEAD, 

AND  OF  DOUBTFUL  IDENTITY,  FROM  JULY  1,  1879,  TO  JULY  1,  1880,  THE  LOCALITY 
IN  WHICH  THE  DEATH  OCCURRED,  TOGETHER  WITH  A  DESCRIPTION  OF  THE 
BODY,  CLOTHING  WORN  AND  EFFECTS  FOUND  ON  THE  BODY. 


DATE. 

DECEASED. 

DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 

1879     Aug  21 

Found  floating  in  the  Bay  two  miles  off  Alameda  Point. 

Aug.  31.  . 

Description:  About  five  feet  five  inches  in  hight,  stout 
build,  brawn  hair  and  chin  whiskers;  a  representation 
of  a  ship,  American  banner  and  an  anchor,  in  India 
ink,  upon  the  right  forearm,  a  star  upon  the  back  of 
left  hand  and  a  vessel  and  American  nag  upon  the  left 
forearm.  Wore  blue  sack  coat  and  pants,  white  bosom 
shirt,  blue  check  shirt,  white  flannel  undershirt,  blue 
flannel  drawers  and  French  screwed  boots.  A  white 
handkerchief  with  blue  and  red  border  and  a  soda 
bottle  filled  with  brandy  were  the  only  effects  found 
upon  the  body. 

Found  suspended  from  a  tree  in  Golden  Gate  Park.    De- 

Sept. 9.. 
Oct   29 

Unknown  man  

scription:  Five  feet  seven  inches  in  hight,  stout  build, 
dark  hair,  sandy  mustache,  about  thirty-five  years  of 
age.  Wore  brown  diagonal  coat,  pants  and  vest  and 
white  check  woolen  shirt,  heavy  screwed  shoes  and 
brown  felt  hat. 

Found  in  the  slip,  between  Jackson  and  Pacific  street 
wharves.  Description:  A  German  about  thirty-five 
years  of  age,  five  feet  nine  inches  in  hight,  short  dai-k- 
brown  hair,  chin  whiskers  and  mustache,  slightly 
tinged  with  gray.  Wore  dark  gray  striped  frock  coat, 
with  side  pockets  and  velvet  collar,  dark  diagonal  vest 
and  pants,  striped  calico  shirt,  dark  woolen  undershirt, 
elastic  gaiters,  white  straw  hat  with  black  band.  Ef- 
fects :  Red  morocco  covered  pocket  testament,  brier- 
wood  pipe,  thi-ee  oroide  shirt  studs  and  one  collar  but- 
ton, bone  handled  single-bladed  jack-knife,  pair  spec- 
tacles, twenty  cents  silver  coin  and  a  five  cent  nickel,  a 
small  pocket  rule. 

Found  in  Bay  near  the  foot  of  Dupont  street     Descrip- 

Nov.   8. 

Unknown  man  

tion  :  About  fifty  years  of  age,  medium  build,  five  feet 
four  inches  in  hight,  full  face,  dark  eyes,  brown  hair 
tinged  with  gray  in  front,,  gray  mustache,  few  days* 
growth  of  gray  beard.    Wore  no  coat  or  vest  ;  wore 
white  bosom  shirt,  black  cassimere  pants,  heavy  boots, 
white  undershirt,  gray  drawers,  woolen  socks,  white 
handkerchief,  blue  border. 

Died  in  the  City  Receiving  Hospital.    Description  :  About 
fifty  years  of  age,  six  feet  one  inch  in  hight,  light  eyes, 
medium  build,  gray  hair,  beard  and  mustache.     Wore 
pepper  and  salt  cassimere  frock  coat,  steel  gray  vest, 

370 


CORONERS   REPORT. 


TABLE  NO.    9— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 


March  1. 


May  13.. 


Unknown  man . . . 


1879.    Aug.  29.. 


Aug.  31. 


DECEASED. 


Unknown  man  (Contin'd) 


Unknown   female  child, 
Chinese... 


Unknown  man. 


DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 


black  cassimere  pants,  white  bosom  shirt,  blue  check 
shirt,  gray  undershirt,  white  drawers,  black  silk  scarf, 
heavy  brogans  and  round  crown  stiff  black  felt  hat. 

Found,  fully  clothed,  in  an  enameled  cloth  bag,  on  the 
vacant  lot  at  the  northwest  corner  of  Powell  and  Sac- 
ramento street;  aged  about  ten  days. 

Died  in  the  City  Prison.  Description  :  About  forty-five 
years  of  age,  five  feet  eleven  inches  in  hight,  medium 
build,  brown  hair,  beard  and  mustache,  light  eyes,  ini- 
tials "W.  H.  G."  on  inside  of  right  forearm,  anchor 
underneath,  over  two  sprigs  of  thistles,  a  heart  under 
thistles  ,all  being  in  India  ink.  Wore  black  cloth  coat 
and  pants,  brown  cloth  vest,  blue  cotton  shirt  and 
gaiters. 

Found  on  the  rocks  in  front  of  the  sea  wall  eastward  of 
Fort  Point.  Description :  About  forty-five  years  of 
age,  six  feet  in  hight,  stout  build,  black  hair  and  black 
chin  whiskers.  Wore  a  blue  check  shirt,  blue  flannel 
undershirt,  blue  overalls,  red  flannel  drawees,  brogans. 

Unknown  female  child. . .  Found  in  a  vacant  lot  on  Vermont  near  Kansas  street.  It 
was  clothed  in  a  white  dress  and  was  found  in  a  paste- 
board box.  It  was  a  few  hours  old. 


Nov.   5.. 


Douglas  Horner  (?). 


Died  at  the  Union  Hotel,  No.  511  Mission  street.     He  was 


deaf  and  dumb,  about  twenty  years  of  age.    Applied 

ugust  25, 
the  name  of  Douglas  Horner  and  said  he  was  born  in 


for  lodgings  at  the  City  Prison,  Au 


1879,  gave 


Stine  (?). 


Frederick  Burri  (?) , 


Humboldt  county,  California.  He  gave  the  informa- 
tion by  wilting  on  a  piece  of  paper.  Effects  :  Speak- 
ing trumpet,  white  handled  jack-knife,  laurel  wood 
snuff-box,  tin-type  picture  of  a  lady. 

Found  dead  in  a  room  at  No.  533  Commercial  street.  De- 
scription :  About  forty  years  of  age,  five  feet  seven 
inches  in  hight,  stout  build,  short  light  hair.  Wore 
gray  checked  coat  and  pants,  rough  cassimere  black 
double-breasted  vest,  with  silk  stripe  and  dots,  heavy 
boots,  the  right  one  patched  over  the  toe,  bosom  shirt, 
cotton  underclothing,  light  soft  felt  hat,  white  hand- 
kerchief bearing  name  "  Maud  Gilroy."  Effects  :  $2  65 
coin,  police  whistle,  pocket  knife,  a  "British  Lion" 
self  -cocking  revolver. 

Found  in  the  Bay,  under  Bay  street  wharf.  Description  : 
Five  feet  eight  inches  in  hight,  medium  build,  brown 
hair,  sandy  beard  and  mustache,  short  growth.  Wore 
black  diagonal  sack  coat,  thin  material,  black  cloth 
vest  with  silk  figure  and  bound  with  braid,  black  cassi- 
mere pants  with  check,  white  cotton  bosom  shirt  with 
red  stripe,  brown,  white  and  green  striped  cotton  shirt, 
double  breasted  red  flannel  undershirt,  brown  and 
white  striped  cotton  drawers,  and  heavy  boots.  Effects  : 
A  red  leather  pocket  book  containing  several  letters, 
two  of  them  were  signed  as  coming  from  sister,  Cath- 
erine Bum,  written  from  Neuchtael,  and  in  German; 
a  letter  dated  1874  bore  the  following  address  at  its 


UNKNOWN    DEAD. 


371 


TABLE   NO.   9— CONCLUDED. 


DATE. 


DECEASED. 


DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 


1879.    Nov.   5.. ' Fred.  Burri  (Con tinned).. 


Dec. 


June  4 . . 


Lemuel  L.  Maule(r). 


Niles  P.  Larsen  (?) 


termination  :  "Catherine  Burri,  care  Mile.  Berthand, 
rue  duCassin,  No.  IGNeuchatel  "Swiss;"  a  letter  dated 
Charlotte ville,  February  7, 1878,  addressed  to  F.  Burey, 
and  signed  Henry  Haase;  an  envelope  addressed  to 
Fred.  Buri,  Stanton,  Hamilton  county,  Indiana;  a 
piece  of  comb,  paper  of  pins,  a  cotton  handkerchief 
with  red  and  black  figured  border  and  figured  center. 

Found  dead  in  bed  at  No.  304  Beale  street.  Description  : 
About  forty-five  years  of  age,  five  feet  five  inches  in 
hight,  medium  build,  gray  hair,  sandy  mustache  and 
chin  whiskers,  blue  eyes,  scar  on  forehead  above  left 
eyebrow,  two  scars  on  upper  side  of  right  arm  below 
elbow.  Wore  dark  cassimere  coat  and  vest,  blue  over- 
alls, blue  check  shirt,  brown  and  white  striped  shirt, 
gaiters.  A  letter  was  found  upon  deceased  addressed 
to  Lemuel  L.  Maule,  Woodland,  Yolo  county,  Califor- 
nia, bearing  postmark  "Richmond,  Ind.,  Aug.  7;"  it 
was  dated  Richmond,  August  6,  1879,  written  to  "My 
dear  brother,"  and  signed  "Sister  Zillah." 

Died  on  board  steamer  Senator  while  en  route  to  this  city 
from  San  Pedro.  Deceased  went  on  board  the  steamer 
at  San  Pedro.  Description'  About  thirty-five  years  of 
age,  five  feet  eight  inches  in  hight,  sandy  hair,  red 
mustache  and  chin  whiskers.  Wore  yellow,  red  and 
purple  stripe  on  gray  ground  woolen  shirt,  blue  flannel 
underwear  and  gray  woolen  socks. 


372 


CORONERS    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.    10. 

SCHEDULE 

SHOWING  THE  DISPOSITION  OF  BALANCE  OF  PROPERTY  RETAINED  IN  THE 
OFFICE  JULY  1,  1879,  AND  WHICH  WAS  ENUMERATED  IN  THE  REPORT  OF 
1878-9,  AND  PROPERTY  FOUND  WITH  OR  UPON  THE  BODIES  OF  DECEASED 
PERSONS  BY  THE  CORONER.  AND  THE  DISPOSITION  OF  THE  SAME,  DURING 
THE  YEAR  COMMENCING  JULY  1,  1879,  AND  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


DATE. 

DECEASED. 

DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 

1879—  April  18.  . 

June  13.. 
June  15.  . 
June  23.. 

June  26.. 
June  27.. 

July    3.. 
July    5.. 

July    7.. 
July   11.. 

Jacob  Sommer  

John  A.  Schoener  
Frederick  Rush  
Herman  Schaeffer  

John  N.  Beneken  
Wong  All  Sik  

August  15,  1879:  Delivered  to  J.  C.  Bauer,  attorney-in-fact 
for  Paul  Faber,   executor  of  the  estate  of  deceased 
(letters  from  District  Court,  Nye  county,   State  of  Ne- 
vada, July  19,  1879.) 

November  10,  1879:   Delivered  to  Lockhart  &  Porter  to  de- 
fray funeral  expenses,  as  authorized  by  Resolution  No. 
13,820,  Board  of  Supervisors. 

July  29,  1879:    Delivered  to  William  H.  Porter,  special  ad- 
ministrator (letters  Probate  Court,  San  Francisco,  July 
29,  1879.) 

November  10,  1879:    Delivered  to  Lockhart  &  Porter  to  de- 
fray funeral  expenses,  as  authorized  by  Resolution  No. 
13,820,  Board  of  Supervisors. 

June  29,  1880:  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

August  20,  1879:  Coin  delivered  to  Treasurer  Hubert,  pocket 
knife  retained  in  office  as  evidence. 

Copy  of  deed  and  letters.      August  20,  1879  :    Delivered  to 
Treasurer  Hubert. 

Thirteen,  dollars  and  thirty-five  cents  (coin),   less  two  dol- 
lars paid  by  the  police  to  remove  deceased  to  the  City 
Receiving  Hospital;  purse,  pocket  knife,  eye  glasses  and 
papers.    July  12,   1879:    Delivered  to  R.   B.  Saffold, 
cousin  of  deceased. 

Pocket  knife,   chain,   op*ium  box,   British  cent,   Chinese 
coin,  shoe  horn  and  papers.  Dark  blue  cloth  coat,  dark 
blue  coat,  light  blue  padded  coat,  white  cloth  coat  and 
dark  blue  pants  (evidence).    February  25,  1879:    Deliv- 
ered to  the  Superior  Court,   Department  No.  12,   on 
the  trial  of  the  case  of  the  People  vs.  Yee  Ah  Tong. 

Three  dollars  (silver  coin),  bank  book  No.  27,  114  German 
Savings  and  Loan  Society,  showing  a  credit  of  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  dollars,  open  faced  gold  watch,   gold 
chain  and  watch  key,  plain  gold  ring,  gold  ring  (setting 
gone),  two  keys,  pair  sleeve  buttons,   car  ticket,  cigar- 
ette holder,   two  pair  eye  glasses,  box  containing  one 
bracelet,   shell  case,   silver  medal,   pair  ear  rings,   one 
stud,  breast  pin,  two  pair  coral  ear  rings,   sleeve  but- 
ton, ring  and  miniature  likeness  in  case,  photographic 

Milton  J.  Saffold  
Yee  Leong  

!  Josef  Kellner 

1 

PROPERTY  OF  DECEASED  PERSONS. 


373 


TABLE     No.  10— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 


1879- July  11. 


DECEASED. 


Jos.  Kellner  (Continued). . 


DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 


July  16..  |  Peter  Anderson. 


July  17. .  i  Benjamin  Hallett. 


July  21. 


Paul  Bucskovszki 


July  21.. 


July  22. 


July  25. 


Joseph  Fisher 


Denis  Linahan. 


Joseph  Oatley 


alburn,  package  of  photographs,  letters,  papers,  violin 
and  trunk  containing  clothing  and  personal  effects. 
July  12,  1879:  Delivered  to  William  Doolan,  Public 
Administrator. 

Ten  dollars  (gold  coin),  $1  90  (silver  coin),  two  car  tickets, 
memorandum  book  and  papers,  key  to  room  on  Hinck- 
ley  street.  July  17:  Delivered  to  William  Doolau, 
Public  Administrator. 

One  dollar  and  fifty-five  cents  (silver  coin),  brass  key, 
sheath  knife  and  silk  handkerchief.  August  20,  1879 : 
Delivered  to  Treasurer  Hubert. 

Two  hundred  and  ninety-five  dollars  (gold  coin),  §60  (cur- 
rency), fifteen  cents  (silver  coin),  watch,  watch  chain, 
Odd  Fellow's  pin,  Defiance  sevtn-chamber  revolver, 
pocket  knife,  memorandum  book  and  five  keys ;  re- 
ceived of  G.  Monnier,  No.  1153  Howard  street,  $15 
(.'old  coin),  §27  50  (silver  coin),  twenty  one-dollar,  nine 
fifty-cent,  and  four  twenty-five  cent  foreign  silver  coins, 
letters,  bank  book  No.  76,224  Sixpenny  Savings  Bank 
(New  York),  showing  a  credit  of  §20,  one  trunk  con- 
taining clothing.  July  28,  1879:  Three  keys  delivered 
to  George  Monnier,  owner  of  them.  July  30,  1879: 
Balance  delivered  to  William  Doolan,  Public  Admin- 
istrator. 

Silver  watch  and  chain,  pocket  knife,  §1  55  (silver  and 
nickel  coin),  two  keys.  July  21,  1879:  Delivered  to  H. 
Eisenlatuer,  son-in-law,  for  wife  of  deceased. 

Forty  dollars  (gold  coin),  found  in  a  trunk  at  his  residence, 
No.  564  Mission  street;  received  from  property  clerk 
Culleu,  police  office,  one  Remington  revolver,  ring  with 
four  keys  attached,  pocket  knife.  July  25, 1879:  Deliv- 
ered ro  Honora  Linahan,  wife  of  deceased. 

Purse  containing  twenty  cents,  three  keys  and  jack  knife. 
July  26,  1879:  Keys  delivered  to  Jeremiah  Hayes,  123 
Clay  street,  their  owner.  August  20,  1879:  Balance  de- 
livered to  Treasurer  Hubert. 


July  26. .  iKate  O'Brien.  . . 


July  29.    Chin  Ah  Ngoou 


July  31.. 


J.  W.  R.  Hill. 


July  31 ..  Richard  Dunn . 


Five  dollars  and  twenty-five  cents  (silver  coin),  plain  gold 
ring,  gold  stud,  silver  thimble,  ring  with  three  keys  at- 
tached, hand  bag  containing  letters  and  papers,  valise 
containing  clothing  and  personal  effects,  trunk  con- 
taining clothing,  etc.  September  14,  1879  :  Delivered 
to  J.  B.  McDonald,  upon  receipt  of  written  order  from 
May  Sheeley,  of  New  York  city,  mother  of  deceased. 


Two  Chinese  coabs  and  one  shirt. 
evidence. 


Retained  in  office  as 


i  Twenty  cents  (silver  coin),  three  one-cent  nickels,  one  ring, 
seven  keys,  two  pair  eye  glasses,  two  foot  rule  and  pa- 
pers. August  1,  1879:  Delivered  to  E.  P.  Hill,  brother 
of  deceased. 

Five  dollars  (gold  coin),  §1  35  (silver  coin),  silver  watch, 
pair  sleeve  buttons,  collar  button,  two  studs,  pocket 


374 


CORONER  S   REPORT. 


TABLE     No.   10— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 


DECEASED. 


DESCRIPTION*  AXD  DISPOSITION 


9- July  31.. 
Aug.    9.. 


R.  Dunn  (Continued). 
Thomas  G.  Frazer 


knife,  medal,  key  and  two  watch  keys. 
1879:  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Hubert. 


November  10, 


Aug.    9..  Ernest  P.  Rieux. 


Aug.  10 
Aug.  12.. 
Aug.  14.. 

Aug.  25.. 

Aug.  27.. 
Aug.  30.. 
Aug.  31 . . 


Lee  Ah  Yu 

Jonas  P.  Hult 

Thomas  Cuddehea. . . 

George  L.  Pearson 

Benino  Galindo 

Adeline  Williams  . . . 


Stine  (?). , 


Sept.   2..  Gompert Schwartz. 
Sept.   2..  S.  Mayer  Dinkel... 


Sept.   8.. 
Sept.   9.. 


J.  H.  Develine. 


Joseph  B.  Fay. 


Silver  watch  and  chain,  ring  with  six  keys  attached,  Smith 
&  Wesson  revolver,  pocket  knife,  comb,  memorandum 
book  and  carpet  bag.  August  11,  1879:  Delivered  to 
William  F.  Frazer,  father  of  deceased. 

Seventy-five  cents  (silver  coin),  gold  watch,  gold  chain  and 
locket,  five  car  tickets,  four  gold  collar  buttons,  one 
cameo  stud,  one  piece  gold  setting,  pocket  knife,  pencil 
holder,  door  key,  ring  with  five  keys  attached,  cork 
screw,  X  L  No.  4  revolver,  pocket  handkerchief.  Au- 
gust 15,  1879 :  Delivered  to  Thomas  Young  for  his 
niece,  Lucy  Rieux,  wife  of  deceased. 

)loth  bag  containing  personal  effects.  August  20,  1879 : 
Delivered  to  Treasurer  Hubert. 

Ten  cents.  September  30,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Treasurer 
Hubert. 

lighty-five  cents  (coin),  Hibernia  bank  book  No.  52,184,  in 
name  of  Thomas  Cudahy,  showing  credit  of  §90,  one 
ring,  "Tycoon"  revolver,  and  papers.  August  20,  1879  : 
Delivered  to  J.  T.  Ward,  special  administrator  (letters 
from  Probate  Court,  San  Francisco,  August  20,  1879.) 

awn  ticket  No.  2,800,  pawn  ticket  No.  43,818,  two  pocket 
knives,  three  keys,  pair  spectacles,  police  whistle,  pair 
ivory  sleeve  buttons,  cigarette  holder,  pencil  holder 
and  one  stud.  August  27,  1879 :  Delivered  to  Adrian 
W.  Beunick,  executor  named  --in  the  holographic  will 
of  deceased. 

Eighty-five  cents  (silver  coin).  September  30,  1879  :  Deliv 
ered  to  Treasurer  Hubert. 

Chemise  undershirt  and  white  evening  dress.  Retained  in 
office  as  evidence. 

wo  dollars  and  sixty-five  cei:ts  (silver  coin),  "British 
Lion" .revolver.  September  30 :  Delivered  to  Treasurer 
Hubert. 


One  coat  and  two  shirt  sleeves, 
office. 


Retained  as  evidence  ii 


Eighty-five  dollars  (currency),  *2  05  (silver  coin\  open-faced 
gold  watch,  scarf  pin,  pocket  knife,  four  keys,  valise 
containing  personal  effects.  September  4,  1879  :  Deliv- 
ered to  B.  Reinhardt,  in  compliance  with  written  re- 
quest of  deceased. 

Trunk  containing  clothing  and  personal  effects.  Septem- 
I  ber  22,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Frank  Lake,  upon  written 
request  of  J.  W.  Develine,  father  of  deceased. 

One  dollar  and  twenty  cents  (silver  coin),    two  pass  k  e 
one  wharf  check,  pocket  knife  and  papers.    Septembs, 
19,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Annie  Fay,  wife  of  deceased,  er 


PROPERTY  OF  DECEASED  PERSONS. 


375 


TABLE     No.  10— CONTINUED  . 


DATE.  DECEASED. 


DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 


1879-Sept.  10.. Christian  Schneider. 
Sept.  11. .  Mary  A.  O'Grady.  . . 
Sept.  19. .  Unknown  man 


Sept.  19. .  John  O'Connor 

| 
Sept.  21. .  George  F.  Martin  . . 


Sept. 22..  Henry  H.  Berry. 
Oct.     5..' Pierre  E.  Leland. 


Oct.     5..  Hugh  Wallace. 


Oct.     5. .  Charles  H.  Williams. . 


Oct.  7 . .  Daniel  F.  Barrows . . 
Oct.  10 ..  John  T.  Haskell .... 
Oct.  12.  .George  W.  Howard. 


Twenty  cent 
Hubert. 


September  30,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Treasurer 


Four  dollars  and  five  cents  (coin),  and  two  earrings.  Janu- 
ary 17,  1880  :  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Twenty  cents  (silver  coin),  five-cent  nickel,  pocket  rule, 
pocket  testament,  brierwood  pipe,  three  oroide  studs, 
collar  button,  jack  knife  and  pair  spectacles.  Septem- 
ber 30,  1879  :  Coin  delivered  to  Treasurer  Hubert,  bal- 
ance retained  as  evidence. 

Ten  cents,  putty  knife  and  pocket  knife.  November  10, 
1873 :  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Hubert. 

Two  dollars  and  fifty  cents  (gold  coin),  §1  45  (silver  coin), 
gold  watch  and  gold  chain,  car  ticket,  pair  sleeve  but- 
tons, one  stud,  lead  pencil,  pocket  knife,  door  key,  two 
small  keys  and  papers.  September  22,  1879  :  Delivered, 
to  W.  D.  English,  nephew  of  deceased. 

Five  doliars  (gold  coin),  $2  70  (silver  coin),  pocket  knife. 
November  10,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Hubert. 

Twelve  dollars  and  forty  cents  (silver  coin),  open-faced 
gold  watch,  locket  and  silk  cord,  two  sleeve  buttons, 
scarf  pin,  memorandum  book  and  "Bulldozer"  revol- 
ver. October  7,  1879  :  Delivered  to  A.  H.  Wands,  upon. 
written  order  from  Ada  E.  Wands,  sister  of  deceased. 


Fifty  cents,  ring  with  four  keys  attached,  three  memoran- 
dum books,  two  guide  books  and  Wesson's  &  Harring- 
ton revolver.  October  7, 1879  :  Delivered  to  B.  F.  Gid- 
diugs,  in  compliance  with  a  written  request  made  by 
deceased,  which  was  found  with  his  body. 

Fifty  cents,  envelope  addressed  to  B.  F.  Blackburn,  Esq., 
office  Evening  Post  (unsealed),  containing  certificate 
No.  10,475,  for  one  hundred  shares  Belmont  Mining 
Company,  Nevada,  ring  with  ten  keys  attached,  S2  00 
(currency),  two  studs,  two  collar  buttons,  three  car 
tickets,  foot  rule  and  three  employees'  car  tickets.  Oc- 
tober 11,  1879:  Delivered  to  T.  Percy  Pease,  upon 
written  order  from  Mrs.  Charles  H.  Williams,  wife  of 
deceased. 

Silver  watch,  one  jack  knife.  October  7,  1879  :  Delivered 
to  James  O.  Barrows,  son  of  deceased. 

One  small  "King  Pin"  pocket  pistol.  October  12,  1879  . 
Delivered  to  Frank  Avery,  nephew  of  deceased. 

Forty-three  dollars  (silver  coin),  §12  50  (gold  coin),  .$4  00 
(currency),  gold  watch,  gold  watch  chain,  pocket  knife, 
pass  key,  field  glass,  small  telescope,  memorandum 
book,  warranty  deed  for  a  piece  of  land  in  Roxbury, 
Mass.,  letters  and  papers,  trunk  containing  clothing 
and  personal  effects.  Vest,  white  shirt  and  undershirt 
retained  as  evidence  in  office.  October  20,  1879  :  Bal- 
ance delivered  to  James  M.  Noyes,  special  administra- 
tor. • 


376 


CORONER  S    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.   10— CONTINUED. 


DATE 

DECEASED. 

1 

DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 

1879—  Oct.   13.. 

Bertholdt  Pusch 

One  dollar  (silver  coin),  three  studs,  two  car  tickets  and 

three  keys.     The  following  named  property  was  found 

in  room  of  deceased,  at  No.  317  Bush  street  :   Ten  dol- 

lars (gold  coin),  $5  55  (silver  coin),  three  foreign  silver 
coins,   twenty  cents  (nickel  coin),    open-faced    silver 

watch,  watch  chain,  open-faced  M'atch.    January  17, 

1880  :  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Oct.   16.. 

William  K.  Falls  

Letters,  papers  an4  twenty  cents.    October  27,  1879     De- 
livered to  H.  F.  Baker,  upon  written  order  from  Moor 

Falls,  New  York  city,  brother  of  deceased. 

Oct.   17.. 

Lee  Foo  Won  

Four  dollars  (silver  coin.)     November  10,  1879  :   Delivered 

to  Treasurer  Hubert. 

Oct    18.. 

Martin  Kelly  

Twenty  cents,  five-cent  nickel  and  pocket  knife.      Novem- 
ber 10,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Hubert. 

Oct.   22.. 

Edward  Low  

One  dollar  and  seventy-five  cents  (silver  coin),  silver  watch 

and  watch  key.     November  10,   1879  :    Delivered  to 

Treasurer  Hubert. 

Oct.   22.. 

M.  E.  Norton  

Fifteen  dollars  (gold  coin),  $14  20  (silver  coin),  $55  00  (cur- 

rency), three  five-cent  nickels,   one  nickel  w'atch,  four 

gold  chains,   two  ladies'  gold  lockets,   pair  ear  rings, 
three  pair  cuff  buttons,   one  cuff  button,   silver  match 

box,  one  lady's  gold  chain  slide,  scarf  pin,  three  collar 

buttons,   one  black  onyx  ring,   pair  onyx  cuff  buttons, 
plain  gold  ring,  gold-mounted  pen  holder,  Grand  Cen- 
tral Hotel  check  No.  736,  bank  book  No.  666,  Chicago 

Dime  Savings  Bank,  showing  credit  of  $31  62;  check 

No.  4,200,  Mercantile  National  Bank,  N.Y.,  for  $2,000, 
payable  to  John  C.  Warnock,  and  endorsed  payable  to 
M.  E.  Norton  or  order;  duplicate  checks  No.  10,185  and 

10,186,  for  fifty  pounds  sterling  each;  check  No.  6,123. 
First  National  Bank,  Colorado,  payable  to  M.  E.  Nor- 

ton, for  $8  00-  receipt  No.  6,999,  for  $250  00;  C.P.R.R. 

ticket,  dated  October  18,  1879,  and  sleeping  car  ticket; 

note  of  hand,  dated  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  July  15,  1878,  pay- 

able ninety  days  after  date,  to  M.  E.  Norton,  for  $100; 

receipt  dated  Kansas  City,   May  10,  1879,  for  $250,  in 
name  of  M.  E.  Norton;  demand  note  dated  New  York, 

July  3,  1879,  for  $50,  in  favor  of  M.  E.  Norton;  receipt 

dated  Syracyse,   May  19,   1879,   to  M.  E.  Norton,  for 

$125;  sealed  envelope  containing  valuable  memoran- 

da,   etc.;  Palace  Hotel  receipt  No.  3,248  for  valuable 

package;   memorandum  of  deposit  of  four  diamond 

' 

rings,  dated  May  7,  1879;  bank  book  First  National 

Bank,  Denver,  Colorado,   in  name  of  M.  E.  Norton, 

showing  credit  of  $15,132  75  (stubs  of  check  in  back  of 

book  shows  account  overdrawn);  memorandum  book, 

one  set  of  scales;  Travelers'  Insurance  Co.  policy  No. 

319,499;  one  set  ear  rings  and  breast  pin,  one  diamond 

(appraised  value,  $77),  British  '  'Bull  Dog"  revolver,  ring 

with  seventeen  keys  attached,   one  silver  sound,  pair 

scissors,  pen  knife,  umbrella,  one  hand  bag  containing 
letters  and  papers,  trunk  and  valise  containing  clothing 
and  personal  effects.     October  24,  1879  :    Delivered  to 

E.  A.  Phelps,  special  administrator  (letters  from  Pro- 
bate Court,  San  Francisco,  October  24  1879.) 

Oct.  23.. 

WongAhSeoug  

CWnese  blue  blouse,  Chinese  shirt  and  drawers.  Retained 

in  office  as  evidence. 

PROPERTY  OF  DECEASED  PERSONS. 


37T 


TABLE     No.  10— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 


DKi'EASKD. 


DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 


879  -Oct    27 . .  J.  A.  B.  Watson . . . 


Oct    29..  C.  L.  Peterson. 


.  "Ranger  No.  2"  revolver  and  brass  key.  October  27, 1879  r 
Delivered  to  R.  R.  Lucas,  in  compliance  with  the  last 
request  of  deceased. 

.  Two  dollars  and  fifty  cents  (silver  coin*,  open-faced  gold1 
!  watch,  gold  chain  and  charm  attached,  two  cuff  but- 
tons, three  shirt  stu4s,  one  collar  button,  one  ring, 
ring  with  seven  keys  attached,  door  key  and  tag,  pen 
knife,  memorandum  book  and  papers,  sixteen  certifi- 
cates of  shares  in  Arizona  Land  and  Mine  Development 
Company,  Tucson  (3,050  shares),  coat,  vest,  white  shirt 
and  undershirt,  November  20, 1879  :  Clothing  retained 
as  evidence  in  office,  balance  delivered  to  Alice  C.  Pe- 
terson, administratrix  of  the  estate  (letters  Probate 
Court,  San  Francisco,  November  18,  1879.) 


Oct    29     Chin  Man  Leong 'Sixty  cents.    November  10,  1879  :    Delivered  to  Treasurer 

Hubert. 


Oct.   29 . .  Thomas  Huggins . 


Oct.   30.. 


Nov     1.. 


NOT.    2.. 


W.  H.  Henderson. . 


Miguel  Hen-era. 


Jose  Castillo 


James  MsGinnis 


John  McDonnell. 


Nov     5..  | Joseph  E.  Bowman 


Seventeen  dollars  and  eighty  cents  (silver  coin),  two  car 
tickets,  silver  watch,  oroide  chain  with  locket  attached; 
demand  note,  dated  San  Francisco.  August  20,  1879, 
for  §220,  payable  to  Thomas  Huggins,  endorsement  on 
face  :  "O.K.  No.  12,  August  24th,  820;"  memorandum 
book,  three  keys,  saloon  and  contents  (noi  theast  cor- 
ner Market  and  Gough  streets).  November  29,  1879  : 
Delivered  to  William  Doolan,  Public  Administrator. 


Smith  &  Wesson  revolver,  three  keys,  pocket  knife,  pair 
spectacles,  four  photographs  and  papers.  October  31, 
1879 :  Revolver  delivered  to  Peter  Mitchell,  its  owner. 
November  4,  1879  :  Balance  delivered  to  J.  C.  Sprague, 
brother-in-law  of  deceased. 


Pipe,  two  keys,  studs  and  letters.  December  1,  1879  :  De- 
livered to  C.  Pinto,  for  M.  Herrera,  father  of  deceased. 
Black  cloth  sack  coat  with  velvet  collar,  blue  cloth 
vest,  bosom  shirt  and  undei shirt  retained  in  office  as 
evidence. 

One  dollar  and  fifty-five  cents  (silver  coin),  pocket  knife, 
letters;  order  dated  San  Jose,  October  31,  1879,  for  $93, 
payable  to  deceased  (order  null  and  void. )  November 
14, 1879  :  Delivered  to  Antonio  Romero,  brother-in-law, 
for  Ebarista  Castillo,  wife  of  deceased. 


One  dollar  and  eighty-five  cents  (coin), 
and  two  keys.  January  17,  1880 : 
urer  Shaber. 


two  pocket  knives 
Delivered  to  Treas- 


Twenty  cents,  pair  sleeve  buttons,  pocket  knife,  three 
studs,  lead  pencil  and  tin  type.  .January  17,  1880  :  De- 
livered to  Treasurer  Shaber.  Bosom  shirt  retained  as 
evidence  in  office. 

Twenty  dollars  (gold  coin\  $3  05  (silver  coin),  three  shirt 
studs,  collar  button,  cameo  ring,  gold  watch,  watch 
chain,  ring  with  five  keys  attached.  Forehand  &  Wads- 
worth  revolver.  November  21,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Ag- 
nes Bowman,  administratrix  of  the  estate  (letters  Pro- 
bate Court,  San  Francisco,  November  21,  1879.) 


378 


CORONERS    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.  10— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 


1879-Nov.    7.. 


DECEASED. 


Herman  Bruehl. 


Nov.    7. .  John  Leonard 


Nov.    7.. 

Nov.  9.. 
Nov.  10.. 
Nov.  11.. 


Patrick  McDermott 


Nov.  19.. 
Nov.  22 


Nov.  22. 


Nov.  22. 


Nov.  25. 


Nov.  30. 


ugustin  Celiz 

Vlichael  Coughlan... 
Amalia  Hartenstein. 


Henry  Thompson. 
Daniel  Hewes — 


DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 


Patrick  O'Loughlin.  . . 


William  A.  Johnson., 


Phillip  Rosenzweig. 


James  F.  McGee 


Eleven  dollars  and  forty-five  cents  (silver  coin).  Novem- 
ber 28,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Lockhart  &  Porter  to  defray 
funeral  expenses,  as  authorized  by  Resolution  No. 
14,144,  Board  of  Supervisors. 

Thirty-two  dollars  and  fifty  cents  (gold  coin),  ten  cents  and 
jack  knife.  November  28,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Lockhart 
&  Porter  to  defray  funeral  expenses,  as  authorized  by 
Resolution  No.  14,144  Board  of  Supervisors. 

Thirty-one  dollars  and  sixty  cents  (coin),  received  from  the 
North  Beach  &  Mission  Railroad  Company,  being  wages 
due  deceased.  November  28,  1879  :  Delivered  to  Lock- 
hart  &  Porter  to  defray  funeral  expenses,  as  authorized 
by  R. solution  No.  14,144,  Board  of  Supervisors. 

"National  Arms  Co."  derringer.  January  17,  1880  :  Deliv- 
ered to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Green  sack  coat,  blue  beaver  vest,  black  pants.  Retained 
in  office  as  evidence. 

Two  dollars  and  sixty-five  cents  (silver  coin),  plain  gold 
ring,  pair  gold  cuff  buttons,  three  pair  earrings,  three 
shirt  studs,  two  odd  cuff  buttons,  two  breast  pins,  one 
chain  and  cross,  pair  gold  eye  glasses,  one  hair  bracelet, 
deed  for  a  lot  in  San  Francisco,  bank  book  No.  28,267, 
German  Savings  and  Loan  Society,  in  name  of  Amalia 
Hartenstein,  showing  a  credit  of  $30;  note  dated  Octo- 
ber 16,  1878,  for  *200,  in  favor  of  Amalia  Hartenstein; 
casket  containing  letters  and  papers,  trunk,  valise  and 
small  box  containing  clothing  and  personal  effects. 
November  17,  1879  :  Delivered  to  F.  O.  Hartenstein, 
husband  of  deceased. 

Five  cents  and  papers.  January  17,  1880 :  Delivered  to 
Treasurer  Shaber. 

Two  dollars  and  fifty  cents  (gold  coin),  $2  75  (silver  coin), 
onyx  seal  ring,  four  keys,  pocket  knife,  pipe  and  eye 
glasses.  November  24,  .1879  :  Delivered  to  Joshua 
Hewes,  brother  of  deceased. 

Ten  dollars  /gold  coin),  twenty  cents,  plain  geld  ring,  one 
gold  ring,  gold  watch  with  hair  chain  and  charms  at- 
tached; note  dated  Sacramento,  January  10,  1879,  for 
$1  000,  in  favor  of  P.  O'Loughlin;  memorandum  book 
and  papers,  250  shares  South  Bodie  Gold  Mining  Co., 
40  shares  California  Mining  Co. ,  20  shares  Consolidated 
Virginia  Mining  Co.  November  23, 1879  :  Delivered  to 
Mary  O'Loughlin,  wife  of  deceased. 

Trunk  containing  clothing  and  personal  effects.    Novem- 
-  ber  25,  1879  :    Delivered  to  C.  E.  Knapp,  Deputy  U.  S. 
Shipping  Commissioner. 

Thirty  cents,  four  keys,  pocket  knife,  eye  glasses,  magnify- 
ing glass,  two  watch  keys,  papers.  November  zb,  1879  : 
Delivered  to  Jennie  Rosenzweig,  wife  of  deceased. 

One  thoiisancl  five  hundred  and  ten  shares  Nevada  Consol- 


PROPERTY  OF  DECEASED  PERSONS. 


379 


TABLE     No.     10— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 


DECEASED. 


DESCRIPTION  AXD  DISPOSITION. 


1879-Nov.  30.. 


J.  F.  McGee  (Continued).. 


Dec.    2 . .  Henry  W.  Meyer . 


Dec.    3.. 

Dec.    6.. 
Dec.    6.. 


Dec.    6.. 


Dec.  11.. 


Dec.  16.. 


AhGnee 

Darng  Ah  On. 
John  T.  Wolfe. 


Darng  Ah  On 


E.    H.   Pomeroy 


Frederick  Geisendorfer.. 


Dec.  18..  i  Daniel  Abbott. 


Dec.  22.. 


iclated  Copper  and  Silver  Mining  Co.,  600  shares  Flor- 
ence Blue  Gravel  Mining  Co. ,  50  shares  Chicago  Quick- 
silver Mining  Co. ;  bill  of  sale  dated  October  10,  1879, 
for  household  furniture,  etc.,  to  Mrs.  May  Edna  Smith; 
85  cents,  scarf  pin,  three  large  keys,  three  small  keys, 
watch  key,  eye  glasses,  pocket  knife,  collar  button,  two 
cuff  buttons,  meerschaum  pipe  and  papers.  December 
1,  1879  :  Delivered  to  F.  A.  McGee,  brother  of  de- 
ceased. 

Bank  book  No.  7356,  Odd  Fellows'  Bank,  showing  a  credit 
of  ¥1,408  83;  twenty  cents,  pair  cuff  buttons,  two  studs, 
ring  containing  five  keys,  photograph  album,  letters 
and  papers.  December  3,  1879 :  Delivered  to  Benjamin 
A.  Reynolds,  Public  Administrator. 


Seventy  cents,  gold  pen  and  pencil.  January  17,  1880  :  De- 
livered to  Treasurer  Shaber.  One  pair  pants  and 
drawers  retained  in  office  as  evidence. 


Coat,  pants,  drawers,  shirt  and  undershirt.    Retained  in 
office  as  evidence. 


Colt's  derringer,  pair  cuff  buttons,  two  studs,  collar  button, 
pocket  knife,  tobacco  box,  wooden  pipe,  ring  contain- 
ing four  keys  (one  marked  C.  P.  R.R.),  silver  ring,  pho- 
tograph album  and  photographs.  December  8,  1879  : 
Key  marked  C.P.R.R.  delivered  to  Captain  Deal  for 
the  Central  Pacific  Railroad  Company,  its  owner. 
January  17,  1880  :  Balance  delivered  to  Treasurer  Sha- 
ber. 

Ten  cents;  sight  draft,  60  days  after  sight,  dated  Cuffey's 
Cove,  California,  August  2,  1879  (No.  961,  drawn  by 
Clark  &  Rutherford  per  A.  H.  R. ,  and  payable  to  the 
order  of  Charley  Duck,  for  s20,  drawn  on  J.  F.  Byxbee, 
No.  10  California  street,  San  Francisco,  indorsed  on 
face,  "Accepted  August  12,  1879,  John  F.  Byxbee  per 
J.  H.  Witham."  January  17,  1880:  Delivered  to  Treas- 
urer Shaber. 


Twenty-five  cents,  pocket  knife,  four  keys,  four  car  tickets, 
two  collar  buttons,  one-dollar  bill  of  Searsport  Bank 
of  Maine,  cork  screw;  pawn  ticket,  No.  3,792,  dated 
December  8,  1879;  papers.  December  13,  1879  :  Deliv- 
ered to  George  W.  Davis,  brother-in-law  of  deceased. 

Three  dollars  and  fifteen  cents  (coin\  plain  gold  ring,  open- 
faced  silver  watch,  ring  containing  twelve  keys,  watch 
key,  pocket  knife,  car  ticket,  "X.L.4"  revolver,  papers, 
letter  and  overcoat.  December  16,  1879  :  Delivered  to 
Mary  Geisendorfer,  wife  of  deceased. 


John  Rob  Roy 


Twenty  cents. 
Shaber. 


January'  17,  1880  :   Delivered  to  Treasurer 


'wenty  cents  and  two  keys.  January  17,  1880  :  Delivered  to 
Treasurer  Shaber. 


380 


CORONER  S   REPORT. 


TABLE     No.      10— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 


1879-Dec. 


Dec.  24  . 


Dec. 


Michael  Schorier .  . . 


David  Erhardt... 


Lawrence  L.  Homer 


Dec.  26.. 


Dec.  26.. 


Dec.  27. 


DECEASED. 


Daniel  J.  Driscoll 


Charles  W.  Dix 


DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 


Ten  dollars  (gold  coin),  eighty  cents  and  three  keys.  March 
12,  1880  :  Coin  delivered  to  Lockhart  &  Porter  on  ac- 
count of  funeral  expenses,  as  authorized  by  Resolution 
No.  14,535  Board  of  Supervisors.  April  30,  1880  :  Keys 
delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Thirty  cents,  one  large  brass  bey,  two  brass  keys,  one  flat 
key,  pocket  knife  and  pair  sleeve  buttons.  December 
30,  1879  :  Large  brass  key  and  one  flat  key  delivered  to 
John  Heizman,  their  owner.  January  17,  1880 :  Bal- 
ance delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 


Seal  ring  (amethyst),  fifty  cents,  pair  sleeve  buttons,  scarf 
pin,  two  studs,  two  collar  buttons,  pocket  knife,  "Brit- 
ish Bull  Dog"  revolver,  piece  of  quartz;  due  bill  dated 
Mammoth  City,  June  4,  1879,  for  $137  50,  in  goods  or 
cash,  to  be  paid  within  forty  days  to  deceased,  made 
>  by  Charles  Ball,  J.  H.  Brown  and  Charles  Schuman, 
having  indorsement  of  §45  on  the  back  thereof;  papers. 
December  28,  1879:  Studs  and  sleeve  buttons  delivered 
to  Lockhart  &  Porter,  undertakers,  to  be  placed  upon 
deceased,  as  per  instructions  from  Harriet  C.  Homer, 
his  wife.  December  29,  1879  :  Balance  delivered  to 
Harriet  C.  Homer,  wife  of  deceased. 


One  hundred  and  forty  dollars  (gold  coin),  $1  95  (silver 
coin),  ten  sen  (Chinese  coin),  gold  watch,  gold  watch 
chain,  pair  cuff  buttons,  two  studs,  ring  containing  live 
keys,  one  door  key,  small  key,  pocket  knife,  pencil 
holder,  car  ticket,  receipts  and  bills  of  steamboat  El- 
len. December  29,  1880  :  Delivered  to  Martha  Dris- 
coll, wife  of  deceased. 


Fifty  cents,  gold  chain,  Maltese  cross,  gold  ring,  two  sleeve 
buttons,  ten  shirt  studs,  six  collar  buttons,  silver  nap- 
kin ring,  two  tooth  picks,  pocket  knife,  tape  line,  cig- 
arette holder,  100  shares  Indian  Queen  Mining  and 
Milling  Co.  (Nevada);  pawn  tickets  Nos.  44,806,  44,817 
and  8,291;  policy  No.  3i>7,039  Travelers'  Insurance  Co., 
for  !$1,000;  pocket  book  containing  letters  and  papers, 
three  keys,  hand  bag,  trunk  containing  clothing  and 
personal  effects.  March  11,  1880  :  Delivered  to  Henry 
Dix,  brother  of  deceased. 


William  Ellsworth One  gold  ring.     January  17,  1880:    Delivered  to  Treasurer 


Dec.  29..  M.  Bereudorffer 


Dec.  29.. 


Dec.  29.. 


Marie  O.  Lehleyder 


Marie  O.  Lehleyder  and  M. 
Berendorft'er 


Shaber. 


One  pair  wood  sleeve  buttons.  December  31,  1879  :  Deliv- 
ered to  Benjamin  A.  Reynolds,  Public  Administrator. 

Plain  gold  ring,  one  ring  with  a  diamond  (?)  and  two  rubies 
set  therein.  December  31, 1879 :  Delivered  to  Benjamin 
A.  Reynolds,  Public  Administrator. 

One  pair  ear  rings,  "Alert"  revolver,  ivory  fan,  pair  ivory 
napkin  rings,  silver  mug,  pair  five-dollar  gold-piece 
sleeve  buttons,  silver  watch,  diamond  ring  ('!),  gold  ring 
(two  pearls),  gold  pencil,  silver  fruit  knife,  corn  knife, 
open-faced  gold  watch,  pair  ear  rings  (pendants),  gold 
necklace  and  locket,  two  Japanese  coins,  §11  (curren- 


PROPERTY  OF  DECEASED  PERSONS. 


381 


TABLE    No.     10— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 


1879-Dec. 


Dec.  31.. 


1880- Jan.    3.. 


M.  O.  Lehleydsr  and  Ber- 
endorter  (Continued). . 


ETjalmer  Peterson. 


John  Powell . . 


Jan.    4. 


Jan.    8.. 


Jan.  12.. 

Jan.  12.. 
Jan.  14.. 


DECEASED. 


Henry  Yorke.  . 


Joshua  A.  Norton. 


E.  H.  Jacquelin . 


Michael  Mooney . . . 
William  H.  Pierce. 


Jan.  20..  Frank  Horan.  .. 


Jan.  20. 


Jan.  22.. 


Thomas  Elligott  . . . 


John  Fitzgerald . . 


DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 


cy),  £47  50  (gold  coin),  $11  75  (silver  coin),  thirteen 
cents,  eight  foreign  silver  coins,  five  car  tickets,  four 
three-cent  postage  stamps,  thirteen  keys,  contents  of 
premises  Iso.  27  Waverly  place,  satchel  containing 
papers.  December  31,  1879:  Delivered  to  Benjamin  A. 
Reynolds,  Public  Administrator. 


Jack  knife,  key,  memorandum  book,  two  pocket  testa- 
ments and  letters.  January  2,  1880  :  Delivered  to  Win. 
Peterson,  brother  of  deceased. 

lighty  cents;  note  dated  April  29,  1876,  for  $30;  fifty  shares 
Gold  Mountain  Gold  Mining  Co.;  note  dated  San 
Francisco,  January  3,  1865,  for  $105;  ten  shares  Ball 
Gold  and  Silver  Mining  Co.,  pawn  ticket  No  831;  bank 
.  book  No.  3,536,  National  Gold  Bank  and  Trust  Co.,  in 
name  of  J.  G.  Powell,  showing  credit  of  $16,297  05  (?); 
"Eureka"  revolver,  trunk  containing  clothing,  papers 
and  personal  effects.  April  30,  1830  :  Delivered  to 
Treasurer  Shaber. 

Two  cents,  two  gold  sleeve  buttons,  two  pearl  studs,  pock- 
et knife,  seven  keys,  pair  eye  glasses,  cigar  holder, 
pawn  ticket,  "Ballard"  derringer  and  papers.  January 
6,  1S80 :  Delivered  to  Benjamin  A.  Reynolds,  Public 
Administrator. 

Two  dollars  and  fifty  cents  (gold  coin),  $3  (silver  coin),  five 
franc  silver  coin,  two  car  tickets,  pair  eye  glasses,  door 
key,  papers,  cane,  umbrella,  hat  and  coat.  Found  in 
room  at  No.  624  Commercial  street  :  four  ceines,  one 
sabre,  statuette  and  papers.  February  16,  1880  :  Five 
canes,  umbrella,  hat,  coat,  sabre,  statuette,  scrap  books 
and  papers  delivered  to  Society  of  California  Pioneers, 
as  authorized  by  Resolution  No.  14,465  Board  of  Su- 
pervisors. February  28,  1880:  Balance  delivered  to 
Treasurer  Shaber. 


Five  dollars  (gold  coin),  fifty  cents,  copper  coin,  pocket 
book,  five  keys  and  whistle.  January  13,  1880,  deliv- 
ered to  Matilda  Jacqueliu,  wife  of  deceased 

Thirty-five  cents.  January  17,  1880,  delivered  to  Treas- 
urer Shaber. 


One  dollar  and  fifty  cents  (silver  coin),  pocket  knife.  Jan- 
uary 15,  1880,  delivered  to  Annette  L.  Pierce,  wife  of 
deceased. 


"Colt's"  Navy  revolver.    January 
Joseph  Fagan,  its  owner. 


2,  1880,  delivered  to 


Two  dollars  and  fifty  cents  (silver  coin),  silver  watch 
watch  chain,  papers,  pocket  knife  and  steel  chain 
January  21,  1880,  delivered  to  Benjamin  A.  Reynolds 
Public  Administrator. 

Seven  dollars  and  seventy-five  cents  (silver  coin),  certlfi- 


382 


CORONER  S   REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     10— CONTINUED 


DATE. 

DECEASED. 

DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 

1880-  Jan.  22.. 
Jan  23 

J.  Fitzgerald  (Continued). 
John  Drinkwater.  

cate  of  deposit  No.  8,206,  San  Francisco  Savings  Union, 
dated  July  1,  1874,  for  .^24  64.     February  11,  1880,  de- 
livered to  William  H.  Porter,  Special  Administrator. 

Ninety  cents,   four  five-cent  nickels,   silver  watch,   iron 

Jan.  24.. 

Jan  28 

Daniel  Desmond  
Henry  Hay 

watch    chain,   three    car  tickets,   two    memorandum 
books,  papers,  Smith  &  Wesson  revolver,   store  and 
contents,  No.  7  Berry  street.    January  23,  1880,  deliv- 
ered to  B.  A.  Reynolds,  Public  Administrator. 

Eighty-five  cents,  United  States  Navy  discharge  papers  in 
name  of  Thomas  J.  Jackson.     February  28,  1880,  de- 
livered to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Five  cents,  two  copper  coins,  five  keys,  two  pairs  specta- 

Jan 29 

cles,   pocket  knife,   meerschaum  pipe,  memorandum 
book  and  papers,  portemonnaie  and  pair  half-dollar 
sleeve  buttons.    January  31,  1880,  delivered  to  R.  R. 
Hay,  son  of  deceased. 

Eighty  cents,  jack  knife.     February  28,  1880,  delivered  to 

Jan  30 

Edward  Walsh 

Treasurer  Shaber. 
Eighty-five    cents,   release  of    mortgage,   dated  April  8, 

Jan  30 

George  Millicich 

1878.      February  5,   1880,   money    delivered   to    John 
Walsh,   son  of  deceased.     March  1,  1880,   release  of 
mortgage  delivered  to  Irving  Sturtevant,  its  owner. 

Seven  dollars  and  twenty  cents  (silver  coin),  two  pocket 

Jan.  30.. 

Jan.  31.. 
Feb.  1.. 

Feb.  5.. 
Feb.  5.. 

Feb.  5.. 

J.  L.  v.  d.  Buseche  

H.  A.  Woodman  
Wong  Duck  Check  

Louis  A.  Win/.ig  
Wong  Toy  Him  

Wong  Toy  Tip  

knives,  one  door  key.     February  12,  1880,  delivered  to 
Hannah  Millicich,  wife  of  deceased. 

Sixty  cents,  portemonnaie,  pocket  knife,  spectacles  and 
papers.    January  30,  1880,  delivered  to  P.  von  Loes- 
secke  for  brother  of  deceased. 

Pair  spectacles,  rule,  whistle,  sleeve  buttons  and  papers. 
February  28,  1880,  delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Xine  dollars  and  Thirty-five  cents  (silver  coin).  82  50  (gold 
coin),  silver  watch  w4th  Chinese  silver  chain,  gold  spe- 
cimen and  two  keys  attached,  papers,  pocket  knife, 
blue  cloth  coat,   fur-lined  coat,    sleeveless  coat  and 
white  shirt.     February  4,  1880,   clothing  retained  in 
office  as  evidence,  balance  delivered  to  Loy  Ho,  wife 
of  deceased. 

Pair  of  cuff  buttons,  two  studs  and  letters.    February  28, 
1880,  delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Five  account  books,  '  '  Colt's  "  revolver  and  one  chest  con- 
taining clothing.    February  8,  1880,  delivered  to  Wong 
Ah  On,  brother  of  deceased. 

Nine  account  books,  memorandum  book  and  papers,  .$1  20 
(silver  coin),  ten  sen  Japanese  coin,  five  cent  nickel, 
two  chests  containing  clothing,  pocket  knife  and  key. 
February  8.  1880,  delivered  to  Wong  Yun  Foy,  uncle 
of  deceased. 

PROPERTY  OF  DECEASED  PERSONS. 


383 


TABLE     No.     10— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 

DECEASED. 

DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 

1880-Feb.  11.. 

Eenry  Hartman  

Ten  cents,  jack  knife  and  papers.  February  28,  1880,  de- 
livered to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Feb.  15.. 

Martin  A.  Heavey  

Five  cents  (nickel),  two  keys,  whistle  and  pocket  knife 
February  28,  1880,  delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Feb.  15.. 

John  Wilson  

Two  dollars  and  twenty-five  cents  (silver  coin),  silver 
watch,  silver  chain,  police  whistle,  pocket  knife,  memo- 
randum book  and  papers.  April  30,  1880:  Delivered 
to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Feb.  19.. 

Patrick  J.Ralph  

Twenty-five  cents,  pipe,  door  key,  match  box  and  pocket 
knife. 

Feb.  19.. 

JohnF.C.  Martin  

Two  hundred  dollars  (gold  coin),  $1  60  (silver  coin),  oroide 
watch    chain,    oroide    neck    chain,   ring,    scarf     pin 
thimble,  two  ear  rings,  pair  gold  spectacles  with  case, 
bank  book  No.  15,  185,  German  Savings  and  Loan  Soci- 
ety,  in  name  of  Fred  Martin,   showing  a  credit  of 
34,000;,  bank  book  No.  5,093,  Savings  and  Loan  Soci- 
ety in  name  of    Fred  Martin,  showing  a  credit  of 
1*5,99373;  two  valises  containing  tools,  etc.  ;  one  trunk 
containing  tools,  clothing  and  personal  effects,  4  keys  : 
box  of  molds,  letters  and  papers.     February  19,  1880, 
Delivered  to  B.  A.  Reynolds,  Public  Administrator. 

Feb.  25.. 

Joseph  P.   Dunlevy  

Twenty-five  dollars  (gold  coin).  March  12.  1880  :  Delivered 
to  Lockhart  &  Porter  on  account  of  funeral  expenses, 
as  authorized  by  Resolution  No.  14,535,  Board  of  Su- 
pervisors. 

Feb.  25.. 

John  McDevitt  

Twenty  cents.  February  25,  1880:  Delivered  to  Philip 
McDevitt,  brother  of  deceased. 

March    7 

Joseph  Chambers  

One  dollar  and  twenty-rive  cents  (coin),  one  key  and  mem- 
orandum book.  April  30,  1880:  Delivered  to  Treas- 
urer Shaber. 

March  10 

G.  H.  South  

"  Deringer  Phila"  revolver.  April  30,  1880  :  Delivered  to 
Treasurer  Shaber. 

March  11 
March  14 

March  15 

Joseph  Malcolm  
A.  C.  Macmeaken  

One  ring,  pair  cuff  buttons,  one  collar  button  and  three 
studs.  April  30,  1880  :  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

One  dollar  and  seventy  cents  (silver  coin),  silver  watch 
silver  chain,  pocket  knife.  March  15,  1880  :  Delivered 
to  S.  C.  Hawkins,  commander  of  the  British  ship 
"  Highflyer,"  for  the  mother  of  deceased. 

Three  dollars  (silver  coin),  pair  ivory  cuff  buttons  ei^ht 
keys,  satchel  containing  papers  and  personal  effects. 

J.  B  Lacaze  . 

March  17 

Daniel  Buckley  

Four  studs,  two  sleeve  buttons,  three  keys,  pocket  knife 
meerschaum  pipe,  pair  scissors,  raisor  and  letters' 
March  17,  1880  :  Delivered  to  Henry  Knust  for  sister 
of  deceased. 

384 


CORONERS    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     10— CONTINUED. 


DATE. 


DECEASED. 


DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 


1880— March  17  Timothy  Donoghue 


March  18  Mary  L.   Belloc. 


March  20  John  Foster. 


March  21|Lee  Sing 


March  28'Johan    G.    Adolph    alias 
Charles  Hartman 


March  28  Louise  M.  Sanford 


March  30  Jerusha  S.  Lake. 


April  4.. 
April  9.. 

April   9.. 
April  9.. 

April  12. . 


Annie  Carney. 
Edda  H.  Hoin. 


Chin  Chin 

Johaues  Andrea. 

Frank  Moore 


Thirty  cents,  three  studs,  pair  cuff  buttons,  pocket  knife, 
gold  riug,  quartz  setting.  March  25,  18SO :  Ring  de- 
livered to  Alfred  Pansho,  brother-in-law  of  deceased  ; 
balance  delivered  to  Jeiry  Donoghue,  brother  of  de- 
ceased. 


Twenty  dollars  (gold  coin),  twenty-five  cents,  silver  purse, 
gold  watch,  gold  chain  with  jiold  slide  and  tassel,  plain 
gold,  ring,  silver  hair  comb,  pair  black  bracelets,  one 
' '  Lizard  "  pin  studded  with  diamonds,  one  gold  ring 
with  sapphire  and  fourteen  diamonds,  one  silk  chem- 
ise, one  handkerchief,  two  pieces  veiling,  one  pair  kid 
gloves,  one  fur-lined  cloak,  lady's  hat,  one  initial  hand- 
kerchief and  female  wearing  apparel.  March  19, 1880  : 
plain  gold  ring  delivered  to  W.  Sea  well,  father  of  de- 
ceased. March  31,  1880  :  Balance  delivered  to  Hippo- 
lyte  Belloc,  husband  of  deceased. 

Three  dollars  and  forty-five  cents  (coin),  five  keys,  pipe, 
pocket  knife,  silver  watch,  silver  watch  chain.  March 
26,  1880 :  -  Delivered  to  Mary  Foster,  wife  of  deceased. 

Four  Chinese  coats,  two  Chinese  shirts.  Retained  in 
office  as  evidence. 


One  dollar  and  eighty  cents  (coin),  key  and  pocket  knife. 
April  30,  1880  :  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

Five  dollars  (gold  coin),  four  keys,  letters  and  papers. 
June  28,  1880 :  Delivered  to  Lockhart  &  Porter  for 
Masonic  Board  of  Relief. 


Eighty  cents,  portemonnaie,  eight  keys,  shoe  buttoner  and 
gold  spectacles.  April  3,  1880:  Delivered  to  Daniel 
W.  Lake,  son  of  deceased. 


One  brooch  and  two  car  tickets.  April  5,  1880 :  Delivered 
to  Mary  Harkins,  sister  of  deceased. 

Plain  gold  ring,  two  gold  rings,  one  stud,  one  pair  ear 
rings,  black  dress,  white  chemise  and  undershirt. 
June  29,  1880  :  Clothing  retained  in  office  ss  evidence, 
balance  delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 


Fifteen  cents.    April  30,   1880:    Delivered  to  Treasurer 
Sbaber. 


Two  dollars  and  fifty  cents  (gold  coin),  five  cents,  four 
keys,  locket  and  chain,  open  faced  watch.  April  30, 
1880 :  Delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 


One  dollar  and  fifteen  cents  (coin),  meerschaum  pipe, 
pocket  knife,  nickel  case  open  faced  watch,  five  keys. 
April  12,  1880  :  Keys  delivered  to  Special  Officer  M. 
H.  Hussey.  June  29,  1880:  Balance  delivered  to 
Treasurer  Shaber. 


PROPERTY    OF    DECEASED    PERSONS. 


385 


TABLE     No.     10 — CONTINUED. 


DATE. 

DECEASED. 

DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION*. 

880-April  23.  . 
April  24 

Charles  de  Young  

Fifteen  dollars  (gold  coin),   §12  (currency),  $2  10  (silver 
coin),  diamond  scarf  pin,   pair  topaz  sleeve  buttons' 
two  cuff  and  one  collar  button,  ivory  pencil,  pocket 
comb,  pair  scissors,  card  case,  pin  cushion,  memoran- 
dum book,  pocket  book  containing  papers,  silver  match 
safe,  pocket  knife,  button  hook,  door  key,  ten  keys, 
corkscrew,  nail  cleaner,  pair  kid  gloves,  seven  car  tick- 
ets and  two  silk  handkerchiefs,  one  knife  and  sheath, 
overcoat,   coat  and  silk  hat.     April  30,  1880:    Knife 
and  sheath,  clothing  and  hat  retained  as  evidence  in 
office,  balance  delivered  to  M.  H.  DeYoung,  brother 
of  deceased, 

April  25 

Axel  T  Hartzell 

pocket  knife,  spectacles  -and  memorandum  book.  June 
29,  1880  :    Delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

'Colt's"   house   intol       June   29     1880'    Deliver°d  to 

April  27.. 
May  10.. 

Arthur  J.  Evans  
Edward  Johnson  

Treasurer  Shaber. 

Pair  sleeve  buttons,   two  studs,  pocket  knife  and  cork- 
screw.   June  23,  1380  :    Delivered  to  Treasurer  Sha- 
ber. 

'Colt's"  (cut-off)  revolver.    June  23,  1880:    Delivered  to 

May  13. 
May  15.. 

Otis  S.  Pierce  
William  Hanrahan 

Treasurer  Shaber. 

Likenesses  in  case,  match  safe,  pooket  knife,  lance,  two 
letters,   memorandum  book,   coat  and  hat.     May  13 
and  June  17,  1830  :   Delivered  to  F.  C.  Pierce,  son  of 
deceased. 

Twelve  dollars  and  fifty  cents  (gold  coin)    65  cents  two 

May  19.. 
May  23.. 

May  23.. 
May  23. 

May  28. 
May  28. 

John  S.  Hagthrop  
Charles  F.  McCabe  

E.  J.  Jasper  
George  W.  Heuer  

William  G.  Davis  
Sigmund  Wolff 

pocket-knives.    May  17,   1880  :     Delivered  to  Annie 
Hanrahan,  wife  of  deceased. 

One  plain  gold  ring.    June  9,  1880  :    Delivered  to  M.   E. 
Langley,  sister  of  deceased. 

Ten  cents,  receipt  dated  April  28,  1880,  for  50  shares  Occi- 
dental, receipt  dated  May  3,  1880,  for  20  shares  Occi- 
dental, brass  key.    May  27,  1880  :    Delivered  to  James 
F.  McCabe,  brother  of  deceased. 

Silver  match-box,  pair  gold  eye-glasses  and  case,  2  shirt- 
studs,  4  keys,  pocket-knife  and  cigar-case.     June  11, 
1880  ;    Delivered  to  Lisette  Jasper,  wife  of  deceased. 

Piece  of  gold  chain,  2  shirt-studs  and  revolver.    June  29, 
1880:    Delivered   to  D.   Heuer,   sister-in-law   of   de- 
ceased, for  wife  of  deceased. 

Two  shirt  studs,  2  collar  buttons,  4  keys.    June  29,  1830  : 
Delivered  to  Treasurer  Shaber. 

1880:     Cane    delivered    to    Nathan    Feldheim,    by 

25 


386 


CORONERS   REPORT. 


TABLE     No.     10— CONCLUDED. 


DATE. 

DECEASED. 

DESCRIPTION  AND  DISPOSITION. 

IftSfl.    Muv   9« 

S  Wnlff  (Onnfcinned^ 

to  Samuel  Hyneman,  by  request  of  deceased 

June  6. .  John  O'Sullivan Thirty-five  cents,  pocket-knife.    June  8,  1880  :     Delivered 

to  H.  C.  O'Sullivan,  sister  of  deceased. 


June  14..  T.  J.  Griffin... 


June  H. .  Lazarus  Cohn . 


I 
June  19..  Martin  McQueeney. 


June  23. 


William  H.  Foster. , 


I 
I 
June 23..  William  Walsh 

June  29. .  Minnie  O.  Baldwin . , 


Promissory  note  at  sight,  dated.  May  3,  1880,  payable  to 
Joseph  Griffin,  for  >?95,  jack-knife,  letter.  June  23, 
1880:  Delivered  to  Win.  H.  Porter,  special  adminis- 
trator. 


Forty  cents,  two  sleeve  buttons,  watch  key,  w  histle,  en- 
knife,  4  keys,  Colt's  revolver,  3  letters  and  silk  hand- 
kerchief. June  16,  1880:  Delivered  to  A.  Cohn, 
brother  of  deceased,  for  wife  of  deceased. 


Ten  cents.     June 
her. 


1880:    Delivered  to  Treasurer     ha- 


Five  dollars  (gold  coin),  silver  watch,  silver  chain,  4  car 
tickets,  purse,  jack-knife,  3  studs,  letters  patent  No. 
188,348,  valise  containing  clothing  and  personal  effects. 
June  23,  1880  :  Delivered  to  W.  F.  Fcbter,  brother  of 
deceased. 


Pocket-knife,  pistol.     Retained  in  office  as  evidence. 


Te  i  dollars  (gold  coin),  gold  thimble,  plain  gold  ring, 
gold  rinp,  3  keys,  trunk  containing  clothing  and  per- 
sonal effects.  On  hand  in  office. 


Jewelry,  stocks,  clothing,  etc.,  value  unknown. 

Totid  amount  of  money *  10,339  35. 


EXPENSES . 


387 


TABLE     No.    11. 

EXPENSES   INCURRED   IN   THE   PROSECUTION  OF  THE   DUTIES   OF    THE     OFFICE 
FOR    THE    FISCAL   YEAR   ENDING   JUNE  30TH,    1880. 


KXPKNSES. 

AMOUNT. 

Chemical  analyses  —  2  casj$  

£100  00 

Rewards  for  bodies  recovered  from  the  Bay  of  San  Francisco  —  51  cases  

510  00 

Total       

$610  CO 

Very  respectfully, 

L.  L.  DORK,  M.  D., 

Coroner. 


PUBLIC  ADMII(ISTf[AT(IS  pOI|T. 


OFFICE  OF  THE  Ex-PuBLic  ADMINISTRATOR,  ) 

San  Francisco,  October  6,  1880.  f 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN— In  accordance  with  a  resolution  of  your  Board  I 
herewith  submit  to  your  Honorable  Body  a  report  of  the  estates 
which  came  into  my  hands  as  Public  Administrator  during  the 
six  months  commencing  on  the  first  day  of  July,  1879,  and  end- 
ing on  the  1st  day  of  December,  1879. 

WM.   DOOLAN, 
Ex-Public  Administrator. 


Estate  of  Levi  Stowell. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  July  11,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $150  00 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  150  00 


Estate  of  Julie  Bonissant. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  July  11,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate . 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  848  40 


Due  Administrator 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Due  Administrator $20  61 


ESTATES    ADMINISTERED    UPON.  389 

Estate  of  Jane  McAlease. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  July  14,  1879. 

Total  estate  delivered  over  to  the  Public  Administrator  of  Amador  County, 
the  Administrator  of  said  estate. 


Estate  of  C.  P.  A.  De  Lannie. 

Letters  of  Administration,  with  will  annexed,  is- 
sued July  21,  1879 

Estate  settled  and  closed. 


Estate  of  John  Wade. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  July  30,  1879. 
Estate  settled  and  closed. 


Estate  of  D.  Stefano. 

'    Letters  of  Administration  issued  July  30,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $380  00 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  380  00 


Estate  of  Peter  Conden. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  July  30,  1879. 
Estate  settled  and  closed. 


Estate  of  Gum  Chun. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued   August   5,    1879 

(Special). 
No  property  received  by  the  Special  Administrator. 


Estate  of  H.  Archimaiidritoff. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued. 

Total  value  of  estate $410 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  177  50 


Kesidue  of  estate . . $233  10 


390  PUB LIC  ADMINISTRATOR'S  REPORT. 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Heal  estate $100  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 133  10 

Balance  as  above  stated. .  $233  10 


Estate  of  Win.  Barklage. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Sept.  20,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $449  00 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  439  00 


Residue  of  estate $10  00 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  hand..  $10  00 


Balance  as  above  stated.  .  $10  00 


Estate  of  Barbara  W.  Smith. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Sept.  11,  1879. 
No   property   has   been  received  by  the  Administra- 
tor. 


Estate  of  G.  Pyritz. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Sept.  11,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $1,361  01 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  815  91 


Residue  of  estate " $545  10 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  in  Treasury ,. $1,000  00 

Balance  as  above  stated.  .  . .  .  '    $545  10 


Estate  of  Henrich  Schnirring. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Sept.  18,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $685  40 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  496  25 


Residue  of  estate  . .  $189  15 


ESTATES    ADMINISTERED    UPON.  391 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  band..  $189  15 


Balance  as  above  stated $189  15 


Estate  of  Tbeodore  Hartwig. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Sept.  20,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $1 ,012  82 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  370  00 


Residue  of  estate $642  82 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  band  .  .  $642  82 


Balance  as  above  stated  .  .  $642  82 


Estate  of  Joseph  Williams. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Sept.  20,  1879. 
Estate  settled  and  closed. 


Estate  of  Harriet  Skiilman,  alias  etc. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Oct.  10,  1879. 
Estate  delivered  over   to   Ptter   Skiilman  by  decree 
of  Superior  Court,  Department  6. 


Estate  of  Dolores  Canto. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Oct.  24,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate ..  . .  $157  07 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  157  07 


392  PUBLIC  ADMINISTRATOR'S  REPORT. 

Estate  of  John  Lachinund. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Oft.  24,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $333  45 

Debts,  claims  aud  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  333  45 


Estate  of  Mary  Ann  Greenwood. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued. 
No  property  has  been  received  by  the  Administrator 
of  said  estate. 


Estate  of  James  Kennedy. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Nov.  19,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $1,486  00 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  897  44 


Eesidne  of  estate 588  56 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  hand $588  56 

Balance  as  above  stated.  .  588  56 


Estate  of  Frances  M.  Hart. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued. 

Total  value  of  estate $1,100  62 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  1,106  62 


Estate  of  Gustav  Damlow. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Nov.  19,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $555  50 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  287  25 

Residue  of  estate $268  25 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  hand .',      $268  25 

Balance  as  above  stated   .  $268  25 


ESTATES    ADMINISTERED    UPON.  393 

Estate  of  John  Simons. 

Letters- of  Administration  issued  Nov.  19,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $200  00 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  144  75 


Residue  of  estate $56  25 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Property  on  hand,  exclusive  of  money $56  25 


Balance  as  above  stated $56  25 


Estate  of  F.  Schumann. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Nov.  24,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $140  00 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  88  00 


Residue  of  estate   $52  00 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Balance  as  above  stated $52  00 


Estate  of  E.  J.  Murry,  alias  etc. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  Nov.  29,  1879. 
No  property  has  been  roceived  by  the  Administrator 
of  the  estate. 


394 


PUBLIC    ADMINISTRATIONS    REPORT. 


The   following  estates  have   been  closed  or  settled  by  me  since  iny  last 
xeport: 


KSTATE  OK 

ESTATE  OK 

KSTATB  OK 

A.  C.  Hoennann. 

Ann  Buckley. 

James  R.  Hamilton. 

J.  D.  Demarest. 

J.  R.  Hamilton. 

Mary  Riley. 

J.  Bordelongue. 

Michael  Shannon. 

Lars  Hansen. 

Anna  Beales. 

John  Maurcr. 

Andrew  Jansen. 

Peter  von  Laere. 

J.  Rochonat. 

Anna  P.  Leube. 

•George  Brand. 

M.  Kelleher. 

Henry  Bryant. 

Peter  Z.  Peterson. 

George  W.  Oakes. 

Catherine  O'Rourke. 

Thomas  Nelson. 

Henry  Nash. 

Margaret  Austin. 

Ellen  Gee. 

Peter  McManus. 

Thomas  Olsen. 

L.  G.  Magnusson. 

Marie  Geise. 

Wilhelm  Bohlen. 

Sever!  n  Rosenberg. 

Bernard  Harkin. 

Levi  T.  Keithly. 

W.  G.  Best. 

Thomas  Murray. 

Thomas  Shephard. 

John  P.  Richardson. 

Yee  Chuck  Wo. 

John  Hill. 

Ellen  Patterson. 

Thomas  Castlebon. 

Daniel  Connor. 

J.  A.  Rochett. 

Margaret  Giles. 

F.  Hartmann. 

•Carl  Wagner. 

John  Merle. 

T.  M.  Rodgers. 

Annie  Gallagher. 

James  G.  Jones. 

Charles  Benjamin. 

J.  B.  White. 

Hong  \Yo. 

Jane  McAiease. 

Ricardo  Garcia. 

Peter  Conden. 

PUBLIC  ADMINISTRATORS  REPOI[1 


OFFICE  OF  THE  PUBLIC  ADMINISTRATOR,  ) 
San  Francisco,  July  1,   1880.      f 


To  the  Honorable  the  Hoard  of  ti 

Of  the-  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN  —  In  accordance  with  Resolution  No.  14,705  (New 
Series)  I  herewith  submit  to  your  honorable  body  a  report  of  the 
estates  which  have  come  to  my  hands  as  Public  Administrator 
for  the  six  months  commencing  on  the  1st  day  of  December, 
1879,  and  ending  on  the  BOfch  day  of  June,  1880. 

BENJ.  A.  REYNOLDS, 

Public  Administrator. 


Estate  of  Heinrich  W.  Meyer,  deceased.  0 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  December  20,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $664=  98 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  196  75 


Residue  of  estate $468  23 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $468  23 


Balance  as  above  stated $468  23 


396  PURLIC  ADMINISTRATOR'S  REPORT 

Estate  of  Bridget  Gardner,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  December  24,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $1,456  55 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  291  25 


Residue  of  estate .         $1, 165  30 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  with  City  and  County  Treasurer..   $1,100  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 52  45 

Property  of  estate  exclusive  of  money,  in  charge 

of  Administrator. .  12  85 


Balance  as  above  stated $1,165  30 


Estate  of  Maud  A.  Costin,  etc.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  7,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $558  65 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  132  00 


Residue  of  estate $426  65 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  with  City  and  County  Treasurer. .       $344  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 1887 

Property  of  estate,  exclusive  of  money,  in  charge 

of  Administrator . .  63  78 


Balance  as  above  stated $426  65 


Estate  of  John  B.  Butler,  deceased. 

Letters«of  Administration  issued  February  7,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $3,342  65 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  438  45 


Residue  of  estate $2,904  20 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  with  City  and  County  Treasurer..   $1,515  05 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 139  25 

Property  of  estate,  exclusive  of  money,  in  charge 
of  Administrator . .  ...      1,249  90 


Balance  as  above  stated . .  $2,904  20 


ESTATES    ADMINISTERED    UPON.  397 

Estate  of  John  Drinkwater,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  16,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $171  10 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  157  75 

Residue  of  estate. $13  35 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $8  35 

Property  of   estate,  exclusive  of  money,  in  charge 

of  Administrator 5  00 


Balance  as  above  stated $13  35 


Estate  of  A.  G.  Crowell,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  December  16,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $1,041  25 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  231  75 


Eesidue  of  estate $809  50 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  with  City  and  County  Treasurer. .       $707  75 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 41  50 

Property  of  estate,  exclusive  of  money,  in  charge 
of  Administrator. .. .  60  25 


Balance  as  above  stated $809  50 


Estate  of  H.  D.  Logeman,  etc.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  December  16,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $1,090  60 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  287  75 


Eesidue  of  estate $802  85 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  deposit  with  City  and  County  Treasurer. .      $710  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 42  85 

Property  of  estate,  exclusive  of   money,  in  charge 

of  Administrator 50  00 


Balance  as  above  stated $602  85 


398  PUBLIC  ADMINISTRATOR'S  REPORT. 

Estate  of  John  Walsh,  etc.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  December  16,  1879. 

Total  value  of  estate $4,429  85 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  233  50 


Residue  of  estate $4,196  35 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  with  City  and  County  Treasurer. .    $4,130  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 66  35 


Balance  as  above  stated $4,196  35 


Estate  of  Patrick  Bradley,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  7,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $1,394  75 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  415  50 


Residue  of  estate $979  25 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury.  .  .  .       $933  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator.  .  46  25 


Balance  as  above  stated $979  25 


Estate  of  Marie  O.  Lehleyder,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  10,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $136  88 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  128  25 

Residue  of  estate $8  63 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $8  63 

Balance  as  above  stated $8  63 


Estate  of  Jacques  Labourdette,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  7,  1880. 

Total  value  ol  estate $591  53 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  138  85 


Residue  of  estate $i52  68 


ESTATES    ADMINISTERED    UPON.  399 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $365  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 65  68 

Property,  exclusive  of  money,  in  charge    of  Ad- 
ministrator . .  22  00 


Balance  as  above  stated  . .  $452  68 


Estate  of  Charles  H.  Sauvelet,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  10,  1886. 

Total  value  of  estate $52  12 

Debts,  claim -s  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  12  20 

Residue  of  estate $39  92, 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $19  92 

Property,  exclusive  of  money,    in   charge   of  Ad- 
ministrator. .  20  00 


Balance  as  above  stated $39  92 


Estate  of  Balmigere  Urbain,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  16,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $400  00 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  115  25 


Residue  of  estate $284  75 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $247  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator.  .  ;>7  75 


Balance  as  above  stated $284  75 


Estate  of  Thomas  Elligott,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  14,  188  J. 

Total  value  of  estate $10,172  10 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  436  75 


Residue  of  estate $9,705  35 


400  PUBLIC  ADMINISTRATOR'S  REPORT. 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $4,182  25 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 213  10 

Property,    exclusive  of  money,  in   charge  of  Ad- 
ministrator    5,310  00 


Balance  as  above  stated $9,705  35 


Estate  of  Jacob  Schlossman,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  7,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $821  55 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  152  75 


Residue  of  estate $668  80 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

€ash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury. . . ,       $506  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 62  80 

Property,  exclusive  of   money,    in  charge  of  Ad- 
ministrator. .  100  00 


Balance  as  above  stated $668  80 


Estate  of  Eliza  F.  Shar,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  February  9,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $9,827  80 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  441  74 


Residue  of  estate $9,386  06 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $13  56 

Property,  exclusive  of  money,  in   charge   of    Ad- 
ministrator       9,372  50 


Balance  as  above  stated $9,386  06 


Estate  of  Edward  Zeipel,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  March  1,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $228  05 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  38  75 

Kesidue  of  estate..  $189  30 


ESTATES   ADMINISTERED    UPON.  401 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $150  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 39  30 

Balance  as  above  stated . .  $189  30 


Estate  of  Mary  A.  Buckley,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  March  1,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $293  85 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  162  75 


Kesidue  of  estate $131  10 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $100  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator . .  31  10 


Balance  as  above  stated '     $131  10 


Estate  of  Fred.  Martin,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  March  6,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $10,039  65 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  385  50 


Kesidue  of  estate $9,654  15 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $9,233  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 375  23 

Property,     exclusive  of    money,    in    charge     of 

Administrator  , .  45  92 


Balance  as  above  stated $9,651  15 


Estate  of  Herman  Bust,  etc.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  March  10,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $435  75 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  oy  Administrator ]  7  75 


Balance  in  favor  of  estate $418  00 

26 


402  PUBLIC     ADMINISTRATORS    REPORT. 


The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury ....       $385  75 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 32  25 


Balance  as  above  stated $418  00 


Estate  of  Pierre  Chaix,  deceased . 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  March  10,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $93  42 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 37  25 


Balance  in  favor  of  estate $56  17 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $23  92 

Property,  exclusive  of  money,  in   charge  of  Ad- 
ministrator . .  32  25 


Balance  as  above  stated $56  17 


Estate  of  Elizabeth  Ballhaus,  etc. ,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  March  6,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $352  20 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 44  75 


Balance  in  favor  of  estate $307  45 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $260  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator . .  47  45 


Balance  as  above  stated $307  45 


Estate  of  Johan  August  Bergstedt,  etc.,  deceased. 
Letters  of  Administration  issued  March  20,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $201  20 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  37  75 


Balance  in  favor  of  estate $163  45 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $100  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 63  45 


Balance  as  above  stated $163  45 


ESTATES    ADMINISTERED    UPON.  403 

Estate  of  Joaniia  Miller,  etc.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  March  20,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $428  95 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  202  75 

Balance  in  favor  ef  estate $226  20 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $165  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 61  20 

Balance  as  above  stated . .  $226  20 


Estate  of  Clark  P.  Burdick,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  April  6,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $342  50 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  194  50 


Balance  in  favor  of  estate $148  00 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $148  00 

Balance  as  above  stated $148  00 


Estate  of  Mary  Mullen,  etc.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  April  6,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $3,188  75 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 134  08 


Kesidue  of  estate $3,054  67 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $54  67 

Property,  exclusive  of   money,  in  charge   of  Ad- 
ministrator        3,000  00 

Balance  as  above  stated $3,054  67 


Estate  of  Martin  Safenberg,  etc.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  April  17,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $296  00 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 57  25 


Kesidue  of  estate $238  75 


404  PUBLIC     ADMINISTRATOR'S    REPORT. 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $172  75 

Property,     exclusive    of    money,    in    charge     of 

Administrator 66  00 


Balance  as  above  stated $238  75 


Estate  of  Caroline  Helfrich,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  April  23,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate    $209  30 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  167  75 

Residue  of  estate $4.1  55 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $41  55 


Balance  as  above  stated $41  55 


Estate  of  Patrick  Sullivan,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  April  23,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $2,254  90 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 7675 


Residue  of  estate $2,178  15 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $2,000  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 178  15 

Balance  as  above  stated $2,178  15 


Estate  of  Jean  Poudepe,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  April  29,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $2,197  30 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 52  00 

Residue  of  estate $2,145  30 

The  piesent  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury ....       $442  07 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 198  00 

Property,    exclusive     of     money,    in     charge    of 

Administrator 1,505  23 


Balance  as  above  stated $2, 145  30 


ESTATES  ADMINISTEKED  UPON.         405 

Estate  of  Jacques  Casteut,  etc.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  April  29,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $1,749  75 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 40  75 


Eesidue  of  estate $1,709  00 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury  ....       $319  57 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 209  25 

Property,    exclusive     of     money,    in    charge     of 
Administrator..  1,18018 


Balance  as  above  stated $1,709  00 


Estate  of  Simon  Mayer,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  April  29,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $5,491  86 

Debts,  claims  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator  468  85 


Kesidue  of  estate $5,023  01 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $573  51 

Property,    exclusive    of     money,    in     charge     of 

Administrator 4,449  50 


Balance  as  above  stated $5,023  01 


Estate  of  Severin  Porte  Pique,  etc.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  May  11,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $326  75 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 54  50 


Residue  of  estate $272  25 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $200  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 72  15 

Property,    exclusive     of    money,    in    charge     of 

Administrator . .  10 


Balance  as  above  stated $272  25 


406  PUBLIC    ADMINISTRATOR'S    REPORT. 

Estate  of  Philip  Mahler,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  May  14,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $964  50 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 70  25 


Residue  of  estate $894  25 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows; 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator   $105  20 

Property,   exclusive   of   money,     in     charge      of 

Administrator  . .  789  05 


Balance  as  above  stated $894  25 


Estate  of  George  Taylor,  Jr.,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  May  17,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $617  85 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 39  00 


Residue  of  estate   $578  85 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $542  85 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator . .  36  00 


Balance  as  above  stated $578  85 


Estate  of  Frederick  Lohaus,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  May  17,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $2,339  19 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 76  85 

Residue  of  estate $2,262  34 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  .as  follows : 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator. $70  84 

Property,    exclusive     of     money,    in    charge     of 

Administrator 2,191  50 


Balance  as  above  stated   $2,262  34 


Estate  of  Peter  August  Broersen,  etc.,  deceased. 
Letters  of  Administration  issued  June  7,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $1,599  55 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 115  00 

Residue  of  estate $1,484  55 


ESTATES    ADMINISTERED     UPON.  407 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows: 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $1,250  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 234  55 

Balance  as  above  stated $1,484  55 


Estate  of  John  Barren,  deceased. 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  April  12,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $4,388  85 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 202  00 


Residue  of  estate $4,186  85 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  on  deposit  in  City  and  County  Treasury $3,900  00 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator 286  85 

Balance  as  above  stated $4,186  85 


Estate  of  Mary  E.  Miller,  deceased, 

Letters  of  Administration  issued  May  14,  1880. 

Total  value  of  estate $107  69 

Debts  and  expenses  paid  by  Administrator 13  69 

Residue  of  estate $94  00 

The  present  condition  of  said  estate  is  as  follows : 

Cash  in  hands  of  Administrator $94  00 

Balance  as  above  stated $94  00 


Letters  of  Administration  have  been  granted  in  the  following  estates,   but 
no  property  has  been  received  by  the  Administrator : 

William  Thompson Letters  issued  Dec.  20,  1879 

Patrick  Deering Letters  issued  Dec.  24,  1879 

Carl  Beushlein Letters  issued  Feb.  10,  1880 

Oscar  Carlsen Letters  issued  April  17,  1880 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  SUpfOI[S 


OFFICE  OF  THE  CITY  AND  COUNTY  SURVEYOR,          ) 
San  Fraucisco,  July  12,  1880.  j 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN  :  I  herewith  submit  the  following  report  of  surveys 
made  and  certificates  issued  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30, 
1880. 

Surveys  made 403 

Certificates  issued 299 

Very  Respectfully, 

A.  A.  LINDSLEY, 

City  and  County  Surveyor. 


COUltTY  RECORDER'S  REPORT. 


HALL  OF  RECORDS, 

San  Francisco,  July  1,  1880. 

To  the  Hon.  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — In  compliance  with  resolution  14,765  (New  Series) 
I  have  the  honor  herewith  to  submit  the  annual  report  of  the 
transactions  of  this  office  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30, 1880. 

Very  respectfully, 

W.  K.  DIETRICH, 

County  Recorder. 


RECEIPTS. 

Fees  collected  and  paid  into  the  City  Treasury $34,783  75 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salary  of  Recorder $4,000  00 

Salary  of  Deputies 6,600  00 

Salary  of  Porter 900  00 

Amount  paid  clerks  for  copying  165,631  folios  at  12 

cents  per  folio 19,875  72 

Books  of  Record,  newspapers  and  stationery 1,952  10 

33,327  82 


Surplus $1,455  93 


410 


COUNTY    RECORDER'S    REPORT. 


LIST  OF  INSTRUMENTS  RECORDED 


> 

I 

M 

£ 

0 

o 

o 

M 

ft 

H 

c 

El 

g 

s 

wf* 

OQ 

3 

3 

«- 

p 

? 

B 

2 

8| 

Cfc 

So" 

n 

s 

SI 

f 

IV 

i 

1 

S" 

Sir 

F 

i 

3  | 

03 

1 

S' 

2. 
1 

If 

3 

Cfi 

P 

PO 

2. 

£ 

s*- 

3 

a 

r>. 

a 

°§ 

§•§ 

1 

0 

? 

1 

HJ 

^  1 

s 

a 

3 

3? 

O 
o 

MONTH. 

§  j? 

o 

i 

3 

00 

I 

i 

If 

& 

1 

3 

0 

g 

F 

P- 

'•     3 

i" 

i 

1" 

1 

1 

:  g- 

0 

3 

S 

0 

'    o. 

05 

g 

3 

« 

;     CC 

I 

sf 

:  7 

1879—  July  

31 

10 

23 

3 

2 

1 

16 

273 

29 

29 

2 

23 

i 

0 

August  

23 

11 

0 

11 

5 

0 

17 

279 

39 

26 

9 

40 

0 

1 

September  . 

28 

12 

0 

0 

7 

0 

10 

260 

25 

15 

8 

29 

0 

0 

October  

22 

8 

0 

50 

9 

1 

15 

295 

31 

19 

6 

27 

1 

0 

November  .  . 

21 

6 

0 

8 

8 

0 

15 

275 

22 

17 

5 

38 

0 

0 

December  .  . 

13 

20 

0 

7 

7 

0 

18 

320 

22 

31 

9 

34 

0 

0 

1880—  January  

20 

21 

31 

7 

4 

0 

15 

326 

25 

18 

14 

11 

2 

0 

February  .  .  . 

17 

9 

0 

3 

7 

0 

19 

286 

32 

12 

17 

18 

1 

0 

March  

21 

12 

0 

5 

7 

0 

12 

356 

32 

20 

6 

23 

1 

0 

April  

24 

13 

0 

8 

6 

1 

10 

331 

36 

26 

3 

33 

0 

0 

May  

25 

35 

0 

15 

10 

0 

28 

357 

39 

18 

43 

37 

2 

0 

June  

20 

10 

0 

3 

10 

o 

12 

319 

30 

14 

11 

19 

0 

0 

TOTALS 

265 

167 

54 

120 

82 

3 

187 

3,677 

362 

245 

133 

332 

8 

1 

DOCUMENTS    RECORDED. 


411 


DUKING     THE     FISCAL    YEAK. 


Marriage 

I 
1 

1 

a! 

l| 

|  Reconve. 

a 

1 

Releases 
Margin 

3 

Sheriff's 
signme 

GO 

ll 

r  o 

1 

Tax  Cert 

t 

iTranscri] 
Satisfa 

TOTALS  . 

5 

02 

a 

£ 

j! 

i 

ion  Certil 

C< 

B 

JT) 
1 

t£ 

•  5> 

3 
et- 

1 

i 

1 

its  of  Jud 
etions  .  .  . 

2 

0 

%•? 

I 

Sci" 

a 

:  £ 

3 

:  3 

S. 

S  j? 

i 

•  og 

^ 

•  P 

& 

•  £P 

1 

.  '  O"1 

LI 

? 

[| 

3 

:  ff 

203 
160 

39 
36 

147 
141 

9 
11 

12 
9 

42 
46 

18 
17 

111 

134 

3 
1 

21 
12 

23 
25 

i 
i 

1 

6 

1 
0 

7 
12 

1,081 
1,072 

131 

31 

141 

5 

19 

35 

9 

120 

1 

16 

24 

3 

3,391 

1 

8 

4,329 

125 

27 

182 

4 

14 

48 

30 

145 

2 

22 

28 

3 

321 

0 

7 

1,442 

192 

27 

178 

4 

19 

44 

31 

122 

1 

16 

40 

1 

38 

5 

7 

1,140 

183 

59 

236 

14 

21 

37 

26 

149 

2 

21 

34 

3 

2 

2 

2 

1,272 

157 

32 

198 

14 

9 

51 

23 

161 

2 

31 

47 

0 

11 

3 

10 

1,245 

121 

22 

146 

5 

7 

48 

VI 

208 

1 

52 

37 

3 

9 

1 

7 

1,119 

175 

77 

212 

10 

13 

54 

113 

245 

2 

21 

18 

3 

331 

1 

1 

1,771 

123 

28 

124 

4 

11 

49 

12 

185 

0 

14 

11 

0 

2 

0 

6 

1,060 

132 

34 

219 

3 

20 

33 

9 

140 

2 

29 

8 

5 

5 

0 

9 

1,25T 

118 

25 

167 

7 

26 

25 

12 

117 

0 

18 

12 

3 

3 

3 

8 

992 

1,820 

437 

2,091 

90 

180 

512 

331 

1,837 

17 

273 

307 

26 

4,120 

17 

84 

17,778 

412        COUNTY  RECORDER'S  REPORT. 


LIST   OF  PRINCIPAL  BOOKS   OF   RECORD. 

Deeds,  A  to  N,  and  1  to  987 ' 1,001 

Mortgages,  A  to  F,  and  1  to  626 632 

Homesteads   

Marriage  contracts 

Marriage  Licenses 

Powers  of  Attorney , 

Releases  of  Mortgages 

Covenants 

Lis  Pendens 

Sheriff's  Certificates 

Attachments,  A,  B,  C,  D,  and  1  to  24 

Liens 

Leases 

Separate  Property  of  Wife   

Miscellaneous,  1,  2,  BB,  A  to  Z,  and  1  to  33 

Transcripts  of  Judgments 

Chattel  Mortgages 

Mortgages  of  Personal  Property 

Tax  Deeds 

Sole  Traders 

Bonds 

Deeds  of  Trust 

Births,  Deaths  and  Divorces 

Certified  Grants 

Original  Grants  and  Spanish  Records 

Limited  Partnerships , 

Wills 

Assignment  of  Mortgages 

General  Indices 

Indices  of  Deeds ,. . .    

Indices  of  Mortgages 

Outside  Land  Books 

Street  Contract  Records 

Description  Tax  Sales : .x 

Banking  Capita] 

Banking  Assets  and  Liabilities 

Block  Books 

Map  Books,  1,  2,  and  A,  B,  C,  D,  E,  F 

Index  Book  of  Maps 

Total  Number  of  Volumes .} 2,478 


HEALTH  OFFICER  REPORT. 


" 

- 

GENTLEMEN — I  have  the  honor  to  transmit  my  'report  of  the 
affairs  of  this  office,  including  mortuary  and  other  statistics,  for 
fiscal  year  terminating  June  30,  1880. 

During  the  year  there  were  4,340  deaths  against  4,493  of  the 
year  preceding,  a  decrease  of  153. 

Our  population,  ,last  year  was  estimated  (Langley's  Directory) 

The  annual  ratio  of  deaths  per  1,000  population  was  14.75. 
-  year  shows  our  population  to  be  by  actual 

count  233,700,  to  that  notwithstanding  the  decrease  in  the  num- 
ber of  deaths,  the  ratio  per  1,000  population  is  increased  from 
14.7"  ne  can  belie  IT  population  has  de- 

creased 72,000  in  12  months.     If  the  census  as  taken  by  the  U. 
jverninent  is  correct  then  our  population   has  undoubtedly 
beeL  ji  several  years.     This  over  estimating  the 

population  of  cities,  whether  intentionally  or  unintentionally, 
causes  much  embarrassment  and  lessei  .uch  the  value  of 

Tital  and  mortuary  statistics. 

our  population  at  233>700  the  annual  ratio  of  deaths 
per  1,000  is  1  Bating  the  Chinese  population  (T 

ccnfcu          _-  annual  ratio  of  deaths  per  1,000  :     -     __ 

Estimating  the  population  of  all  other  nationalities  at  211,700 
.--.-  annual  ratio  of  deaths  per  1,000  is  18.29,  thus 
showing  that  there  are  nearly  (3)  three  deaths  in  a  thousand  more 


414  HEALTH     OFFICER'S     REPORT. 

among  the  Chinese  than  other  nationalities.  Notwithstanding 
the  Chinese  population  is  composed  almost  entirely  of  adults, 
while  more  than  one-third  of  the  deaths  in  other  nationalities  are 
under  five  years  of  age. 

Considering  the  miserable  condition  of  our  sewers  and  the 
presence  in  the  very  heart  of  our  city  of  more  than  20,000  Chi 
nese  who  live  for  the  most  part  in  underground  habitations  with- 
out any  proper  ventilation,  breathing  an  atmosphere  so  contami- 
nated as  to  be  absolutely  nauseating  to  those  unaccustomed  to 
it,  we  have  much  to  be  thankful  for  in  estimating  our  ratio  of 
mortality.  Protected,  as  we  are,  by  the  presence  of  our  trade 
winds  and  the  general  salubrity  of  our  climate,  it  is  to  be  feared, 
that  only  a  repetition  of  virulent  epidemics  will  awaken  our 
people  to  the  necessity  of  removing  these  constantly  menacing 
causes  of  disease. 

I  have  over  and  over  again  urged  the  enforcement  of  the  cubic 
air  law  as  the  only  possible  means  of  correcting  the  sanitary  evils 
of  the  Chinese  quarter. 

By  constant  vigilance  many  nuisances  are  abated  and  a  great 
deal  of  money  expended  to  make  this  portion  of  the  city  even 
tolerable,  but  so  long  as  these  people  are  permitted  to  live  as  at 
present  in  over  crowded  dens,  socially,  morally  and  in  a  sanitary 
point  of  view  they  are  a  curse  to  San  Francisco .  The  daily  en- 
forcement of  the  cubic  air  law  would  compel  many  of  these 
people  to  leave  the  city  or  live  in  less  crowded  quarters. 

In  my  reports  heretofore  made  to  the  Hon .  Board  of  Super- 
visors, I  have  so  fully  discussed  the  subject  of  sewerage,  that  I 
have  nothing  further  to  recommend  and  can  only  refer  you  to 
those  reports,  hoping  that  they  may  lead  to  some  beneficial  leg- 
islation upon  the  subject. 

I  desire,  however,  to  repeat  what  I  have  said  about  the  neces- 
sity of  thorough  ventilation  of  sewers,  because  of  its  great 
sanitary  importance .  All  intelligent  sanitarians  know  that  any 
system  of  sewerage  without  thorough  ventilation  is  a  most  fruit- 
ful source  of  disease. 

The  most  inexpensive  and,  in  my  opinion,  the  most  practical 
and  effective  way  of  ventilating  sewers  is  to  have  perforated 


EEMARKS.  415 

instead  of  solid  manhole  covers,  or  what  would  be  still  better, 
open  grates. 

In  my  report  three  years  ago,  where  this  subject  is  more  fully 
discussed,  I  stated  that  the  experience  of  other  cities  demon- 
strated that  if  these  manholes  are  placed  at  proper  distances, 
admitting  a  free  circulation  of  atmospheric  air,  the  foul  and 
noxious  vapors  are  so  entirely  diluted  as  to  render  them  not  only 
inodorous  but  comparatively  harmless.  The  sewers  of  London 
are  ventilated  by  gratings  placed  at  intervals  of  100  feet,  The 
sewers  of  Paris  being  under  the  sidewalks  are  ventilated  through 
the  gutters.  The  reduction  of  the  death  rate  of  London  in  a 
few  years  from  37J  in  1000  population  to  about  23  is  probably 
more  due  to  the  thorough  ventilation  of  its  sewers  than  all 
other  causes  combined.  In  further  verification  of  these  views,  I 
desire  to  call  your  attention  to  the  construction  of  the  Geary 
street  cable  railroad. 

The  engineer  under  whose  supervision  this  road  was  con- 
structed found  it  necessary  for  purposes  of  drainage  to  connect 
the  tubes  through  which  the  cable  runs  with  the  sewer  in  the 
street,  by  cement  pipes  four  inches  in  diameter.  These  pipes  are 
placed  at  intervals  of  forty  feet,  and  so  thorough  does  the  venti- 
lation seem  to  be  that  no  complaint  has  been  made  of  any  offen- 
sive odors  from  this  sewer  since  the  construction  of  this  road. 
Speaking  from  a  sanitary  stand  point,  I  believe  Geary  street  to 
be  the  most  desirable  thoroughfare  to  live  on  in  the  city.  The 
offensive  and  mephitic  vapors  which,  under  certain  degrees  of 
pressure,  penetrate  the  dwellings  of  other  streets  of  the  city, 
here  escape  into  the  open  air  in'  a  form  so  diluted  as  to  be  both 
inodorous  and  innoxious. 

A  few  ounces  of  alcohol  given  to  a  child  a  few  months  old 
might  take  its  life,  yet  if  thrown  into  as  many  hogsheads  of 
water  and  thus  diluted,  the  same  quantity  of  this  mixture  taken 
by  the  child  would  be  entirely  harmless. 

It  has  been  estimated  that  the  manhole  covers  in  this  city 
could  be  properly  perforated  for  a  little  more  than  $3,000. 

In  proportion  to  the  good  to  be  attained  the  amount  to  be 
expended  is  certainly  very  insignificant. 


416  HEALTH     OFFICEK'S    KEPORT. 

The  valuable  tables  accompanying  this  report  attest  the  intel- 
ligence and  industry  of  the  secretaries'  who  prepared  them. 

The  accompanying  reports  of  the  Market  and  Sanitary  Inspect- 
ors are  the  best  evidence  of  the  fidelity  with  which  their  duties 
are  performed. 

Our  mortuary  report  I  believe  to  be  absolutely  correct.  I  re- 
gret to  say  that  our  registration  of  births  is  still  very  unsatisfac- 
tory, in  consequence  of  many  physicians,  through  carelessness 
or  inadvertence,  neglecting  to  make  returns  to  this  office  as 
required  by  law. 

The  record  of  marriages  furnished  by  our  County  Clerk, 
who  issues  the  licenses,  is  also  believed  to  be  absolutely  correct. 

The  report  of  the  Secretary  shows  that  the  expenses  of  this 
office  are  a  mere  fraction  of  the  amount  expended  by  our  city 
government. 

Very  Respectfully, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

J.  L.  MEAEES,  M.  D., 

Health  Officer,  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco. 
San  Francisco,  July  1,  1880. 


HEALTH  DEPARTMENT. 


MEMBERS    OF   THE    BOARD    OF    HEALTH 

HON.  I.  S.  KALLOCH, 
Mayor  and  ex-officio  President. 

WM.  A.  DOUGLASS,  M.D. 
JAMES  SIMPSON,  M  .D. 
H.    GIBBONS,  JR.,    M.D. 
JAMES  MUKPHY,  M.D. 

HEALTH     OFFICER, 

J.   L.   MEARES,    M.  D. 

QUARANTINE    OFFICER, 

WM.    M.    LAWLOE,   M.D. 

SECRETARY    OF    HEALTH    DEPARTMENT, 

JOHN  HOESCH. 

ASSISTANT    SECRETARY, 

J.   GREY  JEWELL,    M.  I). 

HEALTH    CNSPECTORS, 

J.  C.  STEDMAN,  Fm<t  District.  W.  H.  COWPER,  Fourth  District. 

ED.  DRUM,  Second  District.  H.  J.  BURNS,  Fifth  District. 

R.  E.  CHAPMAN,  Third  District.        DAN'L  McNIELL,  Sixth  District. 

MARKET  INSPECTOR, 

JACOB   WRAY. 

MESSENGER, 

WM.  G.    OLWELL. 

SUPERINTENDENT    DISINTERMENTS, 

E.    H.    COE. 


27 


418 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     REPORT. 


TABLE    No.   I. 

MONTHLY  DISTRIBUTION  OF   MORTALITY    IN    SAN   FRANCISCO 
FOR  FOURTEEN  YEARS. 


FISCAL  YEARS. 

Caucasian  &African  . 

1  Mongolian  

! 

f 

1 

O3 

cr 

October  

i  November  

O 

1 

CM 
O 

II  February  .  .  . 

f 

I 

| 

1 

1866-67  

2410 
3869 
3023 
2919 
2640 
3236 

3710 

5555 
4450 
3970 
3873 

163 
167 
224 
220 
295 
359 
405 
465 
453 
609 
615 
527 
523 
467 

2522 

^r.77 

4093 
3243 
3214 
2998 
3641 
4013 
4163 
4791 
6170 
4977 
4493 
4340 

214 

248 
346 

298 
230 

331 
366 
371 
507 
417 
375 
335 

219 
193 
317 

281 
247 
284 
294 
337 
378 
477 
394 
344 
313 

186 
187 
350 
266 
264 
248 
260 
308 
321 
324 
548 
434 
384 
3-77 

334 
270 
309 
300 

330 
379 
408 
526 
433 
395 
405 

210 

411 
270 
347 
238 
320 
338 
320 
438 
542 
401 
369 
341 

217 
501 

287 
266 
245 

424 
333 

410 
607 
463 
438 
352 

226 
228 
380 
263 
298 
226 
301 
391 
349 
405 
641 
457 
463 
393 

201 

209 
267 
254 
245 
243 

300 
310 

387 

397 
363 

219 

299 
255 
227 
256 
323 
363 
369 
364 
511 
411 
325 
422 

176 
193 

286 
261 
232 
255 

289 
373 
347 
464 
*|5 

405 

208 
218 
309 
271 
226 
263 
361 
292 
347 
398 
444 
377 
370 
316 

201 
275 
293 
282 
221 
247 
368 
343 
359 
561 
407 
368 
321 
318 

1867-68  

1868-69  
1869-70 

1870-71  
1871-72  

1872-73   

18JT3  74  .  . 

1874-75  

1875-76  .    ... 

1876-77 

1877-78  

1879-80  

TABLE    No.   II. 

MONTHLY    PERCENTAGE    TO    TOTAL    MORTALITY    IN    SAN 
FRANCISCO  FOR  FOURTEEN  YEARS. 


FISCAL  YEARS. 


1866-67 • 
1867-68. 


1869-70 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1879-80.. 


8.7 

7 . 5 
7.8 
8.8 
8.7 
8.2 
7.8 
7.8 
8.1 
7.9 
7.8 
7.9 
7.7 


7.4  9.5 
7.3  8.5 
8.6!  8.1 
8.2  8.3 
8.21  9. 
8.310.0 
7.1 
7.7 
7.7 


8.6 


610 


8.3  8. 

7.7  8. 
10.012. 

8.3'  8. 

.8  8. 

7.9  8. 

8. Si  8. 
8.4'lO. 

7.7!  8. 

9.2!  g 

8.8J  9. 

8.01  9, 

8.2  9, 

7.8  8, 


8.4 

8.4 

810.4 

31  9.2 
8J10.5 

ll  9.0 


1 

t 

? 

c 
g 

— 

' 

— 

8.7 

7.0 

8.2 

8.0 

7.6 

7.5 

8.1 

10.7 

7.1 

7.0 

7.6 

7.2 

7.9 

8.0 

8.4 

8.7 

7.1 

7.2 

7.0 

6.9 

8.6 

8.6    8.8 

8.2 

8.9 

9.0l  9.9 

10.1 

9.1 

7.5 

7.8 

8.5 

8.9 

9.0 

8.3 

8.6 

7.6 
8.3 

7.3 
7.5 
8.5 

8.311.7 
7.2    6.6 
7.6    7.4 

7.2 

7.5 

8.2    7  1 

9.7 

9.1 

7.2    7.2 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


419 


TABLE    No.  III. 

MORTALITY    IN    SAN    FEANCISCO    FOR  FOURTEEN    YEARS, 
ARRANGED   ACCORDING   TO    CLASSES. 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

! 

I 

i 

S 

0 

1870-71... 

§ 
~ 

1  1872-73... 

1873-74... 

1 
$ 

1  1875-76 

1876-77 

§ 

i 

i 
£ 

<O 

I  1879-80 

: 

534 
457 
1075 
307 
149 
0 

550 
491 
1058 
255 
136 
87 

1578 
628 
1286 
421 
147 
33 

770 
617 
1278 
396 
142 
40 

625 
633 
1273 
444 
145 
34 

521 

627 
1224 
330 
137 
159 

652 
672 
1410 
412 
151 
344 

922 
728 
1428 
429 
187 
319 

785 
743 
1503 
537 
222 
373 

930 
856 
1691 
570 
252 
492 

2148 
814 
1846 
593 
276 
493 

1027 
876 
1811 
544 
273 
446 

743 
875 
1729 
546 
215 
385 

4493 

555 

884 
1797 
563 
267 
274 

4340 

Constitutional  diseases  
Local  diseases  
Developmental  diseases  
Violent  deaths  
Unascertained  causes  

Totals 

2522 

2577 

4093 

3243 

3214 

2998 

36414013 

4163;  4791 

6170 

4977 

TABLE  No.  IV. 

PERCENTAGE  OF  DEATHS  IN  THE  VARIOUS  CLASSES  FOR 
FOURTEEN  YEARS. 


So 

£ 

5 

So 

g 

S 

S 

9P 

So 

00 

GO 

00 

oo 

°° 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

0 

t 

r. 

<p 

r 

M 

¥ 

r 

o 

•3 

f 

; 

00 

r 

0 

to 

O9 

Ol 

05 

oo 

0 

• 

Zymotic  diseases  
Constitutional  diseases  .    .  . 

21.2 

18.1 

21.3 

19  0 

38.6 
15.3 

23.8 
19.0 

19.517.4 
19.7120.9 

17.9 
18.4 

23.0 
18.1 

18.9 
17.9 

19.1 
18.1 

34.8 
13.2 

20.6 
17.6 

16:5 
19.4 

18.8 
?,0.3 

Local  diseases  

42.6 

41,1 

31.439.4 

39.6 

40.8  38.8 

35.6 

36.1 

35.4 

29.9 

36.4 

38.5 

41.4 

Developmental  diseases.    .. 

12.2 

9.9 

10.3 

12.  9. 

13.8 

11.0 

11.3 

10.7 

12.9 

11.7 

9.6 

10.9 

12.3 

10.6 

Violent  deaths  

5.9 

5  3 

3.6 

4  4 

4.5    4.6 

4.9. 

4.7 

5.3 

5.3 

4.5 

5.5 

4.8 

8.1 

Unascertained  causes  ... 

0.0 

3.4 

0.8    1.2 

2.9    5.3 

9.4 

7.9 

8.9 

10.4 

8.0 

9.0 

8.5 

6.3 

420 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     REPORT. 


TABLE    No.   V. 

STILL-BIRTHS  IN  SAN  FRANCISCO  FOR  A  PERIOD  OF  FOURTEEN 

YEARS. 


FISCAL  YEARS. 

H 

1 

August  .... 

1 

t-j 

| 
1 

| 

5-1 
-3 

February.  . 

1 

I 

f 

«_, 
a> 

1866-67  
1867  68          

211 
9S4 

21 

13 

16 

18 

16 

13 

11 

17 

24 

21 

19 

22 

1868-69              

9fi4 

15 

14 

99 

?4 

32 

30 

22 

25 

15 

16 

23 

26 

1869  70 

267 

17 

21 

16 

98 

22 

31 

28 

19 

29 

17 

21 

18 

1870  71                         

980 

49 

97 

32 

20 

18 

15 

21 

20 

22 

21 

17 

1871  72 

9fi8 

25 

20 

22 

27 

8 

23 

29 

33 

31 

17 

16 

24 

1872  73                     

97S 

16 

ss 

98 

18 

99 

98 

21 

12 

26 

24 

24 

23 

1873-74       

•?91 

90 

99 

?,1 

34 

25 

19 

90 

28 

9q 

97 

94 

27 

1874  75                      

9Q4 

94 

9S 

17 

?6 

23 

23 

37 

1Q 

33 

20 

25 

94 

1875-76  
1876-77                    

306 
8v? 

32 

99 

25 

48 

26 
SO 

22 

9,7 

19 

SO 

38 
31 

25 

97 

27 
IS 

29 
31 

20 
40 

25 
30 

18 
23 

1877  78                                  

SSO 

29 

28 

29 

83 

29 

95 

30 

23 

25 

21 

29 

29 

1878-79                       

987 

28 

99 

94 

30 

9S 

20 

19 

94 

9fi 

15 

99 

27 

1879  80                                  

SI  6 

9^ 

90 

97 

97 

21 

40 

24 

20 

21 

27 

32 

34 

TABLE  No.  VI. 

MONTHLY    PER    CENT.    OF    STILL-BIRTHS    IN    SAN   FRANCISCO 
FOR  FOURTEEN  YEARS. 


p        to*         M        4* 

>>       fc- 

g 

cT 

G 

oT 

p 

a> 

tr 

r 

£ 

(T3 

S" 

<j 

1 

C- 

a" 

^ 

3 

V- 

a 

FISCAL  YEARS. 

1 

S" 

5 

* 

1 

1 

•5 

1 

g- 

6.1 

7.5 

8.51  7.5 

6.1 

5.2 

8.0 

10.9 

1866-67  
1867  68 

9.9 

11.4 

9.9 

9.0 

1868-69  

5.7 

5.3 

9.1  12.1 

11.4 

S.3 

9.5 

5.7 

6.1 

8.7 

9  8 

1  869  70 

6  4 

6  0  10.41  8.2 

11  6 

10  5 

7  1 

10  9 

6  4 

7  0 

6  7 

1870-71  

15.0 

9.7 

11.4 

8.9 

7.1 

6.4 

5.4 

7.5 

7.1 

7.9 

7.5 

6.1 

1871  79                       

Q  S 

7.5 

S    9 

10  1 

3  0 

8  6 

8  2 

19   S 

n  6 

G  3 

6  0 

8  9 

1872  73 

5  9 

l->  1  Id  •> 

6  6 

8  1 

Q  <i 

7  7 

4.4 

.Q  *S 

8  8 

8  4 

1873  74                    

6  Q 

7.0    T.-i 

11   7 

8  6 

6  5 

6.9 

7.9 

9.3i   8.2 

9  S 

1874-75  

8.2 

7.8 

5.8 

8.8 

7.8 

7.8 

12.6 

6.511.2 

6.8 

8.5 

8.2 

1875-76  

10.4 

8.2 

8.5 

7.2    6.2 

12.4 

8.2 

8.8 

9.5 

6.5 

8.2 

6.9 

1876-77                                  

6  S 

IS  6 

8.5 

7.7    8.5 

8  8 

3  7 

8  8 

11   4 

8  5 

6  5 

1877-78  

8.8 

8.5 

8.8  10.0 

8.8 

7.6 

9.1 

6.9 

7-6 

6.3 

8.8 

8.8 

1878-79                           

Q  7 

7  7 

8.4110.4 

8  0 

7  0 

6  6 

8  4 

9  1 

5.2  10.1 

9  4 

1879-80  

7.2 

6.3 

8.6    8.5    6.3 

1         I 

12.6 

7.2 

6.3 

6.3 

8.5 

10.1 

10.7 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


421 


TABLE  No.  VII. 

ESTIMATED  POPULATION,  DEATHS,  AND  DEATH  EATE  OF  SAN 
FRANCISCO    FOR   FOURTEEN  YEARS. 


FISCAL  YEARS. 

ESTIMATED 
POPULATION. 

DEATHS. 

PER  CENT 
PER  1,000. 

1866-67 

*102  313 

2  522 

24  65 

1867-68 

*131  100 

2  577 

19.65 

1868-69         

*  147  ,950 

4,093 

27.66 

1869-70                                     .   . 

f  170  250 

3  243 

19.04 

1870-71  
1871  72                                          .   . 

•172,760 

*178  276 

3,214 
2  998 

18.60 
16  81 

1872-73  
1873  74 

*188,323 

-200  770 

3,641 
4  013 

19.33 
19  98 

1874-75  
1875  76 

*230,132 
*272  345 

4,163 
4  791 

18.09 
17  59 

1876-77                    .  .                                     .... 

*300  000 

6  170 

20.56 

1877-78  
1878  79            

*300,000 
*305  000 

4,977 
4  493 

16.59 
14  75 

1879-80  

t233,700 

4,340 

18.50 

*  According  to  Lang-ley's  City  Directory . 

t  U.  S.  Census.     II.  U.  S.  Census  returns,  July  1,  1880:    White  population,  211,700;  Chinese 
population,  22,000. 


422 


HEALTH    OFFICEE'S     EEPOKT. 


PH 


Unascei1- 
tained.  .  . 


Pacific 
Coast.  .. 


Atlantic 

States  . .  |    «  ^  £  « 


Foreign  M  CD  co  t»  o 

Countries.        -<ica>     ^ 


Female.. 


Male  ..... 


Unascer- 
tained. 


t-  O  •* 

r-i  lO  ••* 
CO  IO  CO 


•       •  rH  O  (M       -CO 


CO  (M  1C  OO  CO      • 


c^g^S^:  i'0  I  2 
IN       •••-•'        :      E 


Per  Cent.  . 


r-IO  1-         r-l 


Total  ..... 


Mongolian  . 


Caucasian 
and  African 


MOKTALITY    STATISTICS. 


423 


Unascer- 
tained. 

-1  ^  ::  ^  :::::::          :  :  ^      :  ^ 

1 

EJj 

Pacific 
Coast.  .  . 

-«l« 

tOrHC-405"           CM                   ••'                                   COCOrH 

§ 

Atlantic 

States.  . 

iai-<N 

-,„  :—  |-         S»g    - 

* 

Foreign 
Countries.  . 

rH  •*       • 

in  in  co    •  TJ»  jo  co  m  co    •  o  i-i            os  t-  o        •  ^i 

;          M                            ;M                           CO         £       '      ; 

M 

Female  

~«;as 

*as8-a-  |s-      s»|j  2^ 

Male  

MSS§3 

jg  0  gi  go  co  >n  oo  co  05    ;§t-            ^S^I      CN  M 

424 


HEALTH     OFFICEK'S    REPORT. 


K 


I 


Unascer-  5   '^^ 

tained. 

Pacific  c*»  o  '  -^oorH.         co  01  rH 

Coast. .  ^ 

Atlantic  ^  2  ^  <"  i3  ^  £  $  3     ^S1"^1     S1^005 

States.. 

Foreign 
Countries 

Female....  SS50     •^cototo'""'     '"SirHcS'""'     oirn" 

Male 

Unascer 
tained 

52  •  rH  CO      -  t^      •  CO  CO  rH         rH  5O      -00 

g    S    E  ^.t-oujcxNooseo 

fe       o       J3  iO         CS4  CC  rH 

III 

a  SrH^S^SS    ^^^S50    Sg^SJSE!00 

14^ 

fl      ^        IH 

2  3   § 

^  ^   p  SS^^10^^00  :    ^?5S 

VP       > 

Per  Cent 

Total £|8rH| 

;  ;«s  •    <N 

Mongolian 

Caucasian  g§^grH^S2i^     2 

and  African 

:   :      :   :  ':!      :S   :  :      :     ^ 

fi      :        :  r'S  ® 

:   :OQ-      .3   :   .  -5 

§ 

fa  ^  ;|   ;i;ll  :  ;  ,     f  '-:    :.  il« 



:  !'l  i3  :5 


MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


425 


;     "* 

•      •  rH 

•      co  I-H            m 

a 

rH         CO 

5*  CN<?} 

CO  <N                (N 
(N 

rH 

rH         CN 

•  <M         CO  rH  CO 

:  :  :    * 

OT        CM                      S 

* 

Tfl             « 

COT,      b-coj* 

:  :  :    S 

T*I        CO  O               O 
TJH  CM                  U7j 

1 

:  * 

T.CO      cornc* 

s0105  a 

-  Ss      s 

8 

-    S 

||    *-!. 

rH  1C  rH 
CO  rH  rH 

oo  co           o 

•        t--(M                0 

i 

•         CO 

i  :     :"H 

;    S3       - 

(N         C5 

•  rH          x*  CO  00 

•        (N  <35               1^ 

CO 

CO        1~ 

^o      cocooj 

H!  s 

1-        CO  00                CO 

<N 

•         CO 

:  :         :^ 

:  :^      : 

;  -    s 

CO 

rH         <N 

•  •* 

CO    T^Oi                   • 

CR  oo           oo 

rH 

50         S 

T}(  co       O  O  CD 

T?§3S             ?, 

b-        O5  O               1— 

c^'0        §3 

S 

:    in-  :        S 

S 

50    3 

^  "-0    S  S  9 

T?^S               £ 

l^.        01  O               O 

^        S 

S 

'•& 

;;>;;! 

:      :S  : 

:§      : 

Nephritis  
Other  Diseases  of  the  Urinary 
tern  .  .  . 

Metritis  
Tumors,  Ovarian  and  Uterine. 
Other  Diseases  of  the  Gener 
System  
Diseases  of  Locomotory  Systen 
Not  Localized  

IV. 

Premature  Birth  
Dentition  
Other  Diseases  of  Children  
Metroperitonitis,  Puerperal  F 
etc  ... 

Other  Diseases  of  Women  
Atrophy,  Inanition,  Marasmus 
Ag-e,  etc  
Other  Diseases  of  Nutrition,  tt 

V. 

Violent  Deaths  

VI. 

Unascertained  Causes  of  Death 

hs  in  P 
Births 


426 


HEALTH    OFFICER'S    REPORT. 


— -  m 

pq  o 

*^  Cu 

< 


Unascer-  rtiHBO^wjftWj 

tained...  S^ 


Pacific 

Coast.. 


Atlantic- 
States  .  . 


Foreign 
i    Countries. . 


Female  ____ 


Male  ...... 


Unascer- 
tained. 


5s! 


a  x 
I  5 


•**  (M  t-*  O  O  rH  r-H 
VT5  O  —  <  IM  00  «  00 


PerCent... 


Total  ...... 


Mongolian  . 


Caucasian 
and  African.' 


Ulflli 


MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


427 


Unaascer- 

•      •  rH  rH      

tained. 

Pacific 
Coast.  .  . 

•  oooooico-*iceoOioorHi^O5    -I-HI-HCO            I-HOOIM'     •**  10 

•  r-trHlOC^COCOrHrHl--               rH-                                                  t—         COrH 

Atlantic 
States.  . 

rH  rH  rHt^  CO  <M  CO  00  I-H      •  rH  t-  CO  CO  rH  O5  rH                  O  CO  •*         rH  rH 

Foreign 
Countries.  . 

•      •  (M  CO  rH  rH  r-  rH  CO      •  CO  30  1C  O  t-  CO  <M                 rHl^r-H             -CO 

Female  .... 

Male  

rHrHCOC-JrHTttrHIMCO'lMrH         I-H  C-«  '                      lOrHCO         rHrH 

is! 

I'll 

•              •              •              ....,_,...  to       ..                   Gi  rH  1^ 

jj 

111 

|     r      ^;;,s>;  =  .       g.a       ; 

< 

if  r 

rH           ;-*             J-jOINJ-^tKeCeC^jgH               WCOg           -CO 

III 

•IMlO-^mrH^COCO       -rHCOO       --H       •       •                          OOCO          '*•* 
<N               CO  rH             •               rH      •             •      •                               T»< 

•§  *  i 

C                 <D 

•  t^cooiocoKOt-oooo-ur,  •*      rH-co                  'o      I-HC-I 

.^^H^llMCO               i-Ht^.rH                   •                                  .,_icOrH 

Per  Cent.  .  . 

:::::::::::::::::          :  :  :      :  : 

Total  

,-H        «o        M  ""* 

Mongolian  . 

:            :     ;      IrHrH      jrH      ;  rH      .      ;  CO      ;      ;                CO  ^  g           j     I 

.   .  .         :  . 

Caucasian 
and  African. 

-a«8BSSSfc«i8K-SS-        |8S    S2 

.    .    .  <u 

hrt 

•      :  :      ::::::::::               :  :| 

1 

o 

;  !l  N&iyt  I!       i;l  1 

CAUSES  OF  1 

;        .:        l!*:'..S.C        ,.o5                SlH^JS 

1-5       :      :  •      :  :  s°  s  :n3^      :  :  «    S     S'i  c     ^ 

i         '     '  /-C'         '  PJ^         "    •  •                        G  ^     '  c3 

:      :;     a3o)-o"gr§c»'cs      :;S           ?  S  ^  •  § 

ijitl 

>  S  02  5  5  ft  E^S  S  O  O  PH'O  W  {»"•<  O            O  O  rH  M      O 

428 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S    REPORT. 


Unascer- 
tained. 

^  :  :^,s    ^  :      :  :  :g 

:      :  :  :  :  :  i1-1 

W          Pacific 
£             Coast.  .  . 

r-( 

-  a-»-  ja 

£          Atlantic 

*t              States.  . 

CO  <N  CO  <>1  Oi  T—  I        i-H  00  (N        C5  C<1  CO  i-H 
r-l               rN               (MCO.-H               ^10 

pH                 iH  iH 

Foreign 

Conntries.  . 

oooosi>-OTh      r-  <  ^  o      OLO^^ 

<Nf-l          O5rH          (MOCO          CMtMr^O 

(M         •*  O  t^  00  M  CO  O5 

Female  .... 

T^                 rJ'iO'MiO                        COrHCO 

-    S9-8-4 

Male 

<N  (N  Oi  t-  CO  CO         CO  O  OS         •**  O  ^H  CO 
CM  00  r-  1         C5l-~         CCOOO         (M-t}iCO'<*t 

M    feS^SS^SJ 

Unascer- 

tained. 

M 

•CO       -Is-       •          rHOOCN          rHOOS^JOC 

CO  Tt  i-H  CO      •  (M  C4 

O      o> 

g    III 

iO                 rH  ^*                        r-l      "  00 

T-H                        rH  r-f 

3    ill 

OOOJD^grH        MMO        g^^^g 

j  ss-sasa 

~~  O  —  tc~~ 

.    . 

£  £  ;* 

^|«         _C                  CCrHrH                  5^^ 

*°    m     c3 

a        5 

^    ""1    ^  I    "S8g 

:  .„  8-p 

Per  Cent.  .  . 

;     ;         ;    ;    ;         I    i    J         !    I    1    '. 

:      ::::::: 

:  :      :  :  :      :  :  :      :  :  :  : 

:      ::::::: 

Total 

£8SS3£    SS3    g^S^g 

•*     S§5S§S^§5 



Mongolian  . 

;   ;      ;  :  :      ;   :         ;  :  ;  r~l 

<N 

Caucasian 
and  African. 

CO'NIMi-ICOM         LOiO-*         COC»-*« 

N         lO  CM  iH  SO  (M  (N  CO 

^    .    .    .  ^   .    .    .    • 

'    ^     '.      '      '      '.      '.      '      '. 

fe  •    •    •  o    • 



:      :  :  :  i*      :  ;3  ;      :  : 

"3 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

:   :            I 
!  !  i  !  J  i|  i  [  i 

lilt  li|Hil.^i§| 

it:  M  ;! 

•  o>    •             •        • 

:5  :      :  :      :  S3 
:      ;   •      •  > 
:  o  :      :  :  y  :3 
:*  :    .2  :|  :« 

MOKTALITY     STATISTICS. 


429 


;   ;;; 

I-H       •                              •       •  OS       •                      •"* 

Oi 

CO 

r  s«: 

IO  r-l  r-l            •      •  00 

888  "3  ia      s 

00 

s 

oo      oo  m  r-i 

00      -r-l         CN  CO  •* 

'.'.'.      co  •*  oo  i-  co            m 

•      •      •                      rH         r-l                  lO 

10 

S        ; 

*    88- 

•&  tt  00         (N  OS  00 

i-1  :    S^g^^        | 

<M 

S               • 

t-      m  I-H  i-i 

rH  *J(  O         <M  CO  t- 

SSS    SS55l^        « 

CO 

T*                                     CO 

« 

| 

£    SJ810 

CO      •      •         <N  OJ  T* 

•      •  <>>  S                         C-] 

1 

S        1 

•* 

rt 

co      «*,     ; 

*  :  i     i0"  : 

\l     l\s'l     * 

0 

CO 

in      <N  o    • 

t^      •  r-l             •  in  00 

'  Jt>-  Oi  OO                 -^ 

8 

1 

OJ         CO  <N  rH 
<M        <N  <N 

S^QO         ^3 

•      •               CO      •'      -t-CO                   0 

1 

5-1 

•«*         OJ  CO  (M 

CO       -r-l              '•       '-T-< 

•r-trH         r-l  0      ^0005                  O 

55 

S 

<N           •*  r-l  CO 

(M      •      '•            •      •  OS 

sa-    j-jia      s 

o 

1 

'5 

OQ 

CO         CO  3i  '° 

^^s  -*as 

^5iw   ?;  ;H  ^  g  s      | 

-r 

1 

t-J 
§ 

:  :  : 

^i    -            co 

i 

r-T 

"  M<p 

S^S         **r^§! 

CO  ^!<  r-  1           -i4   r^  00  CO  O                      Osl 
•^  Ol  CO         C-l  r-^  *JD  t-  1C                   CO 

s 

%         S 

oo                 eo 

i-a 

s 
-^ 

s      •     ? 

:  gj  :  :  : 

i      ; 

^ 

Peritonitis  
Other  Diseases  of  the  Digestive  S 
tern  
Bright's  Disease  
Nephritis  
Other  Diseases  of  the  Urinary  S 

tern  
Metritis  
Tumors,  Ovarian  and  Uterine.  .  . 
Other  Diseases  of  the  Generat 
System  
Diseases  of  Locomotory  System  . 
Not  Localized  

IV. 

Premature  Birth  
Dentition  
Other  Diseases  of  Children  
Metroperitonitis,  Puerperal  Fev 
etc  
Other  Diseases  of  Women  
Old  Age  
Atroph}-,  Inanition  
Other  Diseases  of  Nutrition  

V. 
Violent  Deaths  

VI. 

Unascertained  Causes  of  Death  . 

Deaths  in  Public  Institutions  
Still-births  

430 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     EEPOET. 


TABLE 

MORTALITY  IN  SAN  FRANCISCO  FROM  ALL  CAUSES  (EXCLUSIVE  OF 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

I 

AGES. 

i 
% 

M 
? 
I- 

t« 

s 

.-•' 

v 
g 

P 

0 

ET 
P" 

5 
S" 

P 

§ 
? 

P 

8 
5 

p 

S 

s 

s 

g 

S" 
P 

B 
? 

p 

o' 
? 
$ 

g 

s 

p 

g 
? 

1 

1 
9 

All  causes                      

3873 
8823 
50 

545 
762 
1743 
541 

•2X2 
50 

477 
13 
55 

149 
613 

515 
230 
569 
283 
76 
16 

849 
840 
9 

132 

29 
344 
333 
2 
9 

125 
1 

7 

29 

150 

129 
52 

2 

225 

22.1 

54 
20 

120 
24 

1 

54 
'20 

6i 

i 

lor, 
194 
2 

83 
18 

83 

8 

7 

88 

IK; 

116 

59 

12 
35 
8 

7 

59 

05 
02 

13 

t: 
}6 
] 

7 
3 

13 

100 
100 

17 
39 

28 
6 
10 

19 

38-2 
376 

40 

it;i 

108 
15 

:,  -2 
6 

32 
4 
•4 

6 

155 

19 
18 
87 
24 

9 
6 

661 

5i5J 

51 

170 

230 
27 
87 

10 

M 

4 
13 

31 

14:') 

47 
55 
53 
49 
12 
3 
3 
8 

513 

503 
10 

44 

145 
2(i5 
12 
37 
10 

2! 
1 

19 

39 
106 

68 
56 

t;;> 
51 
15 
5 
2 
5 

415 
401) 

30 
96 

241 
12 
30 
6 

19 

3 

8 

32 

04 

54 
39 

85 
35 
15 
1 
3 
9 

238 
238 

18 

48 
140 
17 
9 

15 
3 

23 

25 

3,4 

2( 
48 
22 
9 

"2 
5 

141 

141 

3 

15 

51 

2 
1 

55 

55 

1 
2 

g 

1 

1 

11 
11 

'5 
6 

Specified  causes  
Unascertained  causes  

CLASSES. 

I.        Zymotic  diseases  
II.      Constitutional  diseases  
III.     Local  diseases  
IV.      Developmental  diseases  
V.       Violent  deaths  

VI.      Unascertained  
I.  —  ORDERS. 

1.  Miasmatic  diseases  
2.  Enthetic  diseases  
3.  Dietic  diseases  

II. 

1.  Diathetic  diseases  
2.  Tubercular  diseases  

III. 

Diseases  of  : 
1.  Nervous  system  
2    Circulatory  system 

2 

9 

G 

17 
14 
2G 
9 

(i 

1 
1 

3 

4 
6 
3 
1 

1 
3 

'l 

'•'• 

'is 

40 
1 
81 

8 
1 

4 

8 

12 

14 

5 

1 

2 
4 

9 
6 
14 
3 
3 

2 

37 

4 

<; 
8 

7 
2 
1 

3.  Respiratory  system  

6.  Urinary  system  

7.  Locomotory  system..  .  .  
8.  Not  localized  

IV. 

Developmental  diseases  of  : 

12 
4'2 

101 
40 
68 
332 

141 

8 
83 

*iO 

1 
4 

1 

" 

7 
88 

11 

2 

1 

] 

i 

i 

7 

"a 

1 

14 

2.  Women  
3.  Old  Age  
4.  Nutrition  

V. 

•20 

4 

"7 
10 

3 

'29 

15 

1 

2( 

'(> 

'245 

1 
1 

0 

1:5 

i 

"7 

7 

.> 

4 
1 

1 

31 
1 

20 

fi 

7 

37 
6 
24 

1( 

6 
•23 

12 

13 

2.  Homicide  
3    Suicide 

3 

14 

in 

17 
6 

6 

1 

1 

VI. 

1     T7nn.spf>rt.n.infi<l  nrmsfis    . 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


431 


NUMBER   X. 

MONGOLIANS)  REGISTERED  DURING  THE  YEAR  ENDING  JUNE  30,  1880. 


CT?Y 
toJ&A. 

RACE. 

WARDS. 

2 
g 

f 

CC 

tf 

s 

NATIVITIES. 

r 

3 

I 

5 

| 

> 

1st  Ward  | 

2dWard  1 

3d  Ward  1 

» 

j? 
^ 

1 

5th  Ward  

6th  Ward  

-i 

5* 
3 

1 

8th  Ward  

1 
$ 

a 

£ 

s 

s. 

1 

Foreign 
Countries... 

Atlantic 
States  

0? 

8  S 

CO    O 

Unascertained. 

LOth  Ward  

-T- 
^ 

1 

L2th  Ward....| 

1 
| 

S 

2381 
2341 

1492 
1482 

3828 
3781 

S 

1391248 
132  240 

28324 
25314 

26  i  92 
26    87 

158206228'458634'376 
1571203  227  457  630  372 

8211111  831  8 

818  111  83  1  8 

1634    67l|  1379  189 
1603    666:1371  18S 

40 

10 

47 

3 

7 

S 

0 

10 

6 

1 

3 

1 

1 

4 

4 

3 

•• 

31  1 

5 

8 

t> 

299 

246 

540 

5 

20 

33 

Q 

30 

4 

6 

26 

29 

89 

75 

30 

68 

88 

145 

62 

335 

& 

451 

311 

751 

11 

9 

42 

3 

133 

2    14 

29 

48  1  46 

96 

114 

86 

141 

]  | 

430 

201 

130 

1 

1128 

615 

1720 

23 

70 

126 

16 

U6 

18    51 

77 

112    98i230 

JSO 

K;-2 

SSI 

763    303 

512 

165 

265 
198 

276 
34 

538 
'>39 

3 

27 

•;<• 

4 

35 

5 

10 

25 

14 

44 

66 

06 

67 

113 

41 

<£> 

's 

120 
145 

45 

55 

366 
28 

10 

4 

40 

10 

47 

3 

7 

8 

3 

JO 

f> 

1 

3 

1 

1 

4 

4 

"3 

31 

5 

8 

6 

252 

8 

220 
5 

472 
13 

5 

17 

32 

1 

22 

1 

4 

6 

2:5 
T 

28 

36 

66 

127 

64 

52 
\\ 

96 
11 

51 
1 

328 
1 

2 

34 

21 

55 

3 

1 

1 

7 

i 

1 

"i 

"'.') 

"3 

"4 

20 

38 

10 

6 

"i 

70 

77 

147 

2 

2 

7 

9 

4 

7 

15 

10 

12 

20 

.14 

49 

95 

45 

9 

381 

232 

604 

9 

7 

Sfl 

-3 

24 

"•2 

in 

22 

32 

86 

84 

94 

71 

192 

336 

156 

121 

322 

180 

502 

13 

27 

88 

3 

36 

4 

16 

27 

42 

24 

64 

98 

4-2 

94 

183 

74 

195 

63 

163 

62 

225 

5 

1 

14 

4 

12 

0 

8 

12 

19!   14 

81 

27l  19 

07 

153 

59 

14 

4 

365 

199 

564 

5 

32 

52 

5 

82 

5 

11 

•27 

•24'   43    S3 

96 

56 

104 

226 

76 

229 

38 

162 

116 

278 

5 

13 

l(i 

3 

24 

6 

Ifi 

9 

18    14 

38 

88 

80 

59 

130 

61 

90 

2. 

53 

23 

76 

8 

1 

5 

1 

3 

7 

3 

8 

6 

13 

26 

44 

23 

8 

1 

3 

13 

16 

2 

'2 

"i 

] 

2 

2 

6 

12        3 

1 

Q 

3 

12 

1    .. 

1 

ll 

9        a 

24 

17 

41 

1 

'3 

1 

5 

1 

4 

12 

2 

14 

28 

^ 

g 

2 

60 

40 

100 

1 

13 

5 

1 

4 

4 

§ 

2 

15 

16 

29 

7 

1 

1 
25 

99 

1 

40 

40 

2 

8 

4 

"l 

1 

:•; 

1 

71     5 

3 

50 

"i 

8 

"28 

40 

67 

"  i 

4 

18 

'  i 

6  ... 

2 

"3 

6 

f 

10    11 

6 

44 

18 

174 

157 

331 

i 

8 

13 

2 

21 

4 

9 

'l7 

9 

22 

30 

80 

34 

108 

20 

'259 

"4 

123 

18 

141 

14] 

92 

97 

00 

7 

1 

8 

j, 

4 

Tut 

£Z 
1 

68 

15 

83 

S3 

49 

2j 

5 

^ 

40 

10 

47 

3 

7 

8 

, 

10 

5 

1 

3 

'     1 

1 

4 

4 

31 

5 

8 

6 

432 


HEALTH    OFFICER'S    REPORT 


TABLE 


| 

A 

GE& 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

CJ 

s- 

to 

to 

s- 

;;i 

5  to  10... 

10  to  15.. 

15  to  20.. 

20  to  30.. 

30  to  40.. 

40  to  50.. 

50  to  60.. 

60  to  70.. 

70  to  80.. 

80  to  90.. 

90  to  100. 

Over  100. 

CLASS  I.—  ZYMOTIC  DISEASES. 
Order  L—  Miasmatic. 

77 

65 

10 

9 

• 

g 

i 

s 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Cerebro-spinal    meningitis 

97 

4 

5 

*> 

7 

? 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Croup  
Diarrhoea 

30 

99 

6 
14 

5 
I 

u 

4 

1 

1 

3 

g 

1 

Diphtheria  

69 
4 

6 
3 

9 

25 

23 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

« 

1 

? 

2 

3 

85 

1 

1 

s 

10 

s 

ia 

•'1 

10 

6 

q 

S 

4 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

18 

9 

s 

3 

1 

1 

2 

1 

Fever,  typho-malarial  

8 

Q 

1 

1 

1 

•> 

: 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Measles  

19 
37 

2 
19 

9 

9 

6 

o 

2 
1 

... 

•• 

22 

2 

1 

i 

9 

7 

2 

g 

1 

13 

] 

2 

9 

fS 

1 

2 

2 

2 

21 

1 

2 

"n 

i 

1 

1 

1 

Order.?.—  Enthetic. 

13 

1 

4 

3 

1 

Order  S.—Dietic. 

6 

5 

46 

4 

is 

is 

<- 

9 

i 

1 

-| 

2 

i 

1 

CLASS    11.—  CONSTITUTIONAL    DIS- 
EASES. 

Order  l.—Diathetic. 

3' 

9 

j 

Cancer  of  arm  .  .  . 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


433 


NUMBEK  X— CONTINUED. 


SEX. 

RACE. 

WARDS. 

hj 

d 

cr' 

EL 

-f- 
£. 

1  Homicides  

NATIVITIES. 

I 

1 

Caucasian  

f 

1st  Ward... 

2d  Ward... 

3d  Ward... 

\ 

i 

i 

I 

I 

~- 

I 

?T 

t 

Foreign 
Countries  .  .  . 

Atlantic 
States  

o| 

Unascertained. 

o 

! 

i 

institutions.  .  . 

P 

si 

5 
14 
20 
19 
35 
1 
4 
42 
1 
1 
8 
5 
3 
11 
17 
17 
11 

"ii 
i 

8 

ft 

26 

1 
2 

14 
1 

46 
3 
13 
10 
3 
34 
3 
4 
43 
3 

77 
8 
26 
30 
22 
68 
4 
8 
83 
4 
1 

3 

4 

8 

3 

1 
1 

2 
2 
1 
5 

i 

8 
1 

•j 

1 

1 

12 

'io 

2 
2 

11 
1 

27 
1 
2 
9 
6 
29 

JL3 

2 
5 
4 
5 
10 

8 

1 

1 
5 
1 

- 

6 
5 
1 
5 
3 
1 

1 
3 
3 
1 

7 

77 
1 
19 
26 
16 
59 

'.'.:; 

1 

1 

1 
2 
2 

3 

1 

... 

"i 

1 
2 

1 
1 

3 
1 

3 

1 

4 

8 

11 

1 

0 

1 

3 
17 

•• 

5 
36 
3 
1 

3 
13 
1 

3 

9 

6 

i 

i 

8 

5 

7 
1 

11 

9 

35 

'"i 

1 

5 
3 
3 

8 
20 
5 
2 
2 
10 

5 

1 
20 

13 
8 
6 
19 
36 
22 
13 
2 
21 
1 

13 

46 
1 

2 

' 

i 

8 

1 

5 
2 
1 

1 

1 

0 

v 

1 
2 
3 

6 

1 

'"l 
2 
4 
3 

5 
5 
3 
18 
34 
4 
8 

9 

1 
2 

2 

i 

"i 

1 
1 

3 

1 

"i 

2 

"2 

CO  CO  CO 

2 

2 
1 

2 

2 

"i 

i 

4 
1 

to  •  oo  oo  to 

1 

7 
1 
2 

4 

8 

1 

14 

7 

i 

2 

1 

2 

10 

4 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

18 

i 

1 

11 
1 

1 

1 

5 

1 

i 

3 

1 

8 

1 

0 

2 

1 

4 

6 

2 

4 

17 

36 

9 

i 

2 
2 

1 

;i 
i 

C 
1 

1 

11 

19 
..  4 

1 

13 

32 

1 

18 
5 

31 

6 

i 

2 

2 

1 

•i 

1 
2 

28 


434 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     REPORT. 


TABLE 


| 

A 

GE 

3. 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

g 

s 

? 

to 

10 

g- 

O* 

5  to  10.. 

10  to  15. 

15  to  20. 

§ 

y 

8 

30  to  40. 

40  to  50. 

50  to  60. 

60  to  70. 

70  to  80. 

80  to  90. 

90  to  100 

Over  100 

; 

Cancer  of  abdomen 

6 

i 

_ 

g 

1 

Cancer  of  breast  

11 

•t 

J 

1 

J 

Cancer  of  bladder     .    .           

9 

-\ 

1 

Cancer  of  jaw  

1 

i 

Cancer  of  leg 

Cancer  of  hip  

1 

1 

Cancer  of  liver 

1<S 

8 

,1 

1 

.7 

.. 

1 

] 

Cancer  of  liver  and  stomach 

1 

1 

Cancer  of  neck 

1 

1 

Cancer  of  ovary 

1 

1 

1 

] 

Cancer  of  peritoneum 

6 

•i 

.) 

- 

Cancer  of  stomach 

91 

» 

•> 

4 

8 

•\ 

••> 

] 

1 

Cancer  of  tongue 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

94 

i 

4 

1C 

7 

'I 

1 

1 

Coxalgia.. 

<S 

8 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Goitre 

1 

1 

Podagra 

1 

1 

11 

1 

.,. 

8 

s 

9 

Order  2.  —  Tubercular. 

Abscess  psoas 

2 

1 

~\ 

1 

1 

35 

13 

n 

- 

- 

•> 

Phthisis  pulmonalis  
Rachitis 

559 
1 

10 

e 

4 

1 

4 

2 

35 

[64 

Ml 

10,- 

64 

26 

(i 

1 

9 

3 

i 

2 

1 

' 

i 

G 

2 

•• 

•; 

CLASS   III.—  LOCAL  DISEASES. 
Order  L—  Nervous  System. 
Apoplexy  

79 

7 

i 

1 

] 

8 

B 

3 

24 
1 

W 

1 

18 

"1 

!) 

Brain,  atrophy  

3 

1 

1 

1 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


435 


No.  X — CONTINUED. 


SEX. 

RACE. 

CITY    WARDS. 

Public  Institutions.  .  . 

ST. 

Suicides  

Homicides  

NATIVITIES. 

K 

E 

a 

c? 

Caucasian 

African  .  .  . 

1st  Ward.. 

s 

J 

1 

3d  Ward  .  . 

*- 
2; 

! 

W 

•? 
^ 

1 

1 
3 

7th-  Ward. 

| 

^ 

1 

i 

^ 

& 

o 

i 

c-t- 

3j 

JS 

12th  Ward.... 

Foreign 
Countries.  .  . 

Atlantic 
States  

9| 

cj 

1 

1 

5 
11 

6 
10 

'"i 

"i 

i 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 
1 

1 
1 

1 

4 
9 

4 

1 
1 

1 

12 
1 

1 

5 
15 
1 
3 

1 

1 

4 

".'i 

'"i 

6 

2 
17 

'353 
1 

7 
1 

60 
5 

9 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

'    8 

1 

1 
1 

1 

6 

"24 

'"i 
i 

1 
15 
1 

i 

i 

2 

T 

1 

7 

1 
13 
1 

i 

i 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 
1 
.  .«. 

1 

•- 

1 

i 
i 

'"e 

21 

i 

3 
1 
24 
1 
5 
1 

1 

1 

1 

"i 

2 

i 

1 
•2 

1 
2 

"i 

"i 
i 

1 
4 

"2 

3 
5 

3 

15 
1 

3 

'"i 

1 

•; 

3 
1 

1 

i 

2 

2 

i 

2 

4 

i 

3 

2 

1 

6 

•• 

15 

9 

i 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

5 

1 

'"5 

1 

i 
11 

1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

4 

5 

1 

'"i 

18 

206 

i 

35 

:::: 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

1 

i 

2 

3 

9 

10 

(> 

1 

1 

34 

561 
1 

8 

5 

34 

:; 

23 

2 

9 

m 

80 

1 

88 

71 
1 

1 
.) 

10 

80 

62 

186 

333 
2 

54 
2 

2 

154 

19 

4 
1 

72 
1 
7 
6 

4 
1 

2 

2 

5 

19 

2 
1 

8 
6 

79 

7 
3 

I 

4 

1 
•2 

9 

1 
2 

2 
1 

6 

1 

i 

21 
3 

1 

4 

2 

1 
3 

3 

3 

2 

8 

4 

436 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     REPORT. 


TABLE 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

I 

AGES. 

Under  1. 

sr 
i<^ 

ba 

S1 

tn 

5  to  10.. 

10  to  15. 

15  to  20. 

20  to  30. 

30  to  40. 

40  to  50. 

50  to  60. 

60  to  70. 

70  to  80. 

80  to  90  

90  to  100  

1 

§ 

; 

Brain,  congestion  •. 

31 

2 
9 

5 

9 
1 
1 

4 
1 

4 

1 

1 

1 
1 

5 

3 

•2 

1 

Brain  disease  (undefined)  

1 

1 

2 

•2 

1 
2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

? 

1 
5 

•2 

2 

Brain  softening     

26 
1 
2 
131 

3 

5 
1 

S 

8 

95 

'^4 

Convulsions  

'ii 

"i 

1 

1 

Encephalitis  (meningitis,  etc.)  

125 
12 
2 
2 
2 

38 

1 

29 

1 

21 
..3 

'.) 

5 

1 

] 

4 

8 
8 

<i 

•2 

2 
2 
2 

2 

•2 

Insanity  (hysterical)  

1 

1 

Myelitis 

j 

1 

1 
55 
3 
1 
9 
3 

3 
21 

"i 

'"i 

"3 

"i 

1 
7 
] 
1 
1 

1 
10 

7 

ia 

i 

i 

i 

(.; 

7 

Paralysis  (hemiplegia,  parap.  etc.) 
Prostration,  nervous  

.,. 

2 

1 

14 

1 
1 

a 

i 

i 

5 

2 

1 

"l 

1 
1 

"2 

1 

Spinal  Disease  (undefined)  
Tetanus                       

Order  2.  —  Circulatory  System. 

i 

Aneurism  of  aorta  

2] 

i 

B 
1 

1 

Aneurism  of  carotid  artery  
Aorta,  calcareous  degeneration  .  .  . 

1 
1 
1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

Carditis                          

1 

i 

i 
i 

i 

•• 

Coelic  axis  aneurism  

1 
2 

2 
4 

! 
1 

i 
i 

"i 

... 

Endocarditis                     .          ... 

1 

Haemorrhage  internal  
Heart  disease  (undefined)  
Heart  dilatation  

13 

79 
2 
1 
1 
3 
14 

i 

3 

:\ 
1 

4 

Ui 

2 
21 

8 

11 

"7 
i 

1 

11 

•; 

i 

1 

i 

:: 

2 

1 

5J        Li'   5                 T 

i 

Heart,'  fatty  degeneration  

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

4 

4 

1 

'•• 

2 

2 
•      1 
S 

2 

1 

1 
ij 

1 

1 

Heart   dilatation 

1 
18 

1 
( 

"8 

Heart,  valvular  disease  .  .  . 

48 

1 

i 

1 

3 

4 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


437 


No.  X — CONTINUED. 


SEX. 

RACE. 

WARDS. 

Public  Institutions.  .  . 

Casualties  

Suicides  

Homicides  

NATIVITIES. 

£ 
« 

«? 
ST 

| 

3 

! 

1st  Ward  

2d  Ward  

3d  Ward  

ei- 

£T 

I 

5th  Ward  

6th  Ward  

s1 

i 

9 

ST1 
S 

I 
\ 

10th  Ward.... 

;? 
p' 

g 

r^ 

^ 

Foreign 

Countries..  . 

Atlantic 
States.... 

II 

Unascertained. 

22 
2 
4 
3 
1 

"i<j 

1 

9 

29 

2 

1 

3 

4 

i 

2 

1 

5 

'i 
1 

8 

'i 

2 

'a 

i 

5 

1 

1 

8 
1 
1 
2 
1 

3 

"5 

2 

18 
1 
3 

1 

2 

5 
2 

3 

7 

2 

9 
5 
1 
3 
25 
1 
2 

1 

1 

*2 

i 

'2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

'•2 

3 

2 
19 

'  2 
12 

1 
6 
1 

"i 

'"i 

,.  .. 

1 

1 

•• 

1 

i 

•2 

1 

8 

11 
1 

2 

"64 

'54 

73 

58 

126 

5 

9 

15 

•• 

9 

4 

10 

13 

7 

14 

37 

s 

10 

82 
7 
1 

2 
1 
30 
3 

'"5 
3 

2 
19 
20 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
12 
47 

1 

43 
5 

1 
2 

120 
12 
2 
2 
2 

5 

4 

s 

9 

16 

5 

7 

7 

8 
1 

17 

;; 
i 
i 

•21 
1 
1 

1 

is 

is 

4 

20 

7 
1 
2 

12 
2 
1 

"i 

92 
3 

"'i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

25 

'"i 

4 

1 
1 

1 

55 
3 
1 
9 
3 

2 

20 
21 
1 
1 

3 

•2 

1 

2 

1 

3 

5 

3 

1 

'i 

r, 
i 

8 
1 

4 

18 

40 
2 

10 

i 

3 

1 

2 

1 

•1 

i 

i 

2 

1 

3 
1 

4 

3 

1 

2 
8 
4 

'"i 

2 
2 

1 
1 

1 

i 

1 

1 
12 
17 
1 

o 

<, 

i 

4 

2 

K 

I 

:; 

2 

i 

1 

3 

1 

1 

L( 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

J 

1 

1 

1 

12 

52 

1 

1 
1 

2 

"21 

1 
1 
2 
1 
32 

2 
2 
4 
13 
79 

0 

1 

1 

... 

] 

1 

j 

6 

".'.' 

] 

i 

•, 

1 

1 

,1 

i 

1 
12 

< 

'•2> 
1 

.... 

f 

1 

5 

" 

j 

f 

4 

l-_ 

i 

1 

1 

, 

1 

j 

9 

] 

ft 

1 

^ 

1 

"is 

3 
IS 

] 

47 

-1 

i 

1 

- 

3 

] 

1 

s 
s 

11 

2 

2 

0 

i 
1 

a 

... 

-, 

, 

I 

"i 

"2>"5 

"3 

", 

"4 

• 

2k 
91. 

29 

1 
14 

2 

438 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     REPORT 


TABLE 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

I 

AGES. 

Under  1  

to 

to 

5  to  10  

15  to  20  
10  to  15... 

20  to  30  

30  to  40  

o 

i 

50  to  60  

60  to  70  

70  to  80  

80  to  90  

90  to  100  

Over  100  

Leucocythsemia  1  .... 

:: 

Pericarditis  
Thrombosis,  cerebral  

Order  3.—  Respiratory  System. 
Abscess,  chest  walls  

2 

1  ... 

1 
3 

1 

2 

Asphyxia  

... 

4 

1 
1 

0 

4 

5 
2 

8 

2 
3 

11 

i 

6 

Asthma  

Apoplexy,  pulmonary  
Bronchitis  
Cynanche  Trachealis 

15 

8: 

1 

29 

7 
1 

1."* 

4  . 

.      1 
.      1 

1 

2 

Empyema  
Emphysema 

1 

1 

1 

Glottis  osdcma  

Haemoptysis 

15 

1  ... 

[ 

4 
1 

j 

1 
1 

1 

Hydrothorax  

5 

Laryngitis 

1 

Larynx  stenosis  

1 

1 

Lungs   oedema 

1 

Lungs,  congestion  
Lun^s  abscess 

46 
1 

23 

3 

4 

2 

1      1 

• 

9 

J 

2 

^ 

2 

, 

Lungs,  gangrene  

4 

1 

1 

-j 

1 

Lungs,  collapse 

1 
4 
368 
1 

1 
1 

69 

'39 

23 

8  1 

i 

1 

1 

Pleurisy  
Pneumonia 

1      4 

K 

1 

44 
1 

59 
"l 

26 

'i 

15 

3 

Pleurodvnia  

Order  k.  —  Digestive  System. 
Abscess,  abdominal 

"i 

Ascites 

4 

Bowels,  malignant  disease 

Bowels,  obstruction  
Bowels,  perforation  
Bowels   occlusion 

2 
1 
2 

i 

i 

1 

1 

1 

Bowels,  ulceration  

2 

1 

1 

Bowels  stricture 

Ccocum  perforation  .  . 

Ccecum  ulcer  

'i 

-\ 

Colitis  

1 

Constipation  
Duodenitis  (chronic) 

1 

'62 
1 

25 

Enteritis  
Enteran^emiphraxis 

4 

1 

3    i 

2 

5 

6 
1 

4 

6 

i 

1 

1 

1 

Enterocolitis 

9 
231 

6 

2 

3 

2 

Gastritis  .  .  . 

5 

6 

4 

2 

2 

MOKTALITY    STATISTICS. 


439 


No.   X — CONTINUED 


SEX. 

RACE. 

WARDS. 

Public  Institutions. 

1 
I 

Suicides  

Homicides  

NATIVITIES. 

2, 

Female  

Caucasian  .  . 

f 

1st  Ward.... 

2dWard.... 

3d  Ward.... 

1 

I 

o\ 

6th  Ward... 

7th  Ward... 

QC 

1 

1 

1 
f 

llth  Ward.. 

1 
1 

Foreign 
Countries. 

Atlantic 
States  

fl 

Unascertained. 

.... 

2 

2 

j 

i 

, 

1 

1 

1 
5 
11 
46 
1 
3 
2 
8 
13 
2 
1 
1 

'si 

i 

3 
1 
3 
233 
1 

1 

1 

2 
4 
4 
34 

3 

15 

80 
1 

! 

1 

ll 

1 

.. 

2 

., 

s 

i 

i 

8 

1 

4 

18 

O5  tO  M 

1 

1 
9 

1 

8 
11 
25 

1 
2 
12 
.... 

"i 

1 

4 

3 
6 

'i 
1 

"i 

1 

3 

2 

2 

2 
44 
1 
1 

!".".". 

10 

1 

4 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

j 

2 
3 
2 

15 
3 

i 

.... 

1 
1 

2 
2 

i 

1 

1 
1 

3 
2 

4 

7 
4 

3 
1 

5 

.... 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 
13 

2 
44 
1 

'"2 

"i 

2 

"2 

*i 

i 

2 

1 

1 

2 

9 

15 

5 

4 

14 

3 

29 
1 

— 

1 

4 
1 

4 

3 

1 

1 

1 

130 

4 

1 

2 

3 

1 

136 

38 

2 

23 

31 

8 

24 

2 

8 

20 

14 

28 

45 

56 

38 

70 
1 

143 

51 
1 

3 

1 

4 

•) 

9 

4 

1 

2 

'"2 
1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

.... 

1 

1 

1 

"ir" 

1 

i 

"i 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

28 
1 
4 
10 

34 

62 
1 

.... 

7 

5 

9 

1 

3 

3 

2 

4 

10 

9 

4 

5 

•• 

•• 

18 
1 

8 

36 

.... 

5 
13 

9 
23 

9 

1 

1 

^ 

1 
4 

3 

4 

1 
10 

8 
3 

.... 

2 

•2 

i 

0 

4 

• 

10 

440 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S    REPORT. 


TABLE 


H 

A 

GE 

3. 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

1 

1C 

to 

5  to  10.. 

10  to  15. 

15  to  20. 

20  to  30. 

S 

40  to  50. 

50  to  60. 

60  to  70. 

70  to  80. 

8 

= 

Over  100 
.  90  to  100 

Gastro-duodenitis 

1 

1 

Gastro-enteritis  

11 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

^ 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Ha)  matenaesis 

4 

1 

1 

9 

Hernia  (strangulated)  

1 

3 

1 

I 

1 

Hepatitis 

9*> 

8 

S 

H 

1 

7 

1 

2 

1 

a 

1 

4 

1 

1 

1 

Intestine  occlusion 

6 

3 

•> 

1 

I 

-, 

9 

i 

^ 

5 

i 

•> 

] 

-. 

5 

3 

1 

i 

24 

1 

, 

7 

/. 

- 

Liver  disease  (undefined) 

13 

1 

1 

,| 

4 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

Liver  hypertrophy 

7 

9 

9 

9 

1 

Melaena  (intestinal  haemorrhage) 

1 

-i 

. 

-. 

Peritonitis  
Pyloric  obstruction 

33 
1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

4 

12 

6 
1 

2 

8 

Perityphlites 

1 

1 

Stomach  malignant  disease 

1 

1 

Stomach,  ulcerat'on 

2 

1 

1 

3 

3 

1 

1 

, 

j 

i 

1 

i 

Order  5.  —  Urinary  System. 

Bright's  disease  (albuminuria)  .... 
Cvstitis 

43 
6 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

i 

9 

9 

9 
1 

10 

6 

1 

1 
1 

Cystitis  of  kidney 

1 

1 

Diabetes 

8 

1 

1 

1 

9 

9, 

1 

1 

1 

Kidney  disease  (undefined) 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Nephritis.  .  . 

fl 

1 

>•> 

2 

1 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


441 


No.  X — CONTINUED. 


SEX. 

RACE'. 

WARDS. 

Public  Institutions.  .  . 

\ 

Suicides  

Homicides  

NATIVITIES' 

K 

<? 
1 

I 

African  

1st  Ward  

2d  Ward  

3d  Ward  

if*> 

e* 

tn 

| 

c^- 

CC 

| 

t 

§? 

3 

10 

5- 

f 

Foreign 
Countries..  . 

> 

3? 

O  o 

Unascertained. 

1 

Sj 

1 

1 

? 

! 

P 

n 

'"5 
1 

1 
6 

1 
11 
1 

T 

1 

1 

... 

2 

1 

... 

... 

1 

2 

1 

3 

1 

6 

i 

4 
1 



2 
7 
17 
4 
2 

2 
1 

7 
3 
2 
1 

4 
8 
24 
6 
4 
1 

i 

g 

1 
8 
15 

i 

10 

2 



'"i 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

i 

1 

1 

2 
4 

2 

G 

•} 

•5 

0 

3 
1 

"i 

2 

2 

3 

1 

3 

4 

.... 

i 

1 

i 

1 

3 

1 
2 
5 
2 
23 
7 

9 

3 

3 

6 
1 

1 

i 

2 

2 

... 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

"io 

2 

1 

3 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

4 
1 
13 
6 

2 
4 

.... 

5 

1 

4 

"8 
7 
1 

3 
1 
6 
1 

4 

23 
13 
3 

7 

"  i 

i 

i 

"i 

2 

i 

"a 

i 

"4 

i 

i 

1 

2 

3 

2 
1 

"2 

4 
1 

5 

'.'.'.'. 

i 

i 

2 

1 

1 

3 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

] 

"i7 

1 
18 
1 

1 
31 
1 

1 

9 

1 

2 

i 

3 

4 

i 

i 

2 

;>, 

2 

5 

1 

2 

20 
1 

8 
1 

...5 



1 

1 

1 

'"i 
i 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

32 
6 

1 
2 

"3 
'"ft 

1 

1 

1 

1 

9 

1 

2 

2 
3 

1 
1 

1 

i 

9 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

15 
1 
1 

1 

1 

25 
4 

3 
1 

11 

43 

6 

1 

i 

3 

•  i 

2 
1 

4 

2 

3 

1 

3 

6 

17 

i 

"-6 

1 
1 

1 
8 
1 
4 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

6 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

6 

i 

1 

2 

1 

5 

1 

442 


HEALTH     OFFICEK'S    KEPOKT. 


TABLE 


S 

A( 

JKS 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Under  1.. 

? 
to 

t* 

s 

OX 

m 
g" 

S 

10  to  15.. 

15  to  20.. 

20  to  30.. 

30  to  40.. 

40  to  50.. 

50  to  60.. 

60  to  70.. 

70  to  80.. 

80  to  90.. 

Over  100. 
90  to  100. 

Pyelitis  

Lithotomy.   .  .                  ... 

Uraemia  

6 

1 

9 

1 

1 

1 

Haematuria     ... 

1 

1 

Order  6.  —  Generative  System. 
'Ovarian  Tumor  •  

9 

1 

1 

Cyst   Ovarian 

1 

1 

Dropsy,  Ovarian  ,.  

1 

1 

Fistula  urinary 

1 

1 

Metritis  

4 

^ 

1 

Ovaritis 

Tumor  uterine  fibroid  

9 

1 

1 

Uterine  fibroma 

1 

1 

Urethra!  stricture  

g 

1 

1 

Ovariotomy  (exhaustion).  .    . 

Peri-uterine  phlegmon  

1 

1 

•Cellulitis,  pelvic          

1 

1 

Order  7.  —  Locomotory  System. 
Ankle  joint  disease  

1 

1 

Buttocks  Gangrene  ...           .   . 

Femur  Caries  

1 

1 

Foot  Gangrene 

2 

1 

1 

Hip  Abscess  

Hip  Subcutaneous  Haemorrhage 

1 

1 

Knee  joint  Caries  

q 

1 

1 

Leg  cellulitis      

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

Order  8.—  Not  Localized. 

o 

Cirrhosis 

, 

1 

1 

g 

"Dropsy  
Eczema.  .  . 

34 
1 

£ 

1 

2 

1 

3 

7 

5 

4 

•• 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


443 


No.    X — CONTINUED. 


SEX. 

RACE. 

WARDS. 

51 

c 
g 
S° 
a 

(3 

o' 

a 

Casualties  

Suicides  

Homicides  

NATIVITIES. 

Female  

1 

Caucasian  

B 

I 

2dWard  

3d  Ward  

4th  Ward  

5th  Ward  

Of 

7th  Ward  

CO 

i 

g 

< 

10th  Ward.... 

llth  Ward.... 

12th  Ward 

Foreign 
Countries... 

Atlantic 
States  

CT 

Unascertained. 

.... 

2 

1 

1 

2 

3 

i 
1 

1 

I 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

"i 

"i 

3 

1 

, 

1 

i 

'"2 

.  .  .  . 

•' 

1 

... 

i 

i 

2 

j 

1 

1 

1 

... 

j 

i 

i 

1 
1 

1 

i 
i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

0 

'"i 

1 

1 

i 

.... 

i 
i 
i 

2 

1 

i 

2 
1 
1 
3 

i 

] 

„ 

1 
1 

1 
1 
3 

3 

1 
1 

i 

2 
14 

2 
2 

33 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
2 
21 

"4 

'    7 

1 

'2 

1 

1 

3 

5     .. 

1 

2 

10 

i 

1 

12 

444 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S    REPORT. 


TABLE 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

1 

AGES. 

d 

1 

5 

5* 

to 

g 

01 

5  to  10.  .  .  . 

10  to  15.  .  . 

15  to  20.  .  . 

20  to  30.  .  . 

30  to  40.  .  . 

40  to  50.  . 

50  to  60.  . 

60  to  70.  . 

70  to  80.  . 

80  to  90  

Over  100  
90  to  100  

Exposure  

i 

i 

Gangrene  

Haemorrhage  

Lues    

i 

•} 

Overheated  

Voraica  

i 

1 

CLASS   IV.—  DEVELOPMENTAL  DIS- 
EASES. 

Order  l.—Of  Children. 
Abscess,  umbilical  .  .  .  .  :  

Atelectasis  pulmonum    . 

4 
1 
46 

4 
1 

46 

Birth   injury  durinf 

Birth,  premature  
Birth  preternatural 

Bladder,  congenital  extraversion.. 

Cyanosis 

U 
3 

12 
3 

1 

1 

Deformity,  congenital  
Delivery,  instrumental 

Dentition  
Gangrene  umbilical 

24 

13 

11 

Haemorrhage,  ante-partem  
Labor  protracted 

1 

1 

Labor    difficult 

2 
2 
4 

2 
2 
4 

Spina  bifida  

Umbilical  cord  compression  ...    . 

1 
1 
1 

K 

"3 
1 

11 

Order  3.—  Of  Women. 

^ 

Child  birth 

5 

1 

3 
24 

... 

1 
1 

Fever,  puerperal,  metro-peritoni- 
tis  etc 

2 

1 

... 

... 

Haemorrhage,  uterine  (puerperal). 

7 

~\ 

• 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


445 


No.    X — CONTINUED] 


SI 

.  1  Female  

1  n  1 

RACE. 

WARDS. 

Public  Institutions. 

Casualties  .  .  , 

Suicides... 

H 

NATIVITIES. 

f 

I 

African 

1st  Ward.  .  .  . 

2d  Ward.... 

s 

I 

*> 

5 

I 

En 

? 

i 

a 

? 

! 

§ 
1 

8th  Ward... 

o 

i 

! 

o 
g; 

! 

M 

s 

! 

12th  Ward.. 

-. 
pi 

5 

Foreign 
Countries.  .  . 

Atlantic 
States  

00    O 

Unascertained. 

:   1  • 

1 
i 

1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

i 

1 

1 

1 

2 
1 
28 

2 

4 
1 

•' 

i 

1 

i 

1 
45 

'"i 

18 

46 

2 

i 

i 

B 

1 

i 

l! 

6 

n 

B 

14 
3 

8 
1 

5 
•2 

13 
3 

1 

i 

1 

i 

••; 

i 

1 

3 

4 

•> 

2 

14 

10 

24 

!') 

i 

••• 

2 

... 

1 

2 

1 

3 

3 

1 

1 

23 

1 

1 

i 

^ 

'"2 
2 
4 

'"i 

4 

2 
1 

2 
2 

1 

T 

4 

1 

1 

1 

../. 

.... 

1 
5 
3 

24 

1 
5 
3 

24 

1 

• 

1 

i 

1 

I 

1 

1 

i 

! 

. 

... 

1 

4 

•! 

! 

1 

1 

4 

0 

Z 

•2 

16 

3 

5 

7 

7 

1 

2 

. 

- 

2 

446 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     REPORTS. 


TABLE 


9 

AGES. 

g 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

d' 

3 

a, 

« 

ET 

to 
S" 

1     0, 

? 

£ 
c" 

& 

£ 

§ 
g 

3 

5 

c 
c 

£' 
? 

B 
? 

o 
o" 

§ 

o" 

§ 
§ 

c 

< 

a 

M 

p 

c 

Ol 

55 

8 

S 

g 

s 

c 

9 

8 

I 

.§ 

Order  3     Old  Age 

68 

> 

29 

•>( 

r 

Order  It.—  Of  Nutrition. 

Atrophy,  inanition  and  marasmus 
Asthenia  and  general  debility  

273 
59 

229 
16 

10 
3 

7 

? 

1 

4 

'i 

4 
3 

G 

1C 

8 

4 

11 

7 

CLASS  V.  —  VIOLENT  DEATHS. 

Order  1.  —  Accident  or  Negligence- 

141 

1 

1 

7 

7 

7 

10 

81 

87 

9S 

18 

8 

1 

g 

1 

i 

0 

8S 

go 

2j 

14 

17 

6 

1 

1 

CLASS  VI.  —  UNCLASSIFIED. 

Order  2.—  Unascertained  

50 

9 

•2 

3 

r; 

10 

10 

6 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


447 


No.  X — CONCLUDED. 


SEX. 

RACE. 

WARDS. 

cr 

•7    —  • 
c    2. 

H                 V  IT  IBS. 

a 

1 

n? 
p" 

Caucasian  

> 
^•T 

P 

1st  Ward.. 

e 
i 

8 

2. 

4th  Ward. 

1 

g 

{ 

is- 

1 

9th  Ward. 

c 

Foreign 
Countries.  .  . 
icides.  .  . 

Atlantic 
Rfcafafl 

|i 

Unascertained 

—• 

i 

2th  Ward 
1th  Ward 

Institutiol 

1 

s 

28 
141 

123 

7 
88 

40 

40 

132 
25 

18 

1 

15 

10 

67 

272 

59 

141 

8 
83 

47 

1 

1 

4 

e 

2 

is 

8 
6 

i 

2 

6 

18 

8 

4 

2 

6 
3 

16 
2 

3 

6 
3 

(i 
19 

6 

10 

4s 
12 

11 

26 

9 

6 

100 

3 

141  .. 

..       50 

.-       18 
..      26 

.-      92 

8        4 
49 

18 

7 
13 

3 
25 

5 

239 

20 

22 

1 

5 

fi 

4 

3 

7 

6 

8 

10 

6 

1 

3 

1 

1 

4 

4 

: 

31 

448 


HEALTH     OFFICEB'S    REPORT. 


APPENDIX    TO    TABLE    No.    X. 


MORTALITY     BY     CLASSES     IN     THE      DIFFERENT     MONTHS     (EXCLUSIVE     OF 

MONGOLIANS.) 


1 

18 

79. 

188 

0. 

«-i 

> 

v 

0 

Vi 

M 

t, 

W 

g 

> 

w 

e-i 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

'<? 

I 

1 

| 

1 

£ 

i 

I 

P 

HJ 

i 

3 

r 

! 

I" 

? 

o- 

1 

1 

; 

* 

j 

All  causes  

3873 

320 

273 

319 

467 

220 

344 

321 

307 

334 

418 

255 

295 

Specified  causes  

3893 

319 

269 

316 

4=13 

917 

340 

321 

306 

33'? 

419, 

9,46 

993 

Unascertained  causes  

50 

1 

4 

3 

14 

3 

4 

1 

1 

2 

6 

9 

2 

CLASSES. 

I.      Zymotic  diseases  

540 

52 

55 

54 

69 

41 

46 

35 

35 

36 

55 

16 

46 

II.     Constitutional  diseases  

751 

41 

46 

66 

73 

42 

75 

67 

69 

72 

83 

62 

55 

III.  Local  diseases  

1749 

137 

118 

120 

197 

96 

158 

150 

137 

170 

906 

116 

137 

IV.  Developmental  diseases  .  .  . 

586 

67 

35 

50 

95 

25 

41 

51 

49 

44 

50 

38 

41 

V     Violent  deaths 

204 

22 

15 

26 

19 

13 

20 

17 

16 

10 

18 

14 

14 

VI.  Unascertained  causes  

50 

1 

4 

3 

14 

3 

4 

1 

1 

2 

6 

9 

2 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


449 


TABLE    No.     XL 

MONTHLY    DISTRIBUTION    OF    MORTALITY    AMONG    THE    MONGOLIANS    FOR 
FOURTEEN   YEARS. 


FISCAL  YEARS. 

H3 

CH 
c 

% 

August  

1 

1 

November  .  . 

December.  .  . 

«H 
P 

3 

February  .  .  . 

f 

! 

1 

«H 
a> 

1866  67 

163 

14 

14 

17 

19 

9 

14 

13 

9 

19 

11 

9 

1» 

1867-68 

167 

1868-69 

994 

19 

19 

16 

91 

14 

19 

°7 

10 

94 

90 

99 

?0 

1869  70 

990 

11 

14 

I'l 

q 

18 

95 

16 

91 

16 

93 

9q 

24 

1870-71 

995 

1871  72 

359 

99 

40 

39 

24 

93 

25 

98 

31 

40 

41 

31 

9--> 

1872-73.          

405 

?,5 

31 

?3 

99 

97 

39 

98 

36 

40 

47 

49 

38 

1873  74 

465 

44 

38 

33 

36 

33 

35 

40 

48 

48 

34 

43 

33 

1874-75           

453 

35 

?9 

96 

49 

39 

39 

49 

34 

51 

41 

37 

5'? 

1875-76          

609 

50 

45 

31 

49 

39 

54 

50 

53 

58 

49 

61 

77 

1876-77.            

615 

77 

55 

75 

58 

64 

48 

39 

44 

38 

44 

41 

41 

1877-78               

597 

51 

37 

34 

44 

41 

43 

44 

36 

55 

46 

48 

39 

1878-79                    

593 

43 

33 

56 

39 

43 

41 

59 

43 

36 

48 

50 

39 

1879-80               

467 

3-1 

97 

33 

•10 

30 

39 

36 

51 

ifi 

49 

43 

41 

29 


450 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S    REPORT. 


TABLE    No.    XII. 

MORTALITY  IN  SAN  FRANCISCO  TOE  FOUBTEEN  YEARS  ARRANGED  ACCORDING 
TO  CLASSES  (MONGOLIANS.) 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

! 

tV 

1 

? 

I 

§ 

r 

? 

? 

00 

r 

? 

r 

P 

? 

r1 

So" 

F 

o 

M 

to 

« 

? 

Cn 

.ps 

r* 

po 

CO 

P 

: 

: 

Zymotic  diseases  
Constitutional  diseases  
Local  diseases 

31 
9 

•58 

28 
13 
35 

60 
60 
42 

25 
77 

69 

45 
96 
71 

48 
122 
46 

25 
71 
17 

20 
99 
19 

6 
48 
11 

28 
67 
13 

81 
35 

7 

7 
39 
20 

3 
120 
16 

10 
122 
54 

Developmental  diseases  .  .  . 
Violent  deaths 

60 

10 

44 
12 

21 
g 

21 
11 

18 
16 

2 

19 

12 

19 

9 
16 

11 

22 

13 

41 

23 
31 

17 
21 

22 

Unascertained  causes  

81 

6 

27 

51 

109 

278 

303 

363 

468 

438 

407 

346 

224 

Totals  

163 

167 

994 

990 

•w 

1405 

465 

4-5" 

6C9 

615 

527 

523 

467 

TABLE    No.    XIII. 

PERCENTAGE  OF  DEATHS  IN  THE  VARIOUS  CLASSES  FOR  FOURTEEN  YEARS 

(MONGOLIANS.) 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

~4 

1 

1 

1869-70. 

1870-71. 

00 

-4 
to 

25 

I 

S 

25 

s 

I 

! 

-» 

i 
oo 

25 

£ 
CO 

g 

'4.3 

21.3 
4.1 
2.6 
•2.6 
65.1 

1.3 
10.6 
2.4 
1.9 
3.6 
80.1 

Zymotic  diseases  
Constitutional  diseases  

19.0 
5.5 
35.6 
36.8 
3.1 
0.0 

16.8 
7.8 
20.9 
6.0 
0.0 
48.5 

26.8 
26.8 
18.8 
19.6 
5.3 
2.7 

11.4 
35.0 
28.2 
9.5 
3.6 
12.3 

15.2 
32.5 
24.1 
7.1 
3.7 
17.4 

13.4 
34.0 
12.8 
5.0 
4.4 
30.4 

6.2 
17.5 
4.2 
0.5 
3.0 
68.6 

4.6 
11.0 
2.1 
1.8 
3.6 
76.9 

18.2 

5.7 
1.1 
2.1 
6.7 
71.2 

1.4 

7.4 
3.8 
4.4 
5.8 
77.S 

0.6 
22.9 
3.1 
3.2 
4.0 

^ 

2.2 
26.1 
11.5 
4.7 
7.4 
47.9 

Developmental  diseases  .  .  . 
Violent  deaths          

Unascertained  causes  

MOKTALITY    STATISTICS. 


451 


TABLE    No.     XIY. 

ESTIMATED    POPULATION,  DEATHS    AND  DEATH  KATE  OF  SAN  FKANCISCO  FOR 
FOURTEEN  YEARS  (MONGOLIANS.) 


FISCAL  YEARS. 


ESTIMATED 
POPULATION. 


PER  CENT. 
PER  1,000. 


1866-67. 

1867-68 4,000* 

4,000* 

1869-70 8,600t 

1870-71 9,000* 

1871-72 10,000* 

1872-73 12,000* 

1873-74 14,500* 

1874-75 19,000* 

1875-76 30,000* 

1876-77 30,000* 

1877-78 30,000* 

1878-79 30,000* 

1879-80 22,OCOt 


163 
167 
224 
220 
295 
359 
405 
465 
453 
609 
615 
527 
523 
467 


41.75 
56.00 
25.58 
32.77 
35.90 
33.75 
32.06 
23.84 
20.30 
20.50 
17.56 
17.43 
21.02 


*  According  to  Langley's  City  Directory, 
t  U.  S.  Census  Returns. 


452 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S    REPORT. 


TABLE 

TOTAL    MORTALITY     OF     MONGOLIANS    DURING 


i 

AC 

rES. 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

1 

? 
!* 

10 

£ 

f 

5  to  10. 

10  to  15 

g- 

§ 

20  to  30 

30  to  40 

§ 

S" 

§ 

50  to  60 

s  s 

Z       0 

s  § 

* 

. 

All  causes             :  

467 

3° 

16 

13 

23 

8 

23 

90 

1^8 

55 

44 

18      9 

Specified  causes  
Unascertained  causes  

243 
2°4 

11 
21 

5 
11 

6 

7 

3 
20 

5 
^ 

2 
91 

53 
S7 

82 
4fi 

34 
2] 

25 
19 

10     3 

8      6 

CLASSES 

I.      Zymotic  diseases  
II.     Constitutional  diseases... 

10 
122 

1 

9 

3 

38 

2 
591 

4 
19 

"9" 

2     .. 

Ill    Local  diseases          

54 

1 

10 

?fi 

f> 

q 

1      2 

22 

U 

5 

5 

1 

V      Violent  deaths  

35 

9 

4 

•? 

fi 

6 

7 

7      1 

VI.  Unascertained  

224 

21 

11 

7 

90 

3 

91 

37 

46 

?1 

19 

8      6 

I. 

1 

1 

Fever  typhoid             .  .    . 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Pyaemia                      

1 

1 

Syphilis  

6 

1 

9. 

8 

II. 

3 

1 

1 

1 

Leprosj7       -               • 

1 

1 

118 

9 

37 

50 

19 

8 

2    .. 

in. 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Arthitis 

1 

1 

MOKTALITY     STATISTICS 


453 


NUMBEE    XY. 

THE     FISCAL     YEAR    ENDING    JUNE    30,    1880. 


SEX. 

i 

CITY  WARDS. 

2 

a 

02 

S 

1 

Nativiti 

M 

S 

3 

2 

§ 

cT 

Female  

—  Mongolian 

1st  Ward. 

2d  Ward.. 

3d  Ward.. 

4th  Ward. 

5th  Ward. 

6th  Ward. 

7th  Ward  . 

8th  Ward. 

1 

10th  Ward 

llth  Ward 

12th  Ward 

ic  Institution 

F 

£ 

c' 

E: 

i 

^ 

P 

Pacific  Coa 

; 

* 

S° 

??" 

g. 

' 

| 

S 

386 

81 

467 

5 

20 

8 

199 

15 

112 

18 

6 

18 

3 

9 

24 

7 

26 

5 

4 

401 

63 

112 

20 

243 

1 

5 

2 

112 

7 

63 

3 

4 

2 

1 

1 

2 

7 

26 

5 

4 

220 

23 

158 

66 

794 

4 

1r. 

6 

87 

8 

49 

1^ 

9 

16 

2 

8 

12 

181 

in 

7 

s 

10 

6 

4 

9 

-) 

109 

13 

122 

5 

76 

3 

32 

1 

1 

1 

6 

122 

49 

5 

54 

24 

2 

19 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

54 

13 

D 

22 

1 

2 

6 

2 

8 

1 

1 

i 

22 

34 

1 

^ 

•'<; 

C 

j 

35 

158 

66 

224 

4 

15 

6 

87 

8 

49 

15 

2 

16 

2 

8 

12 

•• 

181 

40 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

-j 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

2 

6 

5 

1 

fi 

1 

2 

R 

9 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

107 

11 

118 

<s 

7-1 

s 

82 

1 

1 

/I 

118 

1 

1 

1 

1 

l 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

454 


HEALTH    OFFICER'S    KEPORT. 


TABLE 


1 

AG] 

33. 

CAUSES   OF   DEATH. 

Cj 

a 

1 

M 

bO 

b» 

S" 

5  to  10.  . 

10  to  15. 

15  to  20. 

20  to  30. 

30  to  40. 

40  to  50. 

50  to  60. 

60  to  70. 

80  to  90. 
70  to  80. 

. 

Cystitis  

1 

1 

Dropsy  

6 

4 

1 

1 

Haemoptysis  
Hepatitis  

5 

21 

3 
4 

1 

7 

1 

2 

5 



Liver  disease  (undefined)  
Metritis  

1 
1 

.... 

1 

1 

Pneumonia  

11 

1 

3 

Q 

1 

Peritonitis  

5 

4 

1 



IV. 

Atrophy,  inanition  and  ma- 
rasmus   

99 

11 

5 

5 

1 

V. 

Casualties  

26 

2 

4 

2 

5 

4 

3 

5 

5 

1 

1 

9 

1 

Homicides 

4 

1 

2 

1 

VI. 

Unascertained 

24 

11 

7 

20 

3 

21 

37 

46 

21 

19 

8      C 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


455 


No.     XV — CONCLUDED. 


SEX. 

RACE—  Mongolian.  . 

WARDS. 

2 
S' 

| 

I' 

li 

v 

a 

a 
^ 

s 

^•- 

Nativitit 

1 

Female  

1st  Ward...  . 

2dWard  

3d  Ward  

4th  Ward.... 

1 

! 

g 

i 

-j 

c? 

I 

8th  Ward.... 

S 

1 

10th  Ward... 

llth  Ward  .  .  . 

1 
I 

Ic  Institutions.  . 

For.  Countrie 

Pacific  Coast. 

1 
6 
5 
20 

1 

'io' 

4 

13 

26 
5 
3 

158 

1 

1 

$ 

s 

9 

1 

3 

5 

1 
1' 

3 

5 

1 

9 

5 
21 
1 
1 

1 

21 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

9 

1 
11 
5 

22 

26 

*i 

1 

6 

*, 

11 

2 
6 

2 
2 

1 

8 



5 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

26 

22 

26 

i 

5 
4 

1 
66 

4 
224 

4 

4 

15 

6 

87 

8 

49 

15 

2 

16 

2 

18 

12 

181 

40 

456 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     EEPOET. 


APPENDIX    TO    TABLE    No.    XV. 

MORTALITY     OF    MONGOLIANS    BY     CLASSES     IN     THE 
DIFFERENT    MONTHS. 


g 

18 

79. 

18 

80. 

£ 

CAUSKS  OF  DEATH  . 

«H 

c_ 

<<j" 

1 

September. 

October.  .  .  . 

November.. 

| 

.8 

January  

February.  . 

I 

| 

1 

e-i 

All  causes  

467 

S4 

96 

82 

86 

88 

88 

51 

40 

48 

5?, 

86 

41 

Specified  causes            .    . 

9<n 

20 

I9 

14 

18 

17 

16 

27 

95 

?6 

9,6 

15 

?,7 

Unascertained  causes  

994 

14 

14 

IS 

18 

9,1 

17 

94 

15 

22 

?,6 

?,1 

14 

CLASSES. 

I.      Zvmotic  diseases  

10 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

II.    Constitutional  diseases.  .. 

122 

10 

3 

8 

8 

f) 

6 

15 

15 

10 

14 

9 

18 

54 

5 

3 

3 

4 

6 

6 

6 

4 

5 

4 

?, 

6 

IV.  Developmental  diseases.  .  . 
Y     Violent  deaths 

22 
35 

5 

2 

s 

"-'9 

2 
3 

1 
3 

2 
2 

4 

3 

3 

3 

7 

3 

4 

1 
3 

1 

VI.  Unascertained  causes  

244 

14 

14 

18 

18 

21 

17 

24 

15 

22 

26 

21 

14 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


457 


TABLE    No.    XVI. 

NATIVITIES    OF    DECEDENTS     IN     THE     DIFFERENT    MONTHS. 


UNITED   STATES. 

g 

g 

1879. 

1880. 

it* 
c 
«? 

> 
1 

September  

October  

November  

f 

January  

February 

S" 

I 

1 

C-t 

1 

Alabama, 

5 
1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

Alaska  Territory  

2 

9 

1 

1 

1 

1 

California 

152S 
10 
3 
1 
1 

129 
1 
1 

113 

149 

1 
1 

165 
1 

116 

112 

1 

121 

1 

109 
1 

147 

139 

1 
1 

106 
2 

122 
1 

Connecticut  
District  of  Columbia 

Delaware  

Florida 

1 

1 

'"l 
1 

i 

Georgia  
Illinois 

6 

20 
9 
Q 

1 
1 

3 
2 

"-4 

1 

"*8 

'"3 
2 
1 

2 

3 

2 

1 
4 

2 

Indiana  -  
Iowa 

1 

.... 

1 

i 

""i 

i 

Kentucky  

8 

1 

1 

1 

Kansas 

Louisiana  

19 
62 
25 
106 

4. 

3 
3 
1 
12 

3 
6 
1 
5 

1 

1 

2 
6 

2 
6 
4 
4 
1 

'"2 
2 
13 

1 
7 
3 

7 
1 

"  8 

1 

4 
2 
5 

1 
11 

2 

8 

2 
8 
3 
11 

1 

7 
1 
14 
2 
2 

"ie 

1 
1 

i 

6 
3 
It 

'"l 

"21 
2 
1 

4 
1 
1 
10 

"*8 

"i-2 

2 
1 

Maine  

Maryland  . 

Massachusetts  

Minnesota 

Missouri  
Michigan 

13 

4 

3 

1 

1 

1 

.... 

1 

1 

'"i 
1 

25 
1 
3 

M  ississippi  

4 

201 
22 

15 

1 
15 

2 

1 

] 

New  York  . 

10 
1 
1 

21 

1 
1 

10 
1 
2 

14 
3 
1 

14 

2 
1 

22 
3 
2 

21 
3 

New  Jersey  
New  Hampshire 

Nebraska  

Nevada 

4 
6 
26 
6 

1 

1 

"*i 

i 

4 

1 

*"i 

i 

1 

North  Carolina  
Ohio. 

1 

5 
1 
3 

1 

1 
2 

4 
2 
1 

3 

1 

'"5 

i 

3 
'"4 

2 
1 
5 
3 

1 

4 

'"  J 

1 
2 
1 

3 
3 
4 

3 

"'<3 

2 

2 
6 

"    I 

Oregon  

Pennsylvania  
Rhode  Island  
South  Carolina  

49 
12 

8 
2 

2 
2 
2 

Tennessee  

i 
i 

Texas  

1 
1 

17 
19 
3 
1 

Utah  Territory  

"3 

1 

"•2 

'"i 

2 
1 

'"i 
i 

"-2 
3 

'"i 

1 
3 
1 

Virginia 

1 
1 
1 

1 
3 
1 

2 
2 

'"i 

3 

2 

Vermont  
Wisconsin  

Washington  Territory   

West  Virginia  
United  States  

1 

9 

2242 

"i 

186 

1 
1 

153 

'"i 

204 

'"i 

172 

2 

220 

170 

2 

168 

1 

182 

177 

225 

210 

173 

Totals  

458 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S    REPORT. 


TABLE     No.    XVI— CONTINUED. 
NATIVITIES  OF  DECEDENTS  IN  THE  DIFFERENT  MONTHS. 


| 

18 

r9. 

18i 

JO. 

FOREIGNERS. 

CH 

> 
1 

| 
3 

1 

November. 

December  . 

| 

1 
1 

g- 

> 

•O 
2. 

g 

CH 

a 
§ 

: 

Austria 

18 

3 

2 

1 

i 

1 

3 

? 

9 

9 

1 

Australia  

8 

9 

i 

2 

1 

2 

Africa 

1 

1 

Bavaria  '  

2 

1 

1 

Belgium 

4 

1 

i 

1 

1 

Brazil  

1 

1 

Buenos  Ayres 

1 

1 

British  America  

3 

1 

2 

British  Columbia 

China  
Canada 

437 
23 

34 
1 

25 

33 
1 

39 

2? 

37 
2 

34 

2 

49 
3 

44 
1 

44 
1 

35 

5 

36 
2 

Chile  

8 

I 

2 

1 

3 

1 

Central  America  

2 

1 

1 

Costa  Rica  

1 

1 

31 

1 

3 

2 

5 

a 

1 

5 

<i 

3 

? 

1 

15 

14 

1 

England 

109 

9 

6 

6 

12 

7 

11 

22 

ff 

11 

18 

11 

1 

1 

France 

110 

8 

8 

6 

8 

6 

14 

13 

B 

14 

9 

n 

8 

Finland  

Germany 

8 
322 

24 

1 

29 

38 

2 
99 

1 

22 

30 

20 

1 
oq 

si 

1 
30 

"?3 

2 
17 

4 

1 

1 

1 

i 

Guatemala                  

Holland  

7 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

Ireland  

622 

3fi 

H 

54 

^ 

53 

48 

71 

5S 

^Q 

58 

41 

44 

India 

2 

1 

1 

1 

Italv 

39 

1 

3 

6 

7 

4 

2 

3 

3 

B 

4 

1 

1 

1 

Labrador      .   . 

1 

1 

Mexico  

50 

s 

<S 

6 

7 

6 

5 

3 

4 

s 

3 

3 

f. 

Malta                                     .... 

1 

1 

3 

2 

1 

12 

2 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

0 

1 

12 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

s 

New  Brunswick  

9 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

New  Zealand                         .... 

3 

1 

1 

1 

New  South  Wales 

1 

1 

Portugal  

13 

1 

2 

2 

2 

1 

Prince  Edward  Island 

4 

1 

2 

1 

Peru 

4 

1 

9 

1 

11 

1 

1 

2 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Russian  America.  .  . 

1 

1 

MOKTALITY    STATISTICS. 


459 


TABLE     No.    XVI — CONCLUDED. 
NATIVITIES  OF  DECEDENTS  IN  THE  DIFFERENT  MONTHS. 


FOREIGNERS. 

| 

1879. 

1880. 

| 

> 

i 

September. 

October.... 

* 
1 

1 


December.  . 

CH 
P 
S3 

February.  . 

March.  .... 

> 
"d 

1 

«_, 

S 

Scotland  

57 
36 
24 
4 

4 
5 
2 

4 
3 
2 

2 
4 
2 

j 

10 

4 

5 
2 
2 

1 

6 
2 
4 
1 

4 
4 
4 

5 
3 

1 

9 
4 
3 
1 

2 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

Sweden 

Switzerland  
Spain 

Society  Islands  

1 
3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

South  America  
Turkey 

1 

1 

U.  S.  Colombia  (S.  A.)  
Wales 

1 
13 
10 
37 
2 

"i 

i 

6 

1 
1 

1 
3 

1 

2 
1 
10 

2 
4 
2 
1 

1 

3 
1 
3 

"i 

2 

1 

West  Indies  
Unascertained 

4 

1 

6 

1 

2 

Totals  

W>5 

149 

155 

173 

185 

171 

184 

211 

187 

197 

195 

143 

145 

TABLE    No.    XVII. 
AGES     OF    DECEDENTS     IN    THE    DIFFERENT     MONTHS. 


S3 

18 

79. 

18 

80. 

AGES. 

«H 
£ 
*< 

August.  .  .  . 

September. 

October.  .  . 

November  . 

December  . 

January  

February  .  . 

I 

> 

1 

1 

ft 

Under  1  year  of  age  

888 

85 

74 

10-} 

Ill 

67 

57 

65 

57 

7'-) 

69 

69 

6T 

From  1  to  2  years  . 

221 

12 

10 

14 

22 

15 

19 

16 

20 

27 

3-? 

15 

19 

From  2  to  5  years  

213 

16 

1« 

16 

14 

17 

17 

24 

17 

15 

98 

16 

17 

From  5  to  10  years  
From  10  to  15  years  

121 

51 

7 
6 

12 
6 

11 

9 
3 

18 

6 

11 

4 

11 
3 

12 
4 

9 
5 

7 
4 

11 
3 

From  15  to  20  years 

99 

10 

10 

(j 

3 

6 

11 

g 

5 

S 

10 

7 

9 

From  20  to  30  years  

489 

51 

33 

40 

39 

34 

37 

42 

55 

42 

42 

40 

32 

From  30  to  40  years  
From  40  to  50  years  
From  50  to  60  years 

738 
594 
457 

48 
38 
32 

51 
33 

26 

62 
61 
31 

60 
56 
43 

68 
49 
37 

67 
51 
37 

60 
65 
48 

61 
45 
43 

74 
55 
44 

74 
51 
59 

59 
45 

28 

52 
40 
36 

From  60  to  70  years  

260 

19 

17 

20 

23 

20 

20 

30 

21 

*0 

22 

20 

18 

From  70  to  80  years  . 

143 

7 

12 

9 

10 

7 

g 

14 

14 

26 

14 

9 

13 

From  80  to  90  years  

54 

3 

0 

4 

4 

6 

7 

3 

9 

5 

4 

2 

1 

From  90  to  1.00  years  

7 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

Over  100  years  

0 

Unascertained 

7 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

Totals 

4340 

335 

313 

377 

405 

341 

35-2 

393 

363 

422 

405 

316 

318 

Stillbirths  

316 

28 

<>0 

27 

27 

"•Mi 

40 

24 

20 

21 

27 

39 

34 

Births  reported 

1320 

143 

103 

114 

136 

116| 

122 

97 

95 

91 

115 

75 

114 

460 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     REPORT. 


TABLE    No.    XVIII. 
SEX,     RACE    AND     NATIVITIES     OF     DECEDENTS. 


P  2 

cT 

3 

| 

IS 

30. 

BEX,    RACE  AND 

•3  |- 

1 

* 

&H 

> 

02 

0 

a 

M 

«_ 

q 

g 

j^ 

g 

c« 

KATIVITIES. 

:  - 
\  ! 

? 

^ 

I 

jptember  . 

f 

ovember  . 

I 

3 

J 

f 

I 

? 

1 

Sex. 

Males.  . 

2381 

388 

2767 

203 

207 

235 

258 

224 

297 

247 

236 

266 

257 

216 

191 

Females  

1492 

81 

1573 

132 

106 

142 

147 

117 

125 

146 

127 

156 

148 

100 

127 

Race. 

Caucasian  

38T> 

3812 

291 

282 

338 

364 

303 

311 

348 

305 

372 

351 

271 

271 

Mongolian 

467 

467 

34 

o* 

27 

34 

40 

31 

39 

37 

52 

45 

49 

43 

41 

African  

61 

61 

10 

4 

5 

1 

7 

2 

8 

6 

5 

5 

2 

6 

Nativities. 

Foreign  countries  

1659 

401 

2060 

143 

152 

169 

185 

165 

174 

209 

187 

194 

196 

142 

144 

Atlantic  States  

702 

702 

56 

42 

54 

54 

53 

56 

60 

65 

78 

66 

67 

51 

Pacific  Coast  

1478 

"63 

1541 

130 

116 

150 

166 

117 

112 

122 

111 

147 

143 

106 

121 

Unascertained  

34 

3 

37 

6 

3 

4 

6 

10 

2 

3 

1 

2 

Totals 

3873 

467 

434 

335 

313 

377 

405 

341 

352 

393 

363 

422 

405 

316 

318 

MORTALITY       STATISTICS. 


461 


TABLE    No.    XIX. 
LOCALITIES   OF   MOKTALITY  FOR  EACH   MONTH. 


al 

| 

1 

18 

79. 

18 

». 

LOCALITIES. 

3  f  • 
a 

P 

B 

& 

> 

§ 

CH 

c. 

August  

September.  .  . 

October  

!zi 

0 

3 

1 

December  .  .  . 

1 

«<! 

February  

g 
p 

& 

> 

T3 
»t 

<-< 

CH 

c 

3 
£» 

First  Ward  
Second  Ward..  .. 

139 

?48 

8 
8 

147 

?,56 

12 
15 

16 
16 

n 

22 

19 

26 

10 
14 

13 

?,3 

13 

?9 

12 

18 

9 

33 

15 

96 

11 
1Q 

6 
15 

Third  Ward  
Fourth  Ward.... 

20 
3-74 

195 

20 
46? 

2 
40 

2 

99 

2 
39 

"37 

2 
49 

1 
37 

5 
44 

33 

2 
39 

1 
49 

1 

38 

35 

Fifth  Ward  
Sixth  Ward 

26 
99 

124 

26 
216 

1 
12 

2 
I9 

1 
15 

1 
91 

19 

4 

99 

4 

17 

1 
">0 

6 

9S 

1 

17 

1 
20 

2 

18 

Seventh  Ward  
Eighth  Ward... 
Ninth  Ward  
Tenth  Ward  

158 
205 

227 
458 

1 

"97 

159 
205 
227 

485 

21 
14 

11 

19 
18 
18 
31 

ia 

16 
10 
51 

12 
9 
35 
56 

13 
17 

24 
31 

13 
23 
13 
35 

7 
22 
17 
46 

16 
17 
15 

36 

19 
24 
23 

51 

13 
17 
21 
39 

6 
19 
14 
34 

8 
9 
26 
31 

Eleventh  Ward  
Twelfth  Ward  
Public  institutions.  .  .  . 
Casualties  
Suicides  
Homicide  

634 
376 
821 
111 

83 
8 

19 
24 

7 
26 
7 
21 

653 
400 
828 
137 
90 
29 

49 

28 
59 
16 
7 
4 

44 

33 
55 
7 
10 
1 

69 
36 
63 
16 
10 
4 

62 
27 

82 
8 
7 
3 

53 
34 
61 
10 
5 
4 

50 
39 
57 
12 

7 
3 

50 
37 

83 

•  10 

9 

49 
35 
80 
21 
6 
2 

62 
35 
71 
14 
8 
3 

64 
31 
93 
11 
5 
2 

30 
37 
68 
6 
11 
1 

71 

28 
56 
6 
5 

2 

Totals  

3873 

467 

4340 

335 

"313 

o77 

105 

341 

352 

393 

363 

422 

405 

316 

318 

TABLE    No.    XX. 
MONTHLY   DISTRIBUTION  OF  MORTALITY  AMONG   MINORS. 


1 

18 

'9. 

18 

50. 

PARENTAGE  OF  MINORS. 

vf 

1 

Op 

f 

| 

! 

I 

1 

3? 

a1 

f 

2. 

1 

s* 

3 

a 

f 

1 

1 

1 

I 

I 

1 

Foreign  parents  

759 

64 

69 

78 

89 

54 

54 

51 

58 

69 

69 

47 

57 

Native  parents. 

233 

20 

15 

22 

27 

16 

16 

21 

92 

14 

19 

21 

Mixed  parents  

191 

15 

13 

18 

24 

19 

20 

21 

6 

11 

20 

12 

12 

Unascertained  parents  

461 

37 

31 

72 

40 

•28 

33 

36 

27 

51 

38 

31 

3f 

Totals  

1644 

136 

198 

190 

180 

117 

123 

129 

113 

145 

146 

111 

1945 

462 


HEALTH    OFFICEK'S    REPORT. 


TABLE    No.    XXI. 
MONTHLY     DISTRIBUTION     OF    MORTALITY. 


WARDS,  PUBLIC  AND 
CHARITABLE    INSTI- 
TUTIONS, 
VIOLENT     DEATHS,   ETC 

uaucasian  and  At- 
rican  

Mongolian  

1 

i 

1879. 

1880. 

Si 

£ 

> 

September.  . 

October  

'f 
| 

1 

December  .  . 

January  

I 
C2 

I 

f. 

1 

«_i 

P 

City  Wards 

2832 
59 
325 

"a 

6 
3 

425 
"3 

:;.•.>;>: 

59 

328 

24! 

•: 

2~1 

240 

7 
22 

284 
4 
23 

305 
6 

35 

261 
21 

273 
<. 
21 

291 
3( 

254 
6 
30 

326 
6 
34 

294 
6 
39 

230 

25 

249 
5 
18 

City  &  Co.  Almshouse 
City&  Co.  Hospital.. 
County  Jail  
City  Prison  
City  Receiving  Hosp'l 
Cal.  State  Worn.  Hos. 
Cal  Female  Institute 

1 

3 

7 
3 

"~Z 

1 

1 

1 

1 
? 

2 

2 

i 

French  Hospital  .... 
German  Hospital  
House  of  Correction. 
Heb.  Orphan  Asylum 
Home  of  Inebriates.  . 
Home  of  Friendl'ss  Ch 
Industrial  School  
L.  Sisters'  Inf.  Shelter 
Ladies'  P.  &  R.  Soc'y. 
Mt.  St.  Joseph's  Asy. 
Magdalen  Asylum  .  .  . 
Old  Ladies'  Home  .  .  . 
Prot.  Orphan  Asylum 
R  Cath  Orph  Asy 

57 
67 
3 
1 
9 
2 
2 
6 
3 
91 
3 
1 

57 
67 
3 

7 
4 

4 

5 

6 
6 

4 

8 
1 

6 

•> 

3 

6 

11 
3 

5 

5 
10 

5 
6 

2 
3 

:::: 

1 
9 
2 
2 
6 
3 
91 
3 

1 

1 
'"4 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

j 

6 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

'"9 
1 

'"2 

2 
1 
10 

3 
1 

.... 

4 

8 

"6 
5 
2 

318 

'"e 

"'i 

i 

"i2 

"l2 

1 

1 

6 

i 
11 

'"e 
11 
i 

316 

S.  F.  Foundling  Asy. 
Scandinavian  Hosp'l. 
S.  F.  Female  Hosp'l  . 
St.  Mary's  Hospital  .  . 
St.  Luke's  Hospital  .  . 
2Gth-street  Hospital  . 
U.  S.  Marine  Hosp'l 

28 
2 

6 
98 
19 

28 

111 

83 
8 

S873 

"'a 

"26 

7 
21 

467 

28 
2 
6 
98 
19 
2 
28 
137 
90 
29 

1340 

4 

3 
4 

'"4 
16 
7 
4 

335 

1 

2 
7 
10 
I 

313 

1 
6 

"5 

16 
10 
4 

377 

1 
1 
1 
8 
3 

1 

8 
7 
3 

405 

6 

11 

2 

"-3 
10 
5 

4 

341 

7 

"  6 
2 

i 

12 

7 

352 

i 
i 

13 

2 

"'<3 
10 
9 

31H 

9 
2 
1 
2 
21 
6 
o 

363 

6 

2 
1 
2 
14 
8 
3 

422 

10 

2 

"2 
11 
5 
2 

405 

Suicides  
Homicides  

Totals... 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


463 


TABLE    No.    XXII. 

INTERMENT,  DISINTERMENT  AND  REMOVAL    PERMITS    ISSUED 
DURING  THE  FISCAL  YEAR. 


| 

1879. 

18 

30. 

CEMETERIES,    ETC. 

I4 

! 

|j 

Novembe 

December 

January. 

February 

g 

I 

I 

83 

3 
TO 

r* 

. 

Calvary  
City  

1781 
940 

140 

72 

147 

54 

1 
162    171 
56      81 

133 

138 

88 

151 
73 

143 

88 

166 

89 

163 

104 

129 
90 

138 
70 

Country  
Giboth  Oleum 

174 
60 

13 
5 

13 

5 

14      17 
6        5 

10 

5 

15 
5 

16 
4 

20 

8 
5 

16 
9 

20 
2 

13 

Greek  

4 

1 

1 

1 

Home  of  Peace 

62 

4 

4 

7        2 

5 

Q 

„ 

5 

5 

5 

7 

I.  O.  O.  F  
Laurel  Hill 

912 

457 

63 

65 
38 

92!     88 

4°      45 

70 
33 

83 
39 

83 
53 

68 
26 

85 
48 

91 
39 

59 
99 

67 
40 

Masonic  

446 

36 

26 

29      46 

41 

34 

43 

38 

46 

35 

35 

37 

Mission  Dolores  
Presidio  Reservation 

34 
30 

4 

3 

2 

5        4 
4        2 

1 

1 
7 

2 
2 

5 

4 

3 

3 

1 

Private  

2 

l! 

1 

R.  A.  P-  

37 

3 

5 

•>        i 

1 

» 

4 

7 

2 

2 

3 

5 

Salem  

3 

51       3 

2 

2 

2 

3 

3 

5 

Totals 

4992 

388 

365 

425    466 

3^4 

416 

444 

402 

OQQ 

Disinterments  

640 

154 

T>7 

| 
160      18 

50 

29 

36 

15 

19 

13 

12 

13 

Removals  

7QQ 

165 

129 

174      34 

61 

43 

48 

33 

26 

29 

31 

20 

4.l*|       D* 

464 


HEALTH     OFFICER'S     REPOET. 


TABLE     No.     XXIII. 
OCCUPATIONS,    AGES    AND    NATIVITIES    OF    DECEDENTS. 


OCCUPATION. 

Caucasian  and  African  . 

Mongolian  

i  ' 

i 

AGES. 

NATIVITIES. 

Under  20  

g 

8 

o 

o 

S" 

§ 

§ 
P 

s 

3 

c 
^ 

Over  80  

CJ 

r 

<§" 

a 

8 

Atlantic  States.. 

Pacific  Coast  

1 

Actor       

2 

9 

1 

i 

6 

5 
1 

12 

12 

3 

3 

3 

f 

... 

1 

Architect  

1 

1 

1 

Artist  
Baker  

1 

n 

1 

":2 
1 

, 

H 

3 

6 

11 

7 

"23 
15 

fi 

i 

9 
1 
22 
19 
3 

"*8 

1 
9 
1 
25 
19 
3 
8 

-i 

1 
2 
1 

•2 
8 
1 

'"i 

••• 

Barber  
Balloonist  
Boot  and  Shoemaker  — 
Blacksmith  
Bootblack 

4 

1 

4 

2 

0 
6 

1 
6 

3 

1 

1 
1 

-1  to  oo  co 

1 

1 

2 

1 

i 

... 

1 

I 

1 
2 

Boilermaker  

3 
1 

1 

8 

1 

1 
•2 

1 
2 
2 
10 
2 
27 
2 

"l 
4 
4 
3 
16 

Brewer  

H 

1 
4 

Broker 

5 
Ifi 

1 

6 
16 

i 

'"2 

Butcher  

5 

6 

"ii 

1 

1 
11 

1 

•J 
6 
1 

"a 

•• 

o 

5 

Carpenter  

43 

43 

3 

9 
1 

2 

2 
1 

2 
4 
2 
3 
4 
25 
1 

Caulker  

1 

1 

1 

Collector  
Cabinetmaker  
Conductor  
Car  Driver 

3 
2 

4 
2 
3 
3 
25 
1 
39 
1 
7 
6 

'"i 

.... 

1 

'"•2 
1 

'"i 

10 

i 

i 

i 

1 

1 

2 

2 
1 
2 

'"s 

1 

3 

Carriagemaker  

'"5 

2 

1 

1 

i 

1 

1 
3 
12 

1 
48 
1 
3 
5 
5 
22 
2 
3 
1 
2 
29 

2 
1 
10 

"7 

Clerk.....  

3 

Cook  

16 
1 

55 

1 
8 
6 

i 

9 

12 
'"2 

17 
1 
2 
3 
1 
5 

1 

14 

'"2 
1 

a 

2 

'"i 

9 

5 

•• 

Contractor  

2 

1 

2 
2 

2 

•2 

"2 

6 
1 
1 
1 

"s 

2 

'"i 
1 
3 

Coachman  
Cigarmaker  

8 
2 
4 

::* 

7 
23 

9 

4 
1 

i 

Cigar  Dealer  

Distiller  

1 

Dishwasher 

2 
35 

2 

9 

2 
35 
2 

1 
2 

"2 
1 

... 

1 
1 

Domestic  

Druggist 

2 

12 

10 
1 

6 

Dressmaker  

1 

1 

1 

2 

i 

Detective  (Private) 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

2 
2 

2 
2 

9 

"  i 

2 

2 

i 
i 

i 

1 

Editor 

9 

. 

1 

9 

9 

1 
2 
9 

i 

Engraver  
Engineer  

"2 

3 

1 

ll 

2 
4 

3 

5  .. 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


465 


TABLE    No.    XXIII— CONTINUED. 


OCCUPATION. 

Caucasian  and  African  . 

Mongolian  

i 

AGES. 

NATIVITIES. 

d 

^ 

§ 

g 
$ 

9 

g 

S" 

P 

s 
z 
s 

g 
£ 

8 

8 

s- 

3 

S 

cT 

8 

! 

8 

Unascertained  .  . 

| 
I 

3 
1 

Atlantic  States.. 

Pacific  Coast  

Unascertained  .  . 

8 
16 
1 

8 
16 
1 

3 

1 

4 

1 

i 

5 

5 
10 

1 

3 

4 

1 

"2 

;;; 

Farmer                 

2 

2 
1 

2 

3 

Florist 

Foreman 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

Fringe  Factory  

•• 

1 
1 

10 

1 

9 

i 

1 
2 
2 

"i 

1 
1 

Fruiterer       .    . 

9 

? 

'i 

8 

4 

1 

1 

'"2 
1 
2 

1 
2 
1 

i 

B 

Fireman  

9 

2 

I 

Fisherman  
Finisher  

9 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 

3 
1 

12 
1 
10 
1 
1 

Gardener  
Goldsmith  
Glovemaker 

1 

Gl'issblower            

1 
1 

1 

i 

Glasscutter 

1 
2 

Grocer  
Hatter 

10 
1 

10 
1 

i 

2 

4 
1 

2 

i 

8 
1 
1 

Housemover  

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

Housekeeper  

I? 

1? 

2 

4 

'"i 

1 
1 

1 

i 

I 

•• 

11 

2 
2 
1 
1 

1 
1 

'.'.'. 

Hostler  
Hotel  &  Boarding  House 
Ironworker                  .... 

2 
3 
1 
1 
5 
.     4 
3 
187 
1 

233 

2 
3 
1 
1 
5 
4 
3 
420 
1 

i 

Junk  Dealer  
Janitor                     

3 
1 

1 

2 

i 

3 

2 
1 
233 
1 
19 

•2 
2 
I 

•24 

'3 

'.'.'. 

Jeweler  

1 

8 
1 

Journalist 

Laborer  

2 

90 

150 

88 
1 

54 

27 

6 

£ 

Laundryman   

3 
12 

16 

19 
12 

1 

9 

8 
4 

7 

1 
2 
5 
1 

2 
1 

2 

1 

1 

3 
11 
1 

!) 
4 

... 

Longshoreman  
Liquor  Dealer  

15 
1 

15 
1 

2 

Lumberman     

2 

9 

2 
2 
11 
5 
5 

9 

1 
1 

7 
2 
4 

i 

i 

4 
3 
1 

1 

Lithographer  

'"i 

1 
1 

'"i 

"4 

1 
2 

'"2 
1 
1 
1 

1 

"a 

"3 

Machinist  
Master  .Mariner.  
Mason          

11 

5 
5 

1 

Missionary  

1 

2 

1 
2 

Mechanic 

1 

i 

16 
11 

7 

4 

4 

t 

'i 

1 

45 
34 

1 

28 

9 
1 

Merchant  

63 

43 
1 
4 
5 
8 

8 
1 

71 
44 
1 
4 
5 

'  *i 

9 

1 

16 
17 

18 
8 
1 

1 
1 

2 

Miner 

Millwright  
Miller  

'"i 

2 

2 
3 
1 
1 

2 
1 
5 

4 

Moulder  

4 
6 
1 
1 

1 

2 

Musician  

8 

Maltster  



Nun  

1 

s 

1 
3 

1 

Notary  

1 

1 

i 

2 
2 

1 
5 

1 
1 

"a 

i 

Nurse  

4 
1 

4 
1 

1 

3 

Nurseryman            

1 

•• 

Physician  and  Surgeon  .  . 
Pilot... 

12 
1 

1 

13 

1 

1 

1 

6 

1 

2 

2 

i 

30 


466 


HEALTH    OFFICEK'S    KEPORT. 


TABLE   No.   XXIII     CONTINUED. 


OCCUPATION. 

Caucasian  and  African  . 

Mongolian  

'  1 

AGES. 

NATIVITIES. 

1 

P 

g 

8 

§ 
o 

S 

& 
p 

§ 
P 

8 
S 

o7 

g- 
p 

C 

Unascertained  .  . 

Foreign  countries 

Atlantic  States.. 

o 

Unascertained.. 

: 

Plasterer 

4 

4 

2 

1 

4 

2 

2 

2 
2 

•1 

'"i 

... 

Plumber  and  Gasfitter  .  . 
Police  officer  

3 

4 

.... 

3 
4 

i 

Porkpacker    

1 

1 

, 

1 

1 

1 

7 

0 

1 

1 

Porter      

7 

Q 

i 

4 

1 

f 

] 

i 
"i 

6 

1 
5 
R 

•"2 

Printer 

Painter          

10 

7 

10 

7 
1 
1 
5 
1 

Public  Officer 

1 

1 

6 
1 
1 

Powder  mixer  

1 
1 

i 

Peddler 

5 
1 

-> 

f) 

1 

5 

Poultry  dealer 

1 

1 

Real  Estate  

5 
1 

5 

1 
2 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

... 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

; 

1 

9 

2 

1 

1 

1 

"i 

... 

.. 

2 
2 
1 

i 

... 

Roofer 

3 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 
3 
1 
1 
3 

1 

1 

Salesman  

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
1 

i 

.... 

;.'! 

i 

Sailmaker  
Saddler  &  Harnessmaker 
Saloonkeeper  

1 
3 
26 
6 

1 

1 
1 

6 

1 
5 
2 

"i 
i 

"7 

i 

1 

"2 

i 
'3 

2 
20 
4 
79 
13 

1 

i 

6 

1 
11 
•2 

1 

'"i 

26 
6 
90 
15 
1 

5 
3 
19 
6 

7 
1 
23 
4 
1 

6 

1 
31 

2 

90 
6 
1 

'"9 

Servant  

Sawfiler 

... 

1 

1 

2 

2 

, 

1 

2 
1 
5 

Sugar  refiner  

1 
5 
1 

1 

l\ 

'"2 

1 

1 

2 

i 

1 

Soldier 

1 

1 

1 

1 

•'• 

Solicitor 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

9 

1 

.... 

2 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 

1 

Soapmaker  

1 

1 

••• 

•• 

1 
1 

4 
3 

i 

i 

i1 

... 

... 

5 

5 
4 

1 

2 

1 
2 

1 
1 

'  i 

Steward  
Student 

4 

9 

2 
3 
2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

i 

... 

Stoneworker  

3 

9 

1 
1 

1 

i 

1 

2 

"i 

1 

4 
17 
10 
11 
2 

'"e 

4 
23 
10 
11 
2 

4 
1 

2 

1 

1 
7 
3 
1 

1 

1 
4 

2 
4 

2 
3 
2 
3 

'B 

i 
i 

i 

3 

21 
5 
6 
1 

i 

2 
5 

4 

Tailor 

Teacher  
Teamster  
Telegrapher  .  .  . 

i 

i 

'••' 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


467 


TABLE    No.    XXIII— CONCLUDED. 


OCCUPATION. 

Caucasian  and  African  . 

Mongolian  

| 

AGES. 

NATIVITIES. 

Under  20.  ... 

S 

S 

P 

g 

& 

s 

S 
? 
g 

§ 
$ 

8 

§ 
& 

3 

S 

g 
? 

? 

JB 

% 

c 

3 
1 

1 

3 

1 

Atlantic  States.. 

5i 
o 

Unascertained  .  . 

•; 

; 

Tinsmith    

5 
2 
1 

1 

6 
2 
1 

3 

2 
1 

i 

i 

2 
2 
1 

8 

1 

Trapper  and  Hunter  ... 
Trader 

1 

Tiler  

1 

2 

1 
<> 

1 

1 

Trunkmaker      .    . 

1 

1 

2 
2 

3 
1 

3 
1 

2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

Veterinary  Surgeon 

Varnisher  
Waiter 

4 
14 

4 
14 
3 

0 

'"i 

2 
4 

1 

2 
8 

i 

2 

"i 

i 

3 

8 
1 
1 

1 
5 

2 
1 
1 

'"i 

I; 

Watchman  
Weaver 

3 
2 

Wood  dealer  
Woodsawyer  and  Cutter. 
Watchmaker  
Wharfinger 

1 
4 
1 
1 

i 

1 
5 
1 
1 

"3 

1 

1 
1 

'"i 

4 
1 

1 

i 

7 

2060 

1 

702 

1541 

37 

Total  

4029 

311 

4340 

1593 

489 

736 

594 

457 

2GO 

143 

Gl 

468 


HEALTH     OFFICES 'S    EEPOET. 


TABLE     No.     XXIV. 

COMPAEAT1VE     VITAL     STATISTICS     OF    VAEIOUS     CITIES 
DUEING   THE   CALENDAE    YEAE   1879. 


CITIES. 

ESTIMATED 
POPULATION  . 

MAR- 
RIAGES 

'  3,222 
3,446 
2.957 

BIRTHS. 

STILL- 
BORNS  . 

TOTAL 
DEATHS. 

DEATH 
RATE 
PER  1,000. 

1    DEATHS 
FROM 
CONSUMP- 
TION. 

Alexandria,  Egypt. 
Brooklyn,  N.  Y.  ... 
Boston,  Mass  
Baltimore,  Md  
Buffalo,  N.   Y  
Breslau,  Germany.  . 
Belfast,  Ireland.*.  .. 
Barcelona,  Spain... 
Cork,  Ireland  
Calcutta,  India  
Copenhagen,  Den'k. 
Cincinnati,  Ohio  
Cleveland,  Ohio  
Chicago  
Dublin,  Ireland  
District  of  Columbia 
Edinburgh,  Scotl'd. 
Frankfort,  Germany 
Glasgow,  Scotland  .  . 
Havre,  France  
Havana,  Cuba  
Hamburg,  Germany 
Indianapolis,  Ind.  .  . 
Jersey  City,  N.  J... 
Louisville,  Ky  
London,  Eng  
Liverpool,  E'ng  
Milwaukee,  Wis... 
Munich.  Bavaria... 
Manchester,  Eng.  .  . 
Milan,  Italy  
New  York  City,  N.Y 
Newark,  N.  J  
New  Orleans,  La... 
Philadelphia  
Pittsburgh 

212,034 
564,448 
375,000 
393,796 
170,000 
270,000 
182,082 
260,000 
91,965 
429,539 
225,000 
280,000 
175,000 
537,624 
314,666 
170,000 
226,075 
126,003 
539,675 
92,068 
195,437 
417,239 
100,700 
125,000 
200,000 
3,620,868 
538,338 
124,000 
232,000 
-360,514 
288,300 
1,097,563 
125,000 
210,000 
901,380 
150,000 
102,500 
1,988,806 
294,437 
80,000 
305,000 
25,000 
500,000 
152,825 
669,741 
231,647 
10,000 
170,000 

8,335 
10,169 
10,200 
7,615 

10.574 

e;987 

7,406 
2.707 
6,409 
8,443 

7,774 

11,569 
7,435 
7,618 
2,060 
8,276 
5,608 
8,215 
2,689 
13,044 
5,991 
5,290 
2,826 
9,263 
11,235 
4,309 
4,430 
2,715 
12,450 
3,148 
9,052 
11,068 
1,470 
2,517 
2,410 
85,540 
14,502 
1,965 
8,081 
10,014 
8,509 
28,342 
3,116 
4,968 
15,473 
3,003 
2,026 
51,095 
6,712 
1,608 
4,340 
514 
6,167 
3,442 
25,990 
5,612 
240 
4,180 

36.6 
20.49 
20.37 
19.30 
12.12 
30.65 
31.00 
31.60 
29.00 
30.3 
26.6 
18.89 
16.15 
17.23 
36. 
25.35 
19.59 
21.05 
23.05 

""^A" 

26.53 
13.47 
20.14 
13.77 
23.3 
26.9 
15.8 
34.83 
27.9 
29.5 
25.82 
24.93 
23.65 
17.17 
20.02 
19.77 
25.69 
23.1 
20.10 
18.5 

889 
467 
620 

'"569" 
'"429" 

1,665 
1,262 
1,162 

'"647" 

2,350 

'"299" 

'  'l,961  ' 
1,203 

'  '  '  841  ' 
17,410 

'  9,993  ' 

'  7,409 
4,084 
19,817 
3,100 

'l'7,410  ' 

'"535" 
1,616 
433 
1,733 

166 
'"179" 

"'eso' 

199 

187 

399 
8,800 
1,348 
170 
948 

""4',343" 

33,452 
"  1,621  ' 

134,096 
20,844 

9,089  ' 
13,710 

25,573  ' 

198 
244 

8,446  ' 

5,224 

1,071 
18,906 

2,191 

18,499 

809 

2,481 

Providence,  R.  I,  .  . 
Paris,  France  
Rome,  Italy  
Richmond,  Va  
San  Francisco  
Salt  Lake,  Utah  
St  Louis  Mo 

2,522 
56,329 
7  961 

122 
4,277 

293 

8,518 

"si's" 

'"677" 

2,536 

1,416 

1,375 

4,641 

541 

12.33 

22.05 
38.8 
24.02 

781 

Stockholm,  Sweden. 
St.  Petersburgh.Rus. 

7,000 
189 
3,913 

"376" 

Virginia  City,  Nev. 
Washington,  D.  C.. 

'  '  944' 

24.62 

MORTALITY     STATISTICS. 


469 


TABLE    No.    XXV, 

STATEMENT    OF    MARRIAGES,    BIRTHS   AND     MORTALITY  FOR 
THE  FISCAL    YEARS  1879    AND   1880. 


MONTHS. 

GO 

tc 

Births 
Registered. 

ffi 

MONTHS. 

Marriage  Licenses 
Issued. 

f 

fi 

1878    July                 

199 

154 

375 

1879—  July  

174 

143 

335 

August  

218 

110 

344 

August  

170 

103 

313 

September 

214 

153 

384 

September          .... 

181 

114 

377 

October  
November          .... 

238 
192 

148 
110 

395 
369 

October  

November 

204 
221 

136 
115 

405 

341 

December  
1879    January 

203 
186 

146 
121 

438 
463 

December  
1880    January 

211 
172 

122 

97 

352 
393 

February  
March 

174 
115 

104 
91 

370 
325 

February  

151 

169 

95 
91 

363 
422 

April 

154 

130 

339 

April  

164 

115 

405 

Mav 

195 

99 

370 

Mav 

172 

75 

316 

June 

152 

138 

321 

June 

194 

114 

378 

Totals    .  .  . 

2,240 

1  504 

4  493 

Totals 

2  183 

1  340 

4  34ft 

470 


HEALTH  OFFICEK'S  REPORT 


TABLE    No.    XXVI. 

MONTHLY    DISTKIBUTION     OF    MORTALITY     FROM     ZYMOTIC 

DISEASES. 


i-s  ^ 

| 

! 

1 

379. 

18 

SO. 

CAUSES   OF  DEATH. 

II 

:  E> 

1 

g 
<<T 

> 

1 

1 

c 

November 

1 

«H 
at 

j 

February. 

March  

> 
TJ 

HJ 

y 
P 
H 

S 

5 

Alcoholism  

46 
6 

.... 

46 
6 

4 

7 
1 

5 
T 

8 

6 

4 

3 

3 

'2 

6 
1 

3 

1 
T 

Cholera  Infantum  
Cholera  Morbus      .    . 

77 

8 

1 

78 

8 

9 

7 

13 
1 

27 
1 

9 
1 

8 
1 

1 

T 

2 

1 

1 

7 

1 

Cerebral  Spinal  Meningitis  
Croup  .            

27 
SO 

27 
SO 

2 

9 

"9 

8 

s 

4 
5 

5 
S 

1 
8 

1 
<\ 

3 

»s 

2 

1 

9 

2 

3 

1 

Diarrhsea  

fl? 

?•? 

6 

! 

4 

•' 

1 

1 

2 

1 

8 

Diphtheria  

69 

6q 

q 

11 

7 

•> 

10 

o 

8 

9 

S 

<s 

S 

8 

4 

4 

1 

l 

1 

1 

Erysipelas  
Fever  Tvphoid 

8 

85 

1 

8 
86 

q 

in 

2 

8 

io 

1 
<s 

•  •  ^ 

1 

7 

/| 

3 

(} 

0 

1 
4 

"7 

Fever  Congestive  

4 

4 

1 

i 

I 

1 

1 

Fever  Remittent                 . 

IS 

IS 

1 

2 

9 

1 

2 

9 

9 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Fever  Typho-Malarial  

8 

1 

q 

1 

1 

1 

9 

2 

1 

1 

6 

6 

i 

T 

2 

1 

1 

Measles  
Mercurial  Poisonin^  (chronic) 

19 
1 

19 
1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

4 

6 

1 

2 

Purtussis  

S7 

37 

f> 

? 

1 

2 

S 

B 

S 

7 

9 

6 

Purpura  Hsemorrhagica 

9 

9 

1 

Pyaemia  

99 

1 

93 

?, 

i 

9 

3 

1 

2 

8 

1 

1 

5 

1 

Septicaemia  .... 

IS 

IS 

1 

i 

3 

1 

9 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Sewer  Gas  (poisonin^) 

2 

2 

g 

Scarlatina  

91 

91 

?, 

<^ 

8 

8 

8 

1 

4 

i 

Syphilis 

IS 

fi 

10 

? 

T 

! 

2 

9 

B 

9 

9 

9 

Variola 

1 

1 

j 

Totals 

-177 

10 

487 

16 

'iO 

•l"i 

60 

•iO 

l~ 

4'^ 

88 

88 

4r> 

07 

1° 

FINANCIAL.  471 

EXPENSE  OF  OFFICE,  HEALTH  DEPAKTMENT. 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL.,  July  1,  1880. 
Dr.  J.  L.  Meares, 

Health  Officer  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

DEAR  SIR — I  have  the  honor  to  submit  the  following  report  of  the  expenses 
of  this  office  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880: 

EXPENSES. 

Salaries $17,085  00 

Boarding  and  shoeing  horses 2,212  00 

Kent 1,50.0  00 

Stationery,  postage  and  repairing 449  30 

Printing  reports,  blanks  and  books 881  40 

Vaccine  virus ,  82  00 

Chinese  Interpreter , 65  00 

Searching  for  sewer  leaks 40  00 

Shorthand  reporting  in  investigating  smallpox 60  00 

Advertising  condemnation  of  Chinatown 409  50 

$22,784  20 

RECEIPTS. 

Uemoval  and  disinterment  permits , $  1,750  00 

$21,034  20 

Very  respectfully, 

JOHN  HOESCH, 

Secretary. 


472 


HEALTH     OFFICEK'S    REPORT. 


REPORT    OF    QUARANTINE    OFFICER, 


SAN  FKANCISCO,  June  30,  1880. 
J.  L.  Meares,  M.  D., 

Health  Officer  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

SIE — I  have  the  honor  to  submit  the  following  report  for  the  fiscal  year 
ending  June  30,  1880: 

Number  of  vessels  entering  this  port  as  per  tabulated  statement  for  each 
month : 

1879— July,  51;  August,  58;  September,  63;  October,  61;  November,  54; 
December,  54.  1880— January,  52;  February,  54;  March,  50;  April,  51? 
May,  50;  June,  49.  Total,  647. 

Amount  of  quarantine  fees  collected  and  turned  over  to  the  Treasurer,, 
taking  his  receipt  for  the  same : 


MONTHS. 

DUE. 

RECEIPTS. 

1879    July                                              

$    357  50 

5    381  50 

August  
September 

397  50 

447  50 

370  00 
462  50 

October  
November  . 

410  00 
'     350  00 

435  00 
342  50 

December  

365  00 

350  00 

1880  —  January  .... 

345  00 

310  00 

February 

335  00 

350  00 

March  

315  00 

305  00 

April 

335  00 

262  50 

May  

307  50 
307  50 

32?  50 

382  00 

Total  

$4,272   50 

$4,272  50 

Balance  due  

33   25 

33  25 

4/4   QflK     TK 

Amount  collected  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1879,  was   $4,305  75. 


QUAKANTINE. 


473 


EXPENSES. 


1879— July $450  00 

August 450  00 

September 450  00 

October 450  00 

November 450  00 

December 450  00 

1880— January 450  00 

February 450  00 

March 450  00 

April 450  00 

May 450  00 

June .450  00 


Total $5,400  00 


Rent  for  the  year $360  00 

Merchants'  Exchange — July 84  00 

Repairs  to  boat — October 

Merchants'  Exchange — November. ... 

Printing — November 

Merchants'  Exchange — March . . . 


Printing-  April. 
Sundries — May . . 

Printing  —May 

Telephone — Two  years 


8  78 
48  00 

8  25 
48  00 
11  00 
30  15 

6  50 
133  7? 


Merchants'  Exchange 36  00 

Total $780  40 


During  the  year  I   quarantined   three  infected    steamers,    and  removed 
from  the  same  to  the  Twenty-sixth  Street  Hospital  twelve  cases  of  smallpox. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

WM.  F.  McALLISTEE,  M.  D., 

Quarantine  Officer* 


474  HEALTH     OFFICEE'S     EEPOET. 


KEPORT  OF  TWENTY-SIXTH  STEEET  HOSPITAL. 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  '20,  1880. 

J.  L.  Meares,  M.  D., 

Health  Officer  City  and  County  of  San  Francico: 

SIB — Herewith  I  have  the  honor  to  forward  the  report  of  this  hospital  for 
the  year  ending  June  30,  1880. 

Respectfully,  sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

JOHN  W.  FOYE,  M.  D., 

Eesident  Physician. 

Admitted 47 

Discharged 27 

Died 3 

Hemaining  June  30 17 

47 

NATURE    OF  DISEASE. 

Elephantiasis  Graecorum 15 

Variola 11 

Syphilis 15 

Dementia 2 

Eubeola 1 

Loss  of  vision 1 

Quarantined  by  order  of  Health  Officer ., 2 

47 

EACES. 

-Caucasian 12 

Mongolian 34 

African 1 

47 

Whole  number  of  rations  issued  during  the  year 7,378 

JOHN  W.  FOYE,  M.  D., 

Eesident  Ehysician. 


MARKET    INSPECTOR. 


475 


MARKET  INSPECTOR'S   REPORT. 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  June  30.  1880. 


Dr.  J.  L.  Hearts,  Health  Officer: 


The  following  is  respectfully  submitted  as  the  Annual  Report  of  the  Mar- 
ket Inspector,  showing  the  condemnations  made.  That  portion  of  the  report 
covering  the  time  from  August,  1879,  to  March,  1880,  is  made  up  from  the 
returns  of  the  preceding  Market  Inspector. 


td 
I 

Mutton  

& 

1 

Wild  Game  

Chickens  

O 

u 

1 

W 

•** 

CB 

3 

1 

£ 
" 

i 

•O 

c 

S. 

>-t 

1  Turkey  

1879. 
August 

Ibs. 

1,200 
2,000 
1,500 
1,700 
680 

300 
216 
500 

Ibs. 

250 
500 
450 

"56 

tbs. 

2400 
500 
7000 
421 
2500 

500 
2100 

Ibs. 

200 
100 
750 
400 

300 

Ibs. 

doz. 

2 
1 

doz. 
3 

doz. 

2 

5 
4 

doz. 

4 
2 
5 
9 
1 

Ibs. 
ioo 

Ibs. 

86 
48 

doz. 

doz. 

September  
October 

13 

3 

November  
December 

3 

3 

4 

"2" 

8 

1880. 

January  
February  

14 
19 
101 

1 

2 

March  
April.  .  . 

X 

8* 

35 

7 

May.  .  . 

2,500 

June  

11 

Total* 

1250 

1750 

10 

5 

~w 

12 

31# 

100 

327 

8 

11,596 

15421 

13 

3 

Very  respectfully, 

JACOB  WRAY, 

Market  Inspector. 


476  HEALTH  OFFICER'S  REPORT 


EEPOKTS     OF    HEALTH     INSPECTOKS. 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  June  30,  1880. 
J.   L.  Meares,  M.   D., 

Health  Officer  of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

SIB — Herewith  I  submit  my  report  as  Health  Inspector  from  February  1, 
1880,  to  June  30,  1880,  together  with  that  of  my  predecessor,  Mr.  E.  H.  Coe, 
from  June  30,  1879,  to  February  1,  1880,  being  the  Annual  Report  of  District 
No.  4,  of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  for  the  fiscal  year  ending 
June  30,  1880. 

Number  of  complaints  for  seven  months  ending  February  1,  1880. .  415 

Number  of  nuisances  abated  in  seven  months  ending  February  1,  '80.  386 

Number  of  nuisances  referred  to  Superintendent  of  Streets 3 

Number  of  nuisances  location  not  found 2 

Number  of  complaints  without  cause 13 

404 

Number  of  nuisances  unabated  February  1,  1880 9 

Number  of  complaints  for  five  months  ending  June  30,  1880 540 


Total 549 

Number  of  nuisances  abated  in  five  months  ending  June  30  1880.  . .   531 

Number  of  nuisances  referred  to  Superintendent  of  Streets 6 

Number  of  complaints  without  cause 18 

-  545 
Number  of  nuisances  in  process  of  abatement  June  30,  1880 4 

459 


RECAPITULATION. 

Number  of  complaints  investigated  from  June  30,  1879  to  February 

1,  1880 404 

Number  of  complaints  investigated  from  February  1,  1880  to  June 

30,  1880 549 

Number  of  complaints  investigated    during  the  year  ending  June 

30,  1880..  953 


HEALTH     INSPECTORS.  477 

The  following  sanitary  improvements  have  been  made  under  my  supervis- 
ion, in  my  district  from  February  1.  to  June  30,  1880. 

Number  of  feet  of  private  drains  constructed : 

Cement  and  iron-stone  pipe 5,253 

Wooden  sewers 834 

Galvanized  iron  and  tin  pipe   4,140 

Cast  iron  soil  pipe 1,164 

Total..  .  11,391 


Number  of  feet  of  private  sewers  re-constructed, 138 

Number  of  patent  water  closets  constructed 544 

Number  of  patent  water  closets  repaired 176 

Number  of  stench  traps  put  in 620 

Number  of  urinals  placed 187 

Number  of  slop  hoppers  with  traps  placed., 46 

Number  of  privy  vaults  cleaned  and  filled 121 

Number  of  privy  vaults  cleaned 18 

Number  of  privy  vaults  properly  connected  with  public  sewers. . .  16 
Number  of   brick  privy  vaults  built  and  connected  with  public 

sewers 11 

Number  of  squares  of  asphaltum  laid 27 

Number  of  piles  of  garbage  removed   ...    , 20 

I  have  caused  eight  arrests  for  failure  to  abate  nuisances,  which  resulted 
in  the  work  being  done. 

I  declared  the  wooden  sewer  in  Polk  Lane  from  Stockton  to  Broadway  a 
nuisance  and  ordered  an  iron-stone  sower  laid,  which  has  been  done. 
Respectfully, 

JOHN  C.  STEDMAN, 

Health  Inspector  District  No.  4. 


SAN  FKANCISCO,  CAL.,  July  30,  1880. 
To  Dr.  J.  L.  Meares, 

Health  Officer  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco : 

DEAR  SIB — I  have  the  honor  to  submit  the  following  report  for  the  fiscal 
year  ending  June  30,  1880. 

On  December  1st  I  was  appointed  an  Inspector  and  assigned  to  District 
No.  3,  and  on  February  3,  1880,  assigned  to  District  No.  2.  The  complaints 
received  while  in  charge  of  District  No.  3,  were  transferred  to  Mr.  R.  E. 
Chapman,  and  \\ill  not  be  included  in  this  report. 


478  HEALTH     OFFICEK'S    KEPOKT. 

Total  number  of  complaints 235 

Number  of  nuisances  reported  without  cause 7 

Number  of  nuisances  referred  to  other  departments 11 

Number  of  nuisances  abated 217 

235 

The  following  shows  the  amount  of  work  performed: 

Number  of  feet  of  cement  and  iron-stone  pipe  constructed 9,445 

Privy  vaults  cleaned . '. 85 

Patent  closets  with  traps  and  connections 63 

The  following  report  of  my  predecessor,  Mr.  Henry  Blair,  from  beginning 
of  the  fiscal  year  to  December  1,  1880,  is  hereby  annexed : 

Total  number  of  complaints 224 

Complaints  without  cause 5 

Referred  to  other  departments 6 

Nuisances  abated 213 

224 

The  following  statement  shows  amount  of  work  done: 

Premises  connected  by  means  of  cement  and  iron-stone  pipe  sewer 77 

Vaults  cleaned 38 

Vaults  cleaned  and  filled 15 

Patent  closets  with  proper  connections 36 

Since  my   appointment  I  have   caused   the   arrest   of  eighteen   property 
owners,  which  resulted  in  the  prompt  abatement  of  the  nuisances. 
Very  respectfully, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

E.  DRUM, 
Health  Inspector  District  No.  2. 


SAN  FBANCTSCO,  July  15,  1880. 
To  Dr.  J.  L.  Meares. 

Health  Officer  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

DEAE  SIB — I  herewith  submit  my  report  for  District  No.  3,  of  the  City  of 
San  Francisco,  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  June  30,  1880 : 

Number  of  premises  complained  of 541 

Number  of  premises  examined  without  complaints 372 

913 

Number  of  nuisances  abated 721 

Number  reported  without  cause 17 

Number  now  being  abated 10 

Number  of  premises  examined  and  found  in  good  condition 165 

913 


HEALTH     INSPECTORS.  479 

In  order  to  abate  certain  nuisances  the  following  number  of  feet  of  private 
sewers  has  been  constructed: 

Cement,  iron-stone  and  iron  pipe 27,374  feet. 

Galvanized  iron,  tin  and  water  pipe 12,796  feet. 

Total 40,170  feet. 

Number  of  feet  of  private  sewers  reconstructed 3,020 

Number  of  patent  closets  constructed   517 

Numbor  of  stench  traps  put  in 911 

Number  of  privy  vaults  cleaned  and  filled 497 

Number  of  privy  vaults  properly  connected 101 

Number  of  privy  vaults  cleaned  and  not  connected,  there   being   no 

public  sewers 99> 

About  ten  thousand  square  yards  of  dirt  and  rock  have  been  used  in  filling 
ponds  of  stagnant  water,  cesspools,  etc. 

Thirty-one  warrants  of  arrest  were   procured  for  parties  failing  to  abate 
nuisances  when  notified,  which  caused  the  work  to  be  done. 
I  am,  very  respectfully,  yours, 

K.  E.  CHAPMAN, 
Health  Inspector  District  No.  3. 


To  Dr.  J.  L.  Meares, 

Health  Officer  of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

SIR — I  herewith  respectfully  present  my  annual  report  as  Health  Inspector 
of  the  Fourth  District  of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  for  the  fiscal 
year  ending  June  30,  1880: 

Number  of  complaints  investigated 802 

Number  of  nuisances  abated 761 

Number  of  complaints  without  cause 37 

Number  of  nuisances  unabated 4 

—    802 

The  unabated  cases  consist  of  ponds  of  stagnant  water,  to  wit: 

One  on  block  bounded  by  Twenty-first  and  Twenty-second,  Alabama 
streets  and  Bryant  avenue. 

One  on  Harrison  street,  between  Fourteenth  and  Fifteenth  streets. 

One  on  Solano,  between  Bryant  and  Potrero  avenue. 

Also,  one  on  the  block  bounded  by  Harrison,  Alabama,  Butte  and  Twen- 
tieth streets. 


480  HEALTH     OFFICEE'S     KEPOET. 

I  have  caused  to  be  filled  in  six  vacant  lots  covered  by  stagnant  water,  as 
follows,  to  wit: 

Two  on  block  bounded  by  Fair  Oaks,  Guerrero,  Twenty-second  and 
Twenty-third  streets. 

One  on  block  bounded  by  Guerrero,  Dolores,  Eighteenth  and  Nineteenth 
streets. 

One  on  Dolores,  between  Sixteenth  and  Seventeenth  streets. 

One  in  the  lower  part  of  the  Jewish  Cemetery. 

One  on  Harrison  street,  between  Nineteenth  and  Twentieth  streets. 

Old  privy  vaults  cleaned,  filled  and  replaced  by  patent  water  closets  . '. . .  207 

Number  of  feet  of  drains  I  have  caused  to  be  constructed  in  abating 
nuisances: 

Iron-stone  pipe 15, 110  feet. 

Cement  pipe 6,434  feet. 

Wooden  sewers 2,190  feet. 

During  the  above  period  I  have  caused  to  be  arrested  thirty-one  persons 
charged  with  violations  of  the  health  ordinances,  all  of  whom  were  allowed 
further  time  by  the  Court  to  perform  the  work  required  of  them,  which 
was  subsequently  done. 

Respectfully  submitted. 

W.  H.  COWPEE, 

Health  Inspector  District  No.  4. 


SAN  FBANCISCO,  CAL.,  June  30,  1880. 
To  Dr.  J.  L.  Meares, 

Health  Officer  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco; 

DEAR  SIB — I  was  appointed  as  Special  Health  Inspector  for  Chinatown, 
and  served  there  during  the  month  of  April.  On  the  1st  of  May  I  took  charge 
of  District  No.  5: 

Number  of  nuisances  turned  over  to  me 13 

Number  of  nuisances  investigated 80 

—  93 

Number  of  nuisances  abated 69 

Number  of  nuisances  being  abated 8 

Number  of  nuisances  reported  without  cause 16 

—  93 

In  abating  said  nuisances  it  required  1885  feet  of  iron-stone  sewer  pipe. 
Number  of  patent  water  closets  constructed 16 


HEALTH    INSPECTORS.  481 

I  herewith  submit  the  report  of  work  performed  by  my  predecessor  for  the 
ten  months  from  July  1,  1879,  to  May  1,  1880: 

Number  of  premises  reported 245 

Number  of  nuisances  abated 223 

Number  of  nuisances  reported  without  cause 22 

245 

Very  respectfully, 

H.  J.  BURNS, 
Health  Inspector  District  No.  5. 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  1,  1880. 

To  Dr.  J.  L.  Meares, 

Health  Officer  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco  ; 

SIE — I  beg  most  respectfully  to  submit  the  annual  report  of  the  Health 
Inspector  for  the  Sixth  District,  embracing  that  of  my  two  predecessors,  one 
of  whom  had  charge  of  this  District  from  July,  1879,  to  February,  1880, 
seven  months,  and  another  from  February,  1880,  to  April,  1880,  three 
months,  and  your  present  reporter  from  the  1st  of  May,  1880,  to  the  30th 
June,  1880,  ending  the  fiscal  year: 

Number  of  complaints  investigated  from  July,  1879,  to  February,  1880. .  .211 
Number  of  complaints  investigated  from  February,  1880,  to  April,  1880. .  91 
Number  of  complaints  investigated  from  May,  1880,  to  June  30,  1880  . .  .223 

Total  complaints  for  year 525 

Number  of  nuisances  abated 487 

Number  reported  without  cause 21 

Number  under  process  of  abatement 17 

525 

In  the  abatement  of  the  foregoing  nuisances  the  following  work  has  been 
executed  during  the  past  two  months  under  my  personal  supervision: 

Constructed  about  3,500  feet  iron-stone  sewers. 

Constructed  about  1,500  feet  wooden  sewers  where  no  public  sewer  exists. 
Constructed  17  new  wooden  cesspools  where  no  public  sewer  exists. 
Constructed  52  new  patent  water-closets  with  traps  and  water  connections. 
Constructed  15  new  connections  with  public  sewers. 

31 


482  HEALTH    OFFICER'S    KEPOKT. 

Number  privy  vaults  and  cesspools  cleaned  out  and  purified 97 

Number  patent  water  closets  and  traps  repaired 8 

Number  removals  of  rubbish,  garbage,  etc.,  from  vacant  lots,  etc 30 

Several  foul  and  offensive  pools  of  stagnant  water  have  been  filled  with 
gravel  and  gas  lime. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  very  respectfully, 

DANIEL  MoNEILL, 
Health  Inspector  District  No.  6. 


CITY  PHYSICIANS  REPORT. 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  31,  1880. 

To  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN — In  presenting  this,  my  Fourth  Annual  Report,  in 
compliance  with  Resolution  No.  14,765  (New  Series),  I  desire  to 
make  a  few  remarks  in  regard  to  the  institutions  placed  by  the 
Honorable  Board  of  Health  uuder  my  charge. 

The  County  Jail  is  entirely  inadequate  to  its  needs,  not  having 
capacity  sufficient  for  the  proper  and  healthful  placement  of  its 
inmates;  thus,  as  ynu  see,  impairing  their  general  health,  and  in 
consequence  causing  an  extra  expense  upon  the  city  for  medi- 
cines, which  otherwise  could  be  avoided. 

Through  the  courtesy  of  the  Sheriff,  Thomas  Desmond,  a  suit- 
able room  has  been  set  aside  for  hospital  purposes,  and  has  been 
furnished  by  your  Honorable  Board;  thus  in  a  measure  enabling 
me  to  provide  against  epidemics,  as  well  as  establishing  better 
facilities  in  the  treatment  of  acute  cases.  So  far,  there  have 
been  no  epidemical  diseases  in  the  County  Jail,  excepting  one 
case  of  Small  Pox  (Variola),  which  was  immediately  removed  to 
the  Twenty-sixth  Street  Hospital.  The  Jail  has  been  thoroughly 
fumigated,  and  all  of  the  inmates  have  been  vaccinated.  Credit 
is  due  to  the  officers  of  the  Jail  for  the  cleanliness  of  this  Insti- 
tution, to  which  the  good  health  of  the  inmates  is  partially  at- 
tributable. 

The  House  of   Correction,  both  in  point  of   management  and 


484  CITY     PHYSICIAN'S    KEPOKT. 

construction,  is  the  best  prison  Institution  which  the  City  has 
under  its  charge .  The  general  health  of  the  inmates  during  the 
past  year  has  been  uniformly  good.  Nearly  all  of  the  cases 
treated  have  been  prisoners,  who  had  contracted  diseases  else- 
where, and  came  under  my  treatment  when  they  were  admitted 
to  this  Institution  The  Superintendent,  A.  W.  Prevost,  to- 
gether with  the  employees,  deserve  the  highest  commendation 
for  the  good  and  hygienic  condition  of  the  Institution  and  the 
prisoners. 

The  City  Ileceiving  Hospital,  located  in  the  basement  of  the 
Old  City  Hall,  is  more  immediately  under  the  charge  of  the  As- 
sistant City  Physician,  and  you  will  see  by  his  report  that  it  is  the 
receptacle  of  the  numerous  accidents  and  injuries  occurring  in 
this  city.  It  has  been  enlarged  during  the  past  year,  and  to  a 
certain  extent  refurnished  by  the  action  of  your  Honorable 
Board.  Still  it  is  inadequate  for  the  work  performed  and  for  the 
accommodation  of  its  patients.  The  Hospital  comprises  three  (3) 
small  rooms  (not  including  the  operating  room),  having  a  ca- 
pacity of  six  (6)  beds,  and  often,  as  in  the  event  of  serious  acci- 
dents (such  as  fires,  falling  buildings,  etc.)  we  have  been  only 
able  to  give  the  patients  a  mattress  on  the  floor.  The  ventilation, 
at  best,  is  bad,  and  wThen  the  Hospital  is  so  overcrowded  it  be- 
comes almost  unbearable .  As  the  City  increases  in  population, 
new  streets  being  opened,  new  railroads  being  built,  etc.,  surgi- 
cal accidents  must  necessarily  increase  in  number,  and  therefore 
better  accommodations  should  be  provided.  In  no  sense,  is  this 
a  Prison  Hospital,  the  greater  share  of  patients  being  citizens 
meeting  with  accidents  in  their  daily  avocation  or  business. 

Credit  is  due  to  your  Honorable  Board  (especially  to  the 
Chairmafh  of  Health  and  Police)  for  the  prompt  compliance  with 
my  requests  and  needs.  Also  to  Dr.  C.  A.  Stivers,  late  Assistant 
City  Physician  and  Police  Surgeon,  as  well  as  to  the  present  in- 
cumbent, J.  J.  Clarke,  M.  D.,  for  the  diligent  and  faithful  per- 
formance of  their  duties. 

A  tabulated  statement  of  autopsies  made  from  July  1,  1879, 
until  May  31,  1880,  (11  months)  has  been  furnished  by  C.  A. 
Stivers,  M.  D.,  and  for  the  month  of  June,  1880,  by  J.  J.  Clarke, 
M.D.,  at  my  request,  which  you  will  see  annexed. 


DISEASES. 


485 


Cases  attended  in  the  County  Jail 1,050 

Cases  attended  in  House  of  Correction 2,202 

Cases  attended  in  City  Receiving  Hospital 1,034 

Cases  attended  in  Office  and  out-door.s  (indigent  sick) ....  420 

Total 4,706 

Autopsies  made ;    149 

Respectfully, 

CHAS.  BLACH,  M.D., 
City  Physician  and  Police  Surgeon. 


LIST  AND    NUMBER    OF   DISEASES   TREATED  AT    THE    COUNTY 

JAIL. 


Abscess  of  arm 

Abscess  of  axilla 

Abscess  of  face 

Abscess  of  groin 

Abscess  of  hand 

Abscess  of  labia , 

Abscess  of  leg 

Abscess  of  neck 

Abscess  of  perineum 

Abscess  of  scrotum  . . 


Alcoholism,  chronic 

Anaemia 

Anasarca 

Aneurism  of  aorta 

Apthae 

Asthma 

Bronchitis 146 

Bubo 6 

Burn  of  arm 2 

Burn  of  face 

Burn  of  leg 

Carbuncle 

Carcinoma  of  lip 

Carcinoma  of  mainse 

Caries  of  femur 2 

Caries  of  metacarpal  bones 2 

Caries  of  tibia 2 

Chancres 1 

Cholera-morbus 1 

Chorea  . .  1 


Cirrhosis  of  liver 1 

Colic 18 

Condylomata . .  6 

Congestion  of  liver 1 

Congestion  of  lungs 1 

Conjunctivitis 14 

Constipation 2 

Coryza 12 

Debility 26 

Dementia 2 

Diarrhoea -. 12 

Dilatation  of  heart 1 

Diphtheria 1 

Dislocation  of  femur 1 

Dislocation  of  humerus 1 

Dysentery 3 

Dysmenorrhcea 2 

Dyspepsia 78 

Eczema -. 13 

Eczema  of  leg 7 

Endocarditis 2 

Epidydimitis  1 

Epilepsy 7 

Erosion  of  os  uteri 1 

Erysipelas,  facial 8 

Erysipelas  of  arm 2 

Erysipelas  of  leg 2 

Fatty  liver 1 

Fever,  intermittent 69 

Fever,  typhoid g 

Fistula  in  ano 1 


486 


CITY     PHYSICIAN'S     REPORT. 


DISEASES     TREATED     AT     COUNTY     JA[L.— CONCLUDED. 


Fistula,  urinary  
Fracture  of  radius       .    . 

1 
1 

Rheumatism,  sub-acute  
Scabies 

4 

Fracture  of  ulna 

1 

Scald  of  body 

1 

Gangrene  of  leg      

1 

Scarlatina  .... 

\ 

•Gastritis  ....         

1 

Sciatica  

1 

Gonorrhoea  ... 

67 

Scrofula  

2 

Haemoptysis  
Haemorrhoids  

1 
2 

Spermatorrhoea  
Sprain  of  ankle  

2 
2 

Hemiplegia  
Hepatitis  
Hernia,  inguinal  
Herpes  

1 
5 
1 
1 

Sprain  of  knee  
Sprain  of  wrist  
Stricture  of  urethra  
Syphilis  secondary 

X 
2 
6 
9fc 

Hydrocele  

2 

14 

Hysteria  

4 

Tinea 

1 

Icterus  

1 

Tonsilitis 

20 

Laryngitis  

1 

Tumor  of  eyelid 

2 

Leucorrbcea  

4 

4 

Lumbago  

10 

I 

Lupus,  facial  

1 

Ulcer  of  groin 

1 

Neuralgia  

54 

Ulcer  of  hand 

2 

Onychia 

3 

Ulcer  of  le" 

18 

Orchitis  

13 

Ulcer  of  neck 

9 

Ofcitis 

6 

Ulcer  of  throat 

1 

Paralysis  

2 

Ulcer  of  uterus             

I 

Paraplegia  .  .   . 

2 

Valvular  disease  of  heart        .... 

J 

Pericarditis  

1 

Varicose  veins          . 

S 

Phthisis  pulmonalis  
Pleurisy  ... 

38 
20 

Vertigo  
Wound  (bullet)  of  face  

2 
6 

Pneumonia  
Polypus  of  nose  
Prolapsus  uteri  
Pyamiae  

3 
1 
1 
1 

Wound  (bullet)  of  shoulder  
Wound  (bullet)  of  thigh  
Wound  (contused)  of  face  
Wound  (contused)  of  foot  

1 
1 
1 
1 

Psoriasis  

3 

Wound  ''contused)  of  leg  

1 

Retention  of  urine*  

3 

Wound  (incised)  of  face  

2 

I 

1 

Rheumatism,  acute  ^ 

7 

Wound  (incised)  of  throat  

2 

Rheumatism,  chronic  

74 

Total 

1,050 

Sent  before  Commissioners  of   Insanity 

1 

Died  (by  suicide).  .  . 

•- 

1 

LIST  AND  NUMBER  OF  DISEASES  TREATED  AT  THE  HOUSE    OF 


CORRECTION. 


Abscess  of  arm 
Abscess  of  axilla 
Abscess  of  face 
Abscess  of  foot 
Abscess  of  groin 
Abscess  of  hand 
Abscess  of  labia 
Abscess  of  leg; 


Abscess  of  neck 2 

Abscess  of  perineum 8 

Abscess  of  scrotum 1 

Abscess,  psoas 1 

Alcoholism,  chronic 28 

Anaemia 8 

Anasarca 1 

Aneurism  of  aorta 2 


DISEASES. 


487 


DISEASES    TREATED    AT    HOUSE    OF     CORKECTION— CONTINUED. 


Apthoe 5 

Asthma 10 

Bronchitis 153 

Bubo 7 

Burn  of  arm 3 

Burn  of  face 2 

Burn  of  hand = 4 

Burn  of  leg 2 

Carbuncle 7 

Carcinoma  of  lip 2 

Carcinoma  of  liver 3 

Caries  of  femur 2 

Caries  of  metacarpal  bones 1 

Caries  of  tibia 2 

Chancres 27 

Cholera  Morbus 9 

Chorea 2 

Cirrhosis  of  liver 4 

Colic 21 

Condylomata 5 

Congestion  of  liver 3 

Congestion  of  lungs 19 

Conjunctivitis 37 

Constipation 45 

Coryza 6 

Debility 56 

Dementia 12 

Diarrhoaa 36 

Dilatation  of  heart 2 

Diphtheria 4 

Dislocation  of  humerus 3 

Dysentery 52 

Dj  smenorrhoea    „   32 

Dyspepsia 95 

Eczema 41 

Eczema  of  leg 10 

Endocarditis 5 

Epidydimitis 4 

Epilepsy 23 

Epithelioma  of  penis 1 

Erosion  of  os  uteri 6 

Erysipelas,  facial  10 

Erysipelas  of  arm 7 

Erysipelas  of  leg 2 

Fatty  liver 3 

Fever,  intermittent 48 

Fever,  typhoid 5 

Fistula  in  ano 3 

Fracture  of  clavicle..     2 

Fracture  of  femur 2 


Fracture  of  radius 8 

Fracture  of  tibia 1 

Fracture  of  tibia  and  fibula 2 

Furunculus 7 

Gangrene  of  leg 1 

Gastritis 10 

Gonorrhoea 56 

Haemoptysis 2 

Haemorrhoids 35 

Hemiplegia 27 

Hepatitis 9 

Hernia,  inguinal 6 

Herpes 12 

Herpes  circinatus I 

Hydrocele 6 

Hysteria 14 

Icterus 3 

Iritis 4 

Laryngitis 2 

Leucorrhcea 56 

Lumbago 34 

Lupus,  facial 2 

Necrosis  of  tibia 4 

Neuralgia 143 

Onychia 9 

Orchitis 9 

Otalgia 2 

Otitis 14 

Ozamia 5 

Paralysis 9 

Paraplegia 3 

Pericarditis 3 

Phimosis 6 

Phthisis  pulmonalis 93 

Pleurisy 41 

Pneumonia 5 

Polypus  of  nose 2 

Prolapsus  recti 1 

Prolapsus  uteri 15 

Psoriasis 6 

Retention  of  urine 31 

Retroflection  of  uterus 4 

Retroversion  of  uterus 2 

Rheumatism,  acute 9 

Rheumatism,  chronic 104 

Rheumatism,  sub-acute 30 

Rhus  poisoning 2 

Scabies 2 

Scald  of  body 8 

Scarlatina...  1 


488 


CITY    PHYSICIANS    REPORT. 


DISEASES    TREATED    AT    HOUSE    OF    CORRECTION—CONCLUDED. 


Sciatica 8 

Scrofula 9 

Spermatorrhoea 22 

Sprain  of  ankle 6 

Sprain  of  back 18 

Sprain  of  knee 2 

Sprain  of  wrist 8 

Stricture  of  urethra 4 

Syphilis,  secondary 206 

Syphilis,  tertiary 43 

Tinea 1 

Tonsilitis 38 

Tumor  of  eyelid 2 

Tumor  of  jaw 1 

Typhoid  pueumonia 9 

Ulcer  of  foot 2 

Ulcer  of  groin 1 

Ulcer  of  hand 5 

Ulcer  of  leg 9 

Ulcer  of  neck 3 


Ulcer  of  throat 3 

UJcer  of  tongue l 

Ulcer  of  uterus 5 

Valvular  disease  of  heart 4 

Varicose  wins 5 

Vertigo l 

Wound  (bullet)  of  arm l 

Wound  (bullet)  of  hand 1 

Wound  (contused)  of  arm 1 

Wound  (contused)  of  face 3 

Wound  (contused)  of  foot 3 

Wound  (contused)  of  leg 4 

Wound  (contused)  of  side 2 

Wound  (incised)  of  arm 6 

Wound  (incised)  of  face G 

Wound  (incised)  of  hand 7 

Wound  (incised)  of  throat 2 

Wound  (lacerated)  of  leg 8 


Total. 


,  2204 


Sent  to  City  and  County  Hospital 4 

Sent  before  Commissioners  of  Insanity 4 

Died 3 


REPORT     OF     ASSISTANT     CITY     PHYSICIAN. 


489 


REPORT     OF     ASSISTANT     CITY    PHYSICIAN. 


To  Charles  Black,  City  Physician  : 

SIB— I  herewith  submit  to  you  my  Report  for  the  past  year  (from  July  1, 
1879,  to  July  1,  1830)  of  the  number  of  cases  admitted  and  attended  at 
the  City  Receiving  Hospital  : 


Total  number  attended 

SEX. 

Male 852 

Female 180 

Total 1,032 

RACE. 

Caucasian > 995 

Ethiopian 2 

Mongolian 35 

Total 1,032 

EVENT. 

Sent  to  City  and  County  Hospital 7P 

Sent  to  German  Hospital 1 

Sent  to  French  Hospital 1 

Sent  to  U.  S.  Marine  Hospital 1 

Sent  to  Home  of  Inebriates 7 

Sent  to  Almshouse <> 

Sent  before  Commissioners  of  Insanity 12 

*Died. 22 

Discharged 915 

Total. . .  1,032 


Four  of  the  above  were  dead  when  received . 


490 


ASSISTANT   CITY    PHYSICIAN'S  REPORT. 


LIST   AND    NUMBER    OF   DISEASES   AND   ACCIDENTS    TREATED 
AT  THE   CITY   RECEIVING   HOSPITAL. 


Alcoholism,  chronic 6 

Amputation,  result  of 1 

Aneurism  of  aorta 3 

Asthma 1 

Burn  of  face  and  body 1 

Burn  of  face  and  neck 3 

Burn  of  hand 4 

Cholera  morbus I 

Concussion  of  spine 1 

Constipation 4 

Contusion  of  abdomen 1 

Contusion  of  arm 5 

Contusion  of  back 1 

Contusion  of  body 9 

Contusion  of  eye 5 

Contusion  of  face 15 

Contusion  of  foot 6 

Contusion  of  hand 9 

Contusion  of  head 1 

Contusion  of  hip 1 

Contusion  of  knee 4 

Contusion  of  leg 3 

Contusion  of  neck 1 

Contusion  of  shoulder 1 

Contusion  of  side 1 

Contusion  of  thigh 1 

Contusion  of  wrist 1 

Debility,  general 11 

Delirium  tremens 11 

Dementia 4 

Dislocation  of  ankle  joint 2 

Dislocation  of  femur '   2 

Dislocation  of  finger 1 

Dislocation  of  humerus  (shoulder  joint) . .  9 

Dislocation  of  patella 1 

Dislocation  of  ulna  (elbow  joint) 2 

Dislocation  of  ulna  and  radius  (wrist  joint)  2 

Dysentery 2 

Effects  of  intemperance 63 

Effects  of  submersion 21 

Epilepsy 62 

Fever,  intermittent 5 

Fracture  of  ankle  joint 8 

Fracture  of  carpal  bones 8 

Fracture  of  clavicle 3 

Fracture  of  femur 3 

Fracture  of  fibula 1 

Fracture  of  finger 2 

Fracture  of  humerus 6 

Fracture  of  infer,  maxillary 1 


Fracture  of  nasal  bones 2 

Fracture  of  patella 1 

Fracture  of  rib 4 

Fracture  of  spinal  column 1 

Fracture  or  tibia S 

Fracture  of  tibia  and  fibula 8 

Fracture  of  ulna 1 

Fracture  of  ulna  and  radius 4 

Fracture  of  wrist  joint 1 

Heart,  disease  of 2 

Hernia,  inguinal 2 

Herpes .' 1 

Hysteria 1 

Injury  of  foot 2 

Injury  of  hand 2 

Injury  of  hip  joint 1 

Indigestion,  effects  of 1 

Insanity 7 

Nervous  excitation 6 

Neuralgia 3 

Obstruction  of  throat  (fishbone) 1 

Paralysis T 

Pleuritia 1 

Pneumonia,  acute 2 

Poisoned  by  opium 8 

Poisoned  by  Paris  green 1 

Poisoned  by  strychina 1 

Pregnancy 2 

Prolapsus  ani 1 

Puerperal  mania 1 

Rheumatism,  chronic 1 

Rubeola  vulgaris 1 

Spermatorrhoea 1 

Spine,  curvature  of 1 

Sprain  of  ankle 14 

Sprain  of  back 1 

Sprain  of  leg 1 

Sprain  of  shoulder 1 

Sprain  of  wrist 10 

Suffocation,  effects  of  (smoke) T 

Syphilis,  primary 1 

Syphilis,  secondary 1 

Tuberculosis 1 

Ulcer  of  leg 2 

Unknown 4 

Uterine  hemorrhage • 5 

Wound  of  abdomen 26 

Wound  of  arm 18 

Wound  of  back...                                     .  14 


DISEASES. 


491 


DISEASES   TREATED    AT  RECEIVING  HOSPITAL— CONCLUDED. 


3 

3 

oun     o      rain  .  .  .  . 

7 

7 

oun     o      reas 

2 

1 

w°UI            h 

7 

206 

11 

Wound  of  scrotum  

....       2 

.      20 

Wound  of  shoulder  

....       4 

153 

Wound  of  side  

....       2 

3 

Wound  of  thigh  

....       6 

4 

4 

58 

Wound  of  wrist  

....     13 

Wound  of  knee  

1 

Wound  of  leer  .  . 

.     13 

Total  .  .  . 

...1,03 

CLASSIFICATION    OF    CAUSES    OF    DEATH. 


Aneurism  of  aorta 

Bullet  wound  of  abdomen 

Bullet  wound  of  brain 

Bullet  wound  of  lung 

Congestion  of  brain 

Effects  of  opium 


Injuries  received t 

Poisoned  by  Paris  green 1 

Unknown & 


Total. 


"it 


J.  J.  CLARKE,  M.  D., 


Assistant  City  Physician  and  Police  Surgeon . 


AUTOPSIES     MADE     FROM     JULY     1,     1879,     TO     JUNE    1,     1880. 

(11  months.) 
Total  number  made 142 


SEX. 


Females 

Males... 


27 
115 


Total... 


148 


RACE. 

Caucasian 129 

Ethiopian 3 

Mongolian 10 


Total.. 


142 


492 


ASSISTANT     CITY    PHYSICIAN'S     KEPOKT. 


OCCUPATIONS. 


Accountant  
Barber  
Barkeeper 

2 

Journalist  

2 

Laborer  

.   .                    13 

1 

4 

Blacksmith 

8 

La'indr}rman 

2 

Boatman 

2 

Librarian 

1 

Bookkeeper  .... 

1 

Liquor  dealer 

1 

Capitalist  
Contractor  
Cook  

Alabama  
Arkansas 

1 

Longshoreman 

2 

2 
2 

Machinist  

1 

Maltster  

1 
2 

NATP 

UNITED 

1 
1 

fITY. 

STATES. 
New  Jersey  

New  York 

7 

California 

7 

Ohio. 

1 

District  of  Columbia 

1 

Pennsylvania 

2 

Georgia 

1 

Vermont  

2 

Iowa  

1 

Virginia  

1 

Kentucky  
Louisiana  
Maine  

1 
1 
5 
3 

Virginia,  West  
Unknown  State  

Total 

1 
1 

43 

Massachusetts  

Austria  
Belgium  

4 

1 

FOREI 

3NERS. 
Italy  

1 

1 

Central  America  
Chili 

Norway 

2 

Nova  Scotia  
Poland 

1 
1 

China 

10 

Costa  Rica 

1 

Portugal            

1 

England  
France  
Germany  
Holland  

8 
8 
15  ' 
1 
35 

Russia  

1 

4 

3 

TW.a.1 

.     99 

United  States 

43 

99 

Total  

Under  1  year  
From  1  to  10  years  .... 

142 

35 
7 
3 
2 

CLASSIFICATK 

5 
0 
3 

3N    OF    AGES. 

From  50  to  60  years  
From  60  to  70  years  
From  70  to  80  years  

11 

From  30  to  40  years  .  .  . 
From  40  to  50  vears.  . 

38 

Total... 

..  142 

.     38 

CAUSES     OF     DEATH. 


493 


OCCUPATIONS— CONCLUDED. 


Cooper  

I 

Merchant  

1 

1 

Miller                             

2 

1 

Miner          .   .             ... 

1 

2 

Musician                        

1 

1 

Nurse 

1 

1 

Peddler 

1 

] 

Physician                               .... 

1 

1 

Porter      

2 

1 

Prostitute  

4 

Hostler 

3 

Real  estate  agent  .    . 

2 

12 

Saw  yer  

.    .         1 

9 

Trunkmaker  

1 

2 

Waiter     

2 

] 

Watchman  

...                2 

Steward 

2 

Wellsinker               .   .  . 

1 

1 

Without  occupation 

8 

Tobacconist  

1 

Unknown  

24 

Tailor  

1 

Teamster  

2 

Total  

142 

Tile-laver.  .. 

1 

CLASSIFICATION    OF    CAUSES    OF    DEATH. 


Alcoholism,  chronic 

Apoplexy,  cerebral 

Apoplexy,  pulmonary 

Apoplexy,  serous 

Asphyxia,  by  drowning. . . 

Brain,  softening  of 

Cerebro-spinal  meningitis. 

Endocarditis 

Endo-metritis. 

Fever,  typhoid 


11 

4 

11 

7 

6 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Heart,  aortic  valvular  disease  of 2 

Heart,  mitral  valvular  disease  of 5 

Hemorrhage,  cerebral 4 

Hemorrhage,  cerebral  (fracture  of  skull). .  4 

Hemorrhage,  cerebral  (bullet  wound) 3 

Hemorrhage,  from  bullet  wound  of  aorta.  1 
Hemorrhage,  from  bullet  wound  of  heart  1 
Hemorrhage,  from  bullet  wound  of  intes- 
tines    1 

Hemorrhage,  from  bullet  wound  of  jugu- 
lar vein 2 

Hemorrhage,  from  bullet  wound  of  lung  1 
Hemorrhage,  from  bullet  wound  of  sub- 

clavian  artery 1 

Hemorrhage,  from  knife  wound  of  aorta  1 
Hemorrhage,  from  knife  wound  of  heart  3 
Hemorrhage,  from  knife  wound  of  femor- 
al artery 2 

Hemorrhage,  from  knife  wound  of  infer- 
ior vena  cava. . .  1 


Hemorrhage,  from  knife  wound  of  kidne'y 

and  intestines 2 

Hemorrhage,  from  rupture  of  aneurism 

of  aorta  (abdominal) t 

Hemorrhage,  from  rupture  of  aneurism 

of  aorta  (thoracic) 7 

Hemorrhage,  from  lungs  and  liver  (frac- 
ture of  ribs) 1 

Hemorrhage,  from  rupture  of  pulmonary 

artery 1 

Hepatitis,  acute 1 

Hepatitis,  chronic 1 

Hernia,  inguinal  (strangulation) 1 

Hydrothorax 1 

Inanition 1 

Liver,  cancer  of 1 

Liver,  cirrhosis  of 1 

Liver,  hypertrophy 1 

Lungs,  congestion  of 4 

Peritonitis,  acute  (from  wounds) 3 

Pneumonia,  acute 10 

Pneumonia,  chronic 4 

Pneumonia,  pleuro 10 

Poisoned  by  Paris  green 1 

Pyemia  (result  of  wounds) 1 

Septicaemia  (result  of  wounds) 1 

Stomach,  rupture  of 1 

Unascertained 4 

Total...                                            ..  142 


494  ASSISTANT   CITY   PHYSICIAN'S   REPORT. 


SUB-CLASSIFICATION. 

Accidental 10 

Homicide 26 

Natnral  causes 100 

Suicide tt 

Total 142 

C.  A.  STIVERS,  M.   D., 

Late  Assistant  City  Physician  and  Police  Surgeon. 
San  Francisco,  July  1,  1880. 


AUTOPSIES  MADE  FROM  JUNE  1,  1880,  TO  JULY  1,  1880  (1  month). 

Total  number  made. 


SEX. 

Females  

1 

Miles  

6 

Total  

T 

RACE. 

Oancasion  

T 

NATIVITY. 

UNITED  STATES. 

New  York  

1 

FOREIGNERS. 

Canada  

1 

Ireland  

3 

Unknown  

2 

Total  

7 

From  20  to  30  years 2 

From  30  to  40  years 0 

From  40  to  50  years 1 

From  50  to  60  years 3 


CLASSIFICATION    OF    AGES. 

Unknown. .  . 


Total.. 


CLASSIFICATION  OF  CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 


Heart,  rupture  of - 1 

Hemorrhage,  from  bullet  wound  of  lung.  1 
Hemorrhage,  from  knife  wound  of  ext. 

carot 1 

Pneumonia,  acute 1 


Tuberculosis 1 

Uremic  poisoning 1 

Unascertained 1 


Total. 


J.   J.  CLARKE,  M.  D., 

Assistant  City  Physician  and  Police  Surgeon. 
San  Francisco,  July  1,  1880. 


HOSPITAL  REPORT. 


CITY  AND  COUNTY  HOSPITAL,  ) 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  July  1,  1880.    \ 


'lo  the  Honorable  the  Board  of  Supervisors 

of  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco: 

GENTLEMEN  —  I  have  the  honor  to  make  the  accompanying 
annual  report  of  the  City  and  County  Hospitel  for  the  fiscal  year 
ending  June  30,  1880. 

On  my  taking  charge  of  the  Hospital  I  was  urged  by  members 
of  the  Honorable  Board  of  Health  to  place  the  same  on  a  par 
with  the  other  public  institutions  under  their  control.  I  found 
the  administrative  department  had  not  been  whitened  and 
painted  for  five  years;  the  quarters  for  the  employees  were  in  a 
most  reprehensible  condition,  the  walls  and  woodwork  nob 
having  been  cleaned  for  ten  years;  the  wards  had  not  been 
whitened  for  three  years,  nor  had  any  portion  of  the  interior 
been  repainted  since  the  erection  of  the  Hospital.  It  requiried 
the  labor  of  seven  men,  continuously,  painting  and  whitening 
for  four  months  before  the  institution  could  be  considered  in  a 
fair  presentable  condition.  With  the  exception  of  nominal 
wages  to  an  expert,  as  director  of  the  labor,  the  entire  work  was 
voluntarily  performed  by  the  patients  in  a  manner  creditable 
to  any  mechanic.  The  Hospital  roof  was  iu  a  most  faulty  con- 
dition, leaking  and  destroying  the  ceiling  in  many  of  the  wards, 
the  water  closets,  sinks,  floors,  doorsills,  basement  apaartments, 
beds  and  bedding — in  fine,  the  entire  appurtenances  were  in  a 


496  HOSPITAL    REPORT 

most  reduced  and  dilapidated  state.  For  want  of  timely  repairs 
the  oven  Lad  caved  in  and  had  to  be  rebuilt;  the  kitchen  ranges, 
boilers,  heaters,  grates  for  all  the  furnaces  and  fireplaces  had  to 
be  renewed,  requiring  a  large  amount  of  funds  to  repair  and 
replace  them.  Furniture,  crockery,  tableware  and  linen  of  all 
kinds,  were  reduced  to  the  lowest  limit,  originating  complaints 
from  the  attachees  continually.  Most  of  the  sashcords,  window 
curtains  and  cords  had  to  be  renewed,  at  an  outlay  of  means  that 
would  have  saved  the  sum  of  $422  per  month  the  past  five 
months,  had  the  building  been  kept  in  ordinary  repair. 

By  the  kind  co-operation  of  your  Hospital  Committee  the 
institution  is  again  in  proper  condition  to  reflect  credit  to  their 
active  management,  and  equal  to  its  state  when  first  erected. 

I  would  respectfully  call  the  attention  of  your  honorable 
Board  to  the  urgent  necessity  of  supplying  the  Laundry  with  a 
suitable  washer  and  wringer.  A  similar  one  as  used  at  the  Alms 
House  would  supply  our  wants  and  eventuate  in  a  large  saving 
to  the  Hospital.  A  new  pump  is  likewise  needed  at  the  engine 
room;  the  present  one  being  so  old  as  not  to  admit  of  further 
repair. 

The  payroll  has  been  reduced  from  forty-three  employees,  at 
a  monthly  expenditure  of  $2,208,  under  its  former  manage- 
ment, to  thirty-nine  assistants,  and  a  monthly  payment  of  $2,057; 
an  annual  saving  of  $1,812. 

A  close  supervision  of  the  requisition  for  drugs,  liquors,  etc., 
has  resulted  in  the  saving  in  the  Apothecary's  Department,  the 
past  fiscal  year,  of  $1,953  54;  a  sum  nearly  sufficient  to  pay  for 
the  repairs  of  the  Hospital. 

The  Visiting  Physicians  and  Surgeons  are  entitled  to  the 
warmest  thanks  of  the  public  for  their  efficient  and  kindly  aid  to 
the  suffering  poor.  To  Dr.  H.  W.  Boone,  the  Kesident  Physi- 
cian, I  have  many  commendations  for  his  courteous  demeanor 
and  active  professional  attention  to  all  the  duties  of  his  position. 
All  the  officers  have  vied  with  each  other  in  personally  supervis- 
ing their  respective  departments  in  a  most  efficient  manner. 
Yours  respectfully, 

ISAAC   S.   TITUS,  M.  D., 
Superintendent  Physician  City  and  County  Hospital. 


PATIENTS.  497 

Patients  in  Hospital  July  1,  1879 362 

Patients  admitted 2,955 

Total  to  be  accounted  for 3,317 

Patients  discharged  cured 1,830 

Patients  discharged  by  request 737 

Patients  died 337 

Patients  sent  to  Insane  Asylum 24 

Patients  sent  to  Alms  House 18 

Total 2,946 

Patients  remaining  July  1,  1880 371 


Grand  total 3,317 

Average  number  of  patients  in  Hospital 396 


According  to  sex  and  color  those  admitted  during  the  year  are  divided  as 
follows: 

Male—    White 2,425 

Black ' 27 

Yellow 21 

2,473 

Female— White 474 

Black 8 

Yellow 0 

482 


Total 2,955 


Those  who  died — 

Male—    White 275 

Black 4 

Yellow 2 

218 

Female— White 51 

Black 4 

Yellow 1  56 


Total 


32 


337 


498 


HOSPITAL     REPORT. 


TABLE    No.    I. 
NATIVITIES   OF   PATIENTS   ADMITTED. 


NATIVES    OF  THE 

Alabama 2 

Arizona 1 

Arkansas 4 

California 125 

Connecticut 20 

Delaware 10 

District  of  Columbia 5 

Florida 1 

Georgia 3 

Illinois 9 

Iowa 2 

Kansas 2 

Kentucky 7 

Louisiana 16 

Maine 30 

Maryland 27 

Massachusetts 178 

Michigan - ...  6 

Minnesota 2 


UNITED    STATES. 

Mississippi 

Missouri 4 

Nevada 2 

New  Hampshire 19 

New  Jersey 26 

New  York 240 

North  Carolina 

Ohio 

Oregon ....    

Pennsylvania 

Rhode  Island 

South  Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Total . . . 


.  897 


Africa 

FOREIGNERS. 
2         Italv  

37 

Asia  Minor  
At  Sea  

1 
1 

Japan        .... 

11 

Malta  

1 

.     12 

Mexico  ... 

16 

....     30 

New  Zealand. 

2 

12 

Norway  

39 

5 

Patagonia  

1 

Brazil 

2 

Peru  

3 

50 

Portugal  

15 

Chili 

Russia  

20 

10 

Sandwich  Islands  

3 

Denmark  
East  Indies  
Ecuador  
England  

32 
1 
1 
167 
....•  Ill 
343 

Scotland 

45 
15 

80 

Spain  
Sweden        

Switzerland 

38 

Uraguay 

1 

Germany      .                 

Wales  
West  Indies  

Total  .  .  . 

20 
5 

Greece  
Holland      .           

Q 

11 

...2,058 

Ireland.  .  . 

.'.   958 

Natives  of  the  Uuited  States 897 

Total '. 2,955 


CAUSES     OF    DEATH. 


499 


TABLE   No.  II. 
CAUSES     OF     DEATH. 


CAUSES   OF   DEATH. 

1879. 

1880. 

j 

IH 
£ 

August  

September.  .  . 

October  

November.  .  . 

1 
1 

CH 
1 

<S| 

February.  .  .  . 

1 

i 

S' 

«_| 

c 

3 
C6 

Albuminuria 

•2  .. 
1         - 

2        1 
9. 

2 

1 

3 
1 

2\       1 

;;      i 

13 
10 

1 
12 
1 
2 

i 

2 
1 
1 
3 
4 
1 
3 
1 
2 
2 
3 

1 

2 

.) 

3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
7 
2 
18 
3 
3 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
5 
2 
1 
1 

Alcoholism  

1 

2 

Aneurism  of  aorta  
Aneurism  of  abdominal  aorta.  . 
Apoplexy' 

'i 

] 

1 

1 

5 

1 

'"l 

"  i 

1 

Arthritis                   .    . 

"i 

'"i 

.... 

Ascites 

Asphyxia 

i 
i 

Atrophv  of  liver        .                    1  - 

1 

i 

.... 

'"i 

2 
1 

1 

1 

Calciferous  degen  .  of  aorta  .... 

i 

1 

Carcinoma  of  breast 

1 

"i 

i 

1 

Carcinoma  of  lip 

1 

j 

i 

1 

Carcinoma  mammary  gland.  .  . 
Carcinoma  mesentery 

1 

...' 

1 

Carcinoma  of  rectum  
Carcinoma  of  stomach 

i 

9 

.... 

:::: 

1 

1 
1 

1 

Carcinoma  of  uterus  
Caries  of  femur 

i 

Cellulitis  of  le°" 

i 

Cerebral  meningitis 

i     i 

i 

Cerebral  softening  

1 

i 

Cirrhosis  of  kidneys 

i 

Cirrhosis  of  liver 

1 

i 

2 

i 

4 

'"i 

l 
] 

'"l 

1 

"•'i 

Coroner's  cases  . 

2 
1 

1 
1 
1 

2 

5 
1 

Cystitis  
Delirium  tremens 

Diarrhoea,  chronic  
Enterempharaxis 

2 

1 

1 

l 

1 

Epilepsy   

1 

1 

— 

Kpithclioma 

Erysipelas  
Fatty  liver 

1 

i 

l 

Fever,  continued   . 

1 

'"i 

2 

Fever,  intermittent  
Fever,  puerperal            .   . 

"i 

1 
1 

'"i 

i 

"i 

Fever,  typhoid  

i 

Fracture  (compound)  of  le"" 

i 

l 

Gangrene  of  foot  

Gangrene  of  lungs  
Gastritis  chronic  . 

1 

1 

l 

1 

Heart,  dilatation  of  
Heart,  hypertrophy  of  

1 
9 

1 

i 

i 

1 

Heart,  mitral  disease  of  
Heart,  valvular  disease  of  .  . 

i 

i 

500 


HOSPITAL     KEPOET. 


TABLE    No.    II — CONCLUDED. 


18 

79. 

18 

30. 

g 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

«_, 
c^ 

August  

September. 

October  

November  . 

1 

January..  . 

February.  . 

g 
I" 

! 

3 

•S 

SH 

d 

3 

? 

3 

1 

1 

i 

6 

Hypertrophy  of  spleen  

1 

1 

Hypertrophy  of  liver 

1 

1 

i 

3 

Jaundice  

1 

1 

Locomotor  ataxia 

1 

1 

g 

Marasmus 

1 

i 

9 

Mollities  cerebria. 

1 

1 

Morbus  coxarius 

I 

1 

•> 

Laryngitis  

1 

1 

Lymphonia 

1 

1 

Necrosis  

i 

1 

Old  ao-e.  . 

j 

1 

Opium  habit 

i 

] 

Paralysis  .  . 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

i 

1 

1 

4 

Pericarditis.  .  .  . 

1 

1 

Peritonitis 

1 

1 

9 

Phthisis  pulmonalis 

5 

7 

8 

12 

7 

6 

15 

8 

6 

ii 

17 

4 

10H 

Pleurisy 

1 

1 

1 

3 

Pneumonia  

2 

9 

9 

1 

1 

? 

4 

? 

1 

17 

Pleurodynia 

1 

1 

1 

1 

} 

} 

1 

3 

1 

1 

2 

Sarcoma  of  tongue 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Softening  of  brain 

i 

1 

1 

i 

9 

Syphilis,  secondary  . 

1 

1 

1 

9 

4 

i 

1 

-t 

1 

Tetanus  

1 

4 

•Tuberculosis  

1 

1 

1 

I 

1 

2 

1 

1 

4 

Ulcer  of  leir 

] 

1 

i 

3 

! 

1 

1 

1 

s 

Wound  (bullet)  of  chest 

1 

1 

Wound  (bullet)  of  groin 

1 

1 

Wound  (lacerated^  of  abdomen 

1 

Totals  

94 

94 

93 

3fS 

?,3 

?,?, 

39 

31 

30 

38 

33 

15 

337 

DECEASED     PATIENTS. 


501 


TABLE    No.    III. 
SEX      KACE     AND      NATIONALITY      OF      DECEASED     PATIENTS. 


18' 

'9. 

188 

0. 

o 

SEX,  RACE  AND  NATIONALITY. 

£ 

1 

1 

| 

1 

1 

January. 

| 

I 

TJ 
2. 

1 

1 

J- 

: 

SEX  . 

Males  
Females  

18 
6 

28 

I 

17 
0 

29 
6 

10 

4 

20 
t 

31 

8 

26 
5 

25 

5 

33 

5 

26 

7 

12 
3 

279 

58 

Totals  

94 

,4 

.,.. 

35 

93 

22 

39 

31 

31 

38 

33 

lg 

337 

RACK  . 

Caucasian  

24 

94 

28 

35 

21 

99 

36 

37 

31 

1r> 

326 

African  

9 

2 

1 

1 

9 

8 

Mongolian  

1 

1 

1 

3 

Totals  

94 

94 

?:; 

!35 

1 

28 



39 

31 

30 

_ 
88 

33 

15 

337 

NATIONALITY. 

United  States  
Foreign  .... 

6 

18 

4 

2 
21 

9 

8 
15 

8 
14 

10 
29 

10 
21 

11 
19 

< 

9C 

13 

90 

5 
10 

95 
242 

Totals  

24 

24 

23 

35 

;     23 

22 

39 

31 

30 

* 

33 

15 

337 

502 


HOSPITAL     REPORT. 


TABLE   No.    IV. 

ADMISSIONS. 


18 

79. 

15 

80. 

1 

DISEASES  OF   1'ATIKXTS. 

«H 
£ 

*<T 

> 
1 

%> 
I 

1 

I 

November. 

e 

1 

January.  .  . 

February  .  . 

f 

>• 

I 

1 

«H 

F 

Abortion  

1 

i 

Abscess  of  alveolus 

1 

i 

Abscess  of  breast 

1 

i 

Abscess  of  cornea 

1 

] 

2 

Abscess  of  groin       ... 

1 

1 

Abscess  of  hand 

l 

1 

9 

Abscess  of  hip  .  . 

1 

1 

•7 

Abscess  of  jaw 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

Abscess  of  leg 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

0 

Abscesses  multiple 

l 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

2 

Abscess,  palmer 

1 

1 

s 

1 

1 

4 

Abscess  of  shoulder 

i 

1 

Abscess  of  theca 

i 

1 

Abscess  of  thigh 

1 

1 

1 

3 



1 

1 

Acne  rosacea  . 

1 

1 

Albuminuria  
Alcoholism.  .    . 

1 
3 

4 

2 

5 

5 
g 

1 
6 

3 
5 

2 
3 

3 
5 

1 

4 

2 
f> 

2 

4 

3 
6 

28 
52 

Amputation  of  arm 

9 

2 

1 

2 

3 

Amputation  of  foot 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Amputation  of  le»- 

i 

9 

3 

1 

1 

Anaemia 

1 

1 

1 

Aneurism  of  abdominal  aorta 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

g 

1 

2 

Aneurism  of  carotid  aorta 

1 

1 

2 

•? 

1 

2 

1 

-> 

•? 

10 

Aneurism   popliteal 

i 

1 

9 

1 

1 

1 

g 

Angina  pectoris. 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

9 

Apoplexy 

I 

1 

Arthritis 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

9 

Asthma'  
Ataxia 

1 

] 

2 

1 

5 

2 

2 

3 

3 

If) 
1 

1 

3 

1 

i 

6 

1 

1 

2 

Blepharitis 

1 

1 

Brain  lesion                          .    . 

1 

1 

5 

4 

4' 

s 

1 

1 

3 

4 

95 

Bronchitis,  capillary  
Bronchitis,  chronic  .  . 

2 

1 

""?. 

6 

3 

4 

3 

2 
3 

4 

1 

5 
2 

2 

'"2 

3 
1 

30 
16 

DISEASES     OF    PATIENTS. 


503 


TABLE    No.    IV— CONTINUED. 
ADMISSIONS. 


DISEASES  OF  PATIENTS. 

1879. 

1880. 

| 

SH 
g 

£T 

> 
1 

1 

S 

O 

November.  .  . 

December  .  .  . 

<H 
<3 

1 

1 

| 

1 

«H 

c 

3 

o> 

Bubo 

6 
1 

.7 

5 

6 

8 
1 

5 

4 

5 

10 

9 

9 

7 

81 
2 
1 
2 
4 
3 
2 
2 
8 
j 
5 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
3 
1 
11 
1 
4 
1 
3 
1 
3 
3 
1 

;; 
1 
1 

109 
52 
1 
1 
1 
3 
5 
1 

1 

8 

1 
8 

1 

Burn  of  arm 

Burn  of  eye 

1 

Burn  of  face 

1 
1 

1 

Burn  of  foot 

1 
1 

1 



1 

\ 

Burn  of  hand 

1 

1 

Burn  of  head 

1 

Burn  of  leg 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

Carcinoma  of  brain 

Carcinoma  of  breast  
Carcinoma  hepatis 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

Carcinoma  of  jaw 

1 

Carcinoma  of  lip 

1 

1 

Carcinoma  of  liver. 

1 

1 

Carcinoma  of  neck 

] 

Carcinoma  of  rectum 

1 

Carcinoma  of  scalp 

1 

Carcinoma  of  shoulder 

1 

Carcinoma  of  stomach 

1 

Carcinoma  of  uterus 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Cardiopalmus  

Caries  of  femur 

1 

1 

Caries  of  tibia  

1 

1 

1 

Cartilage  of  knee  joint 

1 

Cataract  

1 

3 

3 

3 

1 

1 

Cataract  traumatic 

Catarrh  

L 

2 

1 

Catarrh  of  bladder  

1 

Cellulitis. 

1 

1 

1 

Cellulitis  of  knee  joint  . 

1 

Ceilulitis  pelvic  

1 
1 

2 

Cephalagia  

1 

1 

1 

Cerebral  hemorrhagia  

Cerebral  hvper<Emia 

1 

1 

1 

Cerebral  ''rritation  
Cerebral  meningitis  

1 

1 

Chancre 

14 
3 

9 
3 

3 
3 

6 
1 

12 
3 

6 
4 
1 

11 
1 

6 
4 

11 
11 

8 
6 

1-2 
6 

11 

7 

Chancroids  

Choroiditis  

Congestion  of  lun^s 

1 

Cicatrix  from  burn   

1 

Cirrhosis  of  kidneys  

2 

i 

Cirrhosis  of  liver  

i  ..: 

2 

2 

... 

€  ilica  pictonuin  

1 

Concussion  of  brain  

1 

Condylomata  syphilitis   

1 

Conjunctivitis  

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

Conjunctivitis,  granular  

1 

Constipation  
Corneitis  

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

..._. 

504 


HOSPITAL     KEPORT. 


TABLE    No.    IV— CONTINUED. 
ADMISSIONS. 


187 

9. 

IK 

». 

1 

DISEASES  OF  PATIENTS. 

C_l 

g^ 

vT 

August.  .  .  . 

1 

| 

M 

November  . 

December  . 

January  — 

1 

tf 

> 
•d 
g. 

1 

C-l 

(U 

a 
n 

Coxalgia  

1 

1 

Cyclitis  

1 

. 

1 

Cory?a  

l 

1 

Cystic  growth  of  tongue 
Cystitis  
Cystitis,  chronic  
Debility,  general  

1 

'"4 
1 

2 

2 

'"2 

1 
2 
1 

'"2 

1 

"•3 

•"i 

""l 

1 

18 
5 
1 

Debility,  senile  
Delirium  tremen.s  
Deafness  

5 
1 

2 

0 

3 
1 

'"2 

i 

1 

1 

1 
2 

1 
] 

'"2 

1 

0 

""3 

'"l 

ia 

19 

1 

Diarrhoea  

3 

4 

7 

3 

6 

4 

•2 

j 

3 

3 

4 

i 

44 

Disease  of  testicle  

1 

1 

Dislocation  of  ankle 

3 

2 

1 

•  i 

7 

Dislocation  of  foot  

1 

1 

Dislocation  of  hip  . 

1 

Dislocation  of  humerus.  .  . 

1 

Dislocation  of  metacarpal  bones 

1 

Dislocation  of  shoulder  

1 

3 

1 

Dislocation  of  tarsus  .  .  . 

^ 

. 

Dog  bite  of  nose  

1 

Dysmenorrhcea  

1 

1 

Dysentery  
Dyspepsia  
Eczema  
Eczema  capitis  

6 

.4 
1 

'"5 
1 

5 
1 

'"2 
3 
1 

'"4 
4 

2 
5 
3 

2 

3 

7 
1 

'"i 
i 

4 

3 
3 

4 

12 
47 
21 
a 

Eczema  of  leg  
Euransio  mensium  

1 
1 

i 

2 
1 

Emphysema  .... 

I 

1 

Enipyema 

1 

1 

Endocarditis  

2 

3 

1 

1 

i 

7 

Endometritis 

1 

Epididymitis  

1 

1 

5 

1 

8 

Epilepsy  .  . 

1 

2 

2 

3 

3 

1 

2 

2 

2 

9 

s 

23 

Epithelioma  of  lip  

1 

1 

2 

Erysipelas  of  arm  

1 

1 

Erysipelas,  facial  
Erysipelas  of  leg  

1 

4 

3 
1 

2 

3 

5 
1 

4 

1 

5 
1 

4 

3 
2 

5 

40 

r> 

Excoriation  of  anus  
Exostosis  of  finger.  . 

1 

1 

i 
i 

Fatigue  ,  
Felon  of  finger  

1 

1 

1 

1 

•2 
2 

Fever,  continued  

1 

1 

Fever,  intermittent  
Fever,  malingerin*1' 

9 

10 

14 

10 

7 
1 

8; 

8 

10 

8 

8 

12 

11 

115 
1 

Fever,  puerperal  
Fever,  remittent 

i 

1 

2 

1 

4 
1 

Fever,  typhoid  
Fever,  typho  -malarial    . 

5 
1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

2 

2 

9 

12 
IS 

1 

I 

Fistula  in  ano  
Fracture  of  ankle..  . 

4 

4 

5 

3 

2 

2 

2 
8 

1 

3 
1 

4 

2 

3 

35 
4 

DISEASES    OF    PATIENTS. 


505 


TABLE    No.    IV — CONTINUED. 
ADMISSIONS. 


DISEASES  OF   PATIENTS. 

1879. 

1880. 

HJ 

| 

| 

I 
1 

§• 

1 
3 

December.  . 

January  

March  
February.  .  . 

I 

I 

e 

0 

Fracture  of  clavicle  

Fracture  (ununited)  of  femur.  . 
Fracture  introcapsular  of  femur 
Fracture  of  femur  
Fracture  of  tibia  and  fibula  
Fracture  of  finger  
Fracture  intro  capsular  of  hip. 
Fracture  (compound)  humerus. 
Fracture  of  humerus  
Fracture  of  metacarpal  bones  .  . 

'"i 

2 

'"i 

1 
1 

4 

1 
1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

11 
1 
3 
5 

18 
1 
2 

9 

6 
5 

1 
7 
1 
1 
1 
4 
8 
1 
1 
15 
1 
3 
1 
20 
•27 
1 

3 
4 
3 
2 
32 
3 

i 
i 

12 
2 
1 
1